hits counter Vusi: Business & life lessons from a black dragon - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Vusi: Business & life lessons from a black dragon

Availability: Ready to download

‘I have learned the truth about the world: that it isn’t as round as a tennis ball, and it isn’t shaped like itself. It is shaped the way we shape it, according to the way we see it, the way we mould it to our ambitions and our destiny. I know the colour of who I am. I am a black man, running for my life, for my freedom, for opportunity born from struggle, possibility born ‘I have learned the truth about the world: that it isn’t as round as a tennis ball, and it isn’t shaped like itself. It is shaped the way we shape it, according to the way we see it, the way we mould it to our ambitions and our destiny. I know the colour of who I am. I am a black man, running for my life, for my freedom, for opportunity born from struggle, possibility born from sacrifice. And I am running too, for my father, who never became what he hoped to be, and who never got to see what his children would one day become.’ Maverick. Leadership genius. Self-made millionaire. Dragon. The rock star of public speaking. Vusi Thembekwayo has been called many things. Join him in his inspiring journey from the township to the top echelons of South African business, to becoming one of youngest directors of a listed company and CEO of a boutique investment firm. As a 'Dragons' Den' judge and a sought-after public speaker across the globe, Vusi doesn't just talk business – he lives it. Now you can learn the secret of his success and how to shape your own destiny.


Compare

‘I have learned the truth about the world: that it isn’t as round as a tennis ball, and it isn’t shaped like itself. It is shaped the way we shape it, according to the way we see it, the way we mould it to our ambitions and our destiny. I know the colour of who I am. I am a black man, running for my life, for my freedom, for opportunity born from struggle, possibility born ‘I have learned the truth about the world: that it isn’t as round as a tennis ball, and it isn’t shaped like itself. It is shaped the way we shape it, according to the way we see it, the way we mould it to our ambitions and our destiny. I know the colour of who I am. I am a black man, running for my life, for my freedom, for opportunity born from struggle, possibility born from sacrifice. And I am running too, for my father, who never became what he hoped to be, and who never got to see what his children would one day become.’ Maverick. Leadership genius. Self-made millionaire. Dragon. The rock star of public speaking. Vusi Thembekwayo has been called many things. Join him in his inspiring journey from the township to the top echelons of South African business, to becoming one of youngest directors of a listed company and CEO of a boutique investment firm. As a 'Dragons' Den' judge and a sought-after public speaker across the globe, Vusi doesn't just talk business – he lives it. Now you can learn the secret of his success and how to shape your own destiny.

30 review for Vusi: Business & life lessons from a black dragon

  1. 4 out of 5

    M. R Phora

    "Funding entrepreneurship in South Africa isn't the problem. There is plenty of venture capital to go around. The problem is finding people who are worthy of funding, and the problem inside the problem is structural one: we need to go where the entrepreneurs are, not where we are." - The Black Dragon "Funding entrepreneurship in South Africa isn't the problem. There is plenty of venture capital to go around. The problem is finding people who are worthy of funding, and the problem inside the problem is structural one: we need to go where the entrepreneurs are, not where we are." - The Black Dragon

  2. 5 out of 5

    Olebile

    There are a few gaps in this book. The gap from being in high school, to being a big time only black sales person. The book romanticizes finally making it big and lacks to share the transition that took place to get there. The harsh realities of being a poor black man without connections trying to make it as a venture capitalist. A passage about living in one's car does not necessarily cover the full depth of the struggle, the book could've done more. Shared more. If you don't follow him in the There are a few gaps in this book. The gap from being in high school, to being a big time only black sales person. The book romanticizes finally making it big and lacks to share the transition that took place to get there. The harsh realities of being a poor black man without connections trying to make it as a venture capitalist. A passage about living in one's car does not necessarily cover the full depth of the struggle, the book could've done more. Shared more. If you don't follow him in the media the book does not offer much. I will note that I did gain something about the importance of how much of an impact a strong sense of self is required if you want to make it anywhere. A strong belief in one's own dreams and abilities. It's a thin line between self grandiose and a strong sense of self, I choose the latter. The book has a certain authenticity about it that makes me believe in the latter.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lebohang Storom

    Vusi normally speaks as a black South African devoid of socio-political sensitivities and awareness...and now he writes like one. Firstly, the book contains sound bites from some of his interviews...therefore offering up almost nothing new. Secondly, the book is devoid of introspect, reasoning and critical thinking (a process which one expects to take place naturally when a writer writes a book of this nature). This is a book that will resonate very well with white South Africans who continue to Vusi normally speaks as a black South African devoid of socio-political sensitivities and awareness...and now he writes like one. Firstly, the book contains sound bites from some of his interviews...therefore offering up almost nothing new. Secondly, the book is devoid of introspect, reasoning and critical thinking (a process which one expects to take place naturally when a writer writes a book of this nature). This is a book that will resonate very well with white South Africans who continue to believe that getting out of poverty remains a linear function of effort. Those that believe that all things “self made” are attributable only to effort and character! 🤣 A shockingly under-cooked book, full of self-grandeur and lacking anything of substance. DO NOT WASTE YOUR TIME or money! The cover looks great...may make for a good paper weight. 🙃

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Rwabose

    Beautiful story this was. I loved the way Vusi shared different aspects of his life, from stories of Father's entrepreneurial spirit to his years as a young 17 year old eloquent speaker in South Africa. My favourite was his narration of "the barbarians at the gates" in business, how BlackBerry lost it to iPhone etc. Having listened to Vusi for some years now, I wished this was narrated himself in his commanding voice. Beautiful story this was. I loved the way Vusi shared different aspects of his life, from stories of Father's entrepreneurial spirit to his years as a young 17 year old eloquent speaker in South Africa. My favourite was his narration of "the barbarians at the gates" in business, how BlackBerry lost it to iPhone etc. Having listened to Vusi for some years now, I wished this was narrated himself in his commanding voice.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sibongile Thwala

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book and am inspired to work even harder to be part of the A-Team. While well aware of the challenges people face in the South African context, he accepts no excuses because sheer hard work has got him where he is. He uses simple but powerful anecdotes and I'm still thinking about the lesson of how money works. Vusi writes so beautifully and poetically I think he would even be good at fiction. I would read anything he writes. This book is too thin. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and am inspired to work even harder to be part of the A-Team. While well aware of the challenges people face in the South African context, he accepts no excuses because sheer hard work has got him where he is. He uses simple but powerful anecdotes and I'm still thinking about the lesson of how money works. Vusi writes so beautifully and poetically I think he would even be good at fiction. I would read anything he writes. This book is too thin.

  6. 4 out of 5

    GaretH September

    Really appreciated the view into the "origin story" of Vusi Thembewayo. In the book he shares the lessons and values that have helped to shape the dragon through vivid language and good story telling. A touching message at the end. Worth a read if you're following everything that Vusi Thembekwayo is doing for entrepreneurs and the content of Africa. Really appreciated the view into the "origin story" of Vusi Thembewayo. In the book he shares the lessons and values that have helped to shape the dragon through vivid language and good story telling. A touching message at the end. Worth a read if you're following everything that Vusi Thembekwayo is doing for entrepreneurs and the content of Africa.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Yacoub Hachine

    Amazing story by one of the few African intellectuals, thoroughly enjoyed reading it. As a fellow African it is really motivating that a fellow African inspite of the ods being favored against us, we can achieve our dreams even when we are the first one to do it in our family.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Arthur Charlez

    I love how open Vusi’s mind is to the world around him. How articulate he is about it and that he is passionate about sharing himself with what can be thought of as the next generation. I just wish he read it himself.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Hamilton

    Pretty good book which offers some Good advice throughout. I will definitely revisit in the future.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mogau

    I took a lot of life lessons from this. Also for someone whos been criticized for being whitewashed and forsaking his roots, it helped me understand him better. I love how he talks about being black, and not letting ones mere skin color define their identity. I also love the lessons he learnt from this father about fighting through the pain.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Khosi Nxumalo

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tafadzwa Zimunya

  13. 5 out of 5

    Olwethu Roto-ndamase

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katlego Mphahlele

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tumelo Tjabane

  16. 5 out of 5

    SiyaSpeaks Ngema

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tumi

  18. 4 out of 5

    Naledi Mabidilala

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gontse

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tendekai Madzima

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bryn Lake

  22. 5 out of 5

    Siya Xabanisa

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mathieu

  24. 4 out of 5

    King Bless

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jaco Van Niekerk

  26. 4 out of 5

    Augustine Nwozor

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tafadzwa

  28. 4 out of 5

    Thembeka Mlambo

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Stein

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matt Wingfield

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...