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The Future is Feminist: Radical, Funny, and Inspiring Writing by Women

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A star-studded roster of iconic women write powerfully about what it means to be a feminist yesterday, today, and tomorrow. These poets, essayists, activists, actors, and professors address topics ranging from workplace harassment to resting bitch face. The results are by turns refreshing, provocative, moving, and hilarious. A diverse chorus of intersectional voices and a A star-studded roster of iconic women write powerfully about what it means to be a feminist yesterday, today, and tomorrow. These poets, essayists, activists, actors, and professors address topics ranging from workplace harassment to resting bitch face. The results are by turns refreshing, provocative, moving, and hilarious. A diverse chorus of intersectional voices and a forward-looking stance set this book apart, and its vibrant, textured package makes it a beautiful gift. It's the smart, covetable anthology that women of all ages will turn to for support and inspiration in the ongoing fight for gender equality.


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A star-studded roster of iconic women write powerfully about what it means to be a feminist yesterday, today, and tomorrow. These poets, essayists, activists, actors, and professors address topics ranging from workplace harassment to resting bitch face. The results are by turns refreshing, provocative, moving, and hilarious. A diverse chorus of intersectional voices and a A star-studded roster of iconic women write powerfully about what it means to be a feminist yesterday, today, and tomorrow. These poets, essayists, activists, actors, and professors address topics ranging from workplace harassment to resting bitch face. The results are by turns refreshing, provocative, moving, and hilarious. A diverse chorus of intersectional voices and a forward-looking stance set this book apart, and its vibrant, textured package makes it a beautiful gift. It's the smart, covetable anthology that women of all ages will turn to for support and inspiration in the ongoing fight for gender equality.

30 review for The Future is Feminist: Radical, Funny, and Inspiring Writing by Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kate Ringer

    The text in this collection of essays is printed in neon pink and orange ink; it actually gave me a headache. This may explain why this book has received zero reviews despite being an excellent introduction to feminist writing. Most of the essays were published in the last five years, but there were a few from writers such as Audre Lorde and Mary Wollstonecraft ("Confined then in cages, like the feathered race, they have nothing to do but to plume themselves, and stalk with mock-majesty from per The text in this collection of essays is printed in neon pink and orange ink; it actually gave me a headache. This may explain why this book has received zero reviews despite being an excellent introduction to feminist writing. Most of the essays were published in the last five years, but there were a few from writers such as Audre Lorde and Mary Wollstonecraft ("Confined then in cages, like the feathered race, they have nothing to do but to plume themselves, and stalk with mock-majesty from perch to perch.") My favorite essay was probably "On Pandering: How to Write Like a Man" by Claire Vaye Watkins. It made me think about how infrequently I encounter media that is created for people just like me, and how often I engage with media that is written primarily for white men. I often enjoy the latter, but there is something so deeply satisfying about getting to engage with art through a lens that is 100% my own. Is the solution more writing by women for women? How do we encourage those in power to seek diversity? The phrase, "I'm not here to make friends" echoes in my mind. What is the value of being unlikable?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Erin Cataldi

    So I really enjoyed some aspects of this book and hated others. The main thing I hated..... was the damn font color! The neon orange was damn near impossible to read, it literally hurt my eyes. When the text was in pink it was "ok" to read, but it was mainly frustrating. Other than that, I really enjoyed the variety of feminist voices and stories shared in this compilation.Some feminist writers I had heard of but never read, others were brand new to me. This collection is empowering and superbly So I really enjoyed some aspects of this book and hated others. The main thing I hated..... was the damn font color! The neon orange was damn near impossible to read, it literally hurt my eyes. When the text was in pink it was "ok" to read, but it was mainly frustrating. Other than that, I really enjoyed the variety of feminist voices and stories shared in this compilation.Some feminist writers I had heard of but never read, others were brand new to me. This collection is empowering and superbly well written. I liked that it included a variety of formats (speeches, poems, essays, etc.), diversity, and feminist text from not just several decades, but from several centuries. They made sure that feminism included not just the middle class white women, but females from all of the world, in different financial circumstances, ages, and ethnicity. The collection ranged from calls to action, empowerment, humor, and educational. A great read in a horribly formatted book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Fred P

    This is a good read, if you can handle the almost unreadable format. Why print a book on feminism in pink type? It's an interesting gimmick, and the page layouts are whimsical and fun, but every time I open the book, I'm immediately confronted by the light pink type. I have to turn on lights and pull out my glasses. Wouldn't a book on feminism be just as great in black type? There are some great pieces here: Excerpts from Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Women, written in 179 This is a good read, if you can handle the almost unreadable format. Why print a book on feminism in pink type? It's an interesting gimmick, and the page layouts are whimsical and fun, but every time I open the book, I'm immediately confronted by the light pink type. I have to turn on lights and pull out my glasses. Wouldn't a book on feminism be just as great in black type? There are some great pieces here: Excerpts from Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Women, written in 1792, are profoundly interesting. Everything You Wanted to Know about Feminism but Were Afraid to Ask by Rachel Fudge, 2006, is the short guide to modern feminist movements. There's an enlightening analysis of how societal prejudices affect pregant women by Sofia Jawed-Wessel, and advice on how women can deal with online trolls by Ijeoma Oluo. It's worth the read if you can handle the weird typography.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Caitlyn Barker

    I enjoyed most of the entries in this book. Of the 21, there was only one that I skipped as it just didn't interest me. My favourite entries were The Less We Tell Pregnant Women, I'm Not Mad it's Just my RBF, and a Story of a Fuck Off Fund. I enjoyed most of the entries in this book. Of the 21, there was only one that I skipped as it just didn't interest me. My favourite entries were The Less We Tell Pregnant Women, I'm Not Mad it's Just my RBF, and a Story of a Fuck Off Fund.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Interesting selection of articles, but maybe a little America centric for me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rakisha

    The font color made it impossible to read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    The font color is horrendous, but the content is good. A nice overview of some Feminist writings.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

    I will focus on the content of the book, instead of font colors and aesthetic choices. Thank you for publishing this book and collecting the voices over women across our collective timeline to showcase how we are connected. For me, this anthology underscores the struggle that has the power to bring us together as humanity. I’m excited to share pieces from the book with others and engage in a dynamic dialogues about issues that can take words and transform them into change in our world.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Laura Beck Nielsen

    This collection of intelligent, humorous, and insightful women's works empowered me. I laughed out loud, practically whooped, and I'm pretty sure my fist shot up a few times. You'll catch yourself biting your lip, nodding in agreement, shaking your head, and craving more. More women like this. You want them at your table, all shouting their opinions and sharing their anecdotes out loud while passing the pasta. The only gripe I have is the ink color. In the early morning, or as it got later in th This collection of intelligent, humorous, and insightful women's works empowered me. I laughed out loud, practically whooped, and I'm pretty sure my fist shot up a few times. You'll catch yourself biting your lip, nodding in agreement, shaking your head, and craving more. More women like this. You want them at your table, all shouting their opinions and sharing their anecdotes out loud while passing the pasta. The only gripe I have is the ink color. In the early morning, or as it got later in the evening, the ink made the words tiresome, which is the last thing this reader wanted! Don't let that stop you, though. Brave through the pink. It's worth every line.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nadia

    "And honestly, these are not subjects that should still be up for debate to begin with. Whether or not a woman deserves the same pay as a man should not be up for debate. Whether or not a cop should be able to shoot an unarmed black man in the street without consequence should not be up for debate. Whether or not trans people should be able to use the restrooms that match their gender identity in safety should not be up for debate. Whether or not sick people and many disabled people should be al "And honestly, these are not subjects that should still be up for debate to begin with. Whether or not a woman deserves the same pay as a man should not be up for debate. Whether or not a cop should be able to shoot an unarmed black man in the street without consequence should not be up for debate. Whether or not trans people should be able to use the restrooms that match their gender identity in safety should not be up for debate. Whether or not sick people and many disabled people should be allowed to suffer and die without medical coverage in the richest country in the world should not be up for debate. And if you, in 2017, think that these issues should be up for debate, it is because you've willfully ignored or dismissed the fact that these debates have been had for decades, if not centuries, and progress and general human decency have already shown the fatal flaws of your arguments." Ijeoma Oluo - 'When A Woman Deletes A Man's Comment Online' - pg.68 "And talking of endless cycles, in the UK men are about 22 times more likely to be sent to prison than women are. Men are more likely than women to both perpetrate, and be a victim of, violence. I don't happen to think men are "naturally" more criminal or violent. But even if there are some hormonal differences involved, I think we're failing boys and men: failing to teach them that there are answers that don't involve violence, that violence says nothing about how "manly" you are, that aggression isn't the best answer to most situations. We need to change our cultural conversation around that, quickly. Let's teach boys at school the personally and economically valuable skills of self-expression and emotional intelligence, of mediation and problem-solving. It would introduce the expectation that disputes are to be solved with words, thinking, and kindness, not a half-brick to the head. Men are more often the victims of male violence: sorting this out would benefit more men than women." Naomi Alderman - 'Utopian Thinking: How To Build A Truly Feminist Society' - pg. 138 I found the bright funky colours and layout of this book of essays refreshing and forward-thinking. It offers an interesting mix and diversity of modern Feminist thinkers, such as Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Warsan Shire, and Caitlin Moran combined with OG Feminists, such as Sojourner Truth, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Audre Lorde. This book would benefit those who are newer to Feminist Thought, providing them with a platform from which to deep dive, as well as, Women like myself who have been Feminists for decades to be stimulated, affirmed, and expanded.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Janine

    This was a mixed bag. Which I guess is good - since Feminism and feminist writing spans across the board. The problem was -- I think I was focused on the "funny and inspiring" part of the title, so when I hit the radical I was a bit turned off. That's just not usually my thing? I like my feminism a la Lindy West or Roxane Gay - really smart, a good dose of humor, and just enough to rile up my sense of injustice. I think most of these fell into that category, but a few were just a bit too academi This was a mixed bag. Which I guess is good - since Feminism and feminist writing spans across the board. The problem was -- I think I was focused on the "funny and inspiring" part of the title, so when I hit the radical I was a bit turned off. That's just not usually my thing? I like my feminism a la Lindy West or Roxane Gay - really smart, a good dose of humor, and just enough to rile up my sense of injustice. I think most of these fell into that category, but a few were just a bit too academic and/or radical for me. I either skipped those entirely or did some very serious skimming. The other issue I had was that none of these pieces were new (I don't think). So, I was already familiar with a few of them because they were by women I follow. Which is fine and all to revisit, but it would have been nice to see something new from them. So, yeah -- this was all great and fine and stuff, but nothing earth-shattering for me. And since so many other reviews mention the typography -- yes, the writing is pink and orange. I honestly didn't find it too distracting or hard to read most of the time. Most of the writing is in pink, and it's dark enough that even in sub-standard lighting I was okay reading it. The orange was definitely tougher, but also not used very much, so it wasn't too bad.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Westcoast_girl

    The first essay of this anthology begins with the statement "Although we can all agree on the most basic dictionary definition of feminism (the theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes), it is rarely ever that simple or straightforward." Despite this acknowledgement of complexity, the book continually veers to essays that simplify and make feminist issues straightforward. Beginning in the essay with a sex-based definition of feminism. Other examples: -"A Story of a Fuck The first essay of this anthology begins with the statement "Although we can all agree on the most basic dictionary definition of feminism (the theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes), it is rarely ever that simple or straightforward." Despite this acknowledgement of complexity, the book continually veers to essays that simplify and make feminist issues straightforward. Beginning in the essay with a sex-based definition of feminism. Other examples: -"A Story of a Fuck Off Fund" - imagining a utopian future where women live like "broke student[s]" in order to save enough money to leave their abusive partners and bosses, rather than needing to stay with them -A 12 point list for readers of Esquire with tips like "lady-balls to 'men can't be feminists.' We disbelieve that. In our vaginas," ""our priorities are 1) Kindness 2) Jokes; 3) High tolerance of carbs" and "It was actually us that threw those horrible old trainers of yours away." That's not to say the anthology doesn't have its shining moments. For example, Roxanne Gay, Audre Lorde, Arlie Russell Hochschild, and Sojourner Truth all have essays featured in the book. But this whole book could have shone. There are so many incredible pieces of feminist writing. Disappointing overall.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rosie

    This was a nice little collection of feminist essays. I liked the variety some were funny and others more serious. There were two I just couldn't get through. Audre Lorde's was just too deep for me, i got her point and agree with her but it didn't hold my interest. Overall these essays are great reminders as to why feminism is still relevant today and a good way to feel pissed off once more. I was especially impressed with Chelsea Handler's piece, I didn't realize she could write so well. Recomm This was a nice little collection of feminist essays. I liked the variety some were funny and others more serious. There were two I just couldn't get through. Audre Lorde's was just too deep for me, i got her point and agree with her but it didn't hold my interest. Overall these essays are great reminders as to why feminism is still relevant today and a good way to feel pissed off once more. I was especially impressed with Chelsea Handler's piece, I didn't realize she could write so well. Recommend if you're looking for a collection of light-ish feminist pieces to keep the pissed off person inside of you strong.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    The text itself was VERY challenging with the neon orange and pink text color. The content was much better than the challenge of reading it! Some of the essays and texts were more relatable to me than others. I really liked that it was a collection by a variety of authors, and even though some essays made less of a connection to me, I still enjoyed what they brought to the collection as a whole.

  15. 4 out of 5

    emma

    The Future is Feminist is a brilliant intro to feminism, spanning much time and differing schools of thought. Each essay is different both in subject and mood (yes, some will make you smile.) Despite the hot pink and orange text (I couldn’t read the quotes in orange), I love it. I want it. This is intersectional, empowering, accepting feminism. I feel empowered creatively and mentally.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Holiday

    I agree with others about the font. I LOVE bright colors, but the font really did make it difficult to read. I enjoyed the essays, some of which I'd read before (Not here to make friends, Roxane Gay is also in Bad Feminist), and many by feminists I adore. (Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Mindy Kaling, Audre Lorde. I'm not sure if the future is feminist, but I hope it is. I agree with others about the font. I LOVE bright colors, but the font really did make it difficult to read. I enjoyed the essays, some of which I'd read before (Not here to make friends, Roxane Gay is also in Bad Feminist), and many by feminists I adore. (Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Mindy Kaling, Audre Lorde. I'm not sure if the future is feminist, but I hope it is.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    A strong collection of essays from a variety of different women from differing time periods discussing feminism and issues women have faced and still face today. The only complaint I have is the text colors. The bright pink and orange hurt my eyes and took away from my enjoyment of the text.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Linnell

    Overall, I enjoyed most of the essays in this collection. There were a few that were a bit harder to get through, but they were all worth the read. The thing I really didn't like was the pink & orange text of the book. As others have noted, it was rather hard to read. Overall, I enjoyed most of the essays in this collection. There were a few that were a bit harder to get through, but they were all worth the read. The thing I really didn't like was the pink & orange text of the book. As others have noted, it was rather hard to read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    The format of this book made it very difficult to read. Seriously. I have never had such a difficult time reading a book because of font color. Why the bright orange highlighting of tiny gray words? The content was okay, but I preferred Kelly Jensen's anthology Here We Are. The format of this book made it very difficult to read. Seriously. I have never had such a difficult time reading a book because of font color. Why the bright orange highlighting of tiny gray words? The content was okay, but I preferred Kelly Jensen's anthology Here We Are.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Excellent collection of essays, some very recent and current, and also significant older works by authors such as Sojourner Truth and Mary Wollstonecraft. However, the book is virtually unreadable due to the pink-colored / white-on-fluorescent orange text. Truly awful design.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Boxofdelights

    This is a book of interesting essays. Most of them have been published elsewhere. The only thing wrong with it is the color scheme. Everything is orange and purple, including the text and the pages that text is printed on.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kate Cuthbert

    Not a deep-dive into this topic but rather a comprehensive overview of the different themes, areas of concern, and opinions of those writing into this space. A joyful and soothing read, even with the hot pink internal text design!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    The font this book is printed in is next to unreadable, unfortunately - the bright pink and orange is totally headache-inducing. May still try to read this one again at another time, or if it's reprinted. The font this book is printed in is next to unreadable, unfortunately - the bright pink and orange is totally headache-inducing. May still try to read this one again at another time, or if it's reprinted.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    A little bit uneven, but there are some solid essays here. I especially liked the ones by Jia Tolentino, Claire Vaye Watkins, and Salma Hayek. Definitely agree with the other reviews that say the design of this book is atrocious. Neon orange text on a pink background is almost impossible to read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Faye Ducker

    My rating might be a little unfair on this one as I just wasn't in the mood to be reading this book. Also I found that most of the essays I'd already read before. Works better as a coffee table book to dip in and out of rather than a sit down, cover to cover read. My rating might be a little unfair on this one as I just wasn't in the mood to be reading this book. Also I found that most of the essays I'd already read before. Works better as a coffee table book to dip in and out of rather than a sit down, cover to cover read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alexis Guenther

    The opening essay gave a great primer on the various sub-categories of feminism. Some of my favourites were "On pandering: how to write like a man", "12 things about being a woman that women won't tell you", and "I want a wife" plus the writings of Wollstonecraft and Sojourner Truth. The opening essay gave a great primer on the various sub-categories of feminism. Some of my favourites were "On pandering: how to write like a man", "12 things about being a woman that women won't tell you", and "I want a wife" plus the writings of Wollstonecraft and Sojourner Truth.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    The content of this book was fine, but the text made my eyes hurt. Neon orange and pink? Good for an eye-catching cover, but terrible for the inside text. Ouch.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Schulman

    Truly intersectional blend of the personal and political

  29. 5 out of 5

    Davina

    Four stars for the content. Zero stars for the design: given the print book’s orange and pink text, it was challenging to read any one of these essays.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rebekka Steg

    I wanted to read this book, and I'm sure the content is great, but it was inaccessible to me due to the formatting. The extremely bright neon colours triggered migraines whenever I tried to read it. I wanted to read this book, and I'm sure the content is great, but it was inaccessible to me due to the formatting. The extremely bright neon colours triggered migraines whenever I tried to read it.

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