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Lovecraft: Four Classic Horror Stories

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In Providence, Rhode Island, a dangerous inmate disappears from a hospital for the insane. At Miskatonic University, a professor slumps into a five-year reverie. In a mysterious and vivid dreamworld, a melancholy man seeks the home of the gods. And in the frozen wasteland of Antarctica, polar explorers unearth secrets that reveal a past almost beyond comprehension—and a fu In Providence, Rhode Island, a dangerous inmate disappears from a hospital for the insane. At Miskatonic University, a professor slumps into a five-year reverie. In a mysterious and vivid dreamworld, a melancholy man seeks the home of the gods. And in the frozen wasteland of Antarctica, polar explorers unearth secrets that reveal a past almost beyond comprehension—and a future too terrible to imagine. Graphic novelist I.N.J. Culbard gives terrifying form to four classic tales by H.P. Lovecraft: “The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath,” “The Case of Charles Dexter Ward,” “At The Mountains of Madness,” and “The Shadow Out of Time.” Expertly adapted and beautifully drawn, Culbard’s lean and thrilling adaptations breathe new life into four stories that helped to reinvent the horror genre.  


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In Providence, Rhode Island, a dangerous inmate disappears from a hospital for the insane. At Miskatonic University, a professor slumps into a five-year reverie. In a mysterious and vivid dreamworld, a melancholy man seeks the home of the gods. And in the frozen wasteland of Antarctica, polar explorers unearth secrets that reveal a past almost beyond comprehension—and a fu In Providence, Rhode Island, a dangerous inmate disappears from a hospital for the insane. At Miskatonic University, a professor slumps into a five-year reverie. In a mysterious and vivid dreamworld, a melancholy man seeks the home of the gods. And in the frozen wasteland of Antarctica, polar explorers unearth secrets that reveal a past almost beyond comprehension—and a future too terrible to imagine. Graphic novelist I.N.J. Culbard gives terrifying form to four classic tales by H.P. Lovecraft: “The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath,” “The Case of Charles Dexter Ward,” “At The Mountains of Madness,” and “The Shadow Out of Time.” Expertly adapted and beautifully drawn, Culbard’s lean and thrilling adaptations breathe new life into four stories that helped to reinvent the horror genre.  

30 review for Lovecraft: Four Classic Horror Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Kaufmann

    I.N.J. Culbard adapts and illustrates four of H.P. Lovecraft's longer and better-known works: "The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath," "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward," "At the Mountains of Madness," and "The Shadow Out of Time." The artwork is extraordinary, especially Culbard's renderings of various creatures whose descriptions Lovecraft left intentionally vague, and fulfills the purpose of cutting through Lovecraft's sometimes dense and baroque prose to make the stories flow more smoothly. He do I.N.J. Culbard adapts and illustrates four of H.P. Lovecraft's longer and better-known works: "The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath," "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward," "At the Mountains of Madness," and "The Shadow Out of Time." The artwork is extraordinary, especially Culbard's renderings of various creatures whose descriptions Lovecraft left intentionally vague, and fulfills the purpose of cutting through Lovecraft's sometimes dense and baroque prose to make the stories flow more smoothly. He does an excellent job adapting the stories, sometimes making slight alterations to their structure that work to increase their narrative power. Revisiting these stories, I found myself struck by a few things. I had never really realized before, for instance, that "Dream-Quest" is kind of a "Lovecraft's greatest hits" compilation, featuring not just recurring characters like Randolph Carter and Richard Pickman, but also making use of places and creatures that had only appeared in his poems and fragments before, all brought together into a single narrative. One could say "Dream Quest" is to Lovecraft's work like the Dark Tower series is to Stephen King's. I also noticed for the first time how similar the climaxes are in both "At the Mountains of Madness" and "The Shadow Out of Time." In "Mountains," the deadly shoggoths that destroyed the Elder Things and their ancient city in Antarctica are discovered to still be alive and a threat to the protagonists. In "Shadow," the deadly flying polyps that destroyed the Great Race of Yith and their ancient city in Perth, Australia are discovered to still be alive and a threat to the protagonists. The stories were written only three or four years apart, and I prefer to think of these similarities as the solidification of a theme that interested Lovecraft rather than lazy plotting. My final observation is that as much as I love Roger Corman's 1963 film THE HAUNTED PALACE, "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward" is very cinematic and deserves a more faithful film adaptation. This collection of Culbard's previously and separately published Lovecraft adaptations is a must for fans of graphic novels and H.P. Lovecraft alike. (I now find myself interested in reading Culbert's adaptation of Chambers' THE KING IN YELLOW as well.) One caveat, though: the hardcover is extremely heavy and quite thick, making it difficult to carry with you. You may find it easier to read at home in your favorite chair than to take it with you on a train or an airplane. But then, that's probably the best way to read Lovecraft's chilling tales anyway.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mary Overton

    Terrific introduction to Lovecraft. Be sure to read H.P.'s original stories afterward. Contents: The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath; The Case of Charles Dexter Ward; At the Mountains of Madness; The Shadow Out of Time Terrific introduction to Lovecraft. Be sure to read H.P.'s original stories afterward. Contents: The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath; The Case of Charles Dexter Ward; At the Mountains of Madness; The Shadow Out of Time

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Four of Lovecraft's longest stories captured in a graphic novel form by LNJ Culbard. The stories are faithful to the originals and the artwork is a perfect fit for these Cthulhu Mythos stories. Starts with "The Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath", "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward", "At the Mountains of Madness", and "The Shadow Out of Time". HIghly recommended to Lovecraft enthusiasts. Four of Lovecraft's longest stories captured in a graphic novel form by LNJ Culbard. The stories are faithful to the originals and the artwork is a perfect fit for these Cthulhu Mythos stories. Starts with "The Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath", "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward", "At the Mountains of Madness", and "The Shadow Out of Time". HIghly recommended to Lovecraft enthusiasts.

  4. 5 out of 5

    A

    After giving up on reading H.P.'s complete works, I thought I was done with the whole set of works. I was, however, intrigued when I saw this tome (you really can't describe it in any other way). The artwork isn't amazing as other titles but, coupled with the stories it narrates, it does a wonderful work of putting a visual against the narrative. After giving up on reading H.P.'s complete works, I thought I was done with the whole set of works. I was, however, intrigued when I saw this tome (you really can't describe it in any other way). The artwork isn't amazing as other titles but, coupled with the stories it narrates, it does a wonderful work of putting a visual against the narrative.

  5. 4 out of 5

    ダンカン

    Adaptations are never easy if not done right. My love for H.P. Lovecraft is by far, not the easiest but it is his stories that I enjoyed, even though I read only one collection of his stories (The Call of Cthulhu and Other Stories, which I had read and reviewed). Now, this recently released collection of four of his short stories into graphic novel is what excites me to read, especially when I enjoy the artwork by I.N.J. Culbard, which he too adapt the stories. There are four stories adapted int Adaptations are never easy if not done right. My love for H.P. Lovecraft is by far, not the easiest but it is his stories that I enjoyed, even though I read only one collection of his stories (The Call of Cthulhu and Other Stories, which I had read and reviewed). Now, this recently released collection of four of his short stories into graphic novel is what excites me to read, especially when I enjoy the artwork by I.N.J. Culbard, which he too adapt the stories. There are four stories adapted into this one massive graphic novel - The Dream - Quest of Unknown Kadath, The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, At the Mountain of Madness and The Shadow Out of Time - are related to one another in ways of the world building itself. But do any of it achieved its potential of enjoyment... to me, only two out of four of them are good. The first two stories were some what slow and boring. Nothing really much happening and the narrative itself is rather monotonous. I can't help but feel like I am going into a history lesson class of the universe of ancient ones. Sadly, it doesn't bring the horror out of the stories and ends up pretty much a dud to me. The last two achieve what was intended - the true horrors of the unknown mystery that inspires movies like Alien or John Carpenter's The Thing that has a good substantial influence of Lovecraft's work - a perfect blend of science fiction and horror. The artwork brings out the best in the stories and fits very well here as it does brings out the macabre of the scary. Fans of Lovecraft will enjoy parts of the stories but for those who do not know Lovecraft, might not appreciate much. To me, I would say it deserves a 3.5 out of 5 for this one.

  6. 5 out of 5

    K De

    Best adaptions to a graphic format for Lovecraft. I.N.J. Culbard has the right feel for working with the horror of existential, cosmic existence. The four graphic novels- “The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath,” “The Case of Charles Dexter Ward,” “At The Mountains of Madness,” and “The Shadow Out of Time.”- are collected into a hardcover, heavy weight tome. The interpretations of Lovecraft are studious, well paced and has the right artistic air of foreboding and universal dread, especially with the Best adaptions to a graphic format for Lovecraft. I.N.J. Culbard has the right feel for working with the horror of existential, cosmic existence. The four graphic novels- “The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath,” “The Case of Charles Dexter Ward,” “At The Mountains of Madness,” and “The Shadow Out of Time.”- are collected into a hardcover, heavy weight tome. The interpretations of Lovecraft are studious, well paced and has the right artistic air of foreboding and universal dread, especially with the graphic novel "The Shadow Out of Time'. The high point is the way Culbard adapts the short novel "At the Mountains of Madness" into a pithy exposition of the minute role that humankind has in the greater workings of the time-space frame of reference that humans have constructed versus the infinitely greater races both of this universe and beings that are incomprehensible outside of the known laws of Einstein and quantum physics. The main plot points are hit upon and the pacing is just right. Highly recommended.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Espen

    Absolutely excellent adaptations of some of Lovecraft's better tales. Culbard's visual approach has both the great benefit and disadvantage of dropping most of Lovecraft's archaic prose, focusing on the action, the setting, and above all, the atmosphere. The Mountains of Madness was my favorite here, not entirely unexpected as that's my overall favorite HPL story, but they're all good. I'd have loved to see The Call of Cthulhu in here too! Culbard's art is, well, idiosyncratic, but I liked it. So Absolutely excellent adaptations of some of Lovecraft's better tales. Culbard's visual approach has both the great benefit and disadvantage of dropping most of Lovecraft's archaic prose, focusing on the action, the setting, and above all, the atmosphere. The Mountains of Madness was my favorite here, not entirely unexpected as that's my overall favorite HPL story, but they're all good. I'd have loved to see The Call of Cthulhu in here too! Culbard's art is, well, idiosyncratic, but I liked it. Sometimes it's simplified near to the point of silliness (what's with those eyes?), but in general it works very well indeed with the source matter. The whole production of the book feels great. My version has a two-thirds size dust jacket over an otherwise almost totally black cover. Certain illustrations fill the entire pages to the edges. The only thing I'm missing is page numbers. The paper is so luxuriously thick I was often uncertain if I'd turned two pages at once.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rumi Bossche

    Brilliant graphic novel, four of Lovecrafts most known tales, retold. I fell in love with the artwork and coloring, and the style is really Lovecraft his own works. Makes you fall in love with these tales again. Recommended.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alexandr Kuznetsov

    Графическая адаптация произведений Лавкрафта, с которой можно начать знакомство с автором. Внутри хорошая локализация и изобретательная раскадровка четырёх значимых повестей — такие байки из склепа в твёрдом переплёте.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jack

    A decent introduction to some of Lovecraft's works but I could never shake the feeling that Culbard's artistry plateaued the possibilities of the fiction rather than elevate it. A decent introduction to some of Lovecraft's works but I could never shake the feeling that Culbard's artistry plateaued the possibilities of the fiction rather than elevate it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jessie B.

    Excellent collection

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I loved being able to better see what Lovecraft described. I'm a huge fan of Lovecraft and Cthulu. It made me understand the story better. I loved being able to better see what Lovecraft described. I'm a huge fan of Lovecraft and Cthulu. It made me understand the story better.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dylan

    A mighty fine visual adaptation of some classics. The art style works deceptively well for these stories, especially Kadath.

  14. 4 out of 5

    James

    Amazing artwork that makes me feel small and insignificant. Had some stories in it that I hadn't read before and some remakes that I really enjoyed. Amazing artwork that makes me feel small and insignificant. Had some stories in it that I hadn't read before and some remakes that I really enjoyed.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mark All

    Outstanding art and the stories well-edited for this format/medium. Four of Lovecraft's greatest tales, most notably, At the Mountains of Madness Outstanding art and the stories well-edited for this format/medium. Four of Lovecraft's greatest tales, most notably, At the Mountains of Madness

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Wilson

  17. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  18. 4 out of 5

    Val

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gaff1138

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Hampshire

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dino Gaurige

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

  23. 4 out of 5

    Humfreak

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jason Vanhee

  25. 5 out of 5

    Foxy

  26. 4 out of 5

    Katzilla Kelly

  27. 4 out of 5

    Craig Garrett

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dave H

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessika

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