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Life Is a Dream and Other Spanish Classics (Eric Bentley's Dramatic Repertoire) - Volume II

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Translations of four great Spanish dramas: Calderon de la Barca Life Is a Dream Miguel de Cervantes Siege of Numantia Lope de Vega Fuente Ovejuna Tirso de Molina The Trickster of Seville.


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Translations of four great Spanish dramas: Calderon de la Barca Life Is a Dream Miguel de Cervantes Siege of Numantia Lope de Vega Fuente Ovejuna Tirso de Molina The Trickster of Seville.

30 review for Life Is a Dream and Other Spanish Classics (Eric Bentley's Dramatic Repertoire) - Volume II

  1. 4 out of 5

    Marisela

    This book is a collection of Spanish dramatic classics and I'm reading Life is a Dream right now. It's like Shakespeare, but translated from Spanish. And I love the play so far. Very much in the style of Shakespeare: people in disguise, spurned lovers, etc. Playwright Aaron Loeb recommended I read the plays in this anthology. Thanks! This book is a collection of Spanish dramatic classics and I'm reading Life is a Dream right now. It's like Shakespeare, but translated from Spanish. And I love the play so far. Very much in the style of Shakespeare: people in disguise, spurned lovers, etc. Playwright Aaron Loeb recommended I read the plays in this anthology. Thanks!

  2. 5 out of 5

    S Moss

    Rules for Rulers Perhaps Donald Trump should read this play to learn how he should behave as a noble, just and prudent ruler. It might bring home to him the dangers of overweening pride, arrogant assumption that material wealth and glory belong to him by right, and disregard for the rights of others. For those who haven’t assumed that life will provide them with whatever they want, the play is much less valuable. Maybe it’s interesting to explore rigid Spanish feudal codes, the exhausting demands Rules for Rulers Perhaps Donald Trump should read this play to learn how he should behave as a noble, just and prudent ruler. It might bring home to him the dangers of overweening pride, arrogant assumption that material wealth and glory belong to him by right, and disregard for the rights of others. For those who haven’t assumed that life will provide them with whatever they want, the play is much less valuable. Maybe it’s interesting to explore rigid Spanish feudal codes, the exhausting demands of honor, and the constraints on women, but aside from playing with the idea that all earthly achievements are as insubstantial as a dream, there’s not much here that the contemporary reader can actually use. In contrast to Shakespeare with his freedom from religious or philosophical absolutes and deep understanding of human nature, what’s striking about Calderon is how religiously and feudally fixated his ideas are; almost from the play’s beginning it is clear Segismund has inherent rights to kingship, despite his proclamations of being a monster and having been abusively imprisoned by his father Basil, famed astrologer, who fears a prophecy of being dethroned by his son and arrogantly thinks he can forestall his fate by his son’s timely incarceration. No one in this play can prevent their fate, and those who try usually have a brief epiphany as they’re dying that it was foolish to try. The world is fixed, its workings mysterious but ultimately just according to religious dogmas that support the feudal order. Reasoning is usually specious and often used manipulatively to deceive or persuade another person: syllogisms are presented, inverted, and in a parody of scholarly disputation ultimately seem comic wordplay rather than serious attempts to use the mind to decide one’s behavior. While such clever wordplay, with its focus on religious precepts and convoluted tenets of valor, honor and disgrace (than which there is nothing worse), may have been amusing or even instructive to Calderon’s contemporaries, no woman today will feel so dishonored when a man woos her and then deserts her for another woman that her honor will only be restored by a forced marriage with this man. Maybe in the past no one paid much attention to what life would be like with a man who is forced to marry a woman to save her honor. Thus the play functions not on a realistic level, with individualized characters, but on an abstract either theological or philosophical level with stereotypes of melodramatic stock figures, where the axioms governing life have already been decided. One always completely obeys any authentic king, shows absolute loyalty, and never challenges any order. Even a person like Segismund should never have been challenged or inhibited by his father, who finally realizes that his treatment of his son has led to fulfillment of the prophecy he tried to avoid; Segismund will be king after his death. However, as the play is set in distant, mysterious Poland, the audience may expect that the Poles aren’t as well informed of the way things should be done, so the play will be an amusing exploration of how they come to the realization of life’s divine harmony, which the Spanish already know so well. Thus the dishonored, lucklessly wandering Rosaura, disguised as a man and following the “laws of destiny” (409) while bewailing her misfortune, stumbles on the tower where Segismund is imprisoned and is terrified by this apparition. Clad in “hides of savage beasts, with limbs loaded with fetters” (411), he is almost a recreation of the outcast Cain or the fallen Adam, “since to be born is man’s worst crime” (411). Even creatures of nature have more freedom than he has because they are not tainted by “original sin.” Although at first he wants to kill R because she has seen his situation, “an animated corpse…a human monster” (413), when she offers to kneel to him in recognition of his humanity, he relents, an indication of his latent proper human feelings, for after all he’s been rigorously tutored in law and the natural behavior of animals, so that now he begins to respond with human warmth toward the first person who has treated him as human. Just looking at her he muses “it would be life” (414). After the two begin to share their sufferings, she acknowledges his are greater, and he would find actual pleasure if he just had to endure hers. Throughout R not only bemoans her suffering but also explains there can be pleasure in suffering, which of course is the human condition and must be accepted as inherent in one’s fate, so why not enjoy it. When S’s keeper Clotaldo discovers R and threatens her, S rages frantically that he’ll risk his life to save her, but C will have to kill her per the king’s order. She surrenders to him the sword she had been given by her mother to take to Poland, where it would be recognized and help her. Well, of all coincidences, C recognizes the sword as his, but obviously he’s not going to tell R that and ruin the rest of the play; however, he will let the audience know he gave the sword to R’s mother before he had to leave. Now he confronts the dilemma of having to kill his own “son” in order to obey his king, love versus loyalty. Even more complicating is that his son has come to avenge an injury, “a man insulted and unavenged is in disgrace…since honor is so fragile/That any act can smash it, and it takes/A stain from any breath of air” (418). This attitude seems more paranoid than practical; however, his son’s bravery moves C to seek “the most important mean between extremes” (418) and go to the king, hoping his “loyalty thus will move his mercy” (419). Next we encounter the faithless lover Astolfo lavishing praises on his new mistress, Stella, who seems a bit leery of his “Hyperboles that a few facts/May well refute some other day” (420) and hints that he’s a hypocrite. Stalwart Astolfo assures her that as they as the children of Basil’s two sisters, they have rights to the throne, and even though he asserts his claim takes precedence over hers because he’s a man, they can resolve the issue by marrying. Such “chivalrous gallantry” (421) wins her heart, except she notices a portrait in a locket around his neck. Clearly, this issue can’t be resolved now and ruin the suspense, so Basil enters, and they ask him to use his “subtle mathematics (By which I forestall time, cheat fame itself)…to see, Present before me, all the news and actions of centuries to come” (422), which he can do thanks to Ptolemaic cosmology and astrology to read the stars and see in the heavens “All that is due to happen” (422). Although he has a minor doubt that knowledge can be “a murderer to himself” (423), nonetheless he proudly explains how the monstrous visions of his wife prior to her death while giving birth to his son, the concurrent natural upheavals and eclipse that seemed to betoken the end of the world, and the boy’s fateful horoscope led him to prolonged studies that indicated Segismund would be a cruel, tyrannous ruler disrupting the kingdom and dethroning Basil. With his profound belief in the Fates, Basil declared his son had died so he could imprison him in an isolated tower, with only Clotaldo to instruct him in the Catholic faith. However, before turning his kingdom over to his niece and nephew Basil charitably wants to prove he isn’t a complete tyrant and give Segismund a chance to show whether he is a tyrant or perhaps Basil has put too much faith in predictions when even the most pernicious planets “can but influence, not force,/The free will which man holds direct from God” (425), raising another quandary: which is more accurate Fate as seen through astrology or free will? So Basil drugs Segismund and puts him on the throne, with all the powers attached, to see how he behaves. He thus fulfills his kingly “obligation of mercy” (426), and if Segismund fails the test and acts like a tyrant, then Basil is justified in reconfining him as “merited chastisement." When Clotaldo starts to ask Basil for mercy for R who had found S in his prison, B says it’s no longer a problem because he’s revealed the secret. R thanks him for saving his life, but C reminds him that “any wellborn man who, unavenged,/Nurses an insult, does not live at all…Life in disgrace is not a life at all” (427), and poor R responds that s/he’ll be sure to wipe her honor spotless. Taking back her sword, she mentions that Astolfo is the person who dishonored her, and she must get revenge even if he was her prince, for she’s the woman to whom he was betrothed before he met Stella. C is in a tizzy that reason can’t help with, “My family honor’s injured,/The enemy’s all powerful. I’m a vassal/And she’s a woman. Heavens! Show a path/Although I don’t believe there is a way?There’s nought but evil bodings in the sky. The whole world is a prodigy, say I” (429). Trapped by the stringent feudal code, poor C has nothing he can do except join R. in a chorus of suffering. However, he asks B why he has brought S to the palace, and B explains he wants to know if S’s stars “which never lie…may yet be brought to moderate their sentences,/ Whether by prudence charmed or valour won, /For man does have the power to rule his stars” (430). In case S fails his test of good behavior and goes back to prison, B wants him to wonder if being a king was only a dream, “And he will not be wrong, for in this world,/Clotaldo, all who live are only dreaming” (432). Now C is allowed to tell S the truth “because knowing all things, he may find/Known perils are the easiest to conquer” (433). C now learns that R is a woman and his niece, so she’s given a court position as attendant to Stella. Rather than try to resolve her issues of honor, C decides to wait and let time resolve them. When S arrives, he thinks it’s all his imagination, except that C is now subservient when previously he had tyrannized. C acknowledges his reason can’t resolve this situation and reveals S is the hereditary Prince of Poland who had been held in prison due to “Fate’s inclemency” (435) that had foretold the disasters that would occur when he became king. Now he hopes “you’ll prudently defeat/Your own malignant stars (since they can be/Controlled by magnanimity” (435). S is outraged he has been denied his lawful rank and threatens to kill C, until a servant warns that C was obeying the king, “In an injustice, no one should obey/The king, and I’m his prince” (436), but C is only a lowly servant who can’t question whether his king was right to treat S unjustly. Astolfo’s arrival poses another etiquette issue, for S greets him without showing proper respect for his position, which he immediately protests. When Stella arrives, S is awestruck and begins lavish, improper flattery despite a warning, to which he declares “Nothing seems just to me but what I want” (438). When a servant reminds S he just said “no obedience/Or service should be lent to what’s unjust” (438), S throws him off the balcony and kills him. When Basil arrives and discovers S’s first act has been a homicide, he says he can’t offer him his arms in welcome. S reminds him that he’s been living long without them and wonders how a father could “treat me with such cruelty…could rear me/As a wild beast, could hold me for a monster,/And pray that I were dead” (440). Even denying S life isn’t as bad as when “one gives/Only to take away” (440). S declares that having been robbed of so many years, “you’re my debtor, even to bankruptcy” (440). B cautions him to be kind, humble and restrain his pride because this may all be a dream, which S. angrily discounts. He knows his hereditary rights and “likewise know that I/Am partly man but partly beast as well” (441). When R enters they recognize each other, and S begins very elaborate flattery to woo her and when she resists, he declares “Resistance is like venom to my patience…Since the impossible is always tempting/To me” he decides to “throw your honour through the window too” (443). R rebukes him and he’s even more enraged “I am a tyrant and you plead in vain” (444). C rushes in to warn S it may all be a dream and he won’t be able to reign if he’s cruel. Astolfo arrives and challenges S because “To draw in self-defence offends no king” (445), but B’s arrival stops all this. Astolfo, Stella and R now have a chance to sort out the locket issue, which S sends A to get. When R arrives S says she can examine the locket, then leaves so R can again bemoan at length her most unhappy life filled with an endless stream of misfortunes. “In all my life I never once/Knew them to leave me, nor will they grow tired/Of me till, wounded and shot through and through/By Fate, I fall into the arms of death” (448). Now she wonders how she can meet A (her dishonorer) because her eyes, which reveal her soul, will tell him who she is, and indeed he recognizes her and won’t give her the portrait, so she fights with him. Then when Stella arrives R pretends that she dropped her own portrait which A now has and refuses to give up. After R leaves, A refuses to give up the portrait (which he doesn’t have) and S stalks off calling him “a crude, coarse villain/And ruffian of a wooer. For the portrait--/I do not want it now, since, if I had it,/It would remind me I had asked you for it” (452). A curses R for showing up in Poland. Next scene S and a servant are locked up in the prison tower, the servant because he knows the secret about S. Drugged with opium, S still thinks he’s a vengeful prince, then awakens in the tower. He muses “It seems I’ve always slept,/Since, if I’ve dreamed what I’ve just seen and heard/Palpably and for certain, then I am dreaming /What I see now” (454). He recalls he threatened C, “I was the lord of all, on all I took revenge,/Except I loved one woman…I believe/That that was true, though all the rest has faded” (455). C warns him to do good even in dreams. S replies, “That true, and therefore let us subjugate/The bestial side, this fury and ambition,/Against the time when we may dream once more,/As certainly we shall, for this strange world/Is such that but to live here is to dream…each man/Dreams what he is until he is awakened…by death to dust and ashes./What man is there alive who’d seek to reign/Since he must wake into the dream that’s death (455)….Everyone dreams the thing he is, though no one/Can understand it…/What is this life? A frenzy, an illusion,/A shadow, a delirium, a fiction./The greatest good’s but little, and this life/Is but a dream, and dreams are only dreams” (456). This melancholy meditation underlines the idea that for a Christian earthly life is only a vale of tears; one’s reward comes only at the end if one is saved. However, a modern reader might agree with some of these observations, without accepting their original philosophical foundation. Soldiers arrive to free S as their rightful prince rather than have the foreign Astolfo, Duke of Muscovy, as their ruler. However, it is “Hosts of plebeians, bandits, and freebooters” (459), anarchic forces that have gravitated to S. Now S is hesitant to go through what happened previously because he knows life is a dream. “All that happens in yourselves/Happens as in a sleeping man” (460). Soldiers convince him the previous episode was just a forerunner of this one, so S decides “let’s dream the dream anew!/But it must be attentively, aware/That we’ll awake from pleasure in the end./Forewarned of that, the shock’s not so abrupt/The disillusion’s less. Evils anticipated/Lose half their sting. And armed with this precaution--That power, even when we’re sure of it, is borrowed/And must be given back to its true owner--We can risk anything and dare the worst” (460). S will return to make his father “kneel to me,” but he finally acknowledges the need for self-control: “How many angry passions does this leash/Restrain in me, this curb of knowing well/That I must wake and find myself alone! (461)….To act with virtue/Is what matters, since if this proves true,/That truth’s sufficient reason in itself;/If not, we win us friends against the time/When we at last awake” (462), which means when we die. Civil war has broken out between B’s and S’s forces. “Fortune plays out tragedies in blood…If something has to be, there’s no way out; /In trying to evade it, you but court it./This law is pitiless and horrible…My own precautions have been my undoing,/And I myself have quite destroyed my kingdom” (463). C continues to be hamstrung in trying to salvage R’s honor because after A saved his life he is obligated to him and can’t help R. She tries to reason him out of his reluctance, even claiming her cause is worthier and engaging in full-fledged sophistry on this issue. When he still refuses she becomes as enraged as S and vows to avenge herself or die, showing no moderation in her valorous, honorable, furious quest. Again she meets S, declares her misfortune which obliges him to be chivalrous, declares she too is a “monster of both the sexes” (469) and subjects him to her full history so as to win his aid. Her beautiful, miserable mother was wooed by a stranger who swore to wed her but left, leaving his sword. Similarly, R was wooed, “villainously cheated” (470), driven mad with grief, finally told her mother, who said to go to Poland to seek him, and now she must stop the marriage of A & Stella. S isn’t now sure what is reality and what dream, but since R is without honor, “In a prince/It’s worthier to restore it than to steal it.” (473) and he leaves R still in confusion about his intentions. A servant is killed who had tried to avoid his fate, and dies muttering that Fate can’t be avoided if “God so wills” (475). B picks up this idea and declares, “the activities of man are vain/When they are pitted against higher powers” (476), because he has caused the very events he had tried to avoid. C cautions, “it is not a Christian judgment/To say there is no refuge from its fury./A prudent man can conquer Fate itself” (476), showing that he is not “one mature in prudence.” So Basil submits to Fate and heavenly oracles. S. says that “What Heaven decrees and God writes with his finger…never deceives nor lies. They only lie/Who seek to penetrate the mystery/And, having reached it, use it to ill purpose” (477). The way he was raised made him savage and fulfilled the prophecy. “Fate should not be coerced by man’s injustice--This rouses more resentment…he who seeks to tame his fortune must/Resort to moderation and to measure,/He who foresees an evil cannot conquer it/Thus in advance, for though humility/Can overcome it, this it can do only/When the occasion’s there, for there’s no way/To doge one’s fate and thus evade the issue” (478). S will be reconciled to B since the heavens have shown him the error in his methods. Then S, making a final conquest of his love for R, gives her to A, who still objects that she’s not worthy of him, until C declares her his daughter, and S takes Stella for himself. All praise S who modestly notes “all our human happiness must pass/Away like any dream, and I would here/Enjoy it fully ere it glide away” (480). Aside from some moving speeches and some long, boring ones, the action is completely melodramatic and confusing with all its quick revelations and twists. It is essentially a morality play where good kings win in the end, and everyone submits contentedly to social norms. Based on long-vanished complicated codes of chivalry and honor, its moral dilemmas can hardly concern the contemporary reader nor reflect contemporary reality. The only exception is that S’s basic dilemma can be abstracted as an observation on life that still has some pessimistic value, even detached from its feudal-religious origins. “For this strange world/Is such that but to live here is to dream…each man/Dreams what he is until he is awakened…by death…Everyone dreams the thing he is, though no one/Can understand it…/What is this life? A frenzy, an illusion.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lisa (Harmonybites)

    This is a collection of four Golden Age Spanish drama, ranging from 1585 to 1630 as translated by Roy Campbell, and, to my mind, varying widely in quality. The Siege of Numantia by Miguel de Cervantes of Don Quixote fame is the first play in the book. Cervantes was a contemporary of Shakespeare and this play dates from just a few years before Shakespeare's earliest plays. According to the Wiki, it has been hailed by many as a “rare specimen of Spanish tragedy” and even as the best Spanish trage This is a collection of four Golden Age Spanish drama, ranging from 1585 to 1630 as translated by Roy Campbell, and, to my mind, varying widely in quality. The Siege of Numantia by Miguel de Cervantes of Don Quixote fame is the first play in the book. Cervantes was a contemporary of Shakespeare and this play dates from just a few years before Shakespeare's earliest plays. According to the Wiki, it has been hailed by many as a “rare specimen of Spanish tragedy” and even as the best Spanish tragedy not only from the period before Lope de Vega, but of all its literature. All I can say, if this is the best tragedy in Spanish literature, then I'll pass on reading more. Cervantes is no Shakespeare when it comes to drama, unless we're going to compare this to Titus Andronicus. I found it both tedious and overwrought, a great candidate for a spoof. There are long dramatic monologues from "Spain," a river, "War," "Pestilence" and "Hunger" and I thought the climax ridiculous. Admittedly, this is an old play and I've never seen it dramatized--that can make a difference, as can the translation. But that's true of all the plays here, all with the same translator, and I liked the middle two plays and loved the last play that gives the collection its title. Fuente Ovejuna by Lope de Vega is by one of the most famed Spanish playwrights, and fared better in my estimation. It still seemed a bit over the top to me, though I rather appreciated a play from so early in the 17th century dealing with a peasant revolt against a tyrant. Even if it's a bit disconcerting in the end to have a torturer presented as an instrument of justice. It features some strong female characters too. This wasn't as fun as the third play, or as charming and thought-provoking as the last play, but I didn't finish feeling this was over an hour of my life I wanted back. The Trickster of Seville by Tirso de Molina was a fun read on the page and I would love to see it on the stage. The Notes in the back call it a "great document of European civilization" given it "marks the entrance into literature of Don Juan." I've never read Byron's famous poem, but this play certainly reminded me a lot of the treatment in Mozart's Don Giovanni which obviously owes a dept to Molina. Life is a Dream by Calderon de la Barca is the most celebrated play in the Spanish language--and it's the prize in this book in my opinion--the play in this book that to my mind could undoubtedly rank with Shakespeare. It's a great play--really unique for it's metaphysical dimensions. And it too features a strong female character. It left me smiling. I'd love to see this on film or stage. This book is rated as high as it is because of this play (and as low as it is because of Cervantes.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lyric

    Pretty funny plays, for the most part.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I took Spanish Lit in college and really LOVED Fuente Ovejuna, so I recently revisited this collection. I was thrilled to find that I loved it just as much as I had then, and now that I've finished reading them I desperately miss seeing live theater. • The Siege of Numantia is the first play and is pretty meh, especially once you read the others. There’s very little humor, the women are props, and the action isn’t all that exciting. Perhaps I missed its merit, but it felt like it a let down espec I took Spanish Lit in college and really LOVED Fuente Ovejuna, so I recently revisited this collection. I was thrilled to find that I loved it just as much as I had then, and now that I've finished reading them I desperately miss seeing live theater. • The Siege of Numantia is the first play and is pretty meh, especially once you read the others. There’s very little humor, the women are props, and the action isn’t all that exciting. Perhaps I missed its merit, but it felt like it a let down especially in the company of the other three plays. The more I think about it though, the more I question how this play fits in with the others. In terms of the time period and the classical nature of these works it makes sense, but in theme, character, and plot it sticks out like a sore thumb. There’s plenty going for the others, including lots of humor and wordplay, but what I appreciated most was how the women were still amazing even within their restrictive societal places. All three of these plays include the theme of honor--specifically as it relates to women's honor (i.e. their virginity)--and while unfortunately for them the only way for them to redeem their honor once it is taken (read: they've been tricked into having sex either by a man who is pretending to be another or with the promise of marriage) is to get married to those very same men who dishonored them (a BS system), they all fight hard for that. They may be stuck in a dumb system, but they do their best within that system--and some of them even break out of that system (even if only momentarily) to get their justice. • Fuente Ovejuna is by far my favorite. The character of Laurencia is a BADASS. She’s being chased around by this tool who thinks that because he’s in charge of the town he can sleep with all its women (which he brags about doing A LOT), and Laurencia is not. about. it. She begins the play totally against love, which I was excited about since that's pretty different, but sadly "falls in love" (I think she's just eventually forced to conform) with a different man who's been badgering her but who also saves her from being raped by the Don (all these men are problematic). At the end of the play when she’s been abducted from her own wedding, she escapes and in THE GREATEST MONOLOGUE tells every man in her town how useless they are, then rallies all the women to go murder the Don. I am terrible at acting and memorizing lines, but if I ever needed a monologue, I would for sure choose hers. • Next is The Trickster of Seville which has the annoying plot of following Don Juan who Don Juans his way through a bunch of women while literally laughing at the consequences and death itself. He is an absolute pig, but ultimately gets his via a reanimated statue of a man he killed as a consequence of one of his rapes. It’s a very weird and unsatisfying ending and the women don’t have as much agency as Laurencia does, but they do fight for justice through the limited, available channels. Like in Fuente Ovejuna, a great many of the men in this play are utterly useless and more than a little whiny. • The last play is Life is a Dream, and it contains the second best female badass in these plays: Rosaura. Rosaura starts off pretty disappointing—she looks to Clotaldo (the man who used her mother the same way she gets used by Astolfo, although she doesn't know this at the time) to avenge her honor and unsurprisingly he uses every excuse he can find to get out of it. Finally at the end of the play, she rides out to join Segismund (a horrible man, although he was imprisoned and treated terribly for most of his life) and has an AMAZING monologue about how she is forced to be both man and woman to get her honor back and she is going to get it hell or high water. Even though she doesn't get to kill Astolfo (which I was hoping for), she does end up regaining her honor through her own actions instead of waiting for Clotaldo to make up his mind to do the right thing for once. And last but not least, a small shoutout to the characters Mengo, Catalinón, and Clarion who are hilarious (Catalinón might have one of my favorite lines about how the ocean should contain more wine).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emily O'Brien

  8. 4 out of 5

    Varak Baronian

  9. 5 out of 5

    S.

  10. 4 out of 5

    David

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gareth Reeves

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mark Bellerophon

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jane Jackson

  14. 5 out of 5

    Issa Ggcia

  15. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin Allred

  16. 5 out of 5

    R

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cevat

  18. 5 out of 5

    Genevieve

  19. 5 out of 5

    Maura

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kris

  21. 4 out of 5

    Helen

  22. 5 out of 5

    Miranda

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bita

  24. 4 out of 5

    Katarina Niksic

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Holeman

  27. 5 out of 5

    Francisco De Aldana

  28. 4 out of 5

    Danny

  29. 5 out of 5

    Steven

  30. 5 out of 5

    Natacha Pavlov

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