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Ten years ago, Jerome Stern, director of the writing program at Florida State, initiated the World's Best Short Short Story Contest. Stories were to be about 250 words long; first prize was a check and a crate of oranges. Two to three thousand stories began to show up annually in Tallahassee, and National Public Radio regularly broadcast the winner. But, more important, the Ten years ago, Jerome Stern, director of the writing program at Florida State, initiated the World's Best Short Short Story Contest. Stories were to be about 250 words long; first prize was a check and a crate of oranges. Two to three thousand stories began to show up annually in Tallahassee, and National Public Radio regularly broadcast the winner. But, more important, the Micro form turned out to be contagious; stories of this "lack of length" now dot the literary magazines. The time seemed right, then, for this anthology, presenting a decade of contest winners and selected finalists. In addition, Stern commissioned Micros, persuading a roster of writers to accept the challenge of completing a story in one page. Jesse Lee Kercheval has a new spin on the sinking of the Titanic; Virgil Suarez sets his sights on the notorious Singapore caning; George Garrett conjures up a wondrous screen treatment pitch; and Antonya Nelson invites us into an eerie landscape. Verve and nerve and astonishing variety are here, with some wild denouements.How short can a Micro be, you wonder. Look up Amy Hempel's contribution, and you'll see. Includes: Poet's husband by M. Giles Cough by Harry Humes Daydream by R. Allen Wrong channel by R. Fernandez Harmony by J. Williams 20by20 by L. Brewer Your fears are justified by R. DeMarinis At the point by B. McCaddon Halo by M. McFee Mockingbird by L. Berry Changing the channel by E.E. Miller Wanting to fly by S. Dunning Eclipsed by R. Shuster New Year by P. Painter Survivors by K. Addonizio Anti-Cain by V. Suarez Painted devils by F. Chappell Honeycomb by N.R. Singer Baby, baby, baby by F. Camoin An old story by J. Kelman Conception by T. Fleming All this by J. Avallon Stone belly girl by J. Granger Worry by R. Wallace You can't see dogs on the radio by L. Wendling True story of Mr. and Mrs. Wong by M. Chin Flu by S. Dybek The bridge by R. Edson Kennedy in the barrio by J.O. Cofer Grief by R. Carlson Mount Olive by M.A. Love Hurray for Hollywood by G. Garrett This is how I remember it by Betsy Kemper November by U. Hegi Carpathia by J.L. Kercheval Chickens by E. Magarrell Mayor of the sister city speaks to the chamber of commerce in Klamath Falls, Oregon, on a night in December in 1976 by M. Martone Confirmation names by M. Lippo Hostess ; Housewife by A. Hempel Land's end by A. Nelson Last supper in the Cabinet Mountains by D. Bottoms Strongman by W. White-Ring Diverging paths and all that by M. O'Hara A gentleman's C by P. Powell Of exposure by J. Holman Tea leaves by J. Burroway We eat our peas for the souls in Purgatory by A. McPeters Waiting by P. McNally But what was her name? by D. Raffel Guadalupe in the Promised Land by Sam Shepard Morning news by J. Stern Molibi by L. Hancock Wallet by A. Woodman


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Ten years ago, Jerome Stern, director of the writing program at Florida State, initiated the World's Best Short Short Story Contest. Stories were to be about 250 words long; first prize was a check and a crate of oranges. Two to three thousand stories began to show up annually in Tallahassee, and National Public Radio regularly broadcast the winner. But, more important, the Ten years ago, Jerome Stern, director of the writing program at Florida State, initiated the World's Best Short Short Story Contest. Stories were to be about 250 words long; first prize was a check and a crate of oranges. Two to three thousand stories began to show up annually in Tallahassee, and National Public Radio regularly broadcast the winner. But, more important, the Micro form turned out to be contagious; stories of this "lack of length" now dot the literary magazines. The time seemed right, then, for this anthology, presenting a decade of contest winners and selected finalists. In addition, Stern commissioned Micros, persuading a roster of writers to accept the challenge of completing a story in one page. Jesse Lee Kercheval has a new spin on the sinking of the Titanic; Virgil Suarez sets his sights on the notorious Singapore caning; George Garrett conjures up a wondrous screen treatment pitch; and Antonya Nelson invites us into an eerie landscape. Verve and nerve and astonishing variety are here, with some wild denouements.How short can a Micro be, you wonder. Look up Amy Hempel's contribution, and you'll see. Includes: Poet's husband by M. Giles Cough by Harry Humes Daydream by R. Allen Wrong channel by R. Fernandez Harmony by J. Williams 20by20 by L. Brewer Your fears are justified by R. DeMarinis At the point by B. McCaddon Halo by M. McFee Mockingbird by L. Berry Changing the channel by E.E. Miller Wanting to fly by S. Dunning Eclipsed by R. Shuster New Year by P. Painter Survivors by K. Addonizio Anti-Cain by V. Suarez Painted devils by F. Chappell Honeycomb by N.R. Singer Baby, baby, baby by F. Camoin An old story by J. Kelman Conception by T. Fleming All this by J. Avallon Stone belly girl by J. Granger Worry by R. Wallace You can't see dogs on the radio by L. Wendling True story of Mr. and Mrs. Wong by M. Chin Flu by S. Dybek The bridge by R. Edson Kennedy in the barrio by J.O. Cofer Grief by R. Carlson Mount Olive by M.A. Love Hurray for Hollywood by G. Garrett This is how I remember it by Betsy Kemper November by U. Hegi Carpathia by J.L. Kercheval Chickens by E. Magarrell Mayor of the sister city speaks to the chamber of commerce in Klamath Falls, Oregon, on a night in December in 1976 by M. Martone Confirmation names by M. Lippo Hostess ; Housewife by A. Hempel Land's end by A. Nelson Last supper in the Cabinet Mountains by D. Bottoms Strongman by W. White-Ring Diverging paths and all that by M. O'Hara A gentleman's C by P. Powell Of exposure by J. Holman Tea leaves by J. Burroway We eat our peas for the souls in Purgatory by A. McPeters Waiting by P. McNally But what was her name? by D. Raffel Guadalupe in the Promised Land by Sam Shepard Morning news by J. Stern Molibi by L. Hancock Wallet by A. Woodman

30 review for Micro Fiction: An Anthology of Fifty Really Short Stories

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Tired of losing his wallet to pickpockets, my father, at seventy, makes a phony one. He stuffs the phony wallet with expired coupons and losing Florida Lottery tickets and a fortune cookie fortune that reads, "Life is the same old story told over and over." In a full-length mirror, he tries the wallet in the back pocket of his pants. It hangs out fat with desire. "All oyster," he says to me, "no pearl." We drive to the mall where he says he lost the last one. I am the wheelman, left behind in the Tired of losing his wallet to pickpockets, my father, at seventy, makes a phony one. He stuffs the phony wallet with expired coupons and losing Florida Lottery tickets and a fortune cookie fortune that reads, "Life is the same old story told over and over." In a full-length mirror, he tries the wallet in the back pocket of his pants. It hangs out fat with desire. "All oyster," he says to me, "no pearl." We drive to the mall where he says he lost the last one. I am the wheelman, left behind in the car, while my father cases a department store. He is an old man trying to act feeble and childlike, and he overdoes it like stage makeup on a community-theater actor. He has even brought a walking stick for special effect. Packages of stretch socks clumsily slip from his fingers. He bends over farther than he has bent in years to retrieve them, allowing the false billfold to rise like a dark wish and be grappled by the passing shadow of a hand. Then the unexpected happens. The thief is chased by an attentive salesclerk. Others join in. The thief subdued, the clerk holds up the retrieved item. "Your wallet, sir. Your wallet." As she begins opening it, searching for identification, my father runs toward an exit. The worthless articles float to the floor. Now my father is in the car, shouting for me to drive away. There will be time enough for silence and rest. We are both stupid with smiles and he is shouting, "Drive fast, drive fast."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shovelmonkey1

    I like the idea of micro fiction. Part of me thinks it's a brilliant wheeze because I'm lazy and have a short attention span and therefore it would be something that I'd be prepared to try to write. I might actually finish a micro story before I got bored and sauntered off. On the flipside I also recognise that it's probably a lot harder to write micro fiction than it would initially appear. So, to that end I've decided to review this micro fiction using the technique of the nano review. All of I like the idea of micro fiction. Part of me thinks it's a brilliant wheeze because I'm lazy and have a short attention span and therefore it would be something that I'd be prepared to try to write. I might actually finish a micro story before I got bored and sauntered off. On the flipside I also recognise that it's probably a lot harder to write micro fiction than it would initially appear. So, to that end I've decided to review this micro fiction using the technique of the nano review. All of my summations and synopses will be no more than ten words long. Let the nano nit-picking and inexplicable summaries begin. The Poet's Husband by Molly Giles Oversharing poet wife induces insomnia. The Cough by Harry Hughes Coal miners cough carries him off. Daydream by Roberta Allen Vegas Road trip not preferable to French fantasy. Wrong Channel by Roberto Fernandez Green card gets lost in translation. Harmony by Joy Williams Memories of youth borne on the back of a fly. 20/20 by Linda Brewer Car share with short sighted lunatic is a bad idea. Your Fears are Justified by Rick DeMarinis Life is full of risk but you're not dead yet. At the point by Beauvais McCaddon Dog acclimatises to the new neighbourhood better than owners. The Halo by Michael McFee Versatile holy headgear proves difficult to dispatch. Mockingbird by Laurie Berry Love is forgiving, laziness is shocking, mockingbirds are irrelevant. Changing the channel by E Ethelbert Miller TV doesn't reflect life but it may deflect it. Wanting to Fly by Stephen Dunning Dreams of flight not thwarted by a drowned man. Eclipsed by Robert Shuster Unnatural dark of the sun brings illumination to the sun. The New Year by Pamela Painter Man fails to bring home bacon but still gets ham. Anti Cain by Virgil Suarez Will take a beating for a book deal. Painted Devils by Fred Chappell Love is a battle - make sure you're not firing blanks. More to follow...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    I thought this might be a nice book for inspiring me to write my own micro fiction, but after reading it I’m not sure it’s really for me. I’m all for minimalism in writing but nothing here left much emotional impact.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eärendilen

    i mean.. its ok to be short but still have some depth you know.. 🥀

  5. 4 out of 5

    hypothermya

    Micro Fiction is a collection of short stories. Specifically it's a collection of stories that are 250 words or less. If at this point you're thinking, "There couldn't possibly be any story worth reading that could fit into only 250 words," then perhaps this collection isn't for you. If at this point, you're thinking, "Only 250 words, eh? You mean I don't have to read the first, second, and tenth book in the trilogy in order to get my story fix?," then look no further. This book was specifically Micro Fiction is a collection of short stories. Specifically it's a collection of stories that are 250 words or less. If at this point you're thinking, "There couldn't possibly be any story worth reading that could fit into only 250 words," then perhaps this collection isn't for you. If at this point, you're thinking, "Only 250 words, eh? You mean I don't have to read the first, second, and tenth book in the trilogy in order to get my story fix?," then look no further. This book was specifically designed to pack the maximum amount of punch into a short reading experience. It's perfect for filling in those gaps of time where you're waiting and have nothing to do: public transit, waiting for a meeting to start, etc. And even if you aren't impressed enough to buy the book on that recommendation alone, it's not like it's hard to sample it in the book store. Three minutes, tops, and you've already tried out one of the several wonderful stories in here. While it's difficult to even summarize a story in less words than it takes to tell it, I'll mention some favorites of mine. Hostess by Amy Hempel is a brilliant vignette that can get a laugh and a quick reread every time. 20/20 by Linda Brewer is another favorite of mine, bundling up a quirky and wonderful story with some clever insight into humans and their powers of observations. Survivors by Kim Addonizio, however, is the single story that sticks with me the most. I think of it every time I glance at the spine of this book. Anyone who can tell that powerful of a story in that few words has my undying respect. However, the same brevity that makes this book delightful also is a negative. I am never able to lose myself in the book for hours, nor am I able to get lost in a secondary world (ala Tolkien). This book will definitely stay on my bookcase, and meets and exceeds its goals, even if it isn't quite the epic that some other longer books are.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Zoom

    A quick read of very short (250 word) stories by a variety of writers. Some were superb, others just left me baffled. I'm sure it isn't easy to tell a whole story in so few words. They take so little time to read that you end up reading a lot of them in a sitting, and then you don't remember any of them. A quick read of very short (250 word) stories by a variety of writers. Some were superb, others just left me baffled. I'm sure it isn't easy to tell a whole story in so few words. They take so little time to read that you end up reading a lot of them in a sitting, and then you don't remember any of them.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sterling

    Some stories were good, some were bad. I didn't take much of it with me. Some stories were good, some were bad. I didn't take much of it with me.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael P.

    Good stories have a beginning, a middle, and an ending. Most stories in this collection of microscopic fiction are just endings, though some are just middles and others just beginnings. These stories are unsatisfying because while they reach the goal of being 250 or fewer words, they need more words to create a story that is truly engaging. There are perhaps a half-dozen stories that manage to have good micro beginnings, micro middles, and micro endings, but most of those are merely better than Good stories have a beginning, a middle, and an ending. Most stories in this collection of microscopic fiction are just endings, though some are just middles and others just beginnings. These stories are unsatisfying because while they reach the goal of being 250 or fewer words, they need more words to create a story that is truly engaging. There are perhaps a half-dozen stories that manage to have good micro beginnings, micro middles, and micro endings, but most of those are merely better than the other stories in this book. They are hardly the sort of thing that will be read by the next generation. The very last story by Allen Woodman, however, is a cunning delight.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I struggle with writing short stories (though, one could argue, that if I actually maintained some kind of almost daily writing practice I could feel more comfortable with the form). I have always found it so much easier (and wholly satisfying) to write short snapshots. I was therefore really excited when I found this collection of "really short stories" at a used book sale. I guess as with any collection of writing by a variety of writers, some of these stories were punches in the gut and some. I struggle with writing short stories (though, one could argue, that if I actually maintained some kind of almost daily writing practice I could feel more comfortable with the form). I have always found it so much easier (and wholly satisfying) to write short snapshots. I was therefore really excited when I found this collection of "really short stories" at a used book sale. I guess as with any collection of writing by a variety of writers, some of these stories were punches in the gut and some...weren't. I did, however, learn a lot here and am super down to experiment with this form.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy Clifford

    I enjoyed reading this book because it was a good quick read. It was full of many short stories. I recommend this book to someone who is interested in short facts and stories or someone who is looking for a short book. Some of the stories within this book were boring but others were exciting.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Micro-fiction has always signified the ability to distill understanding and emotion, and how we communicate those things, down to as little language as possible. It's an exercise many writers indulge in--stories under 500 words, and in this case 250 words (a single printed page)--but to see it taken seriously and done exceptionally well, as more than just an exercise, is eye-opening. This collection accounts for a number of exceptional short shorts, employing a variety of narrative strategies. T Micro-fiction has always signified the ability to distill understanding and emotion, and how we communicate those things, down to as little language as possible. It's an exercise many writers indulge in--stories under 500 words, and in this case 250 words (a single printed page)--but to see it taken seriously and done exceptionally well, as more than just an exercise, is eye-opening. This collection accounts for a number of exceptional short shorts, employing a variety of narrative strategies. The diversity and the quality are exemplary. I first read this collection seven years ago, and have unintentionally ended up rereading it almost every year since with a fresh impression and ideas each time. I'd recommend this anthology to most anyone, but even moreso to writers.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ursula

    This is solid collection containing too many terrific stories to list individually. The stronger stories seared themselves into my memory for days while the weaker ones were a jumble of ill-fitting sentences. I definitely plan to revisit this anthology as there's much to learn within its pages. Memorable/Exquisite Stories: --This is How I Remember It by Betsy Kemper --Carpathia by Jesse Lee Kercheval --Confirmation Names by Mariette Lippo --A Gentleman's C by Padgett Powell --The New Year by Pamela P This is solid collection containing too many terrific stories to list individually. The stronger stories seared themselves into my memory for days while the weaker ones were a jumble of ill-fitting sentences. I definitely plan to revisit this anthology as there's much to learn within its pages. Memorable/Exquisite Stories: --This is How I Remember It by Betsy Kemper --Carpathia by Jesse Lee Kercheval --Confirmation Names by Mariette Lippo --A Gentleman's C by Padgett Powell --The New Year by Pamela Painter --All This by Joanne Avallon --Eat Our Peas for the Souls in Purgatory by Annette McPeters --Land's End by Antonya Nelson --Changing the Channel by E. Ethelbert Miller --Survivors by Kim Addonizio

  13. 5 out of 5

    Justin Ahlquist

    I enjoyed this book because the book didn't consist of a story that drags on for 200 or more pages and the stories in it are thought provoking and suspenseful. My favorite short story within the novel was "Daydream" by Roberta Allen because again i relate directly to the plot of the story, and i love the idea of family bonding because not enough of it happens anymore. I reccomend this book to anyone who enjoys short stories that leave you thinking and almost always end on a cliff hanger where yo I enjoyed this book because the book didn't consist of a story that drags on for 200 or more pages and the stories in it are thought provoking and suspenseful. My favorite short story within the novel was "Daydream" by Roberta Allen because again i relate directly to the plot of the story, and i love the idea of family bonding because not enough of it happens anymore. I reccomend this book to anyone who enjoys short stories that leave you thinking and almost always end on a cliff hanger where you want to read more.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cyndie Todd

    I don't know if this book is still in print or not, but it's a great little book to keep around, either in a guest room, in the bathroom, or just handy for a quick story. The stories are extremely short - none taking up more than two pages of an undersized book - yet they really pack a lot of meaning "between the lines." High appeal for the 140 character writer. I don't know if this book is still in print or not, but it's a great little book to keep around, either in a guest room, in the bathroom, or just handy for a quick story. The stories are extremely short - none taking up more than two pages of an undersized book - yet they really pack a lot of meaning "between the lines." High appeal for the 140 character writer.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    There are a few really great stories in here, but most of them are so-so.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Corey Wozniak

    It was okay. Lots of crap stories that didn't make any sense. Others were genuinely amusing or even surprising. I'll be using this title in my HS writing workshop to teach fiction writing. It was okay. Lots of crap stories that didn't make any sense. Others were genuinely amusing or even surprising. I'll be using this title in my HS writing workshop to teach fiction writing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Alden

    This is a small book of small stories, each as big as a house or mountain, each a gift of starlight. Some stories ride on the surface, powerful as a champion surfer. Some carry a bottomless depth of the ages and require multiple reading. And some radiate across oceans, offering a much larger world that challenges us to understand. This collection, put together by Jerome Sterns, just before his death, is chock full of brilliant short, shorts as written by 53 writers and masters of the craft. Of t This is a small book of small stories, each as big as a house or mountain, each a gift of starlight. Some stories ride on the surface, powerful as a champion surfer. Some carry a bottomless depth of the ages and require multiple reading. And some radiate across oceans, offering a much larger world that challenges us to understand. This collection, put together by Jerome Sterns, just before his death, is chock full of brilliant short, shorts as written by 53 writers and masters of the craft. Of the 53 authors, 29 were, (at that time - 1996), teaching writing at various colleges around the U.S. They defy the erroneous and belittling assertion, "those who can, do; those who can't, teach." I found this book to be a timeless cornerstone of micro fiction that I've gone back to again and again for inspiration. For those new to micro fiction, it's a perfect read with which to whet your appetite. You will be amazed at how good short, short fiction tells big stories.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sven Camrath

    An excellent little collection and introduction to flash fiction. I contacted a friend since I seemed to be in a rut when it came to creative writing. Her simple suggestion to limit me to a short narrative rather than attempting to write a novel was all the freedom I had been looking for. She also mailed me this little book. I quickly made my way through the 250-words-and-less stories. Some are like a piece of candy, a literary treat, some you have to chew more to get to the juicy bits. And some An excellent little collection and introduction to flash fiction. I contacted a friend since I seemed to be in a rut when it came to creative writing. Her simple suggestion to limit me to a short narrative rather than attempting to write a novel was all the freedom I had been looking for. She also mailed me this little book. I quickly made my way through the 250-words-and-less stories. Some are like a piece of candy, a literary treat, some you have to chew more to get to the juicy bits. And some approach the quality of abstract art that, unless you 'click' with it, are scratching your head wondering what you are looking at. But that's okay; with every anthology, you will come across some stories that resonate more or less with you. All in all, a great little book that demonstrates that you can snarl a reader in 250 words or less. I highly recommend it for anyone intimidated by the prospect of creative writing.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Emily Dybdahl

    So I'm not really sure how I feel about "short short stories". To me, the traditional short story is the perfect length where you get an entire scene, well-developed, and that's it. Then your imagination fills in the rest and it's great. This collection of micro-fiction felt like glancing through a window into about 30 seconds worth of scene, then fast-walking to the next window, for 50 windows in 25 minutes. That's a lot of scenes and while it's interesting, you don't get much as far as informa So I'm not really sure how I feel about "short short stories". To me, the traditional short story is the perfect length where you get an entire scene, well-developed, and that's it. Then your imagination fills in the rest and it's great. This collection of micro-fiction felt like glancing through a window into about 30 seconds worth of scene, then fast-walking to the next window, for 50 windows in 25 minutes. That's a lot of scenes and while it's interesting, you don't get much as far as information. It's just more of a general entertainment. I mean, this is coming from me who probably doesn't "get" the subtle meanings or artistic nuances of each story but as a lay reader this wasn't super satisfying. I need more!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    I learned about this book from a teacher on Twitter. The concept of flash fiction is not new to me, but I was eager to read more. This is a rather old book at this point, but there are still some solid stories in it. I found myself just reading a handful and putting the book down. I did not read it in one sitting, although that would have been easy to do. Favorites: Eclipsed Survivors Worry Kennedy in the Barrio Carpathia Diverging Paths and All That Waiting Wallet

  21. 4 out of 5

    D.W. Anderson

    I read one story per day. I read them like you're supposed to read poetry. A few stories are duds. Most stories, though, are the best parts of poetry and the best parts of narrative. Some you'll have to work through, so some readers won't like it. Some narratives are obvious. But most of the microfiction pieces selected by Stern & company are nuanced and excellent, like G. Saunder's "Sticks": https://www.unm.edu/~gmartin/535/Stic... I read one story per day. I read them like you're supposed to read poetry. A few stories are duds. Most stories, though, are the best parts of poetry and the best parts of narrative. Some you'll have to work through, so some readers won't like it. Some narratives are obvious. But most of the microfiction pieces selected by Stern & company are nuanced and excellent, like G. Saunder's "Sticks": https://www.unm.edu/~gmartin/535/Stic...

  22. 4 out of 5

    EmmaB

    This was required reading for a writing course, and became a valued resource to look at how writers craft words, and create worlds in less than 300 words. Some were silly, and a few were odd. "Grief" remains one of my favorites. This was required reading for a writing course, and became a valued resource to look at how writers craft words, and create worlds in less than 300 words. Some were silly, and a few were odd. "Grief" remains one of my favorites.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    Proof that good things can come in small packages. I was quite amazed how much talented writers can pack into 250 words. I was especially moved by Annette McPeters and Natalia Rachel Singer. And, the editor's entry was quite poignant. Proof that good things can come in small packages. I was quite amazed how much talented writers can pack into 250 words. I was especially moved by Annette McPeters and Natalia Rachel Singer. And, the editor's entry was quite poignant.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle Carolina

    Read for class.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    A quick collection of micro fiction. I am prepping a micro fiction unit for next year :) it’s also good inspiration for writing.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ktbird

    Sometimes I really enjoy microfiction, and sometimes it tries to hard. This collection was not my favorite.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary Royston

    Outstanding collection of micro fiction. Will be re-reading.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emily Romano

    I had to read some of these for a class in college.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Caitie

    Read this for a class and promptly discovered... I don't think I like microfiction? Read this for a class and promptly discovered... I don't think I like microfiction?

  30. 4 out of 5

    ✧・゚: *✧・゚:* Estrellita*:・゚✧*:・゚✧

    had some great ones some not so great 3 average

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