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A Quiet Genocide: The Untold Holocaust of Disabled Children in WW2 Germany (WW2 Historical Fiction)

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Germany, 1954. Jozef grows up in a happy household - so it seems. But his father Gerhard still harbours disturbing National Socialism ideals, while mother Catharina is quietly broken. She cannot feign happiness for much longer and rediscovers love elsewhere. Jozef is uncertain and alone. Who is he? Are Gerhard and Catharina his real parents? ˃˃˃ A dark mystery gradually u Germany, 1954. Jozef grows up in a happy household - so it seems. But his father Gerhard still harbours disturbing National Socialism ideals, while mother Catharina is quietly broken. She cannot feign happiness for much longer and rediscovers love elsewhere. Jozef is uncertain and alone. Who is he? Are Gerhard and Catharina his real parents? ˃˃˃ A dark mystery gradually unfolds, revealing an inescapable truth the entire nation is afraid to confront. But Jozef is determined to find out about the past and a horror is finally unmasked which continues to question our idea of what, in the last hour, makes each of us human. Scroll up and grab a pre-order copy at only 99 cents today.


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Germany, 1954. Jozef grows up in a happy household - so it seems. But his father Gerhard still harbours disturbing National Socialism ideals, while mother Catharina is quietly broken. She cannot feign happiness for much longer and rediscovers love elsewhere. Jozef is uncertain and alone. Who is he? Are Gerhard and Catharina his real parents? ˃˃˃ A dark mystery gradually u Germany, 1954. Jozef grows up in a happy household - so it seems. But his father Gerhard still harbours disturbing National Socialism ideals, while mother Catharina is quietly broken. She cannot feign happiness for much longer and rediscovers love elsewhere. Jozef is uncertain and alone. Who is he? Are Gerhard and Catharina his real parents? ˃˃˃ A dark mystery gradually unfolds, revealing an inescapable truth the entire nation is afraid to confront. But Jozef is determined to find out about the past and a horror is finally unmasked which continues to question our idea of what, in the last hour, makes each of us human. Scroll up and grab a pre-order copy at only 99 cents today.

30 review for A Quiet Genocide: The Untold Holocaust of Disabled Children in WW2 Germany (WW2 Historical Fiction)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    The Quiet Genocide contains a wealth of fascinating information about the rise of Hitler and National Socialism that was certainly new to this reader. The author chooses to impart these facts largely through the classes Jozef attends at school and university, so I did feel at times that I was sitting alongside him in a series of history lectures – a case of telling rather than showing.  This contrasted with the sections of moving first-hand testimony, for example from Professor Zielinski, which The Quiet Genocide contains a wealth of fascinating information about the rise of Hitler and National Socialism that was certainly new to this reader. The author chooses to impart these facts largely through the classes Jozef attends at school and university, so I did feel at times that I was sitting alongside him in a series of history lectures – a case of telling rather than showing.  This contrasted with the sections of moving first-hand testimony, for example from Professor Zielinski, which felt much more vivid and powerful.   I also confess that I found it difficult to identify with the adolescent drinking exploits of Jozef and his university friends that take up some of the book. Jozef’s experiences at school and university are interspersed with insights into the troubled marriage of his parents, Catharina and Gerhard.   Gerhard finds refuge in drinking sessions, either alone or with his acquaintance Michael, who seems to exercise a strange hold over Gerhard and exudes a general air of malevolence.  Catharina finds refuge from her unhappy marriage in a quite different way; a way that will have unforeseen and tragic consequences. The subtitle of the book, The Untold Holocaust of Disabled Children in WW2 Germany, means the subject matter of the book is clear to the reader from the start but of course what the reader doesn’t know is how Jozef’s personal history is connected to this terrible atrocity.  I think it’s fair to say that it takes quite a while for the mystery surrounding Jozef’s past to be revealed.  However, as the book draws towards its shocking conclusion and the true nature of the connection is revealed, it provides an explanation for the strained relationship between Jozef’s parents and demonstrates how the malevolent influence and twisted belief systems of Nazism persisted in some quarters even beyond the end of the war.  I found this latter section of the book the most compelling and, for me, it had the pace that was perhaps lacking in earlier parts of the book. Although I have read a number of books about atrocities committed by the Nazis during World War Two, the shocking nature of those events never seems to lose its impact.  Most shocking of all, I find, is the ruthless efficiency and organisation with which such terrible acts were carried out: paperwork completed, records kept, numbers tallied, targets set.  Books such as A Quiet Genocide perform an important role in ensuring that such atrocities are never forgotten. I received an advance review copy courtesy of the author in return for an honest and unbiased review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Barbara (The Bibliophage)

    A Quiet Genocide from new author Glenn Bryant is a quiet book. Right up until it punches you in the gut. It’s historical fiction with a topic I’ve never seen broached. And I’ve read WW2 stories for decades now. It opens in post-WW2 Munich with the Diederichs. They’re a small family—just young parents and their grade school aged son. Catharina is a housewife, and Gerhard is a businessman. Young Jozef is a typical boy. But Gerhard drinks too much, Catharina is dissatisfied with life, and Jozef is m A Quiet Genocide from new author Glenn Bryant is a quiet book. Right up until it punches you in the gut. It’s historical fiction with a topic I’ve never seen broached. And I’ve read WW2 stories for decades now. It opens in post-WW2 Munich with the Diederichs. They’re a small family—just young parents and their grade school aged son. Catharina is a housewife, and Gerhard is a businessman. Young Jozef is a typical boy. But Gerhard drinks too much, Catharina is dissatisfied with life, and Jozef is mischievous. And Gerhard has a friend, Michael, who’s uncomfortably menacing. The book then jumps forward to Josef’s first year at university, when things start to unravel. Catharina is more restless. Gerhard is less discreet. And Jozef begins to question his own reality. Since the book’s subtitle is The Untold Holocaust of Disabled Children in WW2 Germany, I anticipated grisly details. When Bryant delivers, it’s more of an intense emotional hit than a gruesome one. But it still hurts. Especially given the kinds of things happening in the 2018 United States. My conclusions Bryant writes like an author with many more books to his credit. A Quiet Genocide is absorbing. Its truth-telling is subtle, and unfurls like a big black umbrella on a rainy day. The book has a darkness to it from the start. Then that umbrella opens and the true storm begins. Bryant learned of this specific genocide while studying modern history at university. Stunned that it’s not taught more often, he determined to make people more aware. Using fiction as a tool makes the story more palpable. There were tens of thousands of families like the Diederichs. Their story deserves to be told. I’m also intrigued to know about Amsterdam Publishers, a small house that specializes in Holocaust Memoirs and WW2 historical fiction. Their catalog looks like something to work my way through. I hope you’ll give this book a try. The Kindle version will be available on August 22, just next week. It’s well worth your time! Acknowledgements Thanks to Glenn Bryant and Amsterdam Publishers for a digital advanced readers copy of A Quiet Genocide. As always, this review is entirely my own honest impressions and writing. More reviews like this at my book blog, TheBibliophage.com.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    "A Quiet Genocide", a must read for all WW2 enthusiasts, follows Jozef Diederich on a journey of discovery about the untold holocaust of disabled children in WW2 Germany. A gripping read from start to finish. well researched and pulling you back in time with every turn of the page. The interwoven stories are so enthralling that you cannot wait to find out what happens next. Following Jozef and his family over the years feels like you are a member of the family, watching the relationships between "A Quiet Genocide", a must read for all WW2 enthusiasts, follows Jozef Diederich on a journey of discovery about the untold holocaust of disabled children in WW2 Germany. A gripping read from start to finish. well researched and pulling you back in time with every turn of the page. The interwoven stories are so enthralling that you cannot wait to find out what happens next. Following Jozef and his family over the years feels like you are a member of the family, watching the relationships between them changing and finding out the dynamics and reasons for this. Glenn Bryant has created an outstanding tribute to this era with "A Quiet Genocide" and you can truly relate to the characters feelings and actions throughout the tale. I read the book in two sittings as I simply could not put it down! A true joy and pleasure to read, I thoroughly recommend this as a book to read to see out 2018 and it is one of my personal favourites of this year.

  4. 5 out of 5

    MelMon Sanchez

    A compelling WW2 fiction that penetrates your senses. Catharina, Gerhard and Jozef have lived as typical of a life as can be lived after the horrors of Adolf Hilter. They have a pretty reserved social life, with the acception of a long time comrade Michael. As Jozef is preparing to enter his College years, his parents reveal a secret that will change his life forever. This secret complicates life for all involved. Bringing to the surface repressed emotions and threatening to unravel long eclipse A compelling WW2 fiction that penetrates your senses. Catharina, Gerhard and Jozef have lived as typical of a life as can be lived after the horrors of Adolf Hilter. They have a pretty reserved social life, with the acception of a long time comrade Michael. As Jozef is preparing to enter his College years, his parents reveal a secret that will change his life forever. This secret complicates life for all involved. Bringing to the surface repressed emotions and threatening to unravel long eclipsed secrets. Life, love, marriage, bonds and blood all come into question. It seems that the Holocaust continues to claim lives even after the demise of the much feared and loathed Fuer.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    I read a lot of WWII fiction and this book joined my shelf of favorites. It takes place in the 1950s in Germany and is about the after effect of the war as well as flashbacks to the war years. There are still people in Germany who are part of the National Socialist party and former Nazis who are unhappy with the changes in their country since the end of the war. The main character is Jozef. He grows up in a fairly happy household with two parents. A friend of his father's, Michael, visits once a I read a lot of WWII fiction and this book joined my shelf of favorites. It takes place in the 1950s in Germany and is about the after effect of the war as well as flashbacks to the war years. There are still people in Germany who are part of the National Socialist party and former Nazis who are unhappy with the changes in their country since the end of the war. The main character is Jozef. He grows up in a fairly happy household with two parents. A friend of his father's, Michael, visits once a week to talk politics and drink with his dad. The day before Jozef goes away to university, his parents tell him that he is adopted which makes him question his entire life. While at the university he is thirsty for knowledge and learns more about WWII and eventually about the way that the Nazis euthanized people who were handicapped - both mentally and physically. He also tries to find out about his birth parents which further unsettles his life. This novel had a great story but was also written to teach the reader about Germany - before, during and after WWII. Even though I read a lot of fiction from this era, I learned several items that I'd never known before which to me is the sign of a great work of historical fiction. An interesting fact - this book was published by Amsterdam Publishing that was founded in 2012. I read this on their website and plan to look into some of their other books. AMSTERDAM PUBLISHERS IS SPECIALIZED IN HOLOCAUST MEMOIRS & WW2 HISTORICAL FICTION. HOLOCAUST SURVIVOR STORIES NEED TO BE KEPT ALIVE.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jana Tenbrook (Reviews from the Stacks)

    Author Glenn Bryant attempts to bring to light some of the lesser-known evils committed during World War 2 and the effects of the war on the generation which grew up in its shadow. Jozef starts out as any other schoolboy, and his parents equally generic. As the story progresses, his personal identity begins to blur and questions regarding his parents’ actions during the war surface. Ultimately, this brings to light the existence of a Nazi-run hospital called Hadamar, where more than 10,000 disab Author Glenn Bryant attempts to bring to light some of the lesser-known evils committed during World War 2 and the effects of the war on the generation which grew up in its shadow. Jozef starts out as any other schoolboy, and his parents equally generic. As the story progresses, his personal identity begins to blur and questions regarding his parents’ actions during the war surface. Ultimately, this brings to light the existence of a Nazi-run hospital called Hadamar, where more than 10,000 disabled children were murdered during World War Two. Like many novels about World War Two, A Quiet Genocide is more didactic than entertaining. Unfortunately, this takes a toll on the reader after a while: we sit with Jozef in history classes and listen to lectures on Hitler, becoming distracted from the seriousness of the subject as Jozef allows his mind to wander to other things such as soccer and the girls in his class. Jozef obviously learns from these lectures as he does exceptionally well in school, especially once he gets to university. I, on the other hand, would have liked to see more personal development in Jozef as he digested the information from his lectures and interviews with his professor. On its surface, the story is not to my taste but an acceptable catalyst for analyzing lesser-known facts from World War Two, specifically the Nazi’s campaign to exterminate all disabled persons from the German population. The plot is not terribly interesting, but forgivable in a first-time author. I am left with no strong feelings for or against this book; it is a good attempt at taking part in the global conversation about World War Two through fiction, but the story is somewhat lacking and the elements of historical analysis and examination of the human condition are stated somewhat bluntly, without much ability to really engage with the protagonist or reader. Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Polly

    A Quiet Genocide will quietly grab you, make you sit up and probably make you quietly have a weep. This book, gently unfolds some harsh but necessary truths about the holocaust. Some of which we may already be very familiar with and some of which may horrify us yet further. I was lucky enough to get my hands on a review copy of A Quiet Genocide - I like reading wartime novels and was more than happy to get stuck in. Bryant's written style puts us right into the plot with no fussing around. One o A Quiet Genocide will quietly grab you, make you sit up and probably make you quietly have a weep. This book, gently unfolds some harsh but necessary truths about the holocaust. Some of which we may already be very familiar with and some of which may horrify us yet further. I was lucky enough to get my hands on a review copy of A Quiet Genocide - I like reading wartime novels and was more than happy to get stuck in. Bryant's written style puts us right into the plot with no fussing around. One of the things I appreciated most about this book was actually that it had an unfussy narrative - with enough depth and visibility of the author's natural aptitude for creating characters (with whom we immediately sympathise or despise depending on the desired outcome) to pull the reader along with the storyline with a sense of urgency. I loved the opening sequences of the book, letting us get to know a young boy, Jozef, and his friend as they get into trouble as only boys can do. This segways into an opportunity to show us how nasty the character of Michael is and to set up the essence of the plotline - who is Michael and what terrible things is he capable of? More importantly, what is his relation to Jozef and his family? By the end of the novel, all these important questions are answered, but the biggest question of all perhaps - why were so many thousands of lives so carelessly torn aside? - remains a poignant and unresolved query in all our minds. While I felt the characters were well developed, I did feel there was an element of character portrayal that sometimes became a little pantomime like. Michael is not conveyed as a complex character - he seemed to just be naturally evil and I almost expected to hear an audience boo and hiss every time he came 'on stage'. Contradictory to that, the characters of Professor Zielinski and Jozef himself were favourites for me and I loved their interactions and the development of their relationship. This of course made for an exemplification of Jozef's lack of prejudices and kind-hearted nature, so unlike Michael, and even unlike his parents who, out of grief, were struggling to do the right thing in their own lives. On Gerhard's part we see he is a lost soul - misled and influenced by negative associations, unable to move on from grief and stuck in gratuitous routine. Overall, the purpose of the novel - to bring to light the terrible plight of thousands of innocent disabled children at the hands of the Nazi regime - is well conceived. Though, at times I did feel as though, in an effort to present the facts objectively - mostly via the character of a ex-Auschwitz resident, and esteemed academic (Professor Zielinski) - the flow of narrative sometimes felt a little jarred, as though facts were being shoehorned in. I would have like to have felt the organic discovery of these statistics, or perhaps not have seen the statistics conveyed within the story but maybe in the endnotes. This didn't spoil the overall enjoyment for me - and perhaps my gripes comes from a love of fiction over non-fiction writing. At times this book bordered on non-fiction style writing, purely because it was, very bravely and with senstivity, dealing with some cold hard truths. Read this novel if you enjoy books about the holocaust or want to find out more about it. 3.5 stars.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    I have no idea where I found this book but I picked it up because I wanted to see a fiction book focused on the genocide of the mentally and physically disabled people and this partly delivered.  In this book, Jozef is the only son of unhappily married Gerhard and Catharina. We watch him grow and discover that not only he is adopted, but how he fits into life in post-war Germany. Michael, one of Gerhard's friends from the war, is an ever-present menace for the family.  This is not a particularly h I have no idea where I found this book but I picked it up because I wanted to see a fiction book focused on the genocide of the mentally and physically disabled people and this partly delivered.  In this book, Jozef is the only son of unhappily married Gerhard and Catharina. We watch him grow and discover that not only he is adopted, but how he fits into life in post-war Germany. Michael, one of Gerhard's friends from the war, is an ever-present menace for the family.  This is not a particularly happy book, especially considering the subject matter, because no one really gets what they want in the end. The plot is a little all over the place at times as it timeskips through Jozef's life and we switch between the point of views of each of the family, Michael and some of Jozef's friends as well. I did like the main secret between Jozef's birth and how it wasn't downplayed how horrifying it was, not just for him but for Catharina as well. The underlying message that the Nazi ideas didn't just vanish after Hitler was dead was a chilling but important one.  I wished we had been able to see more of the history surrounding what happened to the people during the Holocaust and I really wish that a story about the killing of disabled children during WWII had actually included someone with a disability in it as a main character, but this was a book with an original premise.  3.5 stars! 

  9. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Disabled What a sorry way to treat those who cannot defend themselves. The book was put together well and held my interest until the end.

  10. 4 out of 5

    sally reid

    Unfathomable I liked the novel, but was hard to follow in the beginning. About half way through the pieces started to fall into place.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    Difficult but amazing story of children in Germany in 1954. Makes you realize that the world is far from peaceful.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lorna Holland

    Full review now up on the blog: https://www.thewritinggreyhound.co.uk... It's easy to forget the very real horrors of what happened during World War Two, especially now so many decades after the war, with history and the media often romanticising the war and glossing over the most horrifying events. However, in A Quiet Genocide, Glenn Bryant shares the unflinching brutality of the war and the legacy it left behind on people across Europe. No stone is left unturned and nothing is omitted, no matte Full review now up on the blog: https://www.thewritinggreyhound.co.uk... It's easy to forget the very real horrors of what happened during World War Two, especially now so many decades after the war, with history and the media often romanticising the war and glossing over the most horrifying events. However, in A Quiet Genocide, Glenn Bryant shares the unflinching brutality of the war and the legacy it left behind on people across Europe. No stone is left unturned and nothing is omitted, no matter how horrific it may be. This leaves a true-to-life, unflinching account of the fate that countless ill and disabled children faced at the hands of Hitler and the Third Reich. Told through the eyes of Jozef, a young man just starting out in life, it seems that horror after horror unfolds as Jozef begins to dig deeper into the past of both his country and his own family. It's clear that the author has done his research, as the entire novel is well thought out, factually accurate, and compelling to read. The reader is drawn into the story from start to finish, feeling Jozef's conflicted emotions, Catharina's despair, and Gerhard's ignorance alongside each of the characters. There's no doubt that Glenn Bryant is an excellent historical author.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Liesbeth Heenk

    Superb and harrowing historical fiction for young adults about the important subject of euthanasia of the handicapped in the Second World War in Germany. A must read!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Hancock

    Not an overly complex tale This novel manages to weave faction into fiction. Historic facts of the Nazi sterilisation and T4 murder of children and adults are the backdrop to a family tale in post-war Germany. A Berlin university student whose parents in Munich struggle with their past. A Nazi overseer who seems to control the family until the hammer falls on his ‘fourth reich’ plans. A wisened uni Professor who pieces together the story of lies, murder and deceit and helps the main character to Not an overly complex tale This novel manages to weave faction into fiction. Historic facts of the Nazi sterilisation and T4 murder of children and adults are the backdrop to a family tale in post-war Germany. A Berlin university student whose parents in Munich struggle with their past. A Nazi overseer who seems to control the family until the hammer falls on his ‘fourth reich’ plans. A wisened uni Professor who pieces together the story of lies, murder and deceit and helps the main character to open the door to a new brighter future. I had hoped for more factual details of the murder of disabled children and would have afforded 4* if they had been present. Sadly they were lacking but it was nevertheless a well structured tale of faction. Maybe a sequel will follow?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Oakes

    Expertly written and so hard to put down! As a Secondary school History teacher with a degree in Modern History and a fascination for all things related to the World Wars, I found this book to be one of those that you cannot put down! As the story unfolds, I felt my emotions stirring from sadness, to joy, from anger to fright and I was left in awe. Full of historical information, this book guides the reader through the inter war years and the rise of Adolf Hitler, as well as leading on to the hor Expertly written and so hard to put down! As a Secondary school History teacher with a degree in Modern History and a fascination for all things related to the World Wars, I found this book to be one of those that you cannot put down! As the story unfolds, I felt my emotions stirring from sadness, to joy, from anger to fright and I was left in awe. Full of historical information, this book guides the reader through the inter war years and the rise of Adolf Hitler, as well as leading on to the horrific crimes the Nazis committed, which ties all the characters together. I devoured this book, thank you!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Julia Smith

    This was good but shocking read, especially as a disabled person myself. But this is a very important story from history and should be told so no one tries again.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

    A Quiet Genocide is an interesting novel which brings to light the horror of Hadamar – a Nazi hospital where more then 10,000 disabled children were murdered. Though I cannot say that I enjoyed the book because the subject matter is definitely not trivial, it was a great novel. Well worth the read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    CLINTON GOULD

  19. 5 out of 5

    John T. Oglesbee

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lauren MacDonald

  21. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

  22. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Jones

  23. 4 out of 5

    allene smithson

  24. 4 out of 5

    DONNA BENTLEY

  25. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

  26. 5 out of 5

    RavenclawLibraryBooks

  27. 5 out of 5

    Geoff Whitfield

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lea Spitznagle

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Jones

  30. 5 out of 5

    jyll ritter

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