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Facing the Music, Larry Brown’s first book, was originally published in 1988 to wide critical acclaim. As the St. Petersburg Times review pointed out, the central theme of these ten stories “is the ageless collision of man with woman, woman with man--with the frequent introduction of that other familiar couple, drinking and violence. Most often ugly, love is nevertheless g Facing the Music, Larry Brown’s first book, was originally published in 1988 to wide critical acclaim. As the St. Petersburg Times review pointed out, the central theme of these ten stories “is the ageless collision of man with woman, woman with man--with the frequent introduction of that other familiar couple, drinking and violence. Most often ugly, love is nevertheless graceful, however desperate the situation.” There’s some glare from the brutally bright light Larry Brown shines on his subjects. This is the work of a writer unafraid to gaze directly at characters challenged by crisis and pathology. But for readers who are willing to look, unblinkingly, along with the writer, there are unusual rewards.


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Facing the Music, Larry Brown’s first book, was originally published in 1988 to wide critical acclaim. As the St. Petersburg Times review pointed out, the central theme of these ten stories “is the ageless collision of man with woman, woman with man--with the frequent introduction of that other familiar couple, drinking and violence. Most often ugly, love is nevertheless g Facing the Music, Larry Brown’s first book, was originally published in 1988 to wide critical acclaim. As the St. Petersburg Times review pointed out, the central theme of these ten stories “is the ageless collision of man with woman, woman with man--with the frequent introduction of that other familiar couple, drinking and violence. Most often ugly, love is nevertheless graceful, however desperate the situation.” There’s some glare from the brutally bright light Larry Brown shines on his subjects. This is the work of a writer unafraid to gaze directly at characters challenged by crisis and pathology. But for readers who are willing to look, unblinkingly, along with the writer, there are unusual rewards.

30 review for Facing the Music

  1. 4 out of 5

    Vit Babenco

    Larry Brown is a realistic and convincing raconteur. Facing the Music is a book of wistful stories – ten pieces of despair and unhappiness… Ten tales about love and an absence of love. I’m thinking that your first love is your best love, that you’ll never find any better. The way she did it was like she was saying, here I am, I’m all yours, all of me, forever. Nothing’s changed. She turns the light off, and we reach to find each other in the darkness like people who are blind. Absence of love sure Larry Brown is a realistic and convincing raconteur. Facing the Music is a book of wistful stories – ten pieces of despair and unhappiness… Ten tales about love and an absence of love. I’m thinking that your first love is your best love, that you’ll never find any better. The way she did it was like she was saying, here I am, I’m all yours, all of me, forever. Nothing’s changed. She turns the light off, and we reach to find each other in the darkness like people who are blind. Absence of love surely makes one unhappy. And love can bring even more unhappiness… She’s another one of the crazy ones. I don’t know why I’m the one who always finds them, goes straight to them like a pointer after birds. They’re not worth the trouble. They drive me nuts with their kids and their divorces and their diet pills and their friends in trouble and their ex-husbands for whom they still carry the torch. They promise and promise and promise. There are too many things capable to make us unhappy…

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Vacca

    According to Larry Brown's first collection of short stories Facing the Music, some of the joys of life I get to look forward to over the next two decades are as follows: unfulfilling marriages, infidelity, unwanted children, domestic abuse, back problems, alcoholism, cancer, numbness, loneliness, unexpected run-ins with terminal violence, poverty and, naturally, suicide. Thanks, Larry! The second half of my twenties is already looking promising. But before I crawl off into the nearest bottle of According to Larry Brown's first collection of short stories Facing the Music, some of the joys of life I get to look forward to over the next two decades are as follows: unfulfilling marriages, infidelity, unwanted children, domestic abuse, back problems, alcoholism, cancer, numbness, loneliness, unexpected run-ins with terminal violence, poverty and, naturally, suicide. Thanks, Larry! The second half of my twenties is already looking promising. But before I crawl off into the nearest bottle of Old Grandad, let me say a word or two more about this collection. For the most part, firefighter-turned-gloomy-author Larry Brown, delivers each of the ten stories in this slim collection in a clean, economical prose. A majority of these stories feature first-person accounts of men coming to tiny realizations about the inescapable and disappointing banality and wearisomeness of existence. There is a fair amount of humor to be found in a few of these stories, but the jokes come in droll, sober deliveries. The other half of the stories in this collection find Brown flexing his experimental chops with varying degrees of success. "Julie: A Memory" is a muddled jumble of events spanning across the relationship between a young man and woman, featuring a sentence by sentence shift in time with the narration flitting around faster than Billy Pilgrim can blink. "Boy and Dog," is written in the lay-out a poem and gives a See-Spot-Run style account of what happens when you are an asshole who hits-and-runs dogs. "Kubuku Rides" plays around with dialect as it shows how a sorry excuse for a mother breaks down her husband's spirit with her abusive bouts of drinking. All the stories in this collection worked well enough for me. While I wasn't wow-ed at any point, I enjoyed all the Southern pessimism and Leonard Cohen-esque moroseness that carried each of the stories along. I'm looking forward to seeing how Brown's writing develops over the following novels and collections that followed this tender and firm-footed debut. Did I say Leonard Cohen? I meant Drive-By Truckers: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WGu7d...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Asghar Abbas

    Okay. Alright. Stop. You know who you are and what you must be. Wherever you are, in an imagined better place or otherwise. Stop whatever you have been doing and read this fine collection of short stories, the erstwhile fireman's first published work, if I'm not mistaken. Right off the bat, from the get go , few pages in unlike the Black Eyed Peas he Got Me laughing, then immediately afterward I felt bad because the situations within these papery borders were definitely not funny, but rather poi Okay. Alright. Stop. You know who you are and what you must be. Wherever you are, in an imagined better place or otherwise. Stop whatever you have been doing and read this fine collection of short stories, the erstwhile fireman's first published work, if I'm not mistaken. Right off the bat, from the get go , few pages in unlike the Black Eyed Peas he Got Me laughing, then immediately afterward I felt bad because the situations within these papery borders were definitely not funny, but rather poignant. That's the power of Brown's writing ( this guy opted I think ( a disclaimer I know) not to attend college, but oh boy such talent ! Just being smug that talent is inherent hehe something that I keep saying ) and this amazing dry southern wit that he possessed, sense of humor that was him and on the money, always. Even when he's killing us with so much bleak reflection of us, and where we are. Where we are stranded for now. Maybe he is just making us sad about where we are headed. Where we must not go and where we we must. I totally loved the first Song in this collection. I enjoyed how our hero was enjoying the movie on his TV as the narration unfolded. The sadness in that short story made me sad. It was the kinda sadness that comes with experience, with having experienced something, with aging , sage and bittersweet. Feeling you get after living a while. You could tell something had happened with this couple. Something tragic had come to pass between. Maybe love that's gone now or the love that won't go away. A story of centuries old war between men and women; a war of giving in and then the ultimate defeat; acceptance. Things we do to each other. We need one another but not what we give. It reminded me of Hemingway's short story, Hills like White Elephants ( one of my favs) only better, well clearer with more open motivations and a wow ending. Wow as in the spine tingling wordlings. Tell me, how can this book not make you think of you? It made me think of you, that I know . It made me think of you and make you up. Damn , Larry Brown can write . He used to anyway, he's dead now. And that's saddening and maddening right about now . Want more of him. Nope girls , no reference to your amazing band , my favorite, in this review . A band that features my beloved Jenny Lee * wink wink * I was rereading this book earlier , sort of (not important which one) and I picked this up. Ugh this is real, so sooo realistic. Characters that are animated in a way that makes the books that are blessed with them..... hum. As it ought to be. Usually, I am deeply suspicious of short story genre but I am really appreciative of this book. Boy, his writing is real, so real. I needed that. Oddly enough , Brown reminds me of Jack Kerouac. Just , just read the books by Larry Brown. We are riven no more . We are better than us. Insolent nation, now heal. codicil : In the light of now, in the light of day that never came, those few words above do seem naive. Innocent no more. But Writer still is. There. We are not going anywhere. But whoever is having this nightmare, who is there to wake them up? There is no Alice's sister to wake us up from this, there is no Alice dreaming all this either.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gea

    Some very fine writing here. Larry Brown reminds me of Denis Johnson. Facing the Music is Southern grit lit with a dash of dark humor occasionally thrown in when you're not expecting it. These are sad souls, down on their luck, but full of desire and hot with yearning. Brown has a gift for character and dialog. One senses that he is absolutely capturing reality. I'm looking forward to reading one of his novels next. Some very fine writing here. Larry Brown reminds me of Denis Johnson. Facing the Music is Southern grit lit with a dash of dark humor occasionally thrown in when you're not expecting it. These are sad souls, down on their luck, but full of desire and hot with yearning. Brown has a gift for character and dialog. One senses that he is absolutely capturing reality. I'm looking forward to reading one of his novels next.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Pascarella

    Anyone seeking warm, fuzzy, reassuring stories should go elsewhere. Brown goes to the disturbingly honest places most people spend a lifetime trying to cover up. His spotlight on the darkness of our urges is mesmerizing. It's all done with economy, too -- this slim volume packs a surprising punch, and the characters haunted me for days. Brown is also willing to take risks with form, making the reader even more off-kilter. Anyone seeking warm, fuzzy, reassuring stories should go elsewhere. Brown goes to the disturbingly honest places most people spend a lifetime trying to cover up. His spotlight on the darkness of our urges is mesmerizing. It's all done with economy, too -- this slim volume packs a surprising punch, and the characters haunted me for days. Brown is also willing to take risks with form, making the reader even more off-kilter.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    One of the most common mistakes one can make in judging a story is to base his/her judgment on whether or not he/she likes the subject matter or characters. Using such criteria has no place in serious criticism. I mention this only because fine writers like Raymond Carver and Larry Brown are occasionally dismissed because they often write about coarse or even disreputable major characters. Still,focusing on the less than enviable folks who show up on the pages of so many of Larry Brown's storie One of the most common mistakes one can make in judging a story is to base his/her judgment on whether or not he/she likes the subject matter or characters. Using such criteria has no place in serious criticism. I mention this only because fine writers like Raymond Carver and Larry Brown are occasionally dismissed because they often write about coarse or even disreputable major characters. Still,focusing on the less than enviable folks who show up on the pages of so many of Larry Brown's stories is in my view a classic case of mistaking the forest for the trees. Brown is a writer of significant talent. His use of dialogue is spot on, and his sentences move effortlessly and rhythmically. His use of humor sometimes reminds me of Flannery O'Connor's. Picking a favorite in Facing the Music is a lot like choosing between one's son and one's daughter. You love then both but in different ways. Check out "The End of Romance," or the title story, "Facing the Music." Then tell me coarse characters or depressing settings do anything to diminish the power of an exceptionally interesting writer.

  7. 4 out of 5

    luciddreamer99

    Larry Brown has a distinct voice and tone to his work. The voice speaks to you from the page and the reader gets inside the heads of Brown's characters in an almost obsessive way. His stories of alcohol, infidelity, women, and romance never fail to amuse me. He is a masterful writer of the short story and this book is a nice sample of his work. I like some of these stories better than others, but I couldn't give this a lower rating because of the ones I did enjoy. When Brown is on point, he is a Larry Brown has a distinct voice and tone to his work. The voice speaks to you from the page and the reader gets inside the heads of Brown's characters in an almost obsessive way. His stories of alcohol, infidelity, women, and romance never fail to amuse me. He is a masterful writer of the short story and this book is a nice sample of his work. I like some of these stories better than others, but I couldn't give this a lower rating because of the ones I did enjoy. When Brown is on point, he is a joy to read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Great collection. Seems like Brown was trying on voices with these stories. Hints of the masterful storytelling to come later in his novels. Funny, gritty, real. Classic Brown is glimpsed as he works in a variety of voices; maybe trying to settle on the one that would best tell the stories he was to tell later. Liked this a great deal.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Martha

    Brown was a great southern writer - these stories spin around a theme of people coming to a crux in their life - whether self created or not. Almost all come from a history of the stereotypical rough side of southern life, but the reader understands Brown has lived there, known these people, and been respectable honest about them.

  10. 5 out of 5

    James Aura

    Rough as a cob, smooth as a cold beer after a day of shoveling coal, and very much a redneck state of mind. Larry Brown was a master of down home, rough life Southern fiction. Absorbing, not always enjoyable, but ultimately rewarding for fans of the genre.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Grace Tenkay

    Larry Brown was a really good Southern writer. He captured those who are down and out, the outsiders, the beleaguered with clarity and wit. These stories were all compelling and very good reading.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mark Enderle

    I thought a few of these stories were fantastic, and a couple a mess. And too many dead dogs.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mack Hayden

    My girlfriend picked this one up at Powell's on a whim a while ago and recommended it to me when she was finished. I'm really glad she did. These stories are tailor made for a Flannery O'Connor obsessive like me. They may not be as Catholic, but they sure are filled with quiet desperation. Ranging from the darkly comic to the outright tragic, Larry Brown's protagonists barely feel worthy of the title "anti-hero." But that's the mark of his talent: you're empathizing the whole way through with ut My girlfriend picked this one up at Powell's on a whim a while ago and recommended it to me when she was finished. I'm really glad she did. These stories are tailor made for a Flannery O'Connor obsessive like me. They may not be as Catholic, but they sure are filled with quiet desperation. Ranging from the darkly comic to the outright tragic, Larry Brown's protagonists barely feel worthy of the title "anti-hero." But that's the mark of his talent: you're empathizing the whole way through with utterly repellant, hopeless cases because the right person is telling you their stories. "Kubuku Rides," "Old Frank and Jesus," "Boy and Dog," "Night Life," "Leaving Town," and "The End of Romance" were the standouts to me; the others felt a little more unhewn.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Betsy Robinson

    Whether he is writing the inner dialogue of a drunk black woman or a white farmer at the end of his rope or a boy seeking revenge for the death of his dog, there is something so raw and intimately, delicately human here. Brown distills the most private human confusion, shame, hubris, hurt, anger, and self-delusion into spare writing that goes into the reader like emotion pushed through an IV. I found myself rocking and moaning. The range and diversity of the writing is also perfection. He’ll pla Whether he is writing the inner dialogue of a drunk black woman or a white farmer at the end of his rope or a boy seeking revenge for the death of his dog, there is something so raw and intimately, delicately human here. Brown distills the most private human confusion, shame, hubris, hurt, anger, and self-delusion into spare writing that goes into the reader like emotion pushed through an IV. I found myself rocking and moaning. The range and diversity of the writing is also perfection. He’ll play with the short story form, turning it into a lyrical poem or, in a story recalling a memory, disorganized fragments — as if he wrote a story, tore it into individual sentences, then pieced them together randomly. And the creation relays the way memory really works. One of my favorite stories in this collection, “Night Life,” left me gasping. And the last story, “End of Romance,” was one of the most violent and hilarious pieces of work I’ve ever read. There is no way to intuit where Larry Brown will take you. This is magnificent writing, and the book’s title is perfect. The edition I read ends with Brown’s letters to his publisher. Larry Brown (1951–2004) was a fireman and family man who loved to write. His letters make you moan in a different kind of way; you just wish he could have lived longer and that you could have met him.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Casey

    I enjoyed Big Bad Love a lot, and but I think this collection, Brown's first, is even better. It's what you would expect if you've ever read any of Brown's stories--lots of drinking, down-and-out men and women in failing relationships/marriages, violence, and, perhaps surprisingly, humor. Though he doesn't do this in every story, it's Brown is not afraid to allow a story to be funny, even if it's a deadly serious situation for the characters. That's hard to do. Brown "experiments" in two stories: I enjoyed Big Bad Love a lot, and but I think this collection, Brown's first, is even better. It's what you would expect if you've ever read any of Brown's stories--lots of drinking, down-and-out men and women in failing relationships/marriages, violence, and, perhaps surprisingly, humor. Though he doesn't do this in every story, it's Brown is not afraid to allow a story to be funny, even if it's a deadly serious situation for the characters. That's hard to do. Brown "experiments" in two stories: "Boy and Dog," a story written like a poem in five word lines; and "Julie: A Memory," a stream-of-consciousness story dealing with an extrmemely violent act (this one bears rereading). "Samaritans," "Night Life," and "Facing the Music" are all excellent stories. I highly recommend the collection.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Oliver Bateman

    An underrated collection of short stories: "The Rich" is an uproarious profile of a travel agent who serves the wealthy, "Night Life" is an affecting examination of the barriers between men and women, and "The End of Romance" is the most innovative break-up story I've ever read. I despise these "sorta like A and sorta like B" descriptions, but Brown is best understood as a cross between Hubert Selby Jr. and Raymond Carver: He's more understated than the former and more sincere than the latter. F An underrated collection of short stories: "The Rich" is an uproarious profile of a travel agent who serves the wealthy, "Night Life" is an affecting examination of the barriers between men and women, and "The End of Romance" is the most innovative break-up story I've ever read. I despise these "sorta like A and sorta like B" descriptions, but Brown is best understood as a cross between Hubert Selby Jr. and Raymond Carver: He's more understated than the former and more sincere than the latter. Facing the Music is another reading project that can be completed in less than two hours, so what are you waiting for?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    "Facing The Music" is Larry Brown's first published book. Reading a Larry Brown's stories are like talking to a rural Mississippi white guy down on his luck. He has the wonderful gift of writing exactly like a person would talk...people with coolers of beer iced down in the back floorboards of their cars, always struggling with their women, jail, or losing their job...he could take the ordinary and make it extraordinary. He authored 10 books before his death in 2004, at the age of 53. He is high "Facing The Music" is Larry Brown's first published book. Reading a Larry Brown's stories are like talking to a rural Mississippi white guy down on his luck. He has the wonderful gift of writing exactly like a person would talk...people with coolers of beer iced down in the back floorboards of their cars, always struggling with their women, jail, or losing their job...he could take the ordinary and make it extraordinary. He authored 10 books before his death in 2004, at the age of 53. He is high on my list of favorite authors because of his writing style.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Larry Brown is a remarkable and innovative writer. His stories in this volume are raw, human, and evocative. Human desperation is at the heart of many of them, whether desperation for love, money, or simple peace. He writes with a lean style and an eagle eye for hidden emotion. Some of his stories are straightforward, while others toy with the form, as though he'd decided to see how much he could rearrange a story and still have it make sense. This collection of stories is a wonderful read, a sl Larry Brown is a remarkable and innovative writer. His stories in this volume are raw, human, and evocative. Human desperation is at the heart of many of them, whether desperation for love, money, or simple peace. He writes with a lean style and an eagle eye for hidden emotion. Some of his stories are straightforward, while others toy with the form, as though he'd decided to see how much he could rearrange a story and still have it make sense. This collection of stories is a wonderful read, a slice of sun-baked southern life that sizzles with vitality.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Blowdryer

    There's a story that is him getting ready to write Joe - which I wanna read as I enjoyed the movie with Nicolas Cage plus some real people. Joe has the most true to life wino to wino murder you'll ever want to see, and the short story Samaritans is some true to life hardcore preview of all the low behavior the permanently betrayed betrayers are capable of. Pretty good loaner from Cassandra Dallett. There's a story that is him getting ready to write Joe - which I wanna read as I enjoyed the movie with Nicolas Cage plus some real people. Joe has the most true to life wino to wino murder you'll ever want to see, and the short story Samaritans is some true to life hardcore preview of all the low behavior the permanently betrayed betrayers are capable of. Pretty good loaner from Cassandra Dallett.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lady R.E. Miller

    The story "Kubuku Rides" scared the crap out of me, so much in fact, that I actually started drinking less! I thought this story and the title story were best, but overall a wonderful book. p.s. If anyone can tell me what "Kubuku" means or where Larry Brown got that title I'd be very grateful. The story "Kubuku Rides" scared the crap out of me, so much in fact, that I actually started drinking less! I thought this story and the title story were best, but overall a wonderful book. p.s. If anyone can tell me what "Kubuku" means or where Larry Brown got that title I'd be very grateful.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Strickland

    I loved this collection. 4.7 rounded up.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Colin Brightwell

    4.3 stars. With the exception of "The Rich," every story here is incredible. Brown's first collection of short fiction is more experimental than I expected- one story is written in lines of five words, laid out like a poem. Another story, "Julie: A Memory," tells a story about rape and murder but every sentence is out of order. And yet Brown's other stories demonstrate the pain and desperation of people in hard times, traps, life. His men are shitty, using and abusing women and hard drinkers. Br 4.3 stars. With the exception of "The Rich," every story here is incredible. Brown's first collection of short fiction is more experimental than I expected- one story is written in lines of five words, laid out like a poem. Another story, "Julie: A Memory," tells a story about rape and murder but every sentence is out of order. And yet Brown's other stories demonstrate the pain and desperation of people in hard times, traps, life. His men are shitty, using and abusing women and hard drinkers. Brown is what Raymond Carver would have been if he went down south to learn from Faulkner, and with a mix of Denis Johnson thrown in for good measure. A worthwhile collection of short stories if you like to read about desperation.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chiyeung Lau

    Alcoholic wives. Hopeless husbands. Murderous men. These are cutting and gritty stories of the American South. Larry Brown makes us stare in the face of the bleakness and horrors of these character's lives but he does so with extreme empathy and care -- there is still hope for these people, but not in the way you would expect. It's rare for me nowadays to be blown away by a short story collection and feel compelled to finish it in one day but every sentence, every page, every story made me want Alcoholic wives. Hopeless husbands. Murderous men. These are cutting and gritty stories of the American South. Larry Brown makes us stare in the face of the bleakness and horrors of these character's lives but he does so with extreme empathy and care -- there is still hope for these people, but not in the way you would expect. It's rare for me nowadays to be blown away by a short story collection and feel compelled to finish it in one day but every sentence, every page, every story made me want to keep reading until the end. I will definitely be reading more of Brown's work after this.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ollie_le_clodo

    I don't know if I like the idea of a short stories serie, but I tried it anyway, the plot was appealing. At first I thought to myself "read so quickly, immediately forgot". But then I started to like very short sentences, quick typing, and touches of fargo-esque humor in general. Also a special mention to "Julie: A Memory" although a bit difficult at first, has a very fast style, kerouac-y. So a good reading time overall. French Version - Gallmeister - 3.5 * I don't know if I like the idea of a short stories serie, but I tried it anyway, the plot was appealing. At first I thought to myself "read so quickly, immediately forgot". But then I started to like very short sentences, quick typing, and touches of fargo-esque humor in general. Also a special mention to "Julie: A Memory" although a bit difficult at first, has a very fast style, kerouac-y. So a good reading time overall. French Version - Gallmeister - 3.5 *

  25. 4 out of 5

    Roben

    I would have ranked it higher. The things Brown noticed in this life. His quirky and clean writing style. But the thing is....the short story topics are seedy and tough. I know these things are out there in the world but still, maybe that I am just weary of disfunction. Glad I read Mr. Brown, though.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ken Oder

    This was Larry Brown's first published collection of short stories. They hint at the gritty southern based voice that was to come in novels such as Fay. A couple of them represent experimental story-telling techniques that seem to me to miss the mark, but all the others are entertaining sojourns with characters you won't meet anywhere else. A good introduction to Brown's work. This was Larry Brown's first published collection of short stories. They hint at the gritty southern based voice that was to come in novels such as Fay. A couple of them represent experimental story-telling techniques that seem to me to miss the mark, but all the others are entertaining sojourns with characters you won't meet anywhere else. A good introduction to Brown's work.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bill Sanwald

    One of my favorite authors. I finally tracked this one down. I had read everything he had written, fiction-wise, except this one and the last one he wrote. This is the short story collection that introduced the exceptionally talented Larry Brown to the world. A stunning introduction.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Mandly

    I only was able to read a few of these stories before I had to return it, but what I read I enjoyed.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Luci

    Powerful and dark. Some were even a bit depressing, but overall, excellent southern short stories.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    Boy And Dog is genius!!! I didn't care too much for the last story, The End Of A Romance - only because it didn't fit the flow of the stories. Boy And Dog made up for it though. Boy And Dog is genius!!! I didn't care too much for the last story, The End Of A Romance - only because it didn't fit the flow of the stories. Boy And Dog made up for it though.

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