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Young Goodman Brown and Other Short Stories

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Throughout his richly varied literary career, Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) wrote compelling short stories of enduring appeal. His first important publication, long before The Scarlet Letter, was the 1837 collection Twice-Told Tales, which brought the New England writer immediate fame and high praise from no less an authority than Edgar Allan Poe. Another compilation, Mo Throughout his richly varied literary career, Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) wrote compelling short stories of enduring appeal. His first important publication, long before The Scarlet Letter, was the 1837 collection Twice-Told Tales, which brought the New England writer immediate fame and high praise from no less an authority than Edgar Allan Poe. Another compilation, Mosses from an Old Manse, followed in 1846 and achieved further success. This volume contains six stories from those collections as well as another superb selection, "My Kinsman, Major Molineux." In addition to the latter tale and the title story, this edition includes "Dr. Heidegger's Experiment," "The Birthmark," "Rappaccini's Daughter," "Roger Malvin's Burial" and "The Artist of the Beautiful." Here are tales rich in atmosphere and suspense, with plots centering on subjects as diverse as witchcraft, revenge, the power of guilt, and a passion for the beautiful, all recounted in the distinctive voice of one of America's great writers. --back cover Dr. Heidegger's experiment -- The birthmark -- Young Goodman Brown -- Rappaccini's daughter -- Roger Malvin's burial -- The artist of the beautiful -- My kinsman, Major Molineux.


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Throughout his richly varied literary career, Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) wrote compelling short stories of enduring appeal. His first important publication, long before The Scarlet Letter, was the 1837 collection Twice-Told Tales, which brought the New England writer immediate fame and high praise from no less an authority than Edgar Allan Poe. Another compilation, Mo Throughout his richly varied literary career, Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) wrote compelling short stories of enduring appeal. His first important publication, long before The Scarlet Letter, was the 1837 collection Twice-Told Tales, which brought the New England writer immediate fame and high praise from no less an authority than Edgar Allan Poe. Another compilation, Mosses from an Old Manse, followed in 1846 and achieved further success. This volume contains six stories from those collections as well as another superb selection, "My Kinsman, Major Molineux." In addition to the latter tale and the title story, this edition includes "Dr. Heidegger's Experiment," "The Birthmark," "Rappaccini's Daughter," "Roger Malvin's Burial" and "The Artist of the Beautiful." Here are tales rich in atmosphere and suspense, with plots centering on subjects as diverse as witchcraft, revenge, the power of guilt, and a passion for the beautiful, all recounted in the distinctive voice of one of America's great writers. --back cover Dr. Heidegger's experiment -- The birthmark -- Young Goodman Brown -- Rappaccini's daughter -- Roger Malvin's burial -- The artist of the beautiful -- My kinsman, Major Molineux.

30 review for Young Goodman Brown and Other Short Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sergio

    This book... that was a delight! I loved Hawthorne's style. He tells of things horrible and beautiful. There's darkness and there's light. Will reread this collection surely. This book... that was a delight! I loved Hawthorne's style. He tells of things horrible and beautiful. There's darkness and there's light. Will reread this collection surely.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Now I will be honest and I will admit I will struggle here. This edition I will admit is not quite the one I have - yes mine is the Dover Thrift edition (bought from a shall village shop that had the entire series, which I wished I had bought more off. Sadly when I returned the shop and the display where no longer there) However it seems this format/edition does not exist any more so I have had to settle for the next best (and somehow this is where the ISBN sent me too?) Anyway the reason why I a Now I will be honest and I will admit I will struggle here. This edition I will admit is not quite the one I have - yes mine is the Dover Thrift edition (bought from a shall village shop that had the entire series, which I wished I had bought more off. Sadly when I returned the shop and the display where no longer there) However it seems this format/edition does not exist any more so I have had to settle for the next best (and somehow this is where the ISBN sent me too?) Anyway the reason why I am going to struggle is that I am not by nature a classics readers and so will probably do MR Hawthorne a total disservice (after reading the notes in the book too I totally feel ill equipped the comment). However the stories in this book are fascinating. Yes they give an insight in to the writings of the time which for someone who is interested in history but has not got the time (ironic) to go through all the boring bits or the academia finds other ways to explore the past. Stories in this book are a perfect example where they are clearly creations of the time they were written in. The title story is a perfect example of this (Young Goodman Brown) where you have a clear demonstration of what community and reputation (especially religious) hold, something that is almost unrecognisable in todays society it feels. After all if the Devil was to tempt you what would he have to stump up today as compared to times past. This book is was not really my forte but I do recognise the vision especially considering when it was written but not only that you can see the mind that went on create works that are revered by both scholars and authors alike (for example Edgar Allan Poe). As usual Dover Thrift have presented a book that tantalises and temps - they are in general quite short books to show case and tempt you to delve further. Sadly my collection is somewhat limited (I have a number of Jack London books) but one day I will go back and explore some more.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Manray9

    Young Goodman Brown & Other Short Stories are collected here from Nathaniel Hawthorne's volumes of Twice-Told Tales, Mosses from the Old Manse and The Snow Image produced between 1832 and 1854. The tales are representative of American literature in the first half of the 19th century. They mirror the works of Poe and Irving with emphasis on the clash of science and nature and the collision of reason with the supernatural. The best known of this collection is Young Goodman Brown, a story kept aliv Young Goodman Brown & Other Short Stories are collected here from Nathaniel Hawthorne's volumes of Twice-Told Tales, Mosses from the Old Manse and The Snow Image produced between 1832 and 1854. The tales are representative of American literature in the first half of the 19th century. They mirror the works of Poe and Irving with emphasis on the clash of science and nature and the collision of reason with the supernatural. The best known of this collection is Young Goodman Brown, a story kept alive by English teachers around the country. I found it predictable, too Poe-like, and exceeded in skillfulness of prose by the excellent Rappaccini's Daughter. I visualized Rappaccini's Daughter as an early-sixties technicolor horror movie with Vincent Price as Rappaccini, a dark handsome "B" actor such as James Darren as Giovanni, and a ravishing raven-haired Hollywood starlet of limited talent as Beatrice. True drive-in fare circa 1964. Young Goodman Brown & Other Short Stories is a peek through the window of American literary history. As such, it earned a solid Three Stars from me.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    Dr Heidegger's Experiment The Birthmark Young Goodman Brown Rappaccini's Daughter Roger Malvin's Burial The Artist of the Beautiful My Kinsman, Major Molyneaux Dr Heidegger's Experiment The Birthmark Young Goodman Brown Rappaccini's Daughter Roger Malvin's Burial The Artist of the Beautiful My Kinsman, Major Molyneaux

  5. 5 out of 5

    Emily (Obsessed Reader)

    I ONLY READ YOUNG GOODMAN BROWN. When first reading this for my gothic lit. class I was not at all enjoying it. It felt hard to read, and I wasn't understanding everything that was going on. However, after delving deeper into the meanings behind the story and analyzing it, I was able to enjoy it and appreciate it more. I think it is an interesting tale of good versus evil and understanding that no human is purely good. I would definitely recommend researching the meaning behind the story before r I ONLY READ YOUNG GOODMAN BROWN. When first reading this for my gothic lit. class I was not at all enjoying it. It felt hard to read, and I wasn't understanding everything that was going on. However, after delving deeper into the meanings behind the story and analyzing it, I was able to enjoy it and appreciate it more. I think it is an interesting tale of good versus evil and understanding that no human is purely good. I would definitely recommend researching the meaning behind the story before reading it to make the experience more enjoyable.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn

    Young Goodman Brown always knocks me sideways. Hawthorne's prose style is more straightforward here than in many other stories (haven't read Black Veil in a while-- it's not in this edition-- but I think its similar power is heightened by comparably plain language). The title story is a master class in how to carry the reader from the waking world of the everyday into the nightmarish alternate reality of our worst fears about human nature. The allegory could seem heavy handed or far fetched, but Young Goodman Brown always knocks me sideways. Hawthorne's prose style is more straightforward here than in many other stories (haven't read Black Veil in a while-- it's not in this edition-- but I think its similar power is heightened by comparably plain language). The title story is a master class in how to carry the reader from the waking world of the everyday into the nightmarish alternate reality of our worst fears about human nature. The allegory could seem heavy handed or far fetched, but Hawthorne draws you in and makes you see the connection between the surface and what lies beyond. The pink ribbons trembling in the cap of Brown's wife Faith get me every time. Prefer this far and above the other stories.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Okay, I haven't read every one of these stories, and my rating is only for the title story. Here's the thing: Young Goodman Brown is actually based on my great-something-grandfather Joseph Ring and his rather ignoble role in one of the infamous Salem witch trials. Hawthorne's account of Young Goodman Brown's supernatural encounter in the woods matches almost exactly my ancestor's testimony recorded in the trial of Susanna Martin. It is a fascinating and disturbing glimpse of the fear, paranoia, Okay, I haven't read every one of these stories, and my rating is only for the title story. Here's the thing: Young Goodman Brown is actually based on my great-something-grandfather Joseph Ring and his rather ignoble role in one of the infamous Salem witch trials. Hawthorne's account of Young Goodman Brown's supernatural encounter in the woods matches almost exactly my ancestor's testimony recorded in the trial of Susanna Martin. It is a fascinating and disturbing glimpse of the fear, paranoia, and "siege mentality" that characterized much of colonial American life.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nicole aka FromReading2Dreaming

    I have to say I enjoyed these short stories more than I enjoy poems. But again, classic works of literature just aren't for me. I have to say I enjoyed these short stories more than I enjoy poems. But again, classic works of literature just aren't for me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    N.T. Embe

    My feelings about this book are much less impressive than those of the last I read for this class of mine. Did this book have a couple of good tales to tell? Eh... I suppose in some ways it did. Was it something that I enjoyed? ...not completely. I read it because it was there to read. Not much of it had me excited, let alone even engaged too comfortably. I found my mind wandered very frequently during this read, and though most of the stories Hawthorne wrote were well done, at least in terms of My feelings about this book are much less impressive than those of the last I read for this class of mine. Did this book have a couple of good tales to tell? Eh... I suppose in some ways it did. Was it something that I enjoyed? ...not completely. I read it because it was there to read. Not much of it had me excited, let alone even engaged too comfortably. I found my mind wandered very frequently during this read, and though most of the stories Hawthorne wrote were well done, at least in terms of vocabulary and actual plot, they were also all... rather dull. I think out of all of them, "Dr. Heidegger's Experiment," "The Birthmark," "Rappaccini's Daughter," and "The Artist of the Beautiful" were my favorites. But did they elicit from me anything other than an admiration for the concepts that Hawthorne presented? ...not really. The man can tell a story--that is unquestionable. He can also provide the mind with many deep and profound thoughts to dwell on, to mull over--food for the mind and not just mere trifles to read for entertainment. And from the point of view of one looking to increase their mental capacity, or enjoy writing for the artistic sake, this would probably be a very good addition to someone's library. Yet nonetheless I found that for all that I enjoyed this book... it did not blow me away. There is an underlying tone in all these stories that elicits no emotions--no reader reaction. It is the tale told a child by an elderly man who continues to babble even when the child has little to no understanding of what they are saying. And though I'm not saying that Hawthorne is impossible to read, or even that he's difficult to understand (for his stories were quite straightforward for the most part), I am saying that he has very little claim over the skillful use of tone. He talks, and it's the same note from the beginning of the book to the ending, even when the stories change from one variety to another. And such a monotony of tone throughout various tales that have the potential to elicit so much life makes the book (however short it is) drag on even longer than necessary. *Shrugs* It's a mixed bag of goodies. It presents you with wonderful concepts and ideas to entertain, but I feel that the execution isn't something that fits the excitement that most of those ideas conjure up within me. It's a case where personally--many may disagree with me on this--the storyteller's voice doesn't suit the tale he tells, regardless his eloquence in the conveyance. But for the ideas, it's still a great book worth picking up, and something that you should definitely try out just for the experience. Take it out of your library and give it a read-through! You'll come away a little more full for the knowledge and thoughtfulness it brings you.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stephan Peters

    This is a difficult review, as many of the stories are awesome, and some not so awesome. These stories of Hawthorne are not really as good if read through quickly once. They really need to be read, mulled over, and re-read. Then they are awesome as you realize some of the nuances and some of what he is really trying to say. ... and then they become AWESOME - like "Oh Wow! That's what he was getting at!" awesome. Dr. Heidegger's Experiment - 4 Stars - What would people really be like if they could This is a difficult review, as many of the stories are awesome, and some not so awesome. These stories of Hawthorne are not really as good if read through quickly once. They really need to be read, mulled over, and re-read. Then they are awesome as you realize some of the nuances and some of what he is really trying to say. ... and then they become AWESOME - like "Oh Wow! That's what he was getting at!" awesome. Dr. Heidegger's Experiment - 4 Stars - What would people really be like if they could "do it all over again?" The Birthmark - 5 Stars - What happens when "science" conflicts with myth and faerie? Young Goodman Brown - 5 Stars - How well do you really know your neighbours, before and after offering your soul to the devil? Rappaccini's Daughter - 5 Stars - What if Man creates his own Eden? Who is evil, who is good? Roger Malvin's Burial - 5 Stars - What if you leave your lover's father to die, at his request, and with a blessing on you and your daughter? And break s promise you made on his deathbed? The Artist of the Beautiful - 3 Stars - I suspect it deserves more, and I just didn't understand what Hawthorne was trying to say. I found it long and boring. With a cast of characters from a Tenessee Williams play. My Kinsman, Major Molineux - 4 Stars - At first reading American Propaganda; "You can do anything you want regardless of family or background." At later readings, why was Major Molineux really found in the situation he was? Where is the true evil?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Charles Kato

    Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” is an allegorical tale about every man’s struggle between doing what is right and doing what is wicked. The story opens with Goodman Brown and his wife Faith in an emotional dialogue where Faith begs Goodman to not leave her side. Goodman insisted, Faith acquiesced and the journey began into the dark woods of Salem. After travelling deep into the dense forest he met the devil; a familiar man with a serpent shaped staff. Eventually Brown arrived at his Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” is an allegorical tale about every man’s struggle between doing what is right and doing what is wicked. The story opens with Goodman Brown and his wife Faith in an emotional dialogue where Faith begs Goodman to not leave her side. Goodman insisted, Faith acquiesced and the journey began into the dark woods of Salem. After travelling deep into the dense forest he met the devil; a familiar man with a serpent shaped staff. Eventually Brown arrived at his destination, a mystical secret gathering of the town. After having witnessed this evil gathering and due to his poor choice in leaving Faith, Brown loses hope in all that is good. The author’s use of symbolism helps illustrate that if you succumb to the temptation to leave faith in the pursuit of curiosity that eventually evil and sadness will be brought upon you. An exciting book and a must read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cassa

    I'm recommending this more for "Rappaccini's Daughter" than the rest. "Young Goodman Brown" was decent but a little over-the-top in its moral. I don't recall "Dr. Heidegger's Experiment" enough to comment, and I don't think I've read the rest. But "Rappaccini's Daughter" was a lovely read. I'm a sucker for tragic love in any form, and the fact that this story added a creepy horror/psychological-thriller aspect to it all with some early sci-fi made it all the better. Probably one of the better cl I'm recommending this more for "Rappaccini's Daughter" than the rest. "Young Goodman Brown" was decent but a little over-the-top in its moral. I don't recall "Dr. Heidegger's Experiment" enough to comment, and I don't think I've read the rest. But "Rappaccini's Daughter" was a lovely read. I'm a sucker for tragic love in any form, and the fact that this story added a creepy horror/psychological-thriller aspect to it all with some early sci-fi made it all the better. Probably one of the better classic works I've been forced to read in class, and one of the very few I've truly enjoyed outside Shakespeare.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Madly Jane

    Hawthorne is the master of ambiguity, a lost art form in modern fiction. I constantly reread his work and wrote a college paper on The Scarlet Letter, which so impressed me after studying that I wondered how he made such a complex tale look so deceptively simple. His work definitely is a major influence on my current writing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dani Meier

    Great stories. Clever ways of making his points. I found "The Birthmark" to be particularly insightful, especially in light of my own personal and familial experiences with this type of 'phenomenon' (not with regard to the tragic ending, chas v'shalom, but with regard to issues involved!). Great stories. Clever ways of making his points. I found "The Birthmark" to be particularly insightful, especially in light of my own personal and familial experiences with this type of 'phenomenon' (not with regard to the tragic ending, chas v'shalom, but with regard to issues involved!).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    wasn't much the content that did it for me, but his personification of natural force. although it's a bit arrogant to ascribe human traits to things around us, it still creeps me the hell out when its done well. same thing I like about Steinbeck. wasn't much the content that did it for me, but his personification of natural force. although it's a bit arrogant to ascribe human traits to things around us, it still creeps me the hell out when its done well. same thing I like about Steinbeck.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    This is a collection of short stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Most are pretty creepy and fun. Good fun literature.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

    this could be the story responsible for the shudder evoked by the titles "goodman", and particularly... "goodie" for a woman. i don't know why, but calling a woman "goodie" gives me the willlllies. this could be the story responsible for the shudder evoked by the titles "goodman", and particularly... "goodie" for a woman. i don't know why, but calling a woman "goodie" gives me the willlllies.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    "The Birthmark" is one of my favorite short stories. If fact I named one of my dogs after the main character. "The Birthmark" is one of my favorite short stories. If fact I named one of my dogs after the main character.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Hawthorne's short stories are masterful: Puritans; dank atmospheres, fantastical subjects. Rarely, the moralistic attitudes mar my enjoyment. Hawthorne's short stories are masterful: Puritans; dank atmospheres, fantastical subjects. Rarely, the moralistic attitudes mar my enjoyment.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    The Artist of the Beautiful has made me cry more than once.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Hawthorne writes with imagination and sensitivity.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Young Goodman Brown is the best allegory of all time.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura Smith

    The best one is The Minister's Veil....I'll say nothing more. The best one is The Minister's Veil....I'll say nothing more.

  24. 4 out of 5

    SeaShore

    I'm interested in the story, “Young Goodman Brown.” I like Nathaniel Hawthorne's writing. He lived in Salem, Massachusetts. To understand the period a bit better, I wondered about the world in the 1600's and then the 1700's. So much history to traverse. For some humor, read, The Wordy Shipmates by Sarah Vowell The Puritan migration to New England was marked in its effects in the two decades from 1620 to 1640, after which it declined sharply for a while. Also, I considered the reign of Charles I ( I'm interested in the story, “Young Goodman Brown.” I like Nathaniel Hawthorne's writing. He lived in Salem, Massachusetts. To understand the period a bit better, I wondered about the world in the 1600's and then the 1700's. So much history to traverse. For some humor, read, The Wordy Shipmates by Sarah Vowell The Puritan migration to New England was marked in its effects in the two decades from 1620 to 1640, after which it declined sharply for a while. Also, I considered the reign of Charles I (born 1600, died 1649). He was the son of King James of Scotland. Charles was the monarch of England, Scotland and Ireland. Charles was tried, convicted, and executed for high treason in January 1649. The monarchy was abolished and a republic called the Commonwealth of England was declared. The monarchy was restored to Charles's son, Charles II, in 1660. What was significant in the 1700's to me was the race to electrify the world: I re-read Jill Jonnes's book: Empires of Light. Now for, "Young Goodman Brown", one of the stories in this book: Three dark events from the Puritans’ history are mentioned: the Salem Witch Trials of 1692, the Puritan intolerance of the Quakers, and King Philip’s War. During the Salem Witch Trials, one of the most nightmarish episodes in Puritan history, the villagers of Salem killed twenty-five innocent people who were accused of being witches. The witch hunts often involved accusations based on revenge, jealousy, botched child delivery, and other reasons that had little to do with perceived witchcraft. The Puritan intolerance of Quakers occurred during the second half of the seventeenth century. Puritans and Quakers both settled in America, hoping to find religious freedom and start their own colonies where they could believe what they wanted to. However, Puritans began forbidding Quakers from settling in their towns and made it illegal to be a Quaker ; their intolerance soon led to imprisonments and hangings. King Philip’s War, the final event referenced in Hawthorne’s story, took place from 1675 to 1676 and was actually a series of small skirmishes between Indians and colonists. Indians attacked colonists at frontier towns in western Massachusetts, and colonists retaliated by raiding Indian villages. When the colonists won the war, the balance of power in the colonies finally tipped completely toward the Puritans. These historical events are NOT at the center of the book, “Young Goodman Brown,” which takes place after the events do occur, but the reader gets to know of these little battles . Example: the names of Goody Cloyse and Martha Carrier, two of the “witches” killed at Salem, are names of two townspeople in Hawthorne's story. The devil refers to seeing Goodman Brown’s grandfather whipping a Quaker in the streets and handing Goodman Brown’s father a flaming torch so that he could set fire to an Indian village during King Philip’s War. By including these references, Hawthorne reminds the reader of the dubious history of Salem Village and the legacy of the Puritans and emphasizes the historical roots of Goodman Brown’s fascination with the devil and the dark side.

  25. 5 out of 5

    David Meditationseed

    With engaging writing, going through the supernatural and gothic world, Hawthorne is one of the exponents of this style in the early half of the 18th century, influencing many other writers who came after him. Young Master Brown, for example, how many movie scenes we see were possibly inspired by this tale written in 1835, in which the protagonist seeing the most ordinary people in society: from pastors and priests to politicians to merchants, from acquaintances to unknown pedestrians of a city - With engaging writing, going through the supernatural and gothic world, Hawthorne is one of the exponents of this style in the early half of the 18th century, influencing many other writers who came after him. Young Master Brown, for example, how many movie scenes we see were possibly inspired by this tale written in 1835, in which the protagonist seeing the most ordinary people in society: from pastors and priests to politicians to merchants, from acquaintances to unknown pedestrians of a city - watches them closely and realizes that they are devils or faithful of a satanic cult. I remember for example, The Devil's Advocate, or a TV adaptation of an episode of Grimm. In this tale, the characters' names are related to the symbolic, a direct metaphor of the story itself, as in American Gods, by Neil Gaiman. Here we find a woman named Faith and the protagonist Goodman. From the dark and mysterious adventure of a satanic cult, without the certainty of that if it is a dream or reality, and the participation in it of a kind of secret society with the most unlikely members, the author points to two profound reflections: the greater evil would be that which dwells within people? And guilt and obsession could intoxicate an individual's mind in a radical way until death?

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sir Robbiethehoo

    Disappointing after a promising start. A gentle boy introduces themes of religious prejudice. Communities would shun individuals based on their moral choices. This particular story effectively portrayed characters who defied village norms and beliefs to do what they felt as individuals right in-spite of societal pressures. A good reasonable start. Roger Malvin’s Burial was an excellent moral tale. A boy is conflicted as to whether he should leave his injured war companion, also the father of the Disappointing after a promising start. A gentle boy introduces themes of religious prejudice. Communities would shun individuals based on their moral choices. This particular story effectively portrayed characters who defied village norms and beliefs to do what they felt as individuals right in-spite of societal pressures. A good reasonable start. Roger Malvin’s Burial was an excellent moral tale. A boy is conflicted as to whether he should leave his injured war companion, also the father of the woman he loves, or travel on alone. A brilliantly written, thought provoking tale of morals. The visual descriptions are great. Young Goodman Brown was simply okay. Some dubious goings on of the village folk in the woods. Nothing special. Sadly the rest of the stories were exceedingly dull and a massive slog. The Celestial Railroad is the worst short story I have ever read. The Christmas banquet was boring as sin along with the equally hugely uninteresting Ethan Brand. Of a total of twenty stories I only liked three. These three did not have a particularly dated feel. Whereas almost all the others had a horrendous 1800s feel to them (not all 1800 style books have a dull writing style). Wish I had avoided this book and would not recommend.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    I picked up this book in one of those little library boxes that you see around. As I started to read it, I realized that I had read most of the stories before but that didn't stop me. Fall is coming on, Halloween is in the air, and these classic stories are perfect. The thread that holds them together in my opinion, is the power of obsession. We see how an idea, no matter how odd, can take over the mind and cause incredible damage to family and friends. There are hints of the supernatural, mad s I picked up this book in one of those little library boxes that you see around. As I started to read it, I realized that I had read most of the stories before but that didn't stop me. Fall is coming on, Halloween is in the air, and these classic stories are perfect. The thread that holds them together in my opinion, is the power of obsession. We see how an idea, no matter how odd, can take over the mind and cause incredible damage to family and friends. There are hints of the supernatural, mad science, romance, exotic and antique settings and characters, and fabulous writing, nineteenth century vintage. Hawthorne, by his own admission, was a lazy man who had trouble with the concept of rent, but the way he could turn a phrase and construct a story has always been very appealing to me.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Arnau

    I got this collection after reading Hawhorne's "The Scarlett Letter" as an assignment for our 19th Century American Literature class. I have to admit that prior to reading that novel I was skeptical about American non modern works. I was very surprised when coming across Hawthorne's suspenseful and dynamic writing. Sure, some of the stories on this collection are a little dull, and they usually revolve around the same usual topics (religion, death etc.), but that shouldn't be a surprise consider I got this collection after reading Hawhorne's "The Scarlett Letter" as an assignment for our 19th Century American Literature class. I have to admit that prior to reading that novel I was skeptical about American non modern works. I was very surprised when coming across Hawthorne's suspenseful and dynamic writing. Sure, some of the stories on this collection are a little dull, and they usually revolve around the same usual topics (religion, death etc.), but that shouldn't be a surprise considering the contextual mindset and style in which they were written. Regardless of that, there are some gems in here such as Dr. Heidegger's Experiment or The Birthmark.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Jagernauth

    "Thus it is that ideas, which grow up within the imagination and appear so lovely to it and of a value beyond whatever men call valuable, are exposed to be shattered and annihilated by contact with the practical. It is requisite for the ideal artist to possess a force of character that seems hardly compatible with its delicacy; he must keep his faith in himself in while the incredulous world assails him with its utter disbelief; he must stand up against mankind and be his own sole disciple, both "Thus it is that ideas, which grow up within the imagination and appear so lovely to it and of a value beyond whatever men call valuable, are exposed to be shattered and annihilated by contact with the practical. It is requisite for the ideal artist to possess a force of character that seems hardly compatible with its delicacy; he must keep his faith in himself in while the incredulous world assails him with its utter disbelief; he must stand up against mankind and be his own sole disciple, both as respects his genius and the objects to which it is directed."

  30. 4 out of 5

    Maryamhzdg

    Can't say how much I love this story. Young good man brown is one of the best short stories I've ever read. Isn't it true? Everyone has a dark side. You can't think someone is a saint angel. Human beings do mistakes and it's normal . One of the amazing points in this story is that most of the people we consider not just good but perfect and sometimes we blame ourself for not being like them are not as good as we imagine. They do horrible things but they are just perfect at hiding it. Do not ever Can't say how much I love this story. Young good man brown is one of the best short stories I've ever read. Isn't it true? Everyone has a dark side. You can't think someone is a saint angel. Human beings do mistakes and it's normal . One of the amazing points in this story is that most of the people we consider not just good but perfect and sometimes we blame ourself for not being like them are not as good as we imagine. They do horrible things but they are just perfect at hiding it. Do not ever have high opinion of someone at least not more than you should.

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