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The Art of Point-and-Click Adventure Games

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A visual celebration of one of the most loved genres in gaming history, The Art of Point-and-Click Adventure Games is a sumptuous 460 page, hardback coffee table book packed with the very best pixel art and classic scenes from the most defining games of this genre. It will also contain extensive and exclusive interviews with the key developers, designers and artists behind A visual celebration of one of the most loved genres in gaming history, The Art of Point-and-Click Adventure Games is a sumptuous 460 page, hardback coffee table book packed with the very best pixel art and classic scenes from the most defining games of this genre. It will also contain extensive and exclusive interviews with the key developers, designers and artists behind some of the most beloved games and characters in the history of the medium. The book starts with a foreword by Gary Whitta (PC Gamer magazine/Rogue One: A Star Wars Story). Interviewees for the book include (in no particular order) Tim Schafer, Robyn Miller, Ron Gilbert, David Fox, Aric Wilmunder, Richard Hare, Hal Barwood, Gary Winnick, Noah Falstein, Mark Ferrari, Dave Gibbons, Jane Jensen, Simon Woodroffe, Steve Stamatiadis, Louis Castle, Gregg Barnett, Al Lowe, Brian Moriarty, Charles Cecil and Paul Cuisset - plus plenty more… As you can see from the list, the book covers titles such as King’s Quest, Myst, Toonstruck, Discworld, Blade Runner, Gabriel Knight, The Flight of the Amazon Queen, Simon the Sorcerer and of course other classics, such as The Secret of Monkey Island, The Dig, Maniac Mansion and Full Throttle. All of the most famous and iconic point-and-click adventures are going to be covered, as well as some lesser-known games and home-brew efforts.


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A visual celebration of one of the most loved genres in gaming history, The Art of Point-and-Click Adventure Games is a sumptuous 460 page, hardback coffee table book packed with the very best pixel art and classic scenes from the most defining games of this genre. It will also contain extensive and exclusive interviews with the key developers, designers and artists behind A visual celebration of one of the most loved genres in gaming history, The Art of Point-and-Click Adventure Games is a sumptuous 460 page, hardback coffee table book packed with the very best pixel art and classic scenes from the most defining games of this genre. It will also contain extensive and exclusive interviews with the key developers, designers and artists behind some of the most beloved games and characters in the history of the medium. The book starts with a foreword by Gary Whitta (PC Gamer magazine/Rogue One: A Star Wars Story). Interviewees for the book include (in no particular order) Tim Schafer, Robyn Miller, Ron Gilbert, David Fox, Aric Wilmunder, Richard Hare, Hal Barwood, Gary Winnick, Noah Falstein, Mark Ferrari, Dave Gibbons, Jane Jensen, Simon Woodroffe, Steve Stamatiadis, Louis Castle, Gregg Barnett, Al Lowe, Brian Moriarty, Charles Cecil and Paul Cuisset - plus plenty more… As you can see from the list, the book covers titles such as King’s Quest, Myst, Toonstruck, Discworld, Blade Runner, Gabriel Knight, The Flight of the Amazon Queen, Simon the Sorcerer and of course other classics, such as The Secret of Monkey Island, The Dig, Maniac Mansion and Full Throttle. All of the most famous and iconic point-and-click adventures are going to be covered, as well as some lesser-known games and home-brew efforts.

30 review for The Art of Point-and-Click Adventure Games

  1. 5 out of 5

    David

    This is a worthwhile add to any retro-gaming book collection. It was a slow burn to read through all the developer/artist interviews, given that it's an oversized hardcover filled with tiny font (in fact, I had to order a stronger pair of reading glasses specifically to tackle this one). Like many books of this ilk, it had me regularly running off to YouTube to watch gameplay from point 'n clicks I had always meant to play, as well as quite a few I hadn't heard of. Loved the bits from Douglas Croc This is a worthwhile add to any retro-gaming book collection. It was a slow burn to read through all the developer/artist interviews, given that it's an oversized hardcover filled with tiny font (in fact, I had to order a stronger pair of reading glasses specifically to tackle this one). Like many books of this ilk, it had me regularly running off to YouTube to watch gameplay from point 'n clicks I had always meant to play, as well as quite a few I hadn't heard of. Loved the bits from Douglas Crockford about the challenges of getting Maniac Mansion humor past the NES censors. Al Lowe's recollections of Dragon's Keep were amusing, in that they in no way match reality (he said "I wrote a [text] interpreter... it was crazy advanced for its time", but watch a YouTube video, and you'll see it's merely an options "1), 2), and 3)" menu-choice game). There are a few interviews with folks that have recently created remakes of these classics, and the retro-game archeology challenges they encountered. Anyway, fun book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Adan

    Full of great art from famous and obscure point-and-click adventure games (as the title would suggest), this book is also full of interviews with point-and-click luminaries like Ken Williams, Ron Gilbert, Robyn Miller, Tim Schafer, Éric Chahi, Gary Winnick, and many, many more. Just a treasure trove of point-and-click goodness.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    An absolute must-have for anyone interested in game development, pixel art or those who have a fondness for 90's point and click adventure games. The book is enormous and packed to the brim with hundreds of pictures showcasing the artworks as well as interviews from industry legends who worked at Lucasarts and Sierra to even the more obscure developers. The interview format actually works incredibly well and makes the book far more fascinating. An absolute must-have for anyone interested in game development, pixel art or those who have a fondness for 90's point and click adventure games. The book is enormous and packed to the brim with hundreds of pictures showcasing the artworks as well as interviews from industry legends who worked at Lucasarts and Sierra to even the more obscure developers. The interview format actually works incredibly well and makes the book far more fascinating.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Germán

    More like 4.5/5, since it's an awesome book but has some minor flaws. Point and click adventures are probably my favourite game genre, so as soon as I learned about this book I ordered it, and it hasn't disappointed me at all. In every page one can notice the authors' love for the genre and the attention to detail that has been put into this work. The book covers the history of point and click adventure games from 1984 to 2017, with stress on the 90s - on a rough estimate I'd say about 65% of the More like 4.5/5, since it's an awesome book but has some minor flaws. Point and click adventures are probably my favourite game genre, so as soon as I learned about this book I ordered it, and it hasn't disappointed me at all. In every page one can notice the authors' love for the genre and the attention to detail that has been put into this work. The book covers the history of point and click adventure games from 1984 to 2017, with stress on the 90s - on a rough estimate I'd say about 65% of the book focuses on what is often regarded as the golden age of the genre. This history is presented chronologically by alternating high quality pictures (full page or even spreads) of the games and interviews of variable length with the people who worked on them, most of them well-known names for any adventure gamer. Sometimes these interviews contain anecdotes or fun facts that are already known by the fans, but also a lot of lesser-known details that provide the reader with a quite accurate idea of how it was making those games. It is interesting how this double concept pictures/interviews reflects the two ways in which the title can be read: while the pictures show the actual art featured in the games, the interviews describe the art of crafting them. However, the book has two main flaws too. The first one has to do with the format of the interviews. After reading a few of them, one can start noticing that many questions are the same ones, and since some of these people worked on the same games or in the same company, many replies are quite similar. In the same vein, often one can get the impression that the interviewers didn't want to deviate much from the initial set of questions, so even if an answer hints to an interesting story this is ignored and they continue asking as originally intended. Also, a couple of times it is possible to find a question that had already been answered, when the interviewer didn't expect it, in the reply to another previous question. The second one has to do with the selection of interviewees and games. For instance, many interviewees mention Sierra's founders Ken and Roberta Williams, but none of both is interviewed. A bit the same with the Two Guys From Andromeda. I guess that it's not that they were forgotten but rather that they couldn't / didn't want to be interviewed. One cannot blame the authors for this then, but still it's a pity, especially considering that towards the end some of the interviewees, or their interviews, are very weak. However, some omissions in the selection of games are harder to justify. I guess that nobody will expect to find all the games they played decades ago, but several classics from the 90s are missing: Infogrames' Shadow of the Comet (interestingly enough, the fantastic Alone in the Dark, which is an adventure but far from the point and click concept, does appear), at least a MicroProse's adventure, any Sierra's FMV such as Phantasmagoria or The Beast Within... And while in the 00s adventure games were "dead" compared with the previous decade, it was mostly the games from Microids, Frogwares, or Pendulo, that kind of sustained the adventure market, but only the first Runaway by the latter is mentioned. I honestly can't understand how Daria's Inferno or The Adventures of Fatman got chosen over Syberia. Or that no Blackwell game is named either. Anyway, a must read for any adventure gamer.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Luk

    I grew up with point and click adventure games. Being a huge fan of the LucasArts library of games. I must have played Secret of Monkey Island and its successor over a dozen times. Taking a trip back to the heyday of these games and reading several people's point of view of the genre and how they had to work around the technical limitations in their time. The only thing, as mentioned before, is that the interviewer does not always react to what the interviewee is saying and just sticks to the ini I grew up with point and click adventure games. Being a huge fan of the LucasArts library of games. I must have played Secret of Monkey Island and its successor over a dozen times. Taking a trip back to the heyday of these games and reading several people's point of view of the genre and how they had to work around the technical limitations in their time. The only thing, as mentioned before, is that the interviewer does not always react to what the interviewee is saying and just sticks to the initial script. I did get to know a couple of new games, and some which I have overlooked over the years that I'm definitely trying.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Magnesus

    Disappointing in comparison with other positions from Bitmap Books. Interviews follow the same scheme and the interviewer doesn't react to what the interviewee says, the choice of people is a bit random and the first part reads like an ad for Thimbleweed Park. Some games are missing, some have very little coverage (Gobliins only has art from the first game for example) - I would love it to have less interviews, more screenshots, more games and more anecdotes and trivia (like previous Bitmap Book Disappointing in comparison with other positions from Bitmap Books. Interviews follow the same scheme and the interviewer doesn't react to what the interviewee says, the choice of people is a bit random and the first part reads like an ad for Thimbleweed Park. Some games are missing, some have very little coverage (Gobliins only has art from the first game for example) - I would love it to have less interviews, more screenshots, more games and more anecdotes and trivia (like previous Bitmap Books books).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Facundo

    I bought this mainly for the pictures, thinking it was going to be a nice book to have around and skim through now and then. But it was the interviews where I found the most value: interleaved with the games, progressing in chronological order, they make up a nice history of the genre (and, in a way, of video games and computers in general). Having played so many of these games, part of the joy of reading the book was challenging the decisions of the authors, thinking what games or interviews I w I bought this mainly for the pictures, thinking it was going to be a nice book to have around and skim through now and then. But it was the interviews where I found the most value: interleaved with the games, progressing in chronological order, they make up a nice history of the genre (and, in a way, of video games and computers in general). Having played so many of these games, part of the joy of reading the book was challenging the decisions of the authors, thinking what games or interviews I would add or which ones I thought deserved a less prominent place in the collection. Every reader will likely have their own personal list but I would still say this book is nothing short of perfect.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nick Vossen

    Whether it's for the quirky and insightful interviews or just for the amazing artwork (or both!), this book is an invaluable resource for fans of the genre. Although there are always those few games that we miss and wonder about why they're not featured, the editors did a fantastic job of compiling it all together. Whether it's for the quirky and insightful interviews or just for the amazing artwork (or both!), this book is an invaluable resource for fans of the genre. Although there are always those few games that we miss and wonder about why they're not featured, the editors did a fantastic job of compiling it all together.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Fabricio

    A must have for every gamer. A masterpiece.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matthias

    💚💚💚💚💚 Beautifully made and packed with interviews and blown up screen shots of games from another era. What's not to love. 💚💚💚💚💚 Beautifully made and packed with interviews and blown up screen shots of games from another era. What's not to love.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Peer Lenné

    Wunderschön aufgemacht und höchst informativ. Ein Muss für jeden Fan des Genres.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Excellent collection of information about a well- manicured list of point-and-click adventure games! The insight into the world of creating them is presented in a mind-nurturing, creative way which only someone with pure passion for the topic can achieve. Well done, guys! The only thing I would improve us to have a more-friendly, less-professional approach to the interviews, because at times, especially if someone decides to leave all interviews for last like I did, they can get a bit monotone. A Excellent collection of information about a well- manicured list of point-and-click adventure games! The insight into the world of creating them is presented in a mind-nurturing, creative way which only someone with pure passion for the topic can achieve. Well done, guys! The only thing I would improve us to have a more-friendly, less-professional approach to the interviews, because at times, especially if someone decides to leave all interviews for last like I did, they can get a bit monotone. Adding *more* random questions from your discussions to the mix would improve that kind of experience.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Evol

  14. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nektarios Papadakis

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ziad

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ori

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tomas Becks

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katja

  20. 4 out of 5

    Max Dighton

  21. 4 out of 5

    El Hematocrítico

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matias Laino

  23. 4 out of 5

    David

  24. 5 out of 5

    José Malvárez

  25. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Chesnik

  26. 5 out of 5

    Micayla

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mario

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jasja

  30. 5 out of 5

    Svein Erik

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