hits counter The Romanov Files, 1918 - 1953: A Non-fiction Novel - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Romanov Files, 1918 - 1953: A Non-fiction Novel

Availability: Ready to download

No one could have survived the massacre of the Romanov family in Yekaterinburg on the night of July 17, 1918. The massacre was brutal and effective. Yet, after the collapse of the Soviet Union when the bodies of the imperial family were finally recovered from their secret burial place in the woods, two bodies were missing. The little boy was missing, and one of the daughte No one could have survived the massacre of the Romanov family in Yekaterinburg on the night of July 17, 1918. The massacre was brutal and effective. Yet, after the collapse of the Soviet Union when the bodies of the imperial family were finally recovered from their secret burial place in the woods, two bodies were missing. The little boy was missing, and one of the daughters was missing. The identification of the Romanov skeletons was the first great forensic use of DNA evidence. All agreed that the body of the Tsarevich Alexis was missing, but opinion differed about which daughter was missing. Americans, long enamored of the romantic story about the escape of Anastasia insisted that she was missing. The Russians, on the other hand, examined the bones and concluded that an older daughter was missing. They believed the missing person was the third daughter, Marie. How could it be possible for two children to escape? No one could have escaped the execution. Yet, it would have been possible to escape the House of Special Purposes several weeks before the execution. Many unexplained events took place in the ten days leading up to the execution. The local guard of Ural Russians was replaced by a special detachment. Until then, the imperial family was allowed to receive gifts of food and wine from their admirers. The rulers in Moscow had planned to put the family on trial, and they had plenty of time to remove the Romanovs from Ekaterinburg to a place of safety far away from the advancing White army. After the events of that dreadful night, Lenin said that the children were still alive and safe because he believed they were dead. In this telling of the story, Stalin would insist that all the children were dead because he knew that two of them still lived. This story follows the desperate escape of Marie and the new young Tsar Alexis as they make their way across the face of Russia. Marie, the daughter who nursed her mother and excelled at foreign languages while constantly putting on plays in the palace, had the unique set of skills needed by the royalists to preserve the Heir and secure the crown. This story also follows the growing paranoia of Stalin into madness as he destroys millions of people in his effort to hide his greatest secret: it was his fault that the children escaped. This story mixes the historical circumstances of Stalin’s Soviet state with the many unexplained and inconsistent aspects of Stalin’s behavior. Why did he wait so long to have Trotsky killed when he thought nothing of sending millions to their deaths? Why did he eliminate some of those associated with the killing of the tsar’s family but let others live for so long? This telling of the story of the killing of the tsar’s family explores how a variety of unrelated details could all converge to explain one another in terms of Stalin’s attempt to cover up his unwitting complicity in the one event that threatened the survival of the Soviet regime.


Compare

No one could have survived the massacre of the Romanov family in Yekaterinburg on the night of July 17, 1918. The massacre was brutal and effective. Yet, after the collapse of the Soviet Union when the bodies of the imperial family were finally recovered from their secret burial place in the woods, two bodies were missing. The little boy was missing, and one of the daughte No one could have survived the massacre of the Romanov family in Yekaterinburg on the night of July 17, 1918. The massacre was brutal and effective. Yet, after the collapse of the Soviet Union when the bodies of the imperial family were finally recovered from their secret burial place in the woods, two bodies were missing. The little boy was missing, and one of the daughters was missing. The identification of the Romanov skeletons was the first great forensic use of DNA evidence. All agreed that the body of the Tsarevich Alexis was missing, but opinion differed about which daughter was missing. Americans, long enamored of the romantic story about the escape of Anastasia insisted that she was missing. The Russians, on the other hand, examined the bones and concluded that an older daughter was missing. They believed the missing person was the third daughter, Marie. How could it be possible for two children to escape? No one could have escaped the execution. Yet, it would have been possible to escape the House of Special Purposes several weeks before the execution. Many unexplained events took place in the ten days leading up to the execution. The local guard of Ural Russians was replaced by a special detachment. Until then, the imperial family was allowed to receive gifts of food and wine from their admirers. The rulers in Moscow had planned to put the family on trial, and they had plenty of time to remove the Romanovs from Ekaterinburg to a place of safety far away from the advancing White army. After the events of that dreadful night, Lenin said that the children were still alive and safe because he believed they were dead. In this telling of the story, Stalin would insist that all the children were dead because he knew that two of them still lived. This story follows the desperate escape of Marie and the new young Tsar Alexis as they make their way across the face of Russia. Marie, the daughter who nursed her mother and excelled at foreign languages while constantly putting on plays in the palace, had the unique set of skills needed by the royalists to preserve the Heir and secure the crown. This story also follows the growing paranoia of Stalin into madness as he destroys millions of people in his effort to hide his greatest secret: it was his fault that the children escaped. This story mixes the historical circumstances of Stalin’s Soviet state with the many unexplained and inconsistent aspects of Stalin’s behavior. Why did he wait so long to have Trotsky killed when he thought nothing of sending millions to their deaths? Why did he eliminate some of those associated with the killing of the tsar’s family but let others live for so long? This telling of the story of the killing of the tsar’s family explores how a variety of unrelated details could all converge to explain one another in terms of Stalin’s attempt to cover up his unwitting complicity in the one event that threatened the survival of the Soviet regime.

33 review for The Romanov Files, 1918 - 1953: A Non-fiction Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    GMG

    The fact this book has more than 4 stars is proof of how little society cares about statutory rape or child marriage if the victim simply happens to be a boy. I don´t mind dark stuff in fiction, not even when it happens to characters based on real people, or characters that I love, or characters I have come to love, it is fiction after all. What I DO mind is when the dark and immoral content is presented in a positive or at least neutral light by the narrative, like it shamelessly is presented i The fact this book has more than 4 stars is proof of how little society cares about statutory rape or child marriage if the victim simply happens to be a boy. I don´t mind dark stuff in fiction, not even when it happens to characters based on real people, or characters that I love, or characters I have come to love, it is fiction after all. What I DO mind is when the dark and immoral content is presented in a positive or at least neutral light by the narrative, like it shamelessly is presented in this book, THAT infuriates me, and I simply can´t stand by trash. The worst part is that the author makes the characters justify his shitty decision with arguments literal pedophiles use: "he is mature for his age", "not like the other boys", "he never played with other boys (which is simply historicaly false by the way), "but he said yes (he was actually manipulated into it, but even if that wasn´t the case, children cant consent)", and another particularly discusting one: "he is going to die anyways (meaning chronically ill children dont deserve protection from pedophiles)". If he makes the characters question this gross marriage, they still rationalize it because it is "necessary to save the dynasty" or whatever bullshit, the same way the Bolcheviks justify immoral shit like murdering children to "protect the revolution" or whatever. The author simply isnt self aware enough to see the irony. Something else: The author is either insane or simply didn´t do much research if he thinks the real Maria would let any of this happen to her little brother by her own free will, there is also a witness account of Maria crying after her father´s abdication, but the author writes her thinking that she "has never cried before" in an incredibly cringey and innaccurate "tough girls dont cry" inner monologue, so if the pedophilia apologism wasn´t enough, this book is also hilariously out of character. I forgot to add that the author is also delusional, he didnt write this as an alternative universe fiction book, he actually thinks this is a "nonfiction book", meaning he thinks Maria and Alexei really survived or could have, that the disturbing scenareo he wrote about actually happened. Meaning the real Maria gave Alexei up to a pedophile or at least deeply wicked woman Viserys Targaryen style (for those who get the reference). Bitch please. Fuck this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Judy Lane

  3. 4 out of 5

    Candice McKIm

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dianne Martin

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tracie Butler

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Wernham

  7. 5 out of 5

    nancy finnegan

  8. 5 out of 5

    Aubra

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rusty

  10. 4 out of 5

    Francisco Lu

  11. 4 out of 5

    Holly Decker

  12. 5 out of 5

    Pmay

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rachit Desai

  14. 5 out of 5

    Will Trautman

  15. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joan Henry

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lexi

  18. 4 out of 5

    Wayne Randolph

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ann Taylor

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ted Seiberlich

  21. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Koers

  22. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Foss-Bennie

  23. 5 out of 5

    lcraig

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carol Headen

  25. 4 out of 5

    Laura Murphy

  26. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

  27. 4 out of 5

    nicole stephaniuk

  28. 5 out of 5

    peggy whitsell

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

  30. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  31. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn J Williams

  32. 5 out of 5

    evil demon

  33. 5 out of 5

    Susan Wiswall

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...