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Just Peachy: Comics About Depression, Anxiety, Love, and Finding the Humor in Being Sad

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"In this autobiographical collection of thoughtful and poignant comic vignettes, Chisholm explores her experiences with depression, anxiety, and love ." —Booklist Just Peachy is a comic series that explores what the day-to-day is like with depression and/or anxiety. The all-too-real cartoon protagonist gives readers a character to empathize with, and helps explain some of t "In this autobiographical collection of thoughtful and poignant comic vignettes, Chisholm explores her experiences with depression, anxiety, and love ." —Booklist Just Peachy is a comic series that explores what the day-to-day is like with depression and/or anxiety. The all-too-real cartoon protagonist gives readers a character to empathize with, and helps explain some of the not often talked about consequences and symptoms of having depression. The comics also explore the themes of heartbreak, finding love, dealing with stress, and capturing the magical moments in life that keep us going. Through dark humor and cute illustrations, the subject matter becomes a bit more bearable, allowing for honest discussion about things like treatment and getting through anxiety attacks, and providing some comfort in times of struggle. For anyone affected by mental illness, Just Peachy shows that you are not alone. Simply put, this is an encouraging collection of comics about being just okay sometimes. “So brave of Holly Chisholm to share her struggles with mental health issues through this creative medium. Just Peachy will inspire others to connect to, navigate through, and recover from their own day-to-day trials and tribulations of living with a mental illness. Well done!” —Dr. Carlin Barnes and Dr. Marketa Wills, authors of Understanding Mental Illness and founders of Healthy Mind MDs


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"In this autobiographical collection of thoughtful and poignant comic vignettes, Chisholm explores her experiences with depression, anxiety, and love ." —Booklist Just Peachy is a comic series that explores what the day-to-day is like with depression and/or anxiety. The all-too-real cartoon protagonist gives readers a character to empathize with, and helps explain some of t "In this autobiographical collection of thoughtful and poignant comic vignettes, Chisholm explores her experiences with depression, anxiety, and love ." —Booklist Just Peachy is a comic series that explores what the day-to-day is like with depression and/or anxiety. The all-too-real cartoon protagonist gives readers a character to empathize with, and helps explain some of the not often talked about consequences and symptoms of having depression. The comics also explore the themes of heartbreak, finding love, dealing with stress, and capturing the magical moments in life that keep us going. Through dark humor and cute illustrations, the subject matter becomes a bit more bearable, allowing for honest discussion about things like treatment and getting through anxiety attacks, and providing some comfort in times of struggle. For anyone affected by mental illness, Just Peachy shows that you are not alone. Simply put, this is an encouraging collection of comics about being just okay sometimes. “So brave of Holly Chisholm to share her struggles with mental health issues through this creative medium. Just Peachy will inspire others to connect to, navigate through, and recover from their own day-to-day trials and tribulations of living with a mental illness. Well done!” —Dr. Carlin Barnes and Dr. Marketa Wills, authors of Understanding Mental Illness and founders of Healthy Mind MDs

30 review for Just Peachy: Comics About Depression, Anxiety, Love, and Finding the Humor in Being Sad

  1. 4 out of 5

    Julia Sapphire

    2.5 stars TW: Anxiety and Depression This graphic novel explores the topics of anxiety and depression and tries to add a comedic component to it. There are little comics about these illnesses and with a personified version of depression, almost like a grim reaper type of thing. This was just okay in my opinion, I could see what the author was trying to do but it was more of a miss for me. The art style was very nice and I loved the little accents with the colour peach. A lot of the comics con 2.5 stars TW: Anxiety and Depression This graphic novel explores the topics of anxiety and depression and tries to add a comedic component to it. There are little comics about these illnesses and with a personified version of depression, almost like a grim reaper type of thing. This was just okay in my opinion, I could see what the author was trying to do but it was more of a miss for me. The art style was very nice and I loved the little accents with the colour peach. A lot of the comics contradicted one another which is where I had some issues. Overall, it wasn't bad but it lacked for me in a few areas.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    The cover assures us of “Comics About Depression, Anxiety, Love, and Finding the Humor in Being Sad”. Ah-yup. That's exactly what we’ve got here. Holly Chisholm was diagnosed with depression and ADHD, and turned to comics as a way of working through her feelings. Although I am neither depressed nor do I have ADHD, I am closely acquainted with several people who are either or both. Chisholm definitely speaks from experience, as far as I can tell. There's an appealing mix of comedy and pathos in th The cover assures us of “Comics About Depression, Anxiety, Love, and Finding the Humor in Being Sad”. Ah-yup. That's exactly what we’ve got here. Holly Chisholm was diagnosed with depression and ADHD, and turned to comics as a way of working through her feelings. Although I am neither depressed nor do I have ADHD, I am closely acquainted with several people who are either or both. Chisholm definitely speaks from experience, as far as I can tell. There's an appealing mix of comedy and pathos in these strips. I can imagine someone diagnosed with depression or ADHD reading these and saying, “Yes! This woman gets it!” I don't know. This book is a bit on the quiet side. There's nothing gut-bustingly funny, but it's definitely fun and appealing. I really like the point of view in these strips. Recommended!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    This was absolutely great and extremely relatable. For some reason this was the second book about anxiety that I read today, the other one being Thin Slices of Anxiety: Observations and Advice to Ease a Worried Mind and I realize how much better this one is. It delves a lot deeper into anxiety and is both funny and insightful. These are the types of comics that help you feel less alone. Would recommend 100% This was absolutely great and extremely relatable. For some reason this was the second book about anxiety that I read today, the other one being Thin Slices of Anxiety: Observations and Advice to Ease a Worried Mind and I realize how much better this one is. It delves a lot deeper into anxiety and is both funny and insightful. These are the types of comics that help you feel less alone. Would recommend 100%

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    This book is all right, but it just comes off lukewarm when I compare it to Maureen Wilson's Kind of Coping: An Illustrated Look at Life with Anxiety, which I read recently. I did enjoy the few bits with the Mental Health Fairy. I feel like I have been that character to people in my life. This book is all right, but it just comes off lukewarm when I compare it to Maureen Wilson's Kind of Coping: An Illustrated Look at Life with Anxiety, which I read recently. I did enjoy the few bits with the Mental Health Fairy. I feel like I have been that character to people in my life.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brent

    These short cartoons aren't thigh-slappers, aren't all funny. What they are is useful illustrations in comics and cartoons. Holly Chisolm begins, in her Introduction, with her own mental health saga, and in four thematic chapters of page-length cartoon strips, documents feelings of: depression; anxiety; love and relationships; and growth. None of this is the last word on any of this. Most useful is her page/list of Resources (quoting): "Suicide Hotline: 1-800-273-8255 Crisis Text Line: 741741 Onlin These short cartoons aren't thigh-slappers, aren't all funny. What they are is useful illustrations in comics and cartoons. Holly Chisolm begins, in her Introduction, with her own mental health saga, and in four thematic chapters of page-length cartoon strips, documents feelings of: depression; anxiety; love and relationships; and growth. None of this is the last word on any of this. Most useful is her page/list of Resources (quoting): "Suicide Hotline: 1-800-273-8255 Crisis Text Line: 741741 Online Therapy/Coaching betterhelp.com talkspace.com hellopriizm.com App I use for Anxiety and Addiction Headspace - Meditation app I am Sober - Addiction Tracking App Notepad - to write down my thoughts ProCreate - How I draw all my comics Podcasts ... Books that have Helped Me" ... [4 listed]. You get the idea. Just Peachy, an increasingly important combination of self-help, memoir, and comics, is brief, visually appealing, and useful. Recommended. I received an Advanced Reader Copy, of galley, at my workplace, the Carlos Museum Bookshop. The book will be published in March, 2019.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melle

    Gentler and less intense than Allie Brosh's iconic Hyperbole and a Half but still just as honest and compassionate in its depiction of life with mental illness, Holly Chisholm's Just Peachy is another volume that helps tear down the taboo of mental illness and helps readers feel less alone. Recommended especially for fans of Sarah Andersen (Sarah's Scribbles) and Gemma Correll (The Worrier's Guide to Life). Mental illness sucks, but none of us face it alone, thanks to wonderful artists like thes Gentler and less intense than Allie Brosh's iconic Hyperbole and a Half but still just as honest and compassionate in its depiction of life with mental illness, Holly Chisholm's Just Peachy is another volume that helps tear down the taboo of mental illness and helps readers feel less alone. Recommended especially for fans of Sarah Andersen (Sarah's Scribbles) and Gemma Correll (The Worrier's Guide to Life). Mental illness sucks, but none of us face it alone, thanks to wonderful artists like these.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sonja P.

    A short book of comics about depression and anxiety and relationships, drawn simply and effectively. The more we talk about mental illness, the more we bring it into the light, the more people who will live. I believe that and I loved the dark humor, sweetness, and truth here.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Heather H.

    A quick, easy read. Still, some of the comics really hit home as someone who lives with depression and anxiety on a day to day basis.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    This book just didn't do anything for me. It seems to be just disjunctive ramblings and drawings from someone who is depressed.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Martyn

    It's really tough to rate a book like this. Other reviewers have said everything from this is lukewarm to this is awesome and have compared it to works by other authors, but the subject matter is so uniquely personal that I'm not sure it can be compared in that way. It should stand on its own merits. I enjoyed it a lot and I really like the insights the author had into these subjects and the humor used to put them across. Holly says in the afterward "I know my comics can be kind of sad, and they It's really tough to rate a book like this. Other reviewers have said everything from this is lukewarm to this is awesome and have compared it to works by other authors, but the subject matter is so uniquely personal that I'm not sure it can be compared in that way. It should stand on its own merits. I enjoyed it a lot and I really like the insights the author had into these subjects and the humor used to put them across. Holly says in the afterward "I know my comics can be kind of sad, and they aren't that funny, but I hope they spoke to you" well they did, and they made me think; that's all that counts to me.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Recommended for fans of Sarah Andersen and Allie Brosh. Books of comics about hard, uncomfortable subjects like depression and anxiety are somehow very comforting. I guess it’s the juxtaposition of the cute, adorable drawings and their subject matter. It’s a lot easier and more accessible for people to read through one of these comic books than, say, self-help or psychology books. They’re less intense (both mentally and as a time investment), less intimidating, and more inviting and embracing it Recommended for fans of Sarah Andersen and Allie Brosh. Books of comics about hard, uncomfortable subjects like depression and anxiety are somehow very comforting. I guess it’s the juxtaposition of the cute, adorable drawings and their subject matter. It’s a lot easier and more accessible for people to read through one of these comic books than, say, self-help or psychology books. They’re less intense (both mentally and as a time investment), less intimidating, and more inviting and embracing it seems. I hadn’t heard of Just Peachy comics before (I just saw this in my library’s new additions list), but I’m definitely going to check out her Instagram (@justpeachycomics). In this autobiographical collection, Chisholm walks through the various medications and coping mechanisms that have been prescribed or suggested to since her depression diagnosis. She shows the ups and downs of living with depression and anxiety and stresses the importance of never giving up and always making sure that you never lose track of how far you’ve come and just trying to do a little more tomorrow. I think it’s great that she gives so many options to readers who might be dealing with similar issues and feelings (examples: journal, make art, go outside, exercise, spend time with your pet/family/loved one). Like with anything else, you just have to experiment and find what works and feels best for you.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Vicki theglambookworm

    This little diddy walked into my store today, and I had to put my current read on hold to go through it. And ya'll, am I so glad I did. While these cartoons are not the funniest things you'll read, they are raw, real, honest, and yes amusing and adorable. To use some millennial vernacular, they were relatable af. As a way to help battle my depression and anxiety, I tend to find the humor in my mental health, and this book was a great reflection of how I do so. It is a short read, but I deffs rec This little diddy walked into my store today, and I had to put my current read on hold to go through it. And ya'll, am I so glad I did. While these cartoons are not the funniest things you'll read, they are raw, real, honest, and yes amusing and adorable. To use some millennial vernacular, they were relatable af. As a way to help battle my depression and anxiety, I tend to find the humor in my mental health, and this book was a great reflection of how I do so. It is a short read, but I deffs recommend it!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Misti

    A collection of comics about life with depression and anxiety. Many of these images spoke to my own experience, so I'd recommend this book if you have experience with anxiety and depression, or if you don't, and are interested in knowing what it's like for some people. This is a very quick read, so much so that I almost feel badly about counting it in my total for the year, but hey, a book is a book!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    I read Holly Chisholm's Just Peachy book in under an hour. Savoring each picture and each moment of Holly's journal.. relating to some experiences and laughing or crying inside.. Thank you for capturing these moments of yours Holly and sharing with the world. This is a gem of a book for showing how amazing and yet how frail human beings are.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Fauziah Hafidha

    Such an interesting way to tell about depression. I can relate to some stories although I think I'm not a person with depression -just a person with overthinking and worries :)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Extra points for the resource page in the back, with hotline phone numbers, "Apps I use for anxiety and addiction," podcasts, and "Books that have helped me."

  17. 5 out of 5

    Megan Rosol

    A nice, funny, thoughtful graphic novel for when you feel you might be in a reading slump.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    Just lovely.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nadina

    Somewhat relatable, somewhat sad. These were really cute comics. I like how it was broken into chapters.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Relatable books like this are so important. Excited to follow her on Instagram.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vishal Katariya

    Oh my god, so good.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lake Villa District Library

    Featured in our 2019 Holiday Gift Guide!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Margo Adeline

    i read this in a waiting room. it was cute and really made me take a good look at my own mental health and the healthy ways i can deal with my issues.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    I pulled this from the graphic novel collection at work and felt it was a very relatable depiction of living, loving, and growing with (and through) mental illness. I'll be recommending this one to our students for sure!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Connie D

    Sweet, encouraging comic about dealing with depression and anxiety.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tarah Fedenia

    Such a cute little comforting book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kris

    3.5 stars. A graphic novel that deals with anxiety and depression in a relatable way. There is a bit of humor, but mostly, it i realistic, but in an approachable way.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    Holly Chisholm's personal insights about experiencing depression and anxiety were used to create cute, relatable comics that I found to be relaxing to read despite their moments of being very "close-to-home". I was diligently drinking a bottle of water as I read the panels where "The mental health fairy," commands her to drink more water despite her already drinking water. I laughed out loud at the inadvertently reflected realism. Overall, the book was a quick read that did not bring tears (as th Holly Chisholm's personal insights about experiencing depression and anxiety were used to create cute, relatable comics that I found to be relaxing to read despite their moments of being very "close-to-home". I was diligently drinking a bottle of water as I read the panels where "The mental health fairy," commands her to drink more water despite her already drinking water. I laughed out loud at the inadvertently reflected realism. Overall, the book was a quick read that did not bring tears (as the darker subjects were balanced by cute illustrations) nor much laughter, but definitely grazed lightly across my emotional center through both ends of the spectrum. The last illustration of the book was of the all too familiar mountain of overcoming mental health issues. When I closed the book, I thought to myself, "Holly did a really good thing here." It helps people to see relatable stories full of helpful coping mechanisms and positive thinking to balance out the effects of negative thinking while depressed.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    I'm now like 2 weeks out from reading this, but sometimes that's good--it's forcing me to recall what was memorable about this sort of-comic memoir. I didn't love this, but didn't hate it, either. It was unapologetically (maybe even intentionally) unfunny most of the time, but that's okay because mental health usually is pretty unfunny. It's not always necessary to cope with it using humor. I appreciated Chisholm's frankness about her struggles and how she's coping, that it's not necessarily a l I'm now like 2 weeks out from reading this, but sometimes that's good--it's forcing me to recall what was memorable about this sort of-comic memoir. I didn't love this, but didn't hate it, either. It was unapologetically (maybe even intentionally) unfunny most of the time, but that's okay because mental health usually is pretty unfunny. It's not always necessary to cope with it using humor. I appreciated Chisholm's frankness about her struggles and how she's coping, that it's not necessarily a linear path and this comic represented a small piece of the larger picture. However, maybe there was too much focus on the minutiae of depression. It's also okay that didn't especially resonate with me. I think the only time I felt truly interested in Chisholm's writing was when I read her author blurb, because it seemed like she lived this interesting, varied life when she's not hyperfocused on depression. The other thing I appreciated was the list of mental health resources at the back.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kelcey

    This is another great contribution to the literature that is helping to bring anxiety and depression into the normal scope of book content. These are comics, but they aren't ha-ha comics. They are visual representations of the normalcy of living with anxiety and depression. Some of these really hit home and every time I read a work covering anxiety, I find one more example of "oh. yeah, yeah I have had that happen. And wow, it really is not just me. It is something else others struggle with and This is another great contribution to the literature that is helping to bring anxiety and depression into the normal scope of book content. These are comics, but they aren't ha-ha comics. They are visual representations of the normalcy of living with anxiety and depression. Some of these really hit home and every time I read a work covering anxiety, I find one more example of "oh. yeah, yeah I have had that happen. And wow, it really is not just me. It is something else others struggle with and I am not alone." Page 53 is me, all the time and I somehow didn't realize that was another symptom of anxiety, but also now that I think about it, yeah, yeah it does. Also the mental health fairy XD Holly Chisholm, thank you for sharing your experience!

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