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Claire is a thirtysomething neonatal nurse who is becoming increasingly discouraged about her prospects of getting into a long-term relationship and starting a family. She thinks she may have finally met her man in Franck—if not a Prince Charming then at least a friendly and compatible person—but societal pressures and gender norms seem to rear their heads at every turn an Claire is a thirtysomething neonatal nurse who is becoming increasingly discouraged about her prospects of getting into a long-term relationship and starting a family. She thinks she may have finally met her man in Franck—if not a Prince Charming then at least a friendly and compatible person—but societal pressures and gender norms seem to rear their heads at every turn and Claire begins to wonder if it will ever be possible for her to be happy with another person on her own terms. Aude Picault’s chronicle of everyday romance is full of wit and sympathy but it is also backed up by a bibliography of feminist essays and studies of gender relations, offering a valuable and complicated case study of the challenges facing modern women.


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Claire is a thirtysomething neonatal nurse who is becoming increasingly discouraged about her prospects of getting into a long-term relationship and starting a family. She thinks she may have finally met her man in Franck—if not a Prince Charming then at least a friendly and compatible person—but societal pressures and gender norms seem to rear their heads at every turn an Claire is a thirtysomething neonatal nurse who is becoming increasingly discouraged about her prospects of getting into a long-term relationship and starting a family. She thinks she may have finally met her man in Franck—if not a Prince Charming then at least a friendly and compatible person—but societal pressures and gender norms seem to rear their heads at every turn and Claire begins to wonder if it will ever be possible for her to be happy with another person on her own terms. Aude Picault’s chronicle of everyday romance is full of wit and sympathy but it is also backed up by a bibliography of feminist essays and studies of gender relations, offering a valuable and complicated case study of the challenges facing modern women.

30 review for Limited Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    [Shai] Bibliophage

    Limited Edition tackles some real-life issues that women were experiencing, such as still being single in their 30s, pregnancy, and being in a relationship. I'm quite sure that women will appreciate the tale of Claire in this graphic novel, and they will be able to relate to some of the topics addressed in the story. Limited Edition tackles some real-life issues that women were experiencing, such as still being single in their 30s, pregnancy, and being in a relationship. I'm quite sure that women will appreciate the tale of Claire in this graphic novel, and they will be able to relate to some of the topics addressed in the story.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Details the life of a thirty-something neonatal nurse as she looks for love. This one is obviously written for women. A large portion of the book is women complaining about men. At first it was kind of humorous but then it starts to weigh on you. I know we aren't perfect, but we do try and we are not all the same. But most of all, I just found this book to be very boring. It's just everyday life. I don't need to read about that, I live it every day. Details the life of a thirty-something neonatal nurse as she looks for love. This one is obviously written for women. A large portion of the book is women complaining about men. At first it was kind of humorous but then it starts to weigh on you. I know we aren't perfect, but we do try and we are not all the same. But most of all, I just found this book to be very boring. It's just everyday life. I don't need to read about that, I live it every day.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anya (~on a semi-hiatus~)

    Soooo I headed over to NetGalley on a whim today and found this little comic about a thirty-something neonatal nurse, Claire who's trundling along her life looking for a love that would last long. I honestly felt bad for her; Claire was surrounded by friends and colleagues who are starting new chapters in their lives and she feels left behind and lonely. The story is simple enough and realistic but the art is GORGEOUS. I loved how despite looking like a fluffy comic, Limited Edition grappled wit Soooo I headed over to NetGalley on a whim today and found this little comic about a thirty-something neonatal nurse, Claire who's trundling along her life looking for a love that would last long. I honestly felt bad for her; Claire was surrounded by friends and colleagues who are starting new chapters in their lives and she feels left behind and lonely. The story is simple enough and realistic but the art is GORGEOUS. I loved how despite looking like a fluffy comic, Limited Edition grappled with serious issues like misogyny, expectations in relationships, independence, societal standards etc.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sara Dahabović

    Following Claire, a thirty-year-old neonatal nurse, trying to find the man of her dreams was fun, I hope this has a sequel I'm interested to know what happens next. Following Claire, a thirty-year-old neonatal nurse, trying to find the man of her dreams was fun, I hope this has a sequel I'm interested to know what happens next.

  5. 4 out of 5

    ♥ Sandi ❣

    3.75 stars Thanks to NetGalley and Europe Comics for a copy of this graphic novel. Published March 21, 2018 in English. Mid-life and no relationship! Crisis ?!?! That is the premise of this newly translated French graphic novel. Holding true to Fench culture, this graphic novel is graphic. It spends as much time in the bedroom as out of it. We follow a 30-something nurse as she navigates one relationship after another, until she finds the right one. But...is it the right one?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mehsi

    I received this book from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review. So this isn't going to be a very nice review at times. I just need to rant a bit. This book began good, I would have given it a 4 stars at the beginning. The middle was 3 stars, but with the ending and how I felt overall after reading the whole book... 2.5 stars. This mostly had to do with how I just got tired of all the bitching about men and how terrible they were/are. And then probably calls it feminism. :| What I liked: *The a I received this book from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review. So this isn't going to be a very nice review at times. I just need to rant a bit. This book began good, I would have given it a 4 stars at the beginning. The middle was 3 stars, but with the ending and how I felt overall after reading the whole book... 2.5 stars. This mostly had to do with how I just got tired of all the bitching about men and how terrible they were/are. And then probably calls it feminism. :| What I liked: *The art, it was pretty cute and sweet! Plus I liked that the author/artist used limited colours (you just have pink/blue/yellow). -The MC's job. I have read tons of books, but I don't think I have read one where someone has a job working with preemies. -Some of those preemie part just brought tears to my eyes. That one scene were the tiny little baby touched her dad's hand just had me in tears. -That the author/artist didn't shy away from sex scenes (yep, we got quite a few of those). -I could understand Claire (well... minus the man hating parts) and her quest to find someone perfect for her. I also had my share of bad experiences with men and at times I also wondered if I would ever find someone to spend my life with. I was definitely rooting for her. -Her dreams about her future kid and future husband. It was just so lovely and I like that it was added to the story. What I didn't like: *I did think Jo was a bit overkill on her hubby when they had that baby (those 3/4 pages). The guy is doing his effing best, but all you do is bitch bitch and bitch. Oh no, he forgot things, oh no he bought the wrong things. Heaven, woman, we all make mistakes no need to burn someone to the ground. Be happy he tries! Good grief woman. Plus I am sure the guy is working (given that guys generally don't get a lot of parental leave), do you want him to stop working and do everything, thus meaning that you get less money? I am sure you will bitch about that then. Girl, please. Plus she kept being dismissive about him throughout the book. :| *Also, if you can't get an orgasm and then just expect boys just have to magically know what they should do or that you have problem? I am sorry, ever heard of opening that mouth of yours and talk to him? I get so unhappy that woman are all boohooing about guys this and that, while never ever really talking to guy in question for about 2 or 3 years of a relationship. *sighs* And sure, eventually she did talk, but it took motivation from someone else to do so (yes, we finally had a woman who understood that men are not (unlike apparent popular opinion) mind readers). *If your hubby just got home from work, and just wants to sit down for a bit, LET HIM. Instead of constantly getting on his case every time he got home for a busy day of work. Just let him sit for a bit, eat some dinner, and then talk about stuff (and no shouting or cursing or grunting or whatever, just normal talking). *(view spoiler)[The abortion. Don't get me wrong, but I just didn't like that part at all. You have wanted a baby for YEARS, you are getting less and less fertile as you are already over 30. You are even dreaming about it throughout the book. But when you get pregnant (because of a mistake on both sides...) and this is quoted from the book: "I really want to have a baby, but not with Franck." Girl, please. (hide spoiler)] *All the complaining about men throughout the book, I just got so tired about it. Sure, you had some shitty experiences, and yes, sometimes men can be a bit eh, but I am sure we women also make them crazy at times. But oh no, it is all the fault of the men, obviously. *rolls her eyes* *The part with the store and them buying clothes. Really, is it that OFFENDING when someone asks you girl or boy or tells that something is for girls? Geez Louis, people. Just buy whatever you want, do you need to make rude remarks to someone just doing her job? :| Sometimes I don't get my own gender (aka women). The handwriting was a really nice touch to the book, made it more personal, but it was hard to read at times. :( So yeah, a decent book, but it could be better without all the menbashing. Review first posted at https://twirlingbookprincess.com/

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adi Rocks Socks

    ”I can’t live like a halfway open cabinet.” 3.5 very real stars. Limited Edition (French: Idéal Standard) read like an indie movie, and paid homage to the belief that art mirrors life — the story was real, extremely so, and Aude Picault did a really good job of portraying that restless feeling that 30+ women tend to feel, when trapped by a heteronormative society that imposes restrictions on their happiness. In short, I liked it, I really did. The novel centers on Claire, a neonatal nurse living i ”I can’t live like a halfway open cabinet.” 3.5 very real stars. Limited Edition (French: Idéal Standard) read like an indie movie, and paid homage to the belief that art mirrors life — the story was real, extremely so, and Aude Picault did a really good job of portraying that restless feeling that 30+ women tend to feel, when trapped by a heteronormative society that imposes restrictions on their happiness. In short, I liked it, I really did. The novel centers on Claire, a neonatal nurse living in France. She’s in her early thirties, and because of societal conditioning, begins to feel her biological clock ticking. She desperately wants to settle down and have children with “the one”, her problem being that she doesn’t have such a person like “the one”. She meets a man named Franck, and despite not being attracted to him in the least, attempts to build a life with him for one simple reason: he seems persistent, and she just wants someone. Limited Edition chronicles her life with Franck, and depicts how they try to make it work. (Or do they?) It’s not a romance, it’s not a fairytale — it’s simply about one woman, and her struggles with everyday life, as she tries to decide whether settling down is worth it, especially when it’s not with “the one”. (Because really, this perfect man that she often daydreams about is literally a citizen of utopia — no such man exists.) And if there is no such “the one”, and Franck is the only option she has, having invested time and effort into this relationship, will she still be happy? That’s the question that Claire tries to answer in the pages of Limited Edition, which sees her grow from her early thirties to her mid thirties. The art was the typical fare, and more than the artistic skill, I enjoyed the book for Picault’s blasé way of portraying life. I really enjoyed how thought-provoking this book was, and I kinda hope I’ll see more of Claire around! Note: I was provided a copy of the translated work by NetGalley for an honest review! TW: (view spoiler)[Abortion (hide spoiler)]

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amy Layton

    "We can't have a baby if I want."   And thus is the crux of Claire's problems with her relationship.  She begins by being desperately single, wanting nothing more than to consummate the relationship, marriage, and family of her dreams.  She understands it'll take work, but she has no problem cooking and having sex and living with somebody else.  Until she does cook and have sex and lives with somebody else--Franck, that is, who is a veritable manchild.  He views her not as somebody who knocked him "We can't have a baby if I want."   And thus is the crux of Claire's problems with her relationship.  She begins by being desperately single, wanting nothing more than to consummate the relationship, marriage, and family of her dreams.  She understands it'll take work, but she has no problem cooking and having sex and living with somebody else.  Until she does cook and have sex and lives with somebody else--Franck, that is, who is a veritable manchild.  He views her not as somebody who knocked him off his feet, but as somebody he's content with.  He doesn't mind the cooking or the sex or the cleaning.  So it's perfect for him.  But for Claire?  Not so much.  The shelf she always bumps her arm into never gets fixed.  She never orgasms.  And she's always the one hosting and cleaning and trying to make the relationship work.  She loves Franck, sure, but at what cost? When she accidentally gets pregnant, it should be a happy time.  The time to have a serious conversation and perhaps even move her relationship forward to something more serious than just living together.  But when he says she can keep it "if she wants", that's when things noticeably turn sour--and for a good cause.  Everything so far has been "if she wants", and nothing has been about them.  So Claire realizes what the audience has known for a long time: Franck isn't worth shit.  She's cute, funny, and has a job that is both stressful and hugely rewarding.  And what does Franck offer her?  Little to nothing.  Claire, like all women, deserve somebody who is truly worth their salt.   Illustrated with minimal colors and an adorable cartoon style, Idéal Standard, similar to Josephine (though in a much more serious tone), suggests that what many women want is truly worth waiting for.  It doesn't matter the family pressure or friend pressure or personal pressure--wait for the right time and the right person.  Even if you don't want to.  It suggests that by yourself, you are confident and strong and funny and beautiful, and you don't need somebody by your side to make you feel that way.   Idéal Standard is a testament to the female reality of growing older--and growing up. Review cross-listed here!

  9. 5 out of 5

    vostendrasamigosyotengolibros

    I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange of a honest review. I loved the book, it absolutely perfect the way that it talks about social issues at the same time that tells a story, the end it's perfect I have say it, this is just a solid wonderful and beautiful book, I really recommend it for everyone. Masterpiece. I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange of a honest review. I loved the book, it absolutely perfect the way that it talks about social issues at the same time that tells a story, the end it's perfect I have say it, this is just a solid wonderful and beautiful book, I really recommend it for everyone. Masterpiece.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andreea

    I was sent a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. This was such a cute short graphic novel talking about the pressure and expectations set for women by society, family, the norm or themselves, done with humour, but in a realistic way. The book is not condescending nor is it trying to change something or offer solutions, it simply follows a 30-something y/o nurse for babies born prematurely. She is single and she is looking for someone to possibly start a family with. At least I was sent a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. This was such a cute short graphic novel talking about the pressure and expectations set for women by society, family, the norm or themselves, done with humour, but in a realistic way. The book is not condescending nor is it trying to change something or offer solutions, it simply follows a 30-something y/o nurse for babies born prematurely. She is single and she is looking for someone to possibly start a family with. At least that's what she should want, right? Or maybe she really does, but when you are 30, there's even a bigger pressure to get a husband and a baby. Claire is also a bit of a hopeless romantic, but willing to settle for less because... that's what you are supposed to do, right? She goes from date to date, bed to bed, until she finally gets into a stable relationship. She finally joins normal society, right? Claire finally got what she was supposed to get - just a boyfriend for now, yet things do not change or get easier. But is this really what she wants? Is this how it's supposed to feel? At one point, Claire asks herself what if this is her only shot? I think this book was a great and simple way to talk about these ideas of gender role, society expectations of women, relationships and independence. And at it's core, I think this book is about if what we think we need or should do or have to be happy is what makes us happy indeed. Oh, and the art is adorable and so great for the story. It is simple, yet fits the mood and atmosphere perfectly. The use of color was great to separate different parts of Claire's life. I also loved the other characters like Claire's friends and her mum and how different they were as persons and as ideas.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Claire is yum. She's got curves, she's got brains - and she doesn't bitch and bitch and BITCH about men like some of her girlfriends. But she's not got a fella, until she meets a potential The One, and gives it almost three years of go. There clearly is give and take in any relationship, and a lot more taking and giving if you're a fertile woman, and Claire's examples of that make for a very good book. Some people have said it's a bit man-bashing; well I see some characters are but I found the b Claire is yum. She's got curves, she's got brains - and she doesn't bitch and bitch and BITCH about men like some of her girlfriends. But she's not got a fella, until she meets a potential The One, and gives it almost three years of go. There clearly is give and take in any relationship, and a lot more taking and giving if you're a fertile woman, and Claire's examples of that make for a very good book. Some people have said it's a bit man-bashing; well I see some characters are but I found the book to be successfully in tune with its narrative, and not beholden to any message, feminist, anti-men or otherwise. Partly that's down to the way the intimacy of it all - Claire slobbing out in sweat pants, Claire pulling the day-old knickers on for the morning-after cuppa, and suchlike - shows Claire as a real woman. In fact she's such a nice character I almost felt disappointed and jealous when she hooked up. But hey, I could never have her, she would never have me - but as long as we love ourselves with enough room to love others too we'll all be better off. I was better off on reading this, for it's attractively presented, and both smart and warm. A bit like Claire... Four and a half stars.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lauren loves llamas

    Trigger warning: (view spoiler)[abortion (hide spoiler)] This is a translation of a French graphic novel. It’s an exploration of feminism and women’s roles in today’s society – as a sex object, girlfriend, wife and mother. It trots out some of the usual gender role stereotypes – women like taking care of people! boys need to be tough! – and depicts various relationship stages – from one-night-stands, to dating, to a longer term relationship, to marriage, to raising a baby, then children, then emp Trigger warning: (view spoiler)[abortion (hide spoiler)] This is a translation of a French graphic novel. It’s an exploration of feminism and women’s roles in today’s society – as a sex object, girlfriend, wife and mother. It trots out some of the usual gender role stereotypes – women like taking care of people! boys need to be tough! – and depicts various relationship stages – from one-night-stands, to dating, to a longer term relationship, to marriage, to raising a baby, then children, then empty nesters. Ms. Picault doesn’t pull any punches – she shows the various stages of women’s lives with brutal honesty. Claire is optimistic and a bit naive, and at thirtysomething, her clock is ticking. We’re first introduced to Claire doing her pre-date primping, and then, after several hilarious depictions of sex, her morning-after daydreams of a new relationship. Claire’s daydreams are particularly sweet, mostly because they’re of everyday interactions that most parents would take for granted – saying good morning to a cheerful little baby, pushing a young child on a swing, going grocery shopping as a family. These daydreams – along with the depictions of her work as a NICU nurse – were my favorite parts of the story. Claire has built up this ideal of family life and motherhood, but when she visits her friend Lo after she has a baby, she finds a tired, cranky woman, surrounded by a mess, constantly harping on everything her husband isn’t doing. Claire, and the reader, however, see her husband trying to help and being constantly badgered by Lo for not doing anything right. On a visit to her boyfriend’s family, she sees parents frustrated with their children, and sniping at each other over every little thing. Even Claire’s own mother is divorced, and she readily admits that getting married was a bad decision – except, of course, that she had Claire. Over the course of the book, which takes place over several years, Claire slowly realizes that all these roles she’s aiming for – girlfriend, wife, mother – are who she is in relation to someone else, not who she is for herself. While I do think Ms. Picault shows a not particularly rosy view of family life and is particularly harsh against men in particular, she also shows how all of this is part of Claire’s journey. The art is lovely – line drawings with washes of color. It impressed me, several times, how much emotion and expression could be conveyed with just a few lines. I adored Claire’s curves and her big smile! On the other hand, while the script-style lettering (honestly, I think it was a font, not hand lettering) fit the mood, it was extremely hard to read at times. As for other cons, there’s a particular bit related to the trigger warning that I thought felt almost more like someone’s idea of a feminist checklist than anything else. I understood that this particular narrative choice meant that Claire had to actually take action, rather than just continuing coasting along, but given how emotionally fraught the subject matter is, it didn’t sit well with me. Overall, this was a visually lovely chick lit graphic novel! I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anjalee

    I received this book from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review. A series of sunny-hued panels tell the story of Claire, a neonatal nurse on the hunt for her dream man. At 32, Claire very much feels the pressures that come with a ticking body-clock and often finds herself settling for lack-lustre relationships. Over time she learns the importance of being happy on her own terms. Limited Edition loudly deals with feminist issues but doesn't always align with my own beliefs. Whilst I appreciated I received this book from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review. A series of sunny-hued panels tell the story of Claire, a neonatal nurse on the hunt for her dream man. At 32, Claire very much feels the pressures that come with a ticking body-clock and often finds herself settling for lack-lustre relationships. Over time she learns the importance of being happy on her own terms. Limited Edition loudly deals with feminist issues but doesn't always align with my own beliefs. Whilst I appreciated the discussion of valuing your self-worth and what constitutes as a healthy relationship, I do think it was rather man-bashing. Aude Picault uses characters such as Franck to highlight everyday sexism towards women and how often their needs, thoughts and abilities are undermined and underestimated. That being said, the female characters attitudes towards men are not shown to be as problematic or severe, which I found troubling. There was some other glaring issues, but the final message resonated quite strongly with me. I’m a romantic, often wishing I could hurry up and have the husband, the white picket fence, the kids and don’t often take time to be happy in the now. If Limited Edition taught me anything it’s to not always think the grass is greener on the other side and to appreciate where I am currently at in life. Overall I have to give it a 2.5. Although I enjoyed the loose illustrations and related to Claire, the font was jarringly hard to read at times and I found some of the messages to be quite questionable.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Jones

    This graphic novel is all about sex, motherhood and relationships. The artwork is simple and understated, with a monochrome colour palette. Almost every image is coloured in shades of yellow with odd splashes of baby pink and pale blue throughout. I had a bit of an issue with the font personally as it was almost like someone's handwriting and I found myself having to stop to decipher some words that weren't very legible to me which took me out of the story. I also thought that the plot and themes This graphic novel is all about sex, motherhood and relationships. The artwork is simple and understated, with a monochrome colour palette. Almost every image is coloured in shades of yellow with odd splashes of baby pink and pale blue throughout. I had a bit of an issue with the font personally as it was almost like someone's handwriting and I found myself having to stop to decipher some words that weren't very legible to me which took me out of the story. I also thought that the plot and themes were handled in a very heavy handed manner which made me feel very disconnected to the characters and what they were doing. Some of the choices the protagonist made were nonsensical in my opinion. Overall, I think there are readers that would love this. However, personally, I feel that the same story could have been told in a better way; maybe the translation didn't portray the emotion well, or maybe there is some other reason, but on the whole I just felt very detached the whole way through. I love the art style and would be interested in seeing what this artist does in the future but as a story it is quite forgettable.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ije the Devourer of Books

    Claire is in her thirties and desperate to settle down and start a family. She is on the dating merry go round and doesn't seem to be able to meet a guy who wants to settle down. Meanwhile family and friends are settling down and having babies, buying homes and getting on with life. Despite her career as a nurse Claire feels left behind and left out. And then Claire meets a man, moves in with him, and three years down the line she examines if this is what she really wants. Should she settle for l Claire is in her thirties and desperate to settle down and start a family. She is on the dating merry go round and doesn't seem to be able to meet a guy who wants to settle down. Meanwhile family and friends are settling down and having babies, buying homes and getting on with life. Despite her career as a nurse Claire feels left behind and left out. And then Claire meets a man, moves in with him, and three years down the line she examines if this is what she really wants. Should she settle for less and stick with her partner? Or should she learn to appreciate who she is instead of focusing on some kind of ideal, and live her life to the fullest without compromise. Is the man she is with really the man she wants? This is an interesting comic with good drawings. The storyline is great too and it left me wanting more. Copy provided by Europe Comics via Netgalley in exhange for an unbiased review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    A book about not settling. I like the muted colors used in the illustrations --I feel that sweeter yellows like this are incredibly under-utilized in this style of book. It's a declaration of what it feels like to be alone, to search for someone, and to settle. Then! To reclaim yourself from the settling. This is one of the few books I have seen that really tackles the despair, mental load, and constant performative nature of being a woman today. It's exhausting. Also, it calls out bad and irres A book about not settling. I like the muted colors used in the illustrations --I feel that sweeter yellows like this are incredibly under-utilized in this style of book. It's a declaration of what it feels like to be alone, to search for someone, and to settle. Then! To reclaim yourself from the settling. This is one of the few books I have seen that really tackles the despair, mental load, and constant performative nature of being a woman today. It's exhausting. Also, it calls out bad and irresponsible sex in a way that is not overly gratuitous or with a heavy dramatic payload. It's a blunt statement that there is more to life than what we have to put up with. This is a feminist text --in inspiration and content. It treats women's work of all kinds from mothering at home to working an intensive job as equal in the balance of things. There are not petty spats that we often see in largely female composed casts; the friends are around each other, sometimes annoyed, sometimes honest, and sometimes vulnerable in the way that real friendships are. It feels a lot more like 2 1/2 years from someone's real life than an episode of Desperate Housewives. I like that we get the man's perspective in this book, too. We see the way the women in the story perceive his actions and we are also given a look behind the curtain to see his real motivations. (view spoiler)[It seems like he wants to date the main character badly and likes her, but he is really more interested in the experience of the initial chase and trying to settle for his family. (hide spoiler)] The book also presents a human version of male friendships that shows how men interact in work, family, and casual settings that matches the way it treats on the women's experiences. It's really balanced. The only time we see the men cut out is when they are no longer seeing the main character. And this book talks not only about the pressure to marry, but also directly deals with (view spoiler)[an abortion in a really neutral, realistic way (hide spoiler)] . There is some emotional fallout and some personal relief and realization, but the book does not emotionally manipulate the reader with the character's choices.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    "I can't live like..a halfway open cabinet" Claire says at one point in this story. This is the story of Claire, a neonatal nurse, in her early 30s, wondering if she will ever find the love of her life. It goes through her many loves, and her friends and family that surround her. The whole story takes place over a three or four year period, as she goes along with what she has, and then, when asked how she feels, she says the line above. This is important because her latest love has a cabinet with "I can't live like..a halfway open cabinet" Claire says at one point in this story. This is the story of Claire, a neonatal nurse, in her early 30s, wondering if she will ever find the love of her life. It goes through her many loves, and her friends and family that surround her. The whole story takes place over a three or four year period, as she goes along with what she has, and then, when asked how she feels, she says the line above. This is important because her latest love has a cabinet with a shelf that is just in the wrong place. At first she bangs her elbow on it, until she moved it, and then the cabinet can't open all the way. This little irritant, like a bit of grit in an oyster, keeps pressing on her, along with all the other things that are driving her crazy, until she realizes what she has to do with her life (and perhaps there is a pearl that develops from her choice). As her sister tells her, "What ever you decide will be the right choice." This is very chick lit, and very slow, and all about relationships. It is not quite for me, as not much happens, but followers of chick lit, who also like graphic novels, might enjoy it. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Elia

    Hooookay.... So, here's the thing. I have never in my life been able to relate to women like the protagonist Clare. 1) I don't have daddy issues. My father was and is freaking AMAZING with us, and yes, he had some machismo from being an old-school Mexican man, but still supported the HELL out of me, pulled his weight around the house, is still married to my mom, and was never an absentee sexist pig like Clare's dad. 2) I don't want children, so I never had a ticking biological clock screaming at m Hooookay.... So, here's the thing. I have never in my life been able to relate to women like the protagonist Clare. 1) I don't have daddy issues. My father was and is freaking AMAZING with us, and yes, he had some machismo from being an old-school Mexican man, but still supported the HELL out of me, pulled his weight around the house, is still married to my mom, and was never an absentee sexist pig like Clare's dad. 2) I don't want children, so I never had a ticking biological clock screaming at me to reproduce before I got old. 3) I have never EVER felt the need to be in a relationship for the sake of not ending up alone. I love being alone just fine, thanks. 4) I have also never EVER put up with any shit from a man who said things like Clare's boyfriend Franck does about women. Franck is an ASS. 5) I have, hands down, all things considered, the BEST relationship a person could hope for with a man sent directly from heaven. I lucked out SO DAMN hard that I cringe every time I see a depiction of a woman settling for anything less than what I have: a supportive PARTNER who sees me as an equal human being. I also freaking HATE women who sit around bashing men instead of TELLING the men in their lives why they are pissed off at them. This was NOT for me, and Clare pissed me off a lot. Is this a reflection of French men and women and their relationships? I sincerely hope not because if it is then France collectively needs to grow the eff up.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dustyloup

    Interesting that this graphic novel is called "ideal standard" in French and "limited edition" in English. The English title makes me think of the limited biological clock for women and trying to find that special someone but there's a limited number... The French one makes me think of the need, especially when you're on the dating market, to fit the standard image of a woman or man... And also makes me think of toilets and those boring household items (ideal standard as a brand of bathroom fixt Interesting that this graphic novel is called "ideal standard" in French and "limited edition" in English. The English title makes me think of the limited biological clock for women and trying to find that special someone but there's a limited number... The French one makes me think of the need, especially when you're on the dating market, to fit the standard image of a woman or man... And also makes me think of toilets and those boring household items (ideal standard as a brand of bathroom fixtures) that are the center of many couples' disagreements (household chores). Her views are occasionally called into question and I hope the careful reader will not think that everything that Claire does and thinks is validating that view point. It's one way to view the world, flawed, like everyone's. It's interesting to see the ways in which she was courageous (challenging career) and immature (inability communicate with her partner). And sure, Franck is an ass but looking closely at his facial expressions during moments (Scene where Claire undresses or where he builds the furniture and she takes foto) it seems that he has unmet needs just like her and doesn't know how to communicate them. I didn't really care for this at first and almost put it down after about 30 pages but in the end, glad I stayed on for the ride.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'Limited Edition' by Aude Picault is a graphic novel about a young woman who feels discouraged by the relationships in her life. I really liked the story and art. Claire is a neonatal nurse who, when we meet her, has had a series of boyfriends. Now that she is in her 30s, she is feeling the pressure of settling down. Her mother wants her to find someone and her friends are starting to have babies. When she meets Franck, it all seems to be perfect, but, as in any relationship, there are problems. T 'Limited Edition' by Aude Picault is a graphic novel about a young woman who feels discouraged by the relationships in her life. I really liked the story and art. Claire is a neonatal nurse who, when we meet her, has had a series of boyfriends. Now that she is in her 30s, she is feeling the pressure of settling down. Her mother wants her to find someone and her friends are starting to have babies. When she meets Franck, it all seems to be perfect, but, as in any relationship, there are problems. The story is quite good. I love the look at Claire's life in the hospital, as well as her insecurities as a person. The art is perfect for the story. The lettering is handwritten, and I had to really pay attention at times to figure out what the words were, but the style gave the book a unique charm. The book ends with a bibliography of feminist essays and studies about gender relations, which seems fitting after the story that is told. I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Europe Comics and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Blue

    Limited Edition by Aude Picault is about Claire, a neonatal nurse in her early 30s. She wants a relationship and eventually a family. Her friends seem to be moving in this direction and increasingly Claire feels left behind. She finds a guy, who is OK enough, but maybe not good enough to start a family with. Overall, Claire's life is the quintessential modern Western white heterosexual female experience. Everything from the types of friends she has to her job and personal life aspirations, even Limited Edition by Aude Picault is about Claire, a neonatal nurse in her early 30s. She wants a relationship and eventually a family. Her friends seem to be moving in this direction and increasingly Claire feels left behind. She finds a guy, who is OK enough, but maybe not good enough to start a family with. Overall, Claire's life is the quintessential modern Western white heterosexual female experience. Everything from the types of friends she has to her job and personal life aspirations, even to the accidental pregnancy which forces Claire to clarify certain things about her life, and at 35, having to rely on her mother for a downpayment, are very typical. Due to her gender identity and sexual orientation, Claire's story is very heteronormative. It will appeal to many, as it will be very relatable. The art is great, with expressive lines and good use of (yellow) color. Linden trees make a few appearances on these pages, which is great. Made me wish for June. Here's hoping to Claire being a part of the norm and somehow changing the norm from the inside so the next Claire finds the norm less oppressive.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nissa

    Wonderful!! Claire, a neonatal nurse, dates men, moves in with Franck, visits with friends, and grapples with the heavy questions surrounding relationships - what is the value of a companion? What can women expect from men? How are things different now from our parents' generation, and how are they the same? What does and should motherhood look like, and how does that fit in with women's expectations of their lives? The illustrations have a retro French feel, and the monochromatic palette focuse Wonderful!! Claire, a neonatal nurse, dates men, moves in with Franck, visits with friends, and grapples with the heavy questions surrounding relationships - what is the value of a companion? What can women expect from men? How are things different now from our parents' generation, and how are they the same? What does and should motherhood look like, and how does that fit in with women's expectations of their lives? The illustrations have a retro French feel, and the monochromatic palette focuses the reader on the story. I love the variety of perspectives visited in the book, and the subtle ways in which women and men interact throughout. I particularly love Claire's mom, who we meet late in the book - her cultivation of her own life is truly inspiring to both Claire and the reader. This is a timely and wonderful story, and I particularly love how it resonates for an audience at whom many comics are not aimed. I love the story, the characters, the illustrations - an uplifting, thought-provoking, and ultimately inspiring story.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chloe Metzger

    In her 30s Claire is worried that she's going to miss out on the opportunity to be in a long-term relationship and be a mother. As a neonatal nurse who loves her job and has lovely friends, it seems to be the only thing that is missing. I read this in one sitting and while I enjoyed it I did, at times, find it problematic. When Claire meets someone she adores all things seem to be going swimmingly as she gets her wish of a long-term relationship and from that point is where it started to fall fl In her 30s Claire is worried that she's going to miss out on the opportunity to be in a long-term relationship and be a mother. As a neonatal nurse who loves her job and has lovely friends, it seems to be the only thing that is missing. I read this in one sitting and while I enjoyed it I did, at times, find it problematic. When Claire meets someone she adores all things seem to be going swimmingly as she gets her wish of a long-term relationship and from that point is where it started to fall flat for me. Of course, this looks at relationships and gender from a critical perspective but none of the men in this were presented in a positive light. It was something that I got really frustrated with. This was an ok read and some points, which I won't spoil, were really interesting and looked at a side of being a woman that many won't go into. So for that reason, it was a good read. Also, I adored the parts where Claire was at work, I would have liked more of that. Overall 2.5 stars. Thank you to the publisher,

  24. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    It's funny how some books come along exactly when you need them, and wow this book was amazing. This book follows a woman, Clare, who is in her thirtys as she tries to find love and romance in a real, everyday setting. She is (understandably) frustrated with the whole process. When Frank comes into her life, she thinks this may not be my prince charming but it may be enough. We follow Clare through work, friendships and her relationships. This book has some great girlfriends in it who talk about It's funny how some books come along exactly when you need them, and wow this book was amazing. This book follows a woman, Clare, who is in her thirtys as she tries to find love and romance in a real, everyday setting. She is (understandably) frustrated with the whole process. When Frank comes into her life, she thinks this may not be my prince charming but it may be enough. We follow Clare through work, friendships and her relationships. This book has some great girlfriends in it who talk about what it is like to be a modern woman. These women talking leads to some great feminist insights on what it means to be a woman today navigating relationships. Limited Edition was a super validating read as I am going through the dating world, it also opened my eyes to somethings I never fully considered or voiced. Thank you to NetGalley for providing me a copy of this comic in return for an honest review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Romantic Intentions Quarterly

    A very European take on the search for love and the disappointments of finding it, Aude Picault’s Limited Edition gives us, in beautifully articulated but very simple drawings, the tale of neonatal nurse Claire, early thirties and alone, and her succession of one-night stands until she catches the interest of Franck, who is ready to settle down and believes Claire will… do. Candid discussions of sex, pregnancy (both planned and otherwise) and toxic partners may not be considered usual comic book A very European take on the search for love and the disappointments of finding it, Aude Picault’s Limited Edition gives us, in beautifully articulated but very simple drawings, the tale of neonatal nurse Claire, early thirties and alone, and her succession of one-night stands until she catches the interest of Franck, who is ready to settle down and believes Claire will… do. Candid discussions of sex, pregnancy (both planned and otherwise) and toxic partners may not be considered usual comic book fodder to those new to the medium, but Limited Edition is a timely, heart-wrenching and incredibly accessible story of modern relationships, and is no less relevant or absorbing for its fully-illustrated presentation. At once bleak and hopeful, this is a story that lingers. This review appears in Romantic Intentions Quarterly #1.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Angela Holtz

    **Thank you NetGalley for this unlocked PDF!!!** This is a wonderful graphic novel for women. Although men, you might learn a thing or two in here. Claire is a thirty-something neonatal nurse, hoping she'll find the right man. She keeps putting herself out there, and really just putting out, hoping he's the one. Will she get her happily ever after? Or will she find her good enough for now? I really enjoyed this and read it in only a few hours. I like that I can read this one again and again. I hope **Thank you NetGalley for this unlocked PDF!!!** This is a wonderful graphic novel for women. Although men, you might learn a thing or two in here. Claire is a thirty-something neonatal nurse, hoping she'll find the right man. She keeps putting herself out there, and really just putting out, hoping he's the one. Will she get her happily ever after? Or will she find her good enough for now? I really enjoyed this and read it in only a few hours. I like that I can read this one again and again. I hope to see more from Clare or this author. It is based in France, maybe Paris? So that different culture is interesting, as well.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lynnae Leigh

    I was so glad to find this book at the library. I read an excerpt when it was published and I don't know why I really wanted to read it all. I really don't understand why. I was a bit bored. There were some interesting parts, about premature kids and the difficulties their parents have with them ; the "charge mentale" aka when all the chores and responsibilities are on one person of the couple only. But the part about the protagonist's relationship didn't reall click with me. I thought it would be I was so glad to find this book at the library. I read an excerpt when it was published and I don't know why I really wanted to read it all. I really don't understand why. I was a bit bored. There were some interesting parts, about premature kids and the difficulties their parents have with them ; the "charge mentale" aka when all the chores and responsibilities are on one person of the couple only. But the part about the protagonist's relationship didn't reall click with me. I thought it would be about physical appearances not settling or thinking to do so with someone you don't belong with. And I don't like the art that much. Not a book for me.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kirk

    So I think I just found the female equivalent of male narratives I enjoy. Our protagonist is just trying to find basic happiness in life. She wants love, but tries settling with co-existence to avoid being alone. She does have companions throughout the book to vent to, and I think they make some very poignant points about how sucky men can be in a patriarchal society. I really like the character. I like how she tries to make her life work and ultimately does find some degree of happiness in the e So I think I just found the female equivalent of male narratives I enjoy. Our protagonist is just trying to find basic happiness in life. She wants love, but tries settling with co-existence to avoid being alone. She does have companions throughout the book to vent to, and I think they make some very poignant points about how sucky men can be in a patriarchal society. I really like the character. I like how she tries to make her life work and ultimately does find some degree of happiness in the end. This isn’t a romantic comedy. It feels real. Validating and depressing at the same time.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    "Limited Edition" is a graphic novel about a nurse in her early 30s who wants to fall in love and have a family but things don't really go they way she wished for. It's a simple story and I have to say it wasn't exactly for me because I couldn't relate to anything the main character was going through. But at the same time - although it was a bit sad - I liked the message and I believe it could give courage to a lot of women who feel like they are running out of time and are afraid of change. So, "Limited Edition" is a graphic novel about a nurse in her early 30s who wants to fall in love and have a family but things don't really go they way she wished for. It's a simple story and I have to say it wasn't exactly for me because I couldn't relate to anything the main character was going through. But at the same time - although it was a bit sad - I liked the message and I believe it could give courage to a lot of women who feel like they are running out of time and are afraid of change. So, yup, good read but I wasn't the best reader.

  30. 4 out of 5

    K

    I received an ARC of the English-translated version of this book for a review. This was a heartfelt story with intelligently drawn images. It can be many things for different people: a cautionary tale for some, an inspirational tale for others, and for myself it was reassurance that I did the right thing by making sure I was happy first before trying to find my happiness in someone else. Read it, be happy, don't be a half-open cabinet. I received an ARC of the English-translated version of this book for a review. This was a heartfelt story with intelligently drawn images. It can be many things for different people: a cautionary tale for some, an inspirational tale for others, and for myself it was reassurance that I did the right thing by making sure I was happy first before trying to find my happiness in someone else. Read it, be happy, don't be a half-open cabinet.

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