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Two-year-old Greta Greene was sitting with her grandmother on a park bench on the Upper West Side of Manhattan when a brick crumbled from a windowsill overhead, striking her unconscious. She is immediately rushed to the hospital. Once More We Saw Stars begins with this event, leading the reader into the unimaginable. But although it begins with the anguish Jayson and his wi Two-year-old Greta Greene was sitting with her grandmother on a park bench on the Upper West Side of Manhattan when a brick crumbled from a windowsill overhead, striking her unconscious. She is immediately rushed to the hospital. Once More We Saw Stars begins with this event, leading the reader into the unimaginable. But although it begins with the anguish Jayson and his wife Stacy confront in the wake of their daughter’s trauma and the hours leading up to her death, it quickly becomes a narrative that is as much about hope and healing as it is about grief and loss. Jayson recognizes, even in the very midst of his ordeal, that there will be a life for him beyond it—that if only he can continue moving forward, from one moment to the next, he will survive what seems un-survivable. With raw honesty, deep emotion, and exquisite tenderness, he captures both the fragility of life and absoluteness of death, and most important of all, the unconquerable power of love. This is an unforgettable memoir of courage and transformation—and a book that will change the way you look at the world.


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Two-year-old Greta Greene was sitting with her grandmother on a park bench on the Upper West Side of Manhattan when a brick crumbled from a windowsill overhead, striking her unconscious. She is immediately rushed to the hospital. Once More We Saw Stars begins with this event, leading the reader into the unimaginable. But although it begins with the anguish Jayson and his wi Two-year-old Greta Greene was sitting with her grandmother on a park bench on the Upper West Side of Manhattan when a brick crumbled from a windowsill overhead, striking her unconscious. She is immediately rushed to the hospital. Once More We Saw Stars begins with this event, leading the reader into the unimaginable. But although it begins with the anguish Jayson and his wife Stacy confront in the wake of their daughter’s trauma and the hours leading up to her death, it quickly becomes a narrative that is as much about hope and healing as it is about grief and loss. Jayson recognizes, even in the very midst of his ordeal, that there will be a life for him beyond it—that if only he can continue moving forward, from one moment to the next, he will survive what seems un-survivable. With raw honesty, deep emotion, and exquisite tenderness, he captures both the fragility of life and absoluteness of death, and most important of all, the unconquerable power of love. This is an unforgettable memoir of courage and transformation—and a book that will change the way you look at the world.

30 review for Once More We Saw Stars: A Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    We live in a world where a brick can crumble off of an eighth-story Manhattan windowsill and strike a two-year-old child in the head as she’s chattering with her grandmother on a bench below. This is what happened to Greta Greene in 2015. Her head injury was too severe to survive; although she underwent surgery to relieve the swelling in her brain, she never woke up again. The title phrase is adapted from Dante’s Inferno, and it’s appropriate because the author and his wife, Stacy, went through We live in a world where a brick can crumble off of an eighth-story Manhattan windowsill and strike a two-year-old child in the head as she’s chattering with her grandmother on a bench below. This is what happened to Greta Greene in 2015. Her head injury was too severe to survive; although she underwent surgery to relieve the swelling in her brain, she never woke up again. The title phrase is adapted from Dante’s Inferno, and it’s appropriate because the author and his wife, Stacy, went through hell – the kind of nightmare any parent would dread – but came out the other side to have another baby, Harrison, a little over a year later. Music journalist Greene portrays all the ugliness of grief: his anger and bitterness, his hatred of happy families. I have read many a bereavement memoir and can’t remember a more searing account of the emotions and thoughts experienced moment to moment. Mary Karr (in The Art of Memoir) says that seven years is the ideal amount of time that should pass before you try to turn events into memoir. Here it was less than four, which accounts for the raw power of the emotion. Still, the author has managed to universalize his experience of loss, and to wrest all the beauty from it that he could. Greta’s death fundamentally changed his view of the world, such that he had to work to convince himself that it was still a good, safe place to raise his son. In the often mystical ways that he and Stacy tried to connect with Greta’s spirit (including lots of yoga, bereavement support groups, meeting a medium at a Kripalu retreat and undertaking a shamanic ritual in Taos), he came to believe that life is a continuum of energy, and that at its end that energy is conserved and recombined. Marriages often do not survive a loss of this magnitude, so I was impressed that Greene and his wife turned to each other in their grief. There’s a tiny moment, after Greta has been pronounced brain dead, when Greene heads for the cafeteria to keep their fellow vigil-keepers fueled with coffees and snacks, and Stacy gives him spontaneous signs of affection. “I have an impossible thought: We are going to be OK. We will survive this. We are about to enter the unimaginable, but we are also going to pass through. … that kiss and that smile and that casual ‘I love you’ saved me.” I hope I show such grace and openness when tragedy comes. A danger with memoir is that you are so imprisoned in one perspective that any supporting characters feel one-dimensional, but here I feel that I got a very clear sense of not just Greene, but also Stacy, her mother Susan, and even Greta, who had quite the little personality even if she only lived to two. It’s also rare to encounter an account of childbirth from the onlooking father’s perspective, and Greene describes that tumult so well. The whole book has an aw(e)ful clarity to it. It’s an instant classic of the bereavement memoir subgenre. Some favorite passages: “I am the reminder of the most unwelcome message in human history: Children—yours, mine—they don’t necessarily live.” “Grief at its peak has a terrible beauty to it, a blinding fission of every emotion. The world is charged with significance, with meaning, and the world around you, normally so solid and implacable, suddenly looks thin, translucent. I feel like I’ve discovered an opening. I don’t know quite what’s behind it yet. But it is there.” “A pall of societal shame hovers over everyone in this club, the haunted inverse of new-parent meet-ups and mommy groups. Children who lose parents are orphans; bereaved spouses are widows. But what do you call parents who lose children? It seems telling to me that there is no word in our language for our situation. It is unspeakable, and by extension, we are not supposed to exist.” “We are vigilant about not succumbing to self-pity the way we are vigilant about flossing daily, and yet sometimes our situation practically begs it of us.” “If you allow it to be, grief can be a soothing stone temple where you hear only the murmured echoes of your own voice and the voices of your fellow travelers. None of us is expected to accomplish anything concrete while we are here, or to rise to any particular occasion. The mundanities have burned off, and only ultimate meaning remains.” “We aren’t here long enough to stop fighting death, to relax into our existence and gaze clearly. We thrash, mostly blindly, from one pole of oblivion to another. We are lucky if we truly notice three or five things in between.”

  2. 4 out of 5

    Martha Kelly

    Incredibly moving and uplifting at the same time. Loved it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tania

    "We push the apartment door open and are greeted by silence. Nothing in here knows about Greta’s death—not her red horsey with its empty smile, the toy bin beneath the living room chair, the straps on her purple high chair that she would fiddle with. We bring the news with us into each room, like smallpox. " I think I can safely say this will be my favorite memoir of 2019. My younger sister passed away when I was little, which obviously made a big impact on the way I view life. Being a mom myself "We push the apartment door open and are greeted by silence. Nothing in here knows about Greta’s death—not her red horsey with its empty smile, the toy bin beneath the living room chair, the straps on her purple high chair that she would fiddle with. We bring the news with us into each room, like smallpox. " I think I can safely say this will be my favorite memoir of 2019. My younger sister passed away when I was little, which obviously made a big impact on the way I view life. Being a mom myself now, I am always aware of the possibility that this could happen to me and knowing that I would not be able to cope. In Once More We Saw Stars Jayson Greene gives us a raw and heartbreaking account of losing his two-year-old daughter in a freak accident and how he moved through the grieving process. First off, I have the to say the writing is exquisite, personal and heartfelt. The book is filled with memories of many small, intimate moments with his daughter, which he describes in a loving but non-dramatic way. I think when hurt goes this deep, there is no reason to try and write it worse. Jayson just plainly tells us what happens, how he felt on a day by day basis and how something like this can change your worldview. I deeply appreciated his love for his wife throughout the book, even though they had different ways of dealing with this tragedy. Obviously, this is not a happy book, but it is real, and filled with many hopeful and happy moments. A testament to how strong the human heart is. Highly recommend.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Charles Kreger

    It is a parent’s worst nightmare to lose a child. I appreciate Jayson’s willingness to share his heart and soul with us as he deals with the tremendous grief that follows. I was saddened and puzzled to see Jayson and his wife go to extreme and extravagant effort to find their daughter again in every mystical way imaginable and not once seek to find comfort and peace from God or the Bible. It is sad to envision a parent in such a situation with no promise of hope of an eternal life. If you are wi It is a parent’s worst nightmare to lose a child. I appreciate Jayson’s willingness to share his heart and soul with us as he deals with the tremendous grief that follows. I was saddened and puzzled to see Jayson and his wife go to extreme and extravagant effort to find their daughter again in every mystical way imaginable and not once seek to find comfort and peace from God or the Bible. It is sad to envision a parent in such a situation with no promise of hope of an eternal life. If you are willing to try other forms of Eastern religions and Native American rituals, why not give the teachings of Jesus Christ an equal shot.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nigel

    There is a sense in which this is an almost unbearable story initially. The author's two year old daughter, Greta, is killed when a brick falls from a windowsill above where she is sitting. As a parent and grandparent I find this something I maybe would prefer not to think about I guess. However the author does offer his and the family's thoughts as they make they way through the trauma that follows this freak accident. While a fairly large first section looks at the event and the immediate after There is a sense in which this is an almost unbearable story initially. The author's two year old daughter, Greta, is killed when a brick falls from a windowsill above where she is sitting. As a parent and grandparent I find this something I maybe would prefer not to think about I guess. However the author does offer his and the family's thoughts as they make they way through the trauma that follows this freak accident. While a fairly large first section looks at the event and the immediate aftermath the book continues with the journey the parents take in their attempts to come to terms with, if not understand, what has happened to them. There is grief, beauty and love here and it can be very moving. If I have any reservations about this it would be about how well this very American story translate on the other side of the Atlantic. However it will be a story that many will love and will stay with anyone who reads it for a long time I'm sure.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jt O'Neill

    This book is remarkable. I'll start with that. I'd read the reviews and requested it from the library but once I picked it up, I wasn't sure that it was such a good idea to read it. This memoir is the story of the tragic and unexpected death of the author's two year old child. Why would I want to read that? I have plenty of sadness and grief in my life. Why read about more? I decided to be brave and start it. I figured I didn't have to finish it. And the first half was brutal. Jayson Greene has a This book is remarkable. I'll start with that. I'd read the reviews and requested it from the library but once I picked it up, I wasn't sure that it was such a good idea to read it. This memoir is the story of the tragic and unexpected death of the author's two year old child. Why would I want to read that? I have plenty of sadness and grief in my life. Why read about more? I decided to be brave and start it. I figured I didn't have to finish it. And the first half was brutal. Jayson Greene has a way with words. His writing often borders on poetry . I am awed by how he could write so poignantly and beautifully about the details around the day his daughter was injured and the following days of heartbreaking but essential tasks. He paints both the light and joyful pictures of a two year old's life as well as the dark and despairing pictures of grieving parents, family, and friends and he does it with grace and eloquence. I found the pages almost unbearable to read. And so, after the second chapter I considered putting the book down forever. I wondered if maybe to continue reading would just not be a good idea for me. Too sad. I decided to look at the reviews on Goodreads and that's when I realized that there was more to this book than the day Greta died and the days following. I read reviews where people wrote of transformation and beauty, of strength and courage, of hope and a future. I decided to keep going. And when I did, I found all of those things. This turned out to be a book that reminds me to keep my eyes open for miracles. It reminds me that there is so much more going on than is visible. It showed me that grief hurts and grief heals. I highly recommend this memoir.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    It doesn’t feel right to give a star rating to a book like this. This is a true story and it is written from the heart. It is beautifully written and it is a wonderful, heartfelt tribute to the little girl this couple lost. I was inspired by the strength of this couple and the love between them. ❤️

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cassidy

    The entire first half of this book made me sob. Having never lost someone close to me, I found the second half about their grief very interesting, overwhelming, and hopeful. All I am left with is wanting peace for every person in this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dana M

    This book broke my heart ten times over today. Strange, then, that I ultimately found it uplifting. Seems like a lot of uplifting stories can still wreck your heart every which way?

  10. 5 out of 5

    Natalie M

    It is incredibly difficult to review a true story which entails such tragedy and heartbreak. The short life of Greta Greene is honoured by the beautiful words of her father. It is a whole family story of the impact of a random tragedy that occurs one day in New York. The turmoil that befalls the Greene’s is dealt with sincerely, without unnecessary drama or emotional overload. A heavy but positive read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Steve Peifer

    About half way through this book, I started to think this was one of the greatest books ever written. He combined a penetrating insight with such a lyrical gift with words that four different times I read different parts out loud to my wife. The first half of the book, which deals with the freak accident that killed his daughter and how grief can overtake you was as powerful as anything I’ve ever read. If the book had ended there, I would have been buying the book for people who have suffered a l About half way through this book, I started to think this was one of the greatest books ever written. He combined a penetrating insight with such a lyrical gift with words that four different times I read different parts out loud to my wife. The first half of the book, which deals with the freak accident that killed his daughter and how grief can overtake you was as powerful as anything I’ve ever read. If the book had ended there, I would have been buying the book for people who have suffered a loss. But then the book takes a decidedly strange turn with the author and his wife turning to mediums and mystics to have connection with their late child. I understand how the loss of a child could drive you to extremes, and I’m not judging, but I honestly feel like offering these solutions to people would exacerbate their problems, not make them better. I can’t recommend the book, and it breaks my heart, because the first half was so powerful. But the second part would damage more people than it would ever help.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ashlee Tominey

    I marvel at the author’s ability to share such an intensely personal and heartbreaking story and to capture such a breadth of emotions and thoughts in the retelling. Sometimes the right book comes along to help process emotions you didn’t even know you had. This book cracked me open emotionally and left me a little softer in the end. It was much needed. Hand to those moved by the reading experience of When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi or Falling: A Daughter, a Father, and a Journey Back by I marvel at the author’s ability to share such an intensely personal and heartbreaking story and to capture such a breadth of emotions and thoughts in the retelling. Sometimes the right book comes along to help process emotions you didn’t even know you had. This book cracked me open emotionally and left me a little softer in the end. It was much needed. Hand to those moved by the reading experience of When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi or Falling: A Daughter, a Father, and a Journey Back by Elisha Cooper.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I don’t have the words to describe how heartbreaking, poignant, haunting and brilliantly written this memoir is. I read it with tears streaming down my face.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth☮

    I first heard about this book when I listened to an interview with Greene on Just the Right Book podcast (How Do We Write about Grief? - the podcast page is no longer available). Greene's two year old daughter, Greta, dies after she is hit in the head by a piece of brick that falls off the side of a building. Greta is sitting with her grandmother when this happens. As a parent, it is inexplicably difficult to fathom the loss of a child. Even more difficult to imagine processing that grief and tu I first heard about this book when I listened to an interview with Greene on Just the Right Book podcast (How Do We Write about Grief? - the podcast page is no longer available). Greene's two year old daughter, Greta, dies after she is hit in the head by a piece of brick that falls off the side of a building. Greta is sitting with her grandmother when this happens. As a parent, it is inexplicably difficult to fathom the loss of a child. Even more difficult to imagine processing that grief and turning it into a book. But this book doesn't steep itself in melancholy; rather Greene gives a peek into his coping process and how it gets him to the other side. This book reminds me of An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination. In this book, McCracken gives birth to a stillborn baby. She writes in an honest and pragmatic manner. Greene's book is written in a similar fashion. This doesn't mean there isn't emotion present. There is, but you aren't overwhelmed with the heaviness of the loss. Rather, we walk through the loss with Greene and he shows us the other side of grief. Not the absence of grief, for it will always be tugging at the edges, but rather that the incomprehensible can and does get conquered.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Clarke Gunter

    A heartbreaking book. You will cry. But that is a normal reaction to the random, accidental death of an innocent 2 year-old child. The book is interesting because it details how the author and his wife coped with the overwhelming grief of losing their beloved Greta and slowly moved forward to a hopeful and even happy life after her death. It is a painful journey. Many similar books have been written, but Jayson Greene is a gifted writer and tells their terrible story eloquently.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ginger Bensman

    "Children who lose parents are orphans; bereaved spouses are widows. But what do you call parents who lose children? It seems telling to me there is no word in our language for our situation. It is unspeakable, and by extension, we are not supposed to exist." (page 103) An exquisitely painful and ultimately grace-filled examination of the sudden and tragic loss of a child, and the reckoning of such a loss within a life and a marriage. "Children who lose parents are orphans; bereaved spouses are widows. But what do you call parents who lose children? It seems telling to me there is no word in our language for our situation. It is unspeakable, and by extension, we are not supposed to exist." (page 103) An exquisitely painful and ultimately grace-filled examination of the sudden and tragic loss of a child, and the reckoning of such a loss within a life and a marriage.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Freiburger

    It started out powerful, raw and moving. The second half fell apart imo.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bonny

    My husband's family lost their oldest son to malignant melanoma when he was 29-years-old, and this tragic event served to divide the family's story sharply into before-Jim-died and after-Jim-died. Every one of the remaining four siblings changed, some more markedly than others, and as you would expect, the real changes were most apparent in Jim's parents. They rarely talked about it, but I wish they were both still alive because I would give them this eloquent memoir, Once More We Saw Stars. It' My husband's family lost their oldest son to malignant melanoma when he was 29-years-old, and this tragic event served to divide the family's story sharply into before-Jim-died and after-Jim-died. Every one of the remaining four siblings changed, some more markedly than others, and as you would expect, the real changes were most apparent in Jim's parents. They rarely talked about it, but I wish they were both still alive because I would give them this eloquent memoir, Once More We Saw Stars. It's the story of how Jayson Greene and his wife Stacy lost their two-year-old daughter Greta in a horrible, completely random accident, but it's also the story of their grieving and going on. I had heard Jayson Greene interviewed and decided that I couldn't read the book because of how much sadness I thought it would contain, but Greene is a gifted writer. He manages to convey how absolutely heartbroken, bereft, and overtaken by grief he and his wife are, and yes, there is plenty of sadness, but his writing is so beautiful that there is also plenty of honesty, hope, and resilience. I especially appreciated how much of an observer he could still be, even in the depths of his grief, and how respectful and accepting he was of the different ways he and his wife expressed their grief. I think Once More We Saw Stars may well be among the top five books I read this year. I am the reminder of the most unwelcome message in human history: Children - yours, mine - they don't necessarily live.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Leah K

    "I am the reminder of the most unwelcome message in human history: Children - yours, mine - they don't necessarily live". This book is absolutely heartbreaking. Jayson and Stacy have to deal with what no parent should have to - the death of their child. This book goes through their tribulations. The hardship. The never-ending pain. The writing was so beautiful. I cried so many times. As someone who has lost a child (albeit, in a very different manner), this man was writing everything I've struggl "I am the reminder of the most unwelcome message in human history: Children - yours, mine - they don't necessarily live". This book is absolutely heartbreaking. Jayson and Stacy have to deal with what no parent should have to - the death of their child. This book goes through their tribulations. The hardship. The never-ending pain. The writing was so beautiful. I cried so many times. As someone who has lost a child (albeit, in a very different manner), this man was writing everything I've struggled to say since my son's death in 2013. This man wrote my feelings. I found myself nodding. I got it. I related to the struggle of bringing a second child, after the first child's death, into this world. The complete and utter fear...and relief of it all. Once More We Saw Stars will stay with me for a long time. I don't think you have to have lost a child to get this book but I think this one hit extra hard and close to me. I want to thank this author for his words. Even though they were his words, his feelings, his struggled - I want him to know how much they meant to me. A definite 5 star book for me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stacie Buckley

    It feels terribly awkward to give this a star rating. It’s one man’a beautiful, raw, tragic, grief-stricken, horrifying recount of not only the freak accidental death of his two year old daughter, but also of his grief and pain and anger, that of his wife, and other family members. This book captures how they tried to find meaning in this senseless and life altering event and how they dared to find hope again. I’m not going to lie: this book had me sobbing at points. It’s not easy to read (or in It feels terribly awkward to give this a star rating. It’s one man’a beautiful, raw, tragic, grief-stricken, horrifying recount of not only the freak accidental death of his two year old daughter, but also of his grief and pain and anger, that of his wife, and other family members. This book captures how they tried to find meaning in this senseless and life altering event and how they dared to find hope again. I’m not going to lie: this book had me sobbing at points. It’s not easy to read (or in my case, listen to). But I feel that it’s owed to Jayson and Greta that as many people as possible read these words Jayson put forth to honor this little girl. And then go squeeze your loved ones a little bit tighter and longer.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jays

    This book had beautiful writing and the circumstances were heart breaking. Unfortunately the author is obviously of a certain age and lives in the rarified atmosphere of the elite of New York. Grief makes us more self aware but from the writing, the author suffers from the disease of our time - self obsession. Add the New York superiority attitude and it ruined his talent for writing. The author can write but until he removes himself from his bubble world in New York he will be stunted. I couldn’t This book had beautiful writing and the circumstances were heart breaking. Unfortunately the author is obviously of a certain age and lives in the rarified atmosphere of the elite of New York. Grief makes us more self aware but from the writing, the author suffers from the disease of our time - self obsession. Add the New York superiority attitude and it ruined his talent for writing. The author can write but until he removes himself from his bubble world in New York he will be stunted. I couldn’t finish the book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kristi W

    I don't often give 5 star ratings. This book earned every star. It is a tribute to a daughter, to a wife, to family and friends. Jayson Greene wrote a powerful memoir that captured my heart as he described his journey from grieving to living and still grieving. He acknowledges that his grief will always be, but that his living will also be. He learns how to balance the two with tears and raw honesty along the way. Somehow, this book comforted me as it acknowledged that the grief we all carry is I don't often give 5 star ratings. This book earned every star. It is a tribute to a daughter, to a wife, to family and friends. Jayson Greene wrote a powerful memoir that captured my heart as he described his journey from grieving to living and still grieving. He acknowledges that his grief will always be, but that his living will also be. He learns how to balance the two with tears and raw honesty along the way. Somehow, this book comforted me as it acknowledged that the grief we all carry is real and raw despite the time that has passed. At the same time, it manages to be a story of healing and love. Greta's life was a gift. Greene's writing is a gift. I'm grateful that I experienced both through the pages of this book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    An incredibly sad memoir written by a father whose daughter's life is cut short by a freak accident. Shortly after her second birthday, Greta Greene is struck in the head by a crumbling brick. Jayson Greene chronicles the aftermath of her death narrating his stages of grief and quest for some sense of relief from the emotions threatening to overwhelm him. Because neither Jayson nor his wife are religious people they seek out a variety of sources in an attempt to assign some meaning out to their t An incredibly sad memoir written by a father whose daughter's life is cut short by a freak accident. Shortly after her second birthday, Greta Greene is struck in the head by a crumbling brick. Jayson Greene chronicles the aftermath of her death narrating his stages of grief and quest for some sense of relief from the emotions threatening to overwhelm him. Because neither Jayson nor his wife are religious people they seek out a variety of sources in an attempt to assign some meaning out to their tragic loss. Throughout the book Greene describes their journey and the legacy Greta's short life has had on her grieving family.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This memoir will not be for everyone, as it is a journey of Greene's grief. His 2-year old daughter died in a random accident and the book outlines her death and the year following it, where Greene and his wife grieve and begin to heal. Greene is a wonderful writer and I didn't feel like a voyeur reading his story though I definitely was moved by and connected with it. I would have liked to know a tad more about his mother-in-law's grief and healing process, as she was with the daughter when the This memoir will not be for everyone, as it is a journey of Greene's grief. His 2-year old daughter died in a random accident and the book outlines her death and the year following it, where Greene and his wife grieve and begin to heal. Greene is a wonderful writer and I didn't feel like a voyeur reading his story though I definitely was moved by and connected with it. I would have liked to know a tad more about his mother-in-law's grief and healing process, as she was with the daughter when the accident occurred. We do get some, but since she was also traumatically affected, I would have read more about her perspective too.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    "The real pain isn't in the leg being mangled, it's in the way the bone sets." This book was devastating. Which, of course, I should have suspected. Jayson Greene has written an honest memoir about living with a tremendous amount of grief. I was full on sobbing just a few pages in, which was unexpected and due to Greene's painfully raw snapshot of the horrible day he lost his daughter. I wish I had closed the book with a comforting understanding of why tragedy happens, but unfortunately I did not "The real pain isn't in the leg being mangled, it's in the way the bone sets." This book was devastating. Which, of course, I should have suspected. Jayson Greene has written an honest memoir about living with a tremendous amount of grief. I was full on sobbing just a few pages in, which was unexpected and due to Greene's painfully raw snapshot of the horrible day he lost his daughter. I wish I had closed the book with a comforting understanding of why tragedy happens, but unfortunately I did not. Still, a beautiful and devastating story about Greta and the profound impact she had during her short life.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Madeleine

    This book, a true story written by a father who lost his two year old daughter in a freak accident, somehow pulls off the miraculous feat of being both crushingly sad and hauntingly beautiful. I have left a trail of tears throughout Manhattan in all the places I devoured this heartbreaking but lovely story. Put it on your to-read list now for when it is released in May 2019. The version I read was an advance copy.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    A wonderful memoir that encompasses the overwhelming nature of grief, and how the loss of a loved one touches all corners of our life. Greene's writing on the loss of his daughter profoundly speaks on the answers that are sought out after unimaginable loss and the ways in which one moves forward. A wonderful memoir that encompasses the overwhelming nature of grief, and how the loss of a loved one touches all corners of our life. Greene's writing on the loss of his daughter profoundly speaks on the answers that are sought out after unimaginable loss and the ways in which one moves forward.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chrisatphm

    Good until.. The author writes beautifully ... until he decided he had to politicize the story. It was totally unnecessary to the story line, and pulled me out of it. Unfortunately I can’t recommend this book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    This book is both beautiful and heartbreaking. It took me back to places I hadn't been in a long time. ( I lost a child years ago and had another afterwards like Jayson and his wife did.) This book is both beautiful and heartbreaking. It took me back to places I hadn't been in a long time. ( I lost a child years ago and had another afterwards like Jayson and his wife did.)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    In a memoir about grief and losing his daughter, I just don’t understand why the author had to throw in completely random liberal political views.

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