hits counter Meditations on the Tarot: A Journey into Christian Hermeticism - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Meditations on the Tarot: A Journey into Christian Hermeticism

Availability: Ready to download

Published for the first time with an index and Cardinal Hans Urs von Balthasar's afterword, this new English publication of Meditations on the Tarot is the landmark edition of one of the most important works of esoteric Christianity. Written anonymously and published posthumously, as was the author's wish, the intention of this work is for the reader to find a relationship Published for the first time with an index and Cardinal Hans Urs von Balthasar's afterword, this new English publication of Meditations on the Tarot is the landmark edition of one of the most important works of esoteric Christianity. Written anonymously and published posthumously, as was the author's wish, the intention of this work is for the reader to find a relationship with the author in the spiritual dimensions of existence. The author wanted not to be thought of as a personality who lived from 1900 to 1973, but as a friend who is communicating with us from beyond the boundaries of ordinary life.


Compare

Published for the first time with an index and Cardinal Hans Urs von Balthasar's afterword, this new English publication of Meditations on the Tarot is the landmark edition of one of the most important works of esoteric Christianity. Written anonymously and published posthumously, as was the author's wish, the intention of this work is for the reader to find a relationship Published for the first time with an index and Cardinal Hans Urs von Balthasar's afterword, this new English publication of Meditations on the Tarot is the landmark edition of one of the most important works of esoteric Christianity. Written anonymously and published posthumously, as was the author's wish, the intention of this work is for the reader to find a relationship with the author in the spiritual dimensions of existence. The author wanted not to be thought of as a personality who lived from 1900 to 1973, but as a friend who is communicating with us from beyond the boundaries of ordinary life.

30 review for Meditations on the Tarot: A Journey into Christian Hermeticism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Szplug

    Sui generis, at least as regards my reading experience so far. A profound, beguiling, and massively erudite exposition upon Christian Hermeticism built from within the traditions of the Roman Catholic church. The anonymous author—who insisted that his French original be published posthumously—delivers his perceived insight and transcendent guidance from beyond the grave, in a manner of speaking, via epistolic essays on the twenty-two Major Arcana of the Tarot. Dense and difficult—the more so as Sui generis, at least as regards my reading experience so far. A profound, beguiling, and massively erudite exposition upon Christian Hermeticism built from within the traditions of the Roman Catholic church. The anonymous author—who insisted that his French original be published posthumously—delivers his perceived insight and transcendent guidance from beyond the grave, in a manner of speaking, via epistolic essays on the twenty-two Major Arcana of the Tarot. Dense and difficult—the more so as I entered the book woefully uninformed about Catholic and Christian Hermetic ritual and terminology—but also endlessly fascinating and edifying, especially in the recondite and convincing manner with which scientific, psychological, and anthropological phenomena are reconciled with the spiritual revelation of Christ. A billion microbes of bacteria find their explicatory place in the Hermetic tradition. Most astonishing is the vast wealth of scholarship invested by the author in this labour of love. Entire volumes of disparate material have been sifted and parsed through this pen wielded by an unknown hand in order to provide thoroughgoing directions for a mystic augmentation of one's spiritual life. One need not be a Christian, nor even a believer in God, to become lost within the pathways of the Tarot as so rendered—indeed, if it does nothing else, this tome will spark the imagination and stir the creative juices of any reader still capable of drawing breath. A book not to be read so much as studied, pondered over and, inevitably, returned to for another dose of enigmatically bracing wisdom.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cordelia Becker

    This is not a book to read cover to cover. It is a book I keep and read passages. The unknown author is actually a fellow (I've heard that his name is Valentin Tomberg) who was deeply involved in the Golden Dawn/Rosicrusion/Rudolf Steiner crowd and then converted to Catholicism - perhaps becoming a monk (not sure about that). This is no airy fairy, hippie dippie new age book it's a intensely researched tome. He uses the Tarot Deck to reconcile the modern church with the Gnostic traditions. (I'm n This is not a book to read cover to cover. It is a book I keep and read passages. The unknown author is actually a fellow (I've heard that his name is Valentin Tomberg) who was deeply involved in the Golden Dawn/Rosicrusion/Rudolf Steiner crowd and then converted to Catholicism - perhaps becoming a monk (not sure about that). This is no airy fairy, hippie dippie new age book it's a intensely researched tome. He uses the Tarot Deck to reconcile the modern church with the Gnostic traditions. (I'm not a scholar in these matters this is just my take on it) Anyway I am neither Catholic nor to I practice Hermeticism but something about this book facinates me. I read a page from it weekly. It's giving me a great education because he makes hundreds of references (The dude is uber-erudite) to things I've never heard or things I've heard of but never took the time to understand - he inspires me to look up his various references -- just so I can know what the heck he is talking about. The only thing is my paperback version is a mess - from my scribbled notes and highlighting - I can be cruel to books I love -- I think I'll have to get a hard bound version at some point. My faviorite chapter is Temperance Card 14 - this card represents genius and our guardian angel. He speaks of this Angel as being an entity whose purpose is only to serve our needs...well he says it better than I:"An Angel depends on man in his creative activity. If the human being does not ask for it (help), if he turns away from him. the Angel has no motive for creative activity".....(the angel) can then fall into a....twilight existence".... "An Angel who has nothing to exist for is a tragedy in the spiritual world. Therefore Unknown Friend, think of your guardian Angel, think of him when you have problems, questions to resolve, tasks to accomplish, plans to formulate, cares and fears to appease! Think of him as a luminous cloud of maternal love above you, moved by the sole desire to serve you and be useful to you." He also has an interesting take on card #24 - Death which has given me an interesting insight on the millions of women involved in scrapbooking and the new interest North Americans are taking in the Latin American holiday "Dia De Los Muertos_ - Death far from being a scarey card is really a message about memory and memorializing those who are no longer with us.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessecooperlevy

    Anonymous is the best writer ever.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Roger Buck

    In my experience, to engage sincerely with this book is to engage with more than a book. It is to engage with a living spiritual saint, master and genius of the highest order. A very human being, with the warmest of hearts, the most lucid of minds. A profound, profound thinker whose heart, burning with compassion for the world, gave us a manual of practical Christian transformation – a transformation that has undone my neuroses, strengthened my sanity, vastly enlarged my scope of feeling, vitali In my experience, to engage sincerely with this book is to engage with more than a book. It is to engage with a living spiritual saint, master and genius of the highest order. A very human being, with the warmest of hearts, the most lucid of minds. A profound, profound thinker whose heart, burning with compassion for the world, gave us a manual of practical Christian transformation – a transformation that has undone my neuroses, strengthened my sanity, vastly enlarged my scope of feeling, vitalised my mind, melted my anger, fired my compassion, deepened my calmness. And more, so, so much, much more besides. But not only this, he has given us a compendium of psychology, sociology, politics, theology, philosophy and hermeticism that could offer the new millennium – in all its potential horror – the wisest of guides. More here at my website inspired by this book: http://corjesusacratissimum.org/2009/... I also have an archive of posts devoted to Valentin Tomberg with material from him which is unusual and hard to find in the Anglosphere: http: //corjesusacratissimum.org/tag/valentin...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Murray

    This is one of the most valuable books I possess - not in terms of how much I would get selling it second hand, but because it has such a depth of valuable scholarship in it. The writer, who chooses (chose) to remain anonymous, poured his/her learning into these 'meditations' on the major arcana of the Tarot. The reader is provided with an education into esoteric symbology that goes far beyond most so called esoteric books, because the writer has/had such a wonderful grasp of the intricacies of This is one of the most valuable books I possess - not in terms of how much I would get selling it second hand, but because it has such a depth of valuable scholarship in it. The writer, who chooses (chose) to remain anonymous, poured his/her learning into these 'meditations' on the major arcana of the Tarot. The reader is provided with an education into esoteric symbology that goes far beyond most so called esoteric books, because the writer has/had such a wonderful grasp of the intricacies of the thought that underlies the Tarot. You can read it from cover to cover but you are more likely to take it a chapter at a time as almost every paragraph has ideas to ponder and penetrate. I discovered some years back that I had shared a flat in Brighton (UK) with Robert Powell who translated this book from the original German. Strange the byways of fate.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sam Sanford

    This book is not about fortune-telling; the symbols from the Tarot are used as the starting points for a series of spiritual exercises intended to immerse the reader in the living tradition of Christian Hermeticism. Absorbing the knowlege in this book is a lifelong project. “Now, the normal relationship between thought, feeling, and the will for a civilised and educated person is such that his thought awakens feeling and directs the will. Having to act, one thinks, one imagines, one feels, and - This book is not about fortune-telling; the symbols from the Tarot are used as the starting points for a series of spiritual exercises intended to immerse the reader in the living tradition of Christian Hermeticism. Absorbing the knowlege in this book is a lifelong project. “Now, the normal relationship between thought, feeling, and the will for a civilised and educated person is such that his thought awakens feeling and directs the will. Having to act, one thinks, one imagines, one feels, and - lastly - one desires and acts. This is not so for the ‘spiritual person.’ He acts first, then he desires, then he feels the worth of his action, and lastly he understands."

  7. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    I can't say enough about this book. To give you an idea how amazing I think it is, after finishing it I went back to the beginning and started reading it again. I have never done that before, certainly not for a dense 650 page book. Anyone interested in self-improvement, philosophy, sacred magic, or alchemy should check it out. If you come from a Christian background it will be familiar territory. If not take it with a grain of salt. Although the other does draw on every major religion and many I can't say enough about this book. To give you an idea how amazing I think it is, after finishing it I went back to the beginning and started reading it again. I have never done that before, certainly not for a dense 650 page book. Anyone interested in self-improvement, philosophy, sacred magic, or alchemy should check it out. If you come from a Christian background it will be familiar territory. If not take it with a grain of salt. Although the other does draw on every major religion and many philosophers, he is unapologetically Catholic. I was raised Catholic, so I was fine with it. Some people might not like this. Addresses many of life's tougher questions that people seldom discuss.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marymark2

    I have been reading this for a little over a year. It was written by Valentin Tomberg, not Robert Powell--he is the translator only. This is for me the ultimate read--highly provocative, deeply inspiring, profoundly wise.Meditations on the Tarot I have been reading this for a little over a year. It was written by Valentin Tomberg, not Robert Powell--he is the translator only. This is for me the ultimate read--highly provocative, deeply inspiring, profoundly wise.Meditations on the Tarot

  9. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    So far this is mostly sitting by my bed stand while I peruse feng shui books and my book club books. Still, what I've read is amazing and gracious and worth my time.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ojo Oim

    This isn't a tarot reference book but an extended meditation, an open-ended pondering of the symbols of the major arcana. The nameless author writes letters to us as to an Unknown Friend, considering the art of a divine kind of magic, various difficulties and temptations in esoteric studies and philosophy. The author seems to regard himself as a Christian Hermeticist, I'm not sure what that means but it seems to be something like a philosopher, a lover of Christ and wisdom, and a point the autho This isn't a tarot reference book but an extended meditation, an open-ended pondering of the symbols of the major arcana. The nameless author writes letters to us as to an Unknown Friend, considering the art of a divine kind of magic, various difficulties and temptations in esoteric studies and philosophy. The author seems to regard himself as a Christian Hermeticist, I'm not sure what that means but it seems to be something like a philosopher, a lover of Christ and wisdom, and a point the author returns to again and again, engaged in a process of evolution, of becoming. Actually in the index Henri Bergson maybe has more listings than any other name, including Rudolf Steiner, who was the author's teacher at one time. He shares with Bergson an interest in evolutionary spirituality, a moving and growing spirituality. There is a wonderful beauty about this book and about the way the author thinks. Anthroposophist talk about a "living" kind of thinking, and this book exemplifies such a way (as well as I can tell). He clearly has a point of view, which I don't all the time agree with. For example, his critique of Advaita Vedanta is that the adherent loses the ability to cry. A curious and touching observation, but which I don't think is necessarily true. He goes further into the mystery of tears in his discussion of the Temperance card, how the Rose Cross is a symbol of this mystery. Still, our disagreements are not unbearable; the spirit of friendship overwhelms particular ideas and points, and the flow of thought itself is very agreeable. When I bought this book, the kind white haired gentleman at Trident bookstore said that this book had given him much inspiration over the years. His memory and words are part of the warmth of this book for me.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dolores Ashcroft-Nowicki

    For serious and trained occultists, ceremonial magicians, and genuine followers of the Mysteries this is a book to have at your elbow. I have recommended to my students many times and return to it when I need to seek deeper information. It is a book that offers something new to the deep thinkers.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jann

    This is NOT a book on the tarot (as in "card reading"). It is estoteric Christianity.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alex Lee

    As creatures of language, we use meaning to tell us who we are, where we are, what we are and how we are to be. This author dives deeply into the meanings of many deep traditions, as is his chosen methodoloy: Christian Hermeneutics. Hermeneutics is the interpretation of text; really trying to get meaning out of words. So very exactly, this author has tasked for himself to find the meaning of traditions (religion, philosophy, linguistics, cultural critics, historical figures, literary figures, wr As creatures of language, we use meaning to tell us who we are, where we are, what we are and how we are to be. This author dives deeply into the meanings of many deep traditions, as is his chosen methodoloy: Christian Hermeneutics. Hermeneutics is the interpretation of text; really trying to get meaning out of words. So very exactly, this author has tasked for himself to find the meaning of traditions (religion, philosophy, linguistics, cultural critics, historical figures, literary figures, writers...), anyone or work of art whose sole function is to tell us who we are, where we are, what we are and how we are to be. To organize this search, he uses the vehicle of Tarot cards, as a spiritual journey, a transformation of self to be more than self, in order to describe the ascent (or the beginning of such an ascent) to have a deeper holistic grasp of the universe around us. This book is not about fortune-telling. One of the many spoken and returned to themes (and there are many) is the Jungian subconscious. Because we use our internal filing systems qua archetypes to structure relationships in the world, we have access to the outside only in that way. And in that sense, despite archetypes or despite language, we literally have the world through these forms. These forms, like the Tarot, become the Runic gateway not only to our unconscious but also to the outside. But also because of using forms, we run the risk of producing relations. Because we live in these form arrangements, we otherwise know these forms as reality. The author warns us, there is a difference between reality and truth. That is to say, don't get caught up in your world and lose the true union with the universal-all. Rightly so. In a Hegelian like synthesis (without the chaos of Hegel), this author runs the gambit, a real cornucopia of meanings, picks and chooses, guides our way across them in argument leading us on a possible path, an interpretation of a huge sum of human knowledge to the point at which portals break down, words become invisible and you understand more than yourself... also your ultimate place, where you can't get knocked down. Literally lodging you so no one can move you from there, you just understand and you are that understanding. No one can beat you talk, or talk you out of yourself. You just are. Nirvana, heaven, you name it, he's considered it and arranged it here for us to see it. See it all in relation. A real He-man, fascinating piece of work this art. It took me over a decade to get through this book, with many false starts, interruptions of life, and a need to learn how to read better and be more clear in thought... but also, in a way, an impossible pipe-dream too, don't you think? To think we can break the noumenal skin that separates the i from the not-i... and then sort of melt into the rest of the world and become 1. Yet despite this stated goal, when one reads, one gets a better sense of the larger world around us. Transitory in nature, full of riddles, temptations and desires for status -- the author shows us how these things are... so we can learn. this author too wants us to be grounded in a humanly, divine way, to be among fellow men. We are to be, in our spiritual quest, better human beings, which is part of being of the world. He shows us this indirectly, discarding and picking up forms, to give us stepping stones to the way.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Francis Siefken

    Of interest for anyone wondering about a possible dialogue between the esoteric and christianity. In this regard the endorsement and the forword and afterword by cardinal Hans Urs von Balthasar is noteworthy. He notes that the "The author wished to remain anonymous in order to allow the work to speak for itself, to avoid the interposition of any kind of personal element between the work and the reader - reasons that we respect." The book is not about divination. The author uses the symbols of the Of interest for anyone wondering about a possible dialogue between the esoteric and christianity. In this regard the endorsement and the forword and afterword by cardinal Hans Urs von Balthasar is noteworthy. He notes that the "The author wished to remain anonymous in order to allow the work to speak for itself, to avoid the interposition of any kind of personal element between the work and the reader - reasons that we respect." The book is not about divination. The author uses the symbols of the tarot as object of meditations on aspects of the Catholic faith. Of interest is his take on the relation between non-fallen Nature, Mary, Sophia, the Virgin, being Chaste and his views on the notion of the holy trinity illuminated by this fourth element. Also noteworthy is his take on apparitions and the Amsterdam 'Lady of all nations': "I may add that I went to Amsterdam in order to make as scrupulous an investigation as possible, and the result of this investigation there (confirmed subsequently by experiences of a personal nature) was complete certainty not only with respect to the authentici­ty of the experiences of the seer (a woman forty years of age) but also with respect to the authenticity of the subject of these experiences."

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    This is not about Fortune Telling or Divination, but is rather a free-fall plunge into the profound depths of Christian Philosophy. It is dense with meaning, every phrase and paragraph a tiny explosion of greater understanding. This is the sort of book you read and read, and then your brain is full and needs some time to digest what it's read. Some time meaning anything from days to years. No, I'm not done reading it yet. I suspect that once I am, my copy will be so battered that I will need to This is not about Fortune Telling or Divination, but is rather a free-fall plunge into the profound depths of Christian Philosophy. It is dense with meaning, every phrase and paragraph a tiny explosion of greater understanding. This is the sort of book you read and read, and then your brain is full and needs some time to digest what it's read. Some time meaning anything from days to years. No, I'm not done reading it yet. I suspect that once I am, my copy will be so battered that I will need to buy another copy just to have one that isn't falling apart. It cannot be read cover to cover, not if one is reading to understand. Take time over it. Pour yourself a glass of wine, coffee, water, chocolate milk, or beer, and allow yourself to linger, to mull and ponder. Do not rush this. Do not read it with any sort of deadline involved. If you have been seeking the depths that Sunday School, Sunday Sermons, and Best Selling Inspirational Authors just haven't been able to deliver, this is an excellent, foundational start.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Abe Fabella

    This book, along with Manly P. Hall's masterpiece, "The Secret Teachings of All Ages," is one of the few authoritative books on spirituality and occult wisdom that I have ever encountered. The author, who published the book anonymously and posthumously, exudes an unmistakable connection to God as well as rational and moral rightness. Warning: this is very dense reading and I would recommend spending a lot of time, as much as one needs, to digest the wisdom. This is a book not to scan but to savor This book, along with Manly P. Hall's masterpiece, "The Secret Teachings of All Ages," is one of the few authoritative books on spirituality and occult wisdom that I have ever encountered. The author, who published the book anonymously and posthumously, exudes an unmistakable connection to God as well as rational and moral rightness. Warning: this is very dense reading and I would recommend spending a lot of time, as much as one needs, to digest the wisdom. This is a book not to scan but to savor. I will go back to this book again and again to gain insight into what life brings, this is certain.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    An extremely challenging but rewarding set of Catholic Christian meditations centered around the Marseilles Tarot. Bizarre, wonderful, at times incredibly deep.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Iohannes

    well, this was certainy ..interesting, I mean I know of know other book that talks about the spiritual mechanics of levitation and teaches you that one can 'suck in' ghosts; nevertheless apart from these curiosities I think the overall project of this book, i.e. that of a 'great synthesis' of basically everything from Hermeticism/Christianity to Goethe/Schiller and Teilhard/Jung/Bergson to name only a few of the references, 'the alchemical marriage of opposites' etc. (as the author is not tired well, this was certainy ..interesting, I mean I know of know other book that talks about the spiritual mechanics of levitation and teaches you that one can 'suck in' ghosts; nevertheless apart from these curiosities I think the overall project of this book, i.e. that of a 'great synthesis' of basically everything from Hermeticism/Christianity to Goethe/Schiller and Teilhard/Jung/Bergson to name only a few of the references, 'the alchemical marriage of opposites' etc. (as the author is not tired to repeat) is ultimately a failure and results more often than not in a kind of syncretistic theosophy ("pseudo-religion" as Guenon rightly dubbed it). Ironically by far the strongest passages of this book are when he's arguing against certain tendencies, such as the "spiritualisers" (non-dualists) on the one hand and 'will-to-power' materialism on the other hand, while at the same time showing the superiority of the Christian Tradition.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Evan Z

    The work of a true friend.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kent Langseth

    This book is amazing, and of no interest to most modern readers. I dare say most would drop it like a hot potato. For those with the inclination to study it, the book is remarkably rewarding. What's it about? W..e..l..l.. There are ancient mystical traditions, partly commingled with Catholicism (the author was a devout Catholic), which we have little clear sight of today. The author had clear sight, and he shared his understanding in a series of essays on the symbolism used in the Marseilles Tar This book is amazing, and of no interest to most modern readers. I dare say most would drop it like a hot potato. For those with the inclination to study it, the book is remarkably rewarding. What's it about? W..e..l..l.. There are ancient mystical traditions, partly commingled with Catholicism (the author was a devout Catholic), which we have little clear sight of today. The author had clear sight, and he shared his understanding in a series of essays on the symbolism used in the Marseilles Tarot. This is not about fortune telling, boys and girls. The ideas involved and the processes described for mining meaning in the strata of our consciousness are marvelous, both in content and in the contexts defined for their interpretation. The symbols used in the Tarot - tacky artwork and all - are markers, reminders of core ideas. Much of the wonder I experience while studying this book is due to the unusual truth-telling, truth from an era when the Great Chain of Being had not yet got a stake through its heart, courtesy of the scientific revolution. Science at present is not much good at levels of being, states of consciousness, mental archetypes unfurling into timebound instantiations. I believe such ideas are important even though my buddy science doesn't handle them well. Meditations on the Tarot ... provides quite an education.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    Every couple of years I came upon a book that gives me a where-have-you-been-all-my-life shiver of delight. Odd, too, since I have no truck with "divination" and such like spookery and only picked it up because Hans Urs von Balthasar, one of the greatest minds of the last century, wrote the afterword. I suspect I'll be steadily re-reading this masterwork of esoteric Christian spirituality the rest of my life, and that it's contemplative symbolism will work its way into my writing, as it has alre Every couple of years I came upon a book that gives me a where-have-you-been-all-my-life shiver of delight. Odd, too, since I have no truck with "divination" and such like spookery and only picked it up because Hans Urs von Balthasar, one of the greatest minds of the last century, wrote the afterword. I suspect I'll be steadily re-reading this masterwork of esoteric Christian spirituality the rest of my life, and that it's contemplative symbolism will work its way into my writing, as it has already worked its way into my imagination.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Dennis

    This is an amazing book with so many mind-blowing insights and observations of subtle realms by a Christian contemplative and mystic, Valentin Tomberg, who delves into the "archetypes" of human experience using the major arcana of the Tarot.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stereo

    A contradictory book. Traditional yet avant-garde. Catholic yet hermetic. Weird but I liked it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Evan Herberth

    Very interesting. The author (Valentin Tomberg) was a convert to Catholicism from Anthroposophy, after which conversion this book, and Lazarus, Come Forth (or Covenant of the Heart) were written. He uses the images on the Marseilles Tarot trump cards as a point of departure to very eclectic observations. A lot of them do, frankly, deal with occultic concepts such as those from the Kaballah. In my opinion, this is the most boring aspect of the book. Where it really shines is in its dialogue with Very interesting. The author (Valentin Tomberg) was a convert to Catholicism from Anthroposophy, after which conversion this book, and Lazarus, Come Forth (or Covenant of the Heart) were written. He uses the images on the Marseilles Tarot trump cards as a point of departure to very eclectic observations. A lot of them do, frankly, deal with occultic concepts such as those from the Kaballah. In my opinion, this is the most boring aspect of the book. Where it really shines is in its dialogue with Eastern religious concepts, Nietzsche, scientistic reductionism, etc. And I understand from others who would know better than me that it’s a good potential pathway for those taken in by the New Age movement back to Christianity. The author unfortunately, if memory serves, defends certain ideas that are incompatible with Christianity, such as reincarnation and universalism, so the faithful Christian should proceed cautiously if he's not ready to objectively encounter such ideas from an odd, apparently Christian source. But for those who wish to go digging, there do seem to be some gems hiding therein. To be clear, this book is not about practicing cartomancy (which would be forbidden to Christians, of course). Tarot cards precede their hijacking for that purpose. He uses the images on the cards as a point of departure for his thoughts. For a (positive) traditional Catholic assessment of the work and its author: http://corjesusacratissimum.org/2011/...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christian

    This is a remarkable, if not unique book. Giving it only 4/5 stars is almost insolent, but what can I do when I disagree with some of the core premises? Now, I'm not a christian and this probably shows more than anything else, that the author remains true to his religion, although freely incorporating and contemplating ideas from theosophy to buddhism. I'm glad I'm through, but this is truly recommended reading for anyone who can just barely identify with all or some of the keywords in the title This is a remarkable, if not unique book. Giving it only 4/5 stars is almost insolent, but what can I do when I disagree with some of the core premises? Now, I'm not a christian and this probably shows more than anything else, that the author remains true to his religion, although freely incorporating and contemplating ideas from theosophy to buddhism. I'm glad I'm through, but this is truly recommended reading for anyone who can just barely identify with all or some of the keywords in the title. Tombergs breadth and scope in scources he draws upon and elegance of interpretation is a joy to behold and a vast step up from the usual trite fad one is served in the written world of the esoteric.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kenzie

    This book synthesizes a large amount of Christian and Hermetic thought, and yet the focus of the book is not just on theoretical synthesis but on practice. This book has helped me see the Major Arcana in new ways, and it has encouraged me to deepen my practice. My one complaint was that the author sometimes uses other traditions and thinkers as strawmen for a Catholic interpretation. I found this distracting and disappointing, but the author does such a fantastic job of presenting his own argume This book synthesizes a large amount of Christian and Hermetic thought, and yet the focus of the book is not just on theoretical synthesis but on practice. This book has helped me see the Major Arcana in new ways, and it has encouraged me to deepen my practice. My one complaint was that the author sometimes uses other traditions and thinkers as strawmen for a Catholic interpretation. I found this distracting and disappointing, but the author does such a fantastic job of presenting his own arguments based in the Christian and Hermetic tradition that I came away with a clear understanding of his position.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael Jay

    Reading as substantial journey In going through this text I came across a spectrum of ideas, and in their assembly, I was asked to revisit how I assemble things in my mind, how I have built my own "memory palace" in the spirit of Matteo Ricci and Frances Yates, and how I connect old and new moments. I appreciate the results of this journey, and the research through history that the anonymous author took, and the heartfelt desire he\she had for all of the Unknown Friends for which the book was wri Reading as substantial journey In going through this text I came across a spectrum of ideas, and in their assembly, I was asked to revisit how I assemble things in my mind, how I have built my own "memory palace" in the spirit of Matteo Ricci and Frances Yates, and how I connect old and new moments. I appreciate the results of this journey, and the research through history that the anonymous author took, and the heartfelt desire he\she had for all of the Unknown Friends for which the book was written.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Grant Crow

    This is one of the most profound books I have ever read, that demands close, repeated readings, and careful study - in short, a book to be absorbed and put into practice. It was first recommended to me many years ago by a good, a holy friend, who is a Trappist mo nk at a nearby monastery. At first, I was put off and puzzled by the title, but, rest assured, this is no bizzare work of occultism. It is one of the most life-changing explications and explorations of the Christian Mystery and Revelation This is one of the most profound books I have ever read, that demands close, repeated readings, and careful study - in short, a book to be absorbed and put into practice. It was first recommended to me many years ago by a good, a holy friend, who is a Trappist mo nk at a nearby monastery. At first, I was put off and puzzled by the title, but, rest assured, this is no bizzare work of occultism. It is one of the most life-changing explications and explorations of the Christian Mystery and Revelation that I have ever encountered.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Judy Boozer

    Often, in the Christian community, we see the word "Tarot" and start having seizures. This book examines the imagery of the major arcana (the face cards) of the tarot deck and the deeper spiritual meaning we can learn from applying those lessons to our lives and our relationship with God. Suddenly, the tarot cards become a mnemonic device for a deeper understanding of spirituality and our own walk with God.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Brilliant book that opens the soul. Read, re-read, re-read again, all while pondering and connecting to what I thought I knew about spirituality, the sacred and various religious and spiritual traditions. My favourite book on tarot and on spirituality and on the evolution of the human condition. Profound and dense.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.