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30 review for La familia del barrio chino

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Chinatown Family begins with the protagonist Tom, the age of a child, taking the ship with his younger sister and uncle to American from China during the twentieth century to reunite with his father. After getting settled down in the foreign country, Tom slowly adjusts to their new environment and their father whom they have not met. Unlike some books where the setting takes a spam of a few months and something times years, Chinatown Family expanded the time to nearly a decade– from Tom’s childh Chinatown Family begins with the protagonist Tom, the age of a child, taking the ship with his younger sister and uncle to American from China during the twentieth century to reunite with his father. After getting settled down in the foreign country, Tom slowly adjusts to their new environment and their father whom they have not met. Unlike some books where the setting takes a spam of a few months and something times years, Chinatown Family expanded the time to nearly a decade– from Tom’s childhood to his marriage in his twenties. The book did not properly address one major conflict that it took the characters to resolve over time. Rather, this book was mainly addresses the relevant events that can happen in a person’s life such as marriage, schooling, life, and death. In other words, the chapter was like a snip-it of a person’s life and each chapter usually discussed something different. Chinatown Family is a really good book if one would like to learn more about the Asian culture a little bit more but not in a way that is taught in school. The book gives insights as to some of American’s past with immigrants and how they were treated. Furthermore, I thought the book would make a great historical fiction piece because Tom’s father described some of his experiences when he left for America and what he had to endure. When I was reading it, my reaction was “Hey, we learned some of this in class”. Another great thing about this book is that the author introduces different Asian philosophies through the characters by making some of them believe in one philosophy as oppose to another such as Confucianism and Taoism.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    Surprisingly interesting given my general dislike of most Asian American literatures pre-1965. The novel reminds me of Jade Snow Wong's Fifth Chinese Daughter and it's that connection that probably made it the "hard target" for Frank Chin. It's a novel which necessarily invokes the Horatio Alger myth for Chinese Americans in a pre-1965 era where the Japanese are figured as the enemy. Colleen Lye just delivered a paper exploring interethnic fictions of panethnicity around this era and its useful Surprisingly interesting given my general dislike of most Asian American literatures pre-1965. The novel reminds me of Jade Snow Wong's Fifth Chinese Daughter and it's that connection that probably made it the "hard target" for Frank Chin. It's a novel which necessarily invokes the Horatio Alger myth for Chinese Americans in a pre-1965 era where the Japanese are figured as the enemy. Colleen Lye just delivered a paper exploring interethnic fictions of panethnicity around this era and its useful to think about in terms of a different kind of "racial formation" during different temporal moments.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Yuwenhuaji

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It's a very nice book can understood culure between englishi and chinese It's a very nice book can understood culure between englishi and chinese

  4. 5 out of 5

    Piao

    people migrated to other countries, the first generation must encounter a lot of difficulties.I like the way master Lin put in words, bitter but still has sweet sweet part.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Janice

    Insights to an immigrant Chinese American family that settled in New York City. It includes an interracial marriage.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rita

    c 1949 A lovely book. Set in 1930s and early 1940s in Chinatown, NYC, at that time populated almost exclusively by Cantonese speakers, many belonging to large clans. I will be glad some time to read a couple of his other books. Omniscient narration, but largely from perspective of Tom, 13 years old when the book opens on his first day in America, having come over with his year younger sister and his mother, to join his father and two older brothers who came maybe 10 years earlier. Family is from a c 1949 A lovely book. Set in 1930s and early 1940s in Chinatown, NYC, at that time populated almost exclusively by Cantonese speakers, many belonging to large clans. I will be glad some time to read a couple of his other books. Omniscient narration, but largely from perspective of Tom, 13 years old when the book opens on his first day in America, having come over with his year younger sister and his mother, to join his father and two older brothers who came maybe 10 years earlier. Family is from a rural village in Cantonese-speaking area. At the end, Tom is I think 20, and engaged to be married to a newish arrival from northern China. Lin seems to want to show non-Asian American readers as much as possible of cultural values of Chinese, and their range of experiences as immigrants in the U.S. After Gold Rush, father opens a laundry in a basement in upper west side; much later the mother opens a small restaurant in Chinatown itself. The oldest son considers it obvious that his job is to work with his father in the laundry, live with his parents, and not think of moving out or setting off on his own, leaving all profits in hands of father. Interestingly, he marries a second-generation Italian who grew up in Chinatown and finds it normal to live with parents in law. In this happy family she is welcomed and feels fine. Second Brother is opposite, and struck off on his own from the beginning, making money selling insurance to Chinese. Interesting section of Chinatown collecting a lot of money to send to China to help against the first and second Japanese invasions, and their reasons for doing so. Reads like a childhood memoir, yet Lin grew up in China and came to live in the U.S. only in 1935, though he spent a year or two at Harvard graduate school in the 1920s. The character Tom clearly resembles Lin Yutang in many ways -- his interests in mechanical engineering as well as in Chinese classics and in the words of the English language, for example. And his constant thinking of cultural differences and similarities. The only scary part is when teenage Tom is assaulted by neighborhood [white] bullies while delivering laundry to a customer's house. Problem solved by avoiding that particular stretch of street. Brief mention is made of father's experiences [many bad] up in Klondike gold rush and California? where Chinese were being chased out. 204 "If we can't go, then we can't go," said Elsie [recently from China] without even a slight suggestion of regret. "Why be disappointed?" "Didn't you enjoy the outings we had? You act as if you didn't care." "Tom, you are too American! Why be upset about what we cannot help?" Her tone was sure and calm. ...To sit quietly, to wait patiently, to take what came along was the natural thing, the sensible thing to do. Elsie was not aware that this was particularly Chinese. All Chinese are like that. [sic] 172 "Everybody in Chinatown had congratulated him on becoming a grandfather. It sounded like having made a million dollars and was certainly better than having completed a new house. It was the achievement of one of the grand purposes of human life, the attainment of an honor to which all men aspired but in which not all succeeded." Wikipedia: Lin Yutang (1895–1976) was born in the mountainous region town of Banzai, Pinghe, Zhangzhou, Fujian. Lin studied for his bachelor's degree at Saint John's University in Shanghai, then received a half-scholarship to continue study for a doctoral degree at Harvard University. He later wrote that in the Widener Library he first found himself and first came alive, but he never saw a Harvard-Yale game. In financial difficulty, he worked with the Chinese Labor Corps in France and went to Germany, where he completed a doctoral degree in Chinese philology at the University of Leipzig. From 1923 to 1926, he taught English literature at Peking University. He was a key figure in introducing the Western concept of humor, which he felt China had lacked. Lin coined the term youmo (humor) in 1924 and used The Analects to promote his conception of humor as the expression of a tolerant, cosmopolitan, understanding and civilized philosophy of life. Lin's writings in Chinese in the 1930s were critical of the Nationalist government to the point that he feared for his life. After 1935, Lin lived mainly in the United States, where he became known as a "wise and witty" popularizer of Chinese philosophy and way of life. His father was a Christian minister. His journey of faith from Christianity to Taoism and Buddhism, and back to Christianity in his later life was recorded in his book From Pagan to Christian (1959)."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Moshi

    Allons! whoever you are come travel with me! I swear to you there are divine things more beautiful than words can tell.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rebel

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cogito(bis)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Denise Hon

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ola

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paulo Alexandre

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Banks

  14. 5 out of 5

    Miau

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marco Chen

  16. 5 out of 5

    Xu Xun

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carlos Rubens

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

  19. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  20. 5 out of 5

    Julie Wu

  21. 5 out of 5

    Guillermo Guinto

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sijia Wang

  23. 5 out of 5

    Glenn Alexei

  24. 5 out of 5

    Julia Valiente

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lena Lee

  26. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  27. 5 out of 5

    Epicure of Literature

  28. 5 out of 5

    侯 二六

  29. 4 out of 5

    Paolo Grill

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ying

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