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Artist to Artist: 23 Major Illustrators Talk to Children about Their Art

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In this remarkable and beautiful anthology featuring the likes of Maurice Sendak, Robert Sabuda, Rosemary Wells, and Eric Carle, twenty-three of the most honored and beloved artists in children’s literature talk informally to children—sharing secrets about their art and how they began their adventures into illustration. Fold-out pages featuring photographs of their early w In this remarkable and beautiful anthology featuring the likes of Maurice Sendak, Robert Sabuda, Rosemary Wells, and Eric Carle, twenty-three of the most honored and beloved artists in children’s literature talk informally to children—sharing secrets about their art and how they began their adventures into illustration. Fold-out pages featuring photographs of their early work, their studios and materials, as well as sketches and finished art create an exuberant feast for the eye that will attract both children and adults. Self-portraits of each illustrator crown this important anthology that celebrates the artists and the art of the picture book. An event book for the ages. Proceeds from the book will benefit the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, MA.


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In this remarkable and beautiful anthology featuring the likes of Maurice Sendak, Robert Sabuda, Rosemary Wells, and Eric Carle, twenty-three of the most honored and beloved artists in children’s literature talk informally to children—sharing secrets about their art and how they began their adventures into illustration. Fold-out pages featuring photographs of their early w In this remarkable and beautiful anthology featuring the likes of Maurice Sendak, Robert Sabuda, Rosemary Wells, and Eric Carle, twenty-three of the most honored and beloved artists in children’s literature talk informally to children—sharing secrets about their art and how they began their adventures into illustration. Fold-out pages featuring photographs of their early work, their studios and materials, as well as sketches and finished art create an exuberant feast for the eye that will attract both children and adults. Self-portraits of each illustrator crown this important anthology that celebrates the artists and the art of the picture book. An event book for the ages. Proceeds from the book will benefit the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, MA.

30 review for Artist to Artist: 23 Major Illustrators Talk to Children about Their Art

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mir

    23 illustrators talk about their art and their childhoods (which seem to have universally included wanting to "do" art if not thinking of becoming artists) and what other artists influenced them. They each get a page of text, a childhood photo and a portrait by themself, then a fold out showing their work, including childhood drawings if they had some saved. Most of them were quite interesting in what they had to say. I think I've read books by all but a couple of these individuals, although often 23 illustrators talk about their art and their childhoods (which seem to have universally included wanting to "do" art if not thinking of becoming artists) and what other artists influenced them. They each get a page of text, a childhood photo and a portrait by themself, then a fold out showing their work, including childhood drawings if they had some saved. Most of them were quite interesting in what they had to say. I think I've read books by all but a couple of these individuals, although often the illustrator does not get equal credit, or doesn't come up in a key word search, so I'm only linking to ones that do appear in my "read" shelf under their name. I was surprised that some I know quite well don't appear as entries in book data, such as Quentin Blake or Barry Moser or Nancy Burkert. I'll endeavor to read the ones I've missed and also edit the links, until I have a review for something by each person included in this book. Mitsumasa Anno Quentin Blake Ashley Bryan Nancy Ekholm Burkert Eric Carle Tomie dePaola Jane Dyer Mordicai Gerstein Robert Ingpen* Steven Kellogg Leo Lionni Petra Mathers Wendell Minor Barry Moser Alice Provensen Robert Sabuda & Matthew Reinhart Maurice Sendak Gennady Spirin Chris Van Allsburg Rosemary Wells Paul O. Zelinsky *Ingpen was the one entry that came across as umsympathetic, to me. He wrote, "You can choose to be an artist and fly away with your creativity, or to be an illustrator and surround yourself with craft. You cannot be both." I think that is absolutely not true. Maybe he tells himself that because his illustrations are boring. Yeah, you heard me, Ingpen! BORING! Also, he didn't fill up the whole page, what a slacker. Random trivia that I find interesting: --Barry Moser went to military academy, beginning in 7th grade. --Sabuda and Reinhart are not a couple. --Spirin is very religious. --Jane Dyer has a twin named Jean. --Chris Van Allsburg hadn't taken art before he decided to major in it in college.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    What a wonderful, inspiring anthology! Odilon Redon is quoted as saying, “Art is a flower which opens freely, outside of all rules.” The 23 illustrators here are each unique and they each talk openly about their art: how they began, and continue to enjoy the creative process. The lay-out is quite ingeniously done: with its fold-out style it invites the reader to literally “enter” the pages of each artist/illustrator beneath a full-page self-portrait. Adjacent to this is a letter addressed to chi What a wonderful, inspiring anthology! Odilon Redon is quoted as saying, “Art is a flower which opens freely, outside of all rules.” The 23 illustrators here are each unique and they each talk openly about their art: how they began, and continue to enjoy the creative process. The lay-out is quite ingeniously done: with its fold-out style it invites the reader to literally “enter” the pages of each artist/illustrator beneath a full-page self-portrait. Adjacent to this is a letter addressed to children, and with one exception, a photograph or two of the artist as a child is featured in the top right-hand corner of the page – I viewed this as a personal postage stamp. All letters are signed – even their signatures are interesting! The two pages inside the fold-out vary, but most feature photographs of early work, sketches and finished art, and often, a picture of the artist’s studio. Reading this as an adult, I was reminded of the many books I had read as a child and to other children as an adult. And in many cases I learned about and was intrigued by books I had never heard of, such as Mordecai Gerstein’s The Absolutely Awful Alphabet and Alice Provensen’s A Day in the Life of Murphy. The only author/illustrator not living to this day is Leo Lionni. He is one of my favourite authors, so I was pleased to see him featured, and a letter written on his behalf by his granddaughter. In the Biographies of the Artists in the final pages of the book, it says he passed away in 1999 at the age of eighty-nine. Matthew Reinhart certainly got it right in the opening statement of his letter: “When I was a kid, an uncle of mine, a well-known painter who made giant paintings of ladies in their underwear, told me that I couldn’t be an artist until I was dead. I was too young to argue, but I knew he was totally wrong.” In fact, as Eric Carl says in the intro, that he was “struck by the fact that, for many of [the artists:], the dream or longing to make pictures and tell stories began in early childhood. Tomie dePaola – another of my favourites – says in his letter that he told everyone who would listen that he was going to be an artist when he grew up. He first said this when he was four years old. Tomie dePaola ended his letter with this advice: As my twin cousins told me a long time ago, “You have to practice, practice, practice – and don’t copy.” That was very good advice, so I am passing it on to you, Artist to Artist! Here is a sampling of what a few of the others had to say: Mitsumasa Anno: But in developing one’s own individual style, I believe that the culture that is part of your being from childhood is of great importance. If you look deeply into the culture you were brought up in… you will discover that the actual techniques you need for drawing good pictures are very easy to find. They are within you. Ashley Bryan: In our earliest years there’s no how? to our plunge into art. The doing gives the answer. There is no one way. Your work in art is original and there is no end to the adventure…HURRAH! Eric Carle: Ultimately, my aim is to entertain, and sometimes to enlighten, the child who still lives inside of me. This is where I begin. And just as in my boyhood, making pictures is how I express my truest feelings, my truest self. Alice Provensen: Young children make marvelous pictures. There is nothing they can’t draw. They paint and draw from their imaginations and the world around them. And they are not afraid to draw anything… It isn’t until an adult criticizes the picture and makes derogatory comments – “Those cars only have three wheels” or “The printing on those stores is too big” or “That person’s legs are too long – that children lose their confidence and stop drawing. If young people spent as much time drawing as they do learning to form the complicated letters of the alphabet such as Q or F or G, they would all make good pictures and maybe never even need to draw a straight line. Maurice Sendak: An illustration is an enlargement, an interpretation of the text, so that the reader will comprehend the words better. As an artist, you are always serving the words. You must never illustrate exactly what is written. You must find a space in the text so that the pictures do the work. Then you must let the words take over where words do it best. It’s a funny kind of juggling act. A great example of this is found in Piggybook, by Anthony Browne: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/14... And finally, Rosemary Wells: Expect to be different from other kids, because if you are an artist, you are different. Sometimes it’s hard to be different…but stay the course. Believe in yourself. Few people in this world can truly say they love their jobs, and the meaning of their work. I f you stay true to yourself and practice, practice, practice, you will have a life where you love what you do. And you can do it forever. All profits from the sale of this book go to the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, which opened in 2002. “The museum’s mission is to inspire, especially in children and their families, an appreciation for and an understanding of the art of the picture book.” That’s what this anthology does. Surely, despite severe cut-backs in education, schools can purchase one copy for the school library for all to share. Or, if you are a parent, relative or friend of a child who aspires to be an artist, this would make a wonderful gift. To learn more about the museum, visit their website at: www.picturebookart.org Take the virtual tour – I did!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Krista the Krazy Kataloguer

    What I found that all the illustrators in this book had in common was that they loved to draw from the time they were little kids, and felt compelled to draw all the time, even when they were supposed to be doing other things. That sounds so much like my brother, who, alas, was never encouraged in school and steered toward an art degree. I think any child who shows signs of being a potential artist should have this book placed in their hands to read. The illustrators here are encouraging and ins What I found that all the illustrators in this book had in common was that they loved to draw from the time they were little kids, and felt compelled to draw all the time, even when they were supposed to be doing other things. That sounds so much like my brother, who, alas, was never encouraged in school and steered toward an art degree. I think any child who shows signs of being a potential artist should have this book placed in their hands to read. The illustrators here are encouraging and inspiring. Each illustrator does a self-portrait as well--Maurice Sendak drew himself with some of the characters from his books. Made me wish I could draw. Recommended.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    I love biographies and art books, children’s books, and I really love a good children’s art book. This is a really good one. Twenty-three artists/illustrators, most known to me but some not known to me, have several pages each. They write a short biography that concentrates on being an artist when they were young. There are a variety of stories and I found almost all of them interesting. They each have a photo of themselves from some point in their childhood. Each has a few pages of examples of t I love biographies and art books, children’s books, and I really love a good children’s art book. This is a really good one. Twenty-three artists/illustrators, most known to me but some not known to me, have several pages each. They write a short biography that concentrates on being an artist when they were young. There are a variety of stories and I found almost all of them interesting. They each have a photo of themselves from some point in their childhood. Each has a few pages of examples of their art and they each do a self portrait, which (in my opinion) is some of the best art in the book as many are incredibly creative, but I enjoyed a great deal of all of the art; the artists featured create art in various styles/methods. At the end of the book there’s a one paragraph biography for each concentrating on their adult years as artists. These 23 people remember what it is like to be young and they direct their comments to children, especially children who have some interest in creating art and being artists. I was impressed by the sensitivity of many of them. Many of them had difficulties with school subjects such as reading, and many were not supported for being artists when they were kids. Some give pep talks to encourage budding young artists. After Eric Carle’s introductory note (more on that in a minute) the book starts off with a page that says “Dear young artist,” One of the most moving things for me was contained in Carle’s note. He was a child in Nazi Germany and he writes of being 12 years old and having an art teacher who showed him works by Klee and others deemed degenerate by the Nazis, something his teacher did for him at great personal risk, according to Carle. This is a beautiful book and I was fortunate to get a library copy in perfect condition. I’d have thought there would have been some damage as there are many fold out pages and even a pop up page. This would make a perfect gift book for any child who has a passion to make art.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Beverly

    Eric Carle convinced 23 picture book illustrators to write a short letter to readers about their background and artwork, and to encourage readers in their own efforts. Several of the artists advise readers to ignore naysayers who may tell them they can't make a living doing artwork, but that they should follow their dreams. Readers are also assured that it takes practice and hard work, just like in any other endeavor. Each artist has drawn or painted a self-portrait, which faces the letter. On o Eric Carle convinced 23 picture book illustrators to write a short letter to readers about their background and artwork, and to encourage readers in their own efforts. Several of the artists advise readers to ignore naysayers who may tell them they can't make a living doing artwork, but that they should follow their dreams. Readers are also assured that it takes practice and hard work, just like in any other endeavor. Each artist has drawn or painted a self-portrait, which faces the letter. On opening the self portrait's fold-out page, the reader can see photos of the artist's studio, and samples of their artwork. The back matter includes a couple of bibliographies of the books in which the various illustrators' work appears, and brief biographies of each one. This book should be a great encouragement to youngsters who want to have a career in art.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    A heavenly survey of illustrators, each of whom writes a letter to the reader explaining how and why they became artists. Gorgeous illustrations, wonderful text - this belongs in any art studio.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    The illustrators/artists provide wonderful messages to children throughout this anthology. As Tomie DePaola shares, "You can be one too. But it is hard work. As my twin cousins told me a long time ago, 'You have to practice, practice, practice --- and don't copy.' This was very good advice, so I'm passing it on to you, Artist to Artist." Throughout the book, there are messages of perseverance, originality, doing what you love, and using your imagination! I also discovered a few new artists/illus The illustrators/artists provide wonderful messages to children throughout this anthology. As Tomie DePaola shares, "You can be one too. But it is hard work. As my twin cousins told me a long time ago, 'You have to practice, practice, practice --- and don't copy.' This was very good advice, so I'm passing it on to you, Artist to Artist." Throughout the book, there are messages of perseverance, originality, doing what you love, and using your imagination! I also discovered a few new artists/illustrators whose work I had not previously seen. The book shares a variety of artistic styles, too. Pop-up books as a form of art, illustrators who favor nature, Eric Carle sharing his collage style. Alice Provensen, one I was previously not familiar with, offers this: "It isn't until an adult criticizes the picture and makes derogatory comments --- 'Those cars only have three wheels' or 'That person's legs are too long' --- that children lose their confidence and stop drawing." Too many great comments to share, but I will end with one from Rosemary Wells, "The most important thing in the whole of life is to love what you do. Draw from your life. Draw all the time. Expect to be different from other kids, because if you are an artist, you are different." I love when we celebrate differences in individuals and society. Most of these talented artists began at an early age, and truly followed their dreams. We all benefit from their talent and passion in a variety of children's books we read!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cindi

    I loved this book. I loved how it speaks directly to children and says that all children are artists, providing lots of encouragement to kids who might want to pursue art as a career or hobby. Each of 23 artists has written a small history of their own art as well as giving advice to kids about art. There is a self-portrait of each artist as well as samples of their work and (usually) a photo of their studio. It was fun to see that some artists are messy and some are neat and organized. Still, t I loved this book. I loved how it speaks directly to children and says that all children are artists, providing lots of encouragement to kids who might want to pursue art as a career or hobby. Each of 23 artists has written a small history of their own art as well as giving advice to kids about art. There is a self-portrait of each artist as well as samples of their work and (usually) a photo of their studio. It was fun to see that some artists are messy and some are neat and organized. Still, they all do incredible work. It also opened my eyes to some picture books that I have not seen and plan to check out for my small ones!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    This provides a nice overview of popular children's books illustrators. I already knew some of them, of course, but I learned about a few more that I'm looking forward to checking out. Most importantly, though, I learned that there is an Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, MA, which I will definitely add to my to-do list for my wishful vacation to New England this year.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carissa

    Excellent book by some of the best Illustrators. They all explain how they got into the profession. Some thought they couldn't even draw a stick person, something so many artists hear from others when they find out you are an artist, but really the key is sticking to it. I couldn't draw much at all when I went to college, but I knew I wanted to do it. I was way behind my peers, but I learned techniques and developed my work and now have a passion for all kinds of mediums and am illustrating a bo Excellent book by some of the best Illustrators. They all explain how they got into the profession. Some thought they couldn't even draw a stick person, something so many artists hear from others when they find out you are an artist, but really the key is sticking to it. I couldn't draw much at all when I went to college, but I knew I wanted to do it. I was way behind my peers, but I learned techniques and developed my work and now have a passion for all kinds of mediums and am illustrating a book right now. It takes a lot of work, but can be learned. It's not purely talent! Others grew up knowing they wanted to do nothing else but be an artist or illustrator. Some had their parents' support, others didn't. But, when you have that passion, it can't be stopped. Some self-taught, some had training, some kind of just "stumbled" into it. Beautiful book with artist commentaries sharing their backgrounds, early childhood drawings, to some of their published work. Some show pictures of their studios and working space. Many styles, mediums, and techniques are presented, including a pop-up! Even though it's geared towards juveniles, it is a great book for anyone interested in the background and drawings of some of the greats including Eric Carle, Quentin Blake, Chris Van Allsburg, Jane Dyer, Steven Kellogg, and others.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Dixon

    I really enjoyed reading this book - seeing the artists and their workshops, looking at examples of their work, hearing their stories about "always wanting to be an artist" etc. But I'm an adult who appreciates children's picture books. The intended audience is children (as per the title), and I think that children at the age able to read the text are quite possibly thinking themselves too old to be interested in picture books, so I wonder if they're going to see this book as worth reading. Then I really enjoyed reading this book - seeing the artists and their workshops, looking at examples of their work, hearing their stories about "always wanting to be an artist" etc. But I'm an adult who appreciates children's picture books. The intended audience is children (as per the title), and I think that children at the age able to read the text are quite possibly thinking themselves too old to be interested in picture books, so I wonder if they're going to see this book as worth reading. Then, by the time they're starting to follow a career path, they could do with a little more depth. I might be wrong - after all, I never had any artistic leanings as a child. ...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mike Violano

    A truly wonderful book by and about artists of children's' illustrated books. Each of the contributors are award winning masters of children's literature and speak to budding artists in heartfelt letters. Most of my favorite illustrators are here-- Eric Carle (who served as editor and invited all to contribute), Maurice Sendak, Tomie dePaola, Chris VanAllsberg, Jerry Pinkney, Leo Lionni, and Robert Sabuda and others. Each artist includes a self-portrait, a sketch or two from childhood, and a few A truly wonderful book by and about artists of children's' illustrated books. Each of the contributors are award winning masters of children's literature and speak to budding artists in heartfelt letters. Most of my favorite illustrators are here-- Eric Carle (who served as editor and invited all to contribute), Maurice Sendak, Tomie dePaola, Chris VanAllsberg, Jerry Pinkney, Leo Lionni, and Robert Sabuda and others. Each artist includes a self-portrait, a sketch or two from childhood, and a few favorite illustrations with commentary. Highly recommended for children's book lovers of all ages.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tina Hoggatt

    Profiles of illustrators and author/illustrators of books for young readers feature self-portraits by each author and first person narratives about their life in the field. A fold-out page on each profile shows examples of their art and process, including drawings from their childhood. A wonderful model for the young artist or illustrator. For each their vision of themselves began in childhood. Beautifully designed, published by the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Natalie VanDusen

    Simply fantastic. I loved reading about the process, the creativity, and what led these people to become illustrators. Some were new to me, some were favorites from my childhood. I would love to keep seeing new versions of this with new illustrators that kids (and adults) love.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn Hee

    This is a wonderful book that serves as a great intro to some of the best well known picture book illustrators. I would have liked to have seen more samples of the artist's artwork included but what I liked was the inclusion of their childhood photos and how their careers began.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jm Sasi

    this was very exciting book , and i will recommend it to my friends.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I loved this book. I hope my Jack and James feel this way about their work someday!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    I am not sure why everyone thinks this is a great book. My first question is who is this book aimed at? They say children, but this is not a book for elementary school, at best it is YA and do teenagers really care about how to create art for children? As for the content, like any compendium, some artists give great advice and others are weak. I also have a major issue is with the editing of the book and its layout. Each two page spread has the artist's letter on the left and a fold out page of I am not sure why everyone thinks this is a great book. My first question is who is this book aimed at? They say children, but this is not a book for elementary school, at best it is YA and do teenagers really care about how to create art for children? As for the content, like any compendium, some artists give great advice and others are weak. I also have a major issue is with the editing of the book and its layout. Each two page spread has the artist's letter on the left and a fold out page of the artist's self portrait and artwork on the right, but neither are clearly labeled with the artist's name. Instead the artist signs his/her letter, but even as an adult I can not read many of the names. None of the information is consistent from artist to artist, and I was left wondering what books did this artist illustrate, what media did they work it? Much of this is answered in the back of the book, but it should have been put on the page with each artist. In summary, I think this book is of more interest to adults than children, and I do not recommend purchase of the book as it is not that strong.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    I originally read this primarily to look at the sections on Ashley Bryan and Jerry Pinkney. I have a growing appreciation of the art in children's books. Both Bryan and Pinkney have won numerous awards for their work. I am reading through the other artists which include dePaola and Sendak. Artist to Artist: 23 Major Illustrators Talk to Children about Their Art is a brief look into 23 major artists and it is interesting to get a little insight into how and why they became what they are. This I originally read this primarily to look at the sections on Ashley Bryan and Jerry Pinkney. I have a growing appreciation of the art in children's books. Both Bryan and Pinkney have won numerous awards for their work. I am reading through the other artists which include dePaola and Sendak. Artist to Artist: 23 Major Illustrators Talk to Children about Their Art is a brief look into 23 major artists and it is interesting to get a little insight into how and why they became what they are. This is a nice resource book although the sections are brief.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karen Dransfield

    This is an interesting read. One that's taken me several months and at least one library fine and 2 or 3 requests to get it back to read some more. Each illustrator tells about their early life leading up to their working as an illustrator, and includes some pictures they drew when young, pictures they drew while developing one or more stories that they have published. An actual photo of them as a child, and a self portrait. The pages fold out. It's very interesting to see how many of them were This is an interesting read. One that's taken me several months and at least one library fine and 2 or 3 requests to get it back to read some more. Each illustrator tells about their early life leading up to their working as an illustrator, and includes some pictures they drew when young, pictures they drew while developing one or more stories that they have published. An actual photo of them as a child, and a self portrait. The pages fold out. It's very interesting to see how many of them were discouraged to take up art as a profession... and they did anyway and are now well known and doing it full time. A great way to encourage kids who don't think they can follow their dreams. It would be a great one to share with kids. Especially as they are introduced to each of the artists work in stories.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    10/10: Love this one! Got it for David. Each artist has a unique style as well as a unique story. That's empowering. Amazon Book Description: In this remarkable and beautiful anthology featuring the likes of Maurice Sendak, Robert Sabuda, Rosemary Wells, and Eric Carle, twenty-three of the most honored and beloved artists in children’s literature talk informally to children—sharing secrets about their art and how they began their adventures into illustration. Fold-out pages featuring photographs 10/10: Love this one! Got it for David. Each artist has a unique style as well as a unique story. That's empowering. Amazon Book Description: In this remarkable and beautiful anthology featuring the likes of Maurice Sendak, Robert Sabuda, Rosemary Wells, and Eric Carle, twenty-three of the most honored and beloved artists in children’s literature talk informally to children—sharing secrets about their art and how they began their adventures into illustration. Fold-out pages featuring photographs of their early work, their studios and materials, as well as sketches and finished art create an exuberant feast for the eye that will attract both children and adults. Self-portraits of each illustrator crown this important anthology that celebrates the artists and the art of the picture book. An event book for the ages.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Relyn

    10/03/08 I discovered this on one of my blog roams. It sounded great, but has turned out to actually sound better than it is. At least so far. It is good enough that I am going to finish it. But, not wonderful. 10/07/08 Maybe it really is my mood. This one didn't really float my boat either. I guess because I was expecting it to appeal to kids and it really didn't. It is a really great idea, and I was surprised that I didn't really like the book. Very surprised, actually. I love pictures books so 10/03/08 I discovered this on one of my blog roams. It sounded great, but has turned out to actually sound better than it is. At least so far. It is good enough that I am going to finish it. But, not wonderful. 10/07/08 Maybe it really is my mood. This one didn't really float my boat either. I guess because I was expecting it to appeal to kids and it really didn't. It is a really great idea, and I was surprised that I didn't really like the book. Very surprised, actually. I love pictures books so much, mostly due to my love of children's book illustration. Well, in spite of my ambivalence for this book, I am dying to go to the Eric Carle museum. Imagine! An entire museum dedicated to children's book illustration.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    What a wonderful book! I highly recommend reading it aloud to the children near you. These well-known illustrators (my favorites are Eric Carle, Tomie dePaola, Leo Lionni, Maurice Sendak, Chris Van Allsburg, Rosemary Wells, Paul O. Zelinsky, and Robert Sabuda and Matthew Reinhart) each write a letter to children briefly telling them their story and how they became an illustrator, and usually encouraging the children to follow their dreams in a very real and honest way. They also each include a s What a wonderful book! I highly recommend reading it aloud to the children near you. These well-known illustrators (my favorites are Eric Carle, Tomie dePaola, Leo Lionni, Maurice Sendak, Chris Van Allsburg, Rosemary Wells, Paul O. Zelinsky, and Robert Sabuda and Matthew Reinhart) each write a letter to children briefly telling them their story and how they became an illustrator, and usually encouraging the children to follow their dreams in a very real and honest way. They also each include a self-portrait, a photo of him or herself as a child, examples of their work, and a picture of their studio space. It also has a great bibliography. It's really a wonderful book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    I wish this book were much, much thicker to include lots of other illustrators, but the book's effort to inspire young artists is probably better achieved through a smaller selection. I loved the open-fold page that hides various samples of the artist's work. I found this book is best read in big chunks, because the similar elements that are common to each artist's feature emerge more clearly - self-portrait by each artist, photo from early childhood, and very early work. Each artist's statement I wish this book were much, much thicker to include lots of other illustrators, but the book's effort to inspire young artists is probably better achieved through a smaller selection. I loved the open-fold page that hides various samples of the artist's work. I found this book is best read in big chunks, because the similar elements that are common to each artist's feature emerge more clearly - self-portrait by each artist, photo from early childhood, and very early work. Each artist's statement is targeted for aspiring artists, recording a master's counsel to one just finding their passion and starting their training. (I'm not sure why the version I read didn't have a copyright date.)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    Listed as one of School Library Journal's best books of 2007, Artist to artist is a wonderful compilation of 23 illustrators' stories. Each artist includes a brief letter about their work, a self portrait, and a fold-out section with examples of their work. Especially engaging are the examples which show the stages the artists' work goes through before the final product is eventually printed. Artists include Robert Sabuda, Rosemary Wells, Eric Carle, Maurice Sendak, Ashley Bryan, Quentin Blake, Listed as one of School Library Journal's best books of 2007, Artist to artist is a wonderful compilation of 23 illustrators' stories. Each artist includes a brief letter about their work, a self portrait, and a fold-out section with examples of their work. Especially engaging are the examples which show the stages the artists' work goes through before the final product is eventually printed. Artists include Robert Sabuda, Rosemary Wells, Eric Carle, Maurice Sendak, Ashley Bryan, Quentin Blake, Leo Lionni, Alice Provensen, and Gennady Spirin. Recommended for grade 4 and up

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    A very nice compilation of letters from illustrators to children, including examples of their work. I especially enjoyed (as I always do) glimpses at sketchbooks, early work, and studio space. It makes them seem more real! I even learned about some artists with whom I was not familiar. I also feel encouraged reading that even the most talented artists have not always easily or directly achieved their goals in the art world, but as Eric Carle says in his introduction, these are artists who "follo A very nice compilation of letters from illustrators to children, including examples of their work. I especially enjoyed (as I always do) glimpses at sketchbooks, early work, and studio space. It makes them seem more real! I even learned about some artists with whom I was not familiar. I also feel encouraged reading that even the most talented artists have not always easily or directly achieved their goals in the art world, but as Eric Carle says in his introduction, these are artists who "follow their instincts and listen to their own inner voices."

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    This was a nicely thought-out book, both in visual presentation/layout, and content. It was fun reading the brief 'letters to kids' that each of the 23 artists wrote. I enjoyed seeing the representative artworks by each artist (particularly those by Quentin Blake, illustrator of all those great Roald Dahl tales--he's one of my absolute favorites). The main messages seem to center on "being yourself" as an artist (shun the temptation to imitate others!) but it's also about what led these artists This was a nicely thought-out book, both in visual presentation/layout, and content. It was fun reading the brief 'letters to kids' that each of the 23 artists wrote. I enjoyed seeing the representative artworks by each artist (particularly those by Quentin Blake, illustrator of all those great Roald Dahl tales--he's one of my absolute favorites). The main messages seem to center on "being yourself" as an artist (shun the temptation to imitate others!) but it's also about what led these artists to follow the paths they did. Quick read, and enjoyable.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    One of the best art books I've read. Yes this is targeted towards children, but any one who is an artist(in reality or at heart) would be impacted and inspired by reading this book. I think this book is more helpful to the aspiring artist than any instructional art book on technique or style. There are so many accepted myths surrounding art that continue to stifle and stagnate the flow in our society. Books like this do their part by helping to undo the detrimental ideas such as "talent" and "sta One of the best art books I've read. Yes this is targeted towards children, but any one who is an artist(in reality or at heart) would be impacted and inspired by reading this book. I think this book is more helpful to the aspiring artist than any instructional art book on technique or style. There are so many accepted myths surrounding art that continue to stifle and stagnate the flow in our society. Books like this do their part by helping to undo the detrimental ideas such as "talent" and "standards" where art is concerned.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jess Gill

    filled with a variety of illustrations by a number of famous children's book illustrators, this compilation is a treasure for those who love picture books. best of all are the words of advice to young artists - my favorite by Ashley Bryan: "In our earliest years there's no how? to our plunge into art. The doing gives the answer. There is no one way. Your work in art is original and there is no end to the adventure... hurrah!"

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chandra Jordan

    I truly enjoy reading to my children and often seek out books with dynamic, unique rich illustration. One of my son's favorite illustrators is Eric Carle. He is the author of this book Artist to Artist which has an array of wonderful quotes from accomplished illustrators, which support the idea of the importance of art and creativity in childhood. This book is an affirmation to any child or adult who may be pursuing art as a path of career or life choice.

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