hits counter Science Comics: The Brain: The Ultimate Thinking Machine - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Science Comics: The Brain: The Ultimate Thinking Machine

Availability: Ready to download

With Science Comics, you can explore the depths of the ocean, the farthest reaches of space, and everything in between! These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. In this volume, Fahama has been kidnapped by a mad scientist and his zombie assistant, and they are intent on stealing her brain! She'll need to learn about the With Science Comics, you can explore the depths of the ocean, the farthest reaches of space, and everything in between! These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. In this volume, Fahama has been kidnapped by a mad scientist and his zombie assistant, and they are intent on stealing her brain! She'll need to learn about the brain as fast as possible in order to plan her escape! How did the brain evolve? How do our senses work in relation to the brain? How do we remember things? What makes you, YOU? Get an inside look at the human brain, the most advanced operating system in the world . . . if you have the nerve!


Compare

With Science Comics, you can explore the depths of the ocean, the farthest reaches of space, and everything in between! These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. In this volume, Fahama has been kidnapped by a mad scientist and his zombie assistant, and they are intent on stealing her brain! She'll need to learn about the With Science Comics, you can explore the depths of the ocean, the farthest reaches of space, and everything in between! These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. In this volume, Fahama has been kidnapped by a mad scientist and his zombie assistant, and they are intent on stealing her brain! She'll need to learn about the brain as fast as possible in order to plan her escape! How did the brain evolve? How do our senses work in relation to the brain? How do we remember things? What makes you, YOU? Get an inside look at the human brain, the most advanced operating system in the world . . . if you have the nerve!

30 review for Science Comics: The Brain: The Ultimate Thinking Machine

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carla Johnson-Hicks

    There is a lot of information in this graphic novel. Nour wants to sell the most cookies for her Woodland Adventure Troop. Her sister Fahama is helping her. When they split up, Fahama ends up in a old mansion with a mad scientist and his sidekick. They want to take her brain to study. While trying to stall them, she asks a lot of questions about the brain, what it does, how it does things, what it is made of, the role of the various parts etc. This book gives so many facts, definitions etc. from There is a lot of information in this graphic novel. Nour wants to sell the most cookies for her Woodland Adventure Troop. Her sister Fahama is helping her. When they split up, Fahama ends up in a old mansion with a mad scientist and his sidekick. They want to take her brain to study. While trying to stall them, she asks a lot of questions about the brain, what it does, how it does things, what it is made of, the role of the various parts etc. This book gives so many facts, definitions etc. from the make up of a cell to the role of the spinal cord that I was a bit overwhelmed with all the vocabulary and information and I am an adult. This could be overload for some readers but it is a fun way to present the information to middle grade students. There is a glossary at the back that I was constantly checking while reading. If someone is interested in the brain, or if this is a topic being studied, this could be used as an introduction or overview, but I think more time would have to be spent on the various areas if this information was going to be retained. If it is just to read and maybe pick some information up, then this would definitely be an interesting way to learn some things about the nervous system. The publisher generously provided me with a copy of this book via Netgalley.

  2. 4 out of 5

    January Gray

    I cannot recommend this series enough! They are perfect for getting children (and adults) interested in reading and learning! I love the whole series, and this one did not disappoint.

  3. 5 out of 5

    OpenBookSociety.com

    http://openbooksociety.com/article/sc... Title: Science Comics: The Brain – The Ultimate Thinking Machine By: Tory Woolcott ISBN: 1626728003 (ISBN13: 9781626728004) Brought to you by OBS reviewer Andra Summary: With Science Comics, you can explore the depths of the ocean, the farthest reaches of space, and everything in between! These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. In this volume, Fahama has been kidnapped by a mad scientist and his zombie ass http://openbooksociety.com/article/sc... Title: Science Comics: The Brain – The Ultimate Thinking Machine By: Tory Woolcott ISBN: 1626728003 (ISBN13: 9781626728004) Brought to you by OBS reviewer Andra Summary: With Science Comics, you can explore the depths of the ocean, the farthest reaches of space, and everything in between! These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. In this volume, Fahama has been kidnapped by a mad scientist and his zombie assistant, and they are intent on stealing her brain! She’ll need to learn about the brain as fast as possible in order to plan her escape! How did the brain evolve? How do our senses work in relation to the brain? How do we remember things? What makes you, YOU? Get an inside look at the human brain, the most advanced operating system in the world . . . if you have the nerve! Review: I have read a couple of graphic novels in the Science Comics series (Science Comics: Plagues: The Microscopic Battlefield and Science Comics: Robots and Drones: Past, Present, and Future) and quite enjoyed those titles so thought I would pick up Science Comics: The Brain – The Ultimate Thinking Machine. Fahama is essentially kidnapped and to be used as part of an experiment by “The Evil Brain”. Luckily, she is quick on her feet and keeps asking her captor questions. And this is where the reader picks up all the information about the brain. I liked segments like the following where humour was interjected into the information being disseminated: “The eye is one of my favorite body parts. EYE love it because it’s a CORNEA-copia of puns!” “Your (vitreous) humor is the WORST.” “I see what you did there.” “What can I say? I’m a good PUPIL.” I really enjoyed learning so many new things…for example – how and in what the Egyptians kept when they mummified their dead. The jars were called canopic jars. They removed the brain through the back of the head via the Foramen magnum. Who knew? Or being told how fast nerve signals can move –> up to 540 kph (335 mph)! I am a bit perplexed about Fahima’s sister – the Girl Scout with attitude… not sure I liked her bullying tactics or calling Troop 7 scum. Not very nice and not really something I like in a book (graphic novel or otherwise) where I know youth will be reading. Also, I found her attitude towards her mom to be disrespectful. There were certainly little nuggets throughout that you could tell were for the younger crowd: “The brain stem regulates things you don’t think about, like your heart rate and breathing, but it’s also in charge of things like sneezing and barfing!” Or When discussing how large the neocortex is when flattened out like a newspaper or pizza box: “That’s both gross and cool!”- ”Most things in biology are.” One thing I have to say about this book is that it is filled with SO much information – I felt like my brain was going to explode (hee hee). I also at times found the transitions abrupt. For example, when discussing taste and then the next page jumps right into hearing. There needed to be a more gradual transition into the next topic. Possibly with further editing, these transitions would not seem so unexpected. From my experience each volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic— plagues, solar systems, dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, etc. So far, they are attractively illustrated graphic novels offering wildly entertaining views of their specific subject matters. The audience for these wonderful books seems to be very wide…elementary student, high schooler or an adult expanding their horizons… these graphic novels are wonderful for all. *OBS would like to thank the publisher for supplying a free copy of this title in exchange for an honest review*

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC from Edelweiss Plus Fahama's sister is bound and determined to sell the most scout cookies and win the prize, so the two split up to sell more. Fahama, unfortunately, falls into the clutches of an evil scientist/brain in a jar who wants to remove her brain. She stalls him by asking for more information about the brain and neuroscience, while her sister looks for her. There is a ton of excellent information about neuroscience, and this book is fun and informative. It would be an excellent to E ARC from Edelweiss Plus Fahama's sister is bound and determined to sell the most scout cookies and win the prize, so the two split up to sell more. Fahama, unfortunately, falls into the clutches of an evil scientist/brain in a jar who wants to remove her brain. She stalls him by asking for more information about the brain and neuroscience, while her sister looks for her. There is a ton of excellent information about neuroscience, and this book is fun and informative. It would be an excellent tool to use in the classroom. However, I suspect that most of my readers will do what I did-- read Fahama's story and skim the information about neuroscience. If there were one of these comics on, say, ancient Roman history, I would have gobbled it up. Since a prebind of this is $18 (which is a lot-- I get $10 per student per year!), I will purchase this if teachers ask or if students start asking for science books. Now I have to go watch Gateway to the Mind. (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0154525/) I love Frank Baxter's voice!

  5. 5 out of 5

    J Aislynn d'Merricksson

    Science Comics: The Brain by Tory Woollcott follows Fahama who is out helping her younger bratty sister sell cookies. Fahama gets kidnapped by an Evil Brain and his zombie butler when she knocks on the wrong door. He wants to remove her brain! Fahama distracts him in a bid for time so rescue can arrive by asking about the brain and its functions. The Evil Brain is happy to talk about his specialty. As Fahama learns about the brain, so does the reader. The information is pretty thorough. I even l Science Comics: The Brain by Tory Woollcott follows Fahama who is out helping her younger bratty sister sell cookies. Fahama gets kidnapped by an Evil Brain and his zombie butler when she knocks on the wrong door. He wants to remove her brain! Fahama distracts him in a bid for time so rescue can arrive by asking about the brain and its functions. The Evil Brain is happy to talk about his specialty. As Fahama learns about the brain, so does the reader. The information is pretty thorough. I even learned a few new things! There's humour as well. I adored the Star Trek neurons! I also liked that they included umami among the flavour receptors. The writing seems more junior high and high school level, rather than elementary level. Recommended for those interested in science! ***Many thanks to the Netgalley and First Second Books for providing an egalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lily Williams

    It is so crazy to think about how a bunch of brains made this book on brains possible. My brain thinks this book on brains is pretty great and very informative... but is that narcissistic of my brain?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Theresa MG

    Fun and detailed explanation of the brain and nervous system. My 3rd grader was introduced to Science Comics at school and was excited to find them at the local library. We love reading them together at home.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Dulaney

    While my library owns several graphic novels from the Science Comics series, this is the first I’ve read. Detailed information on the brain and how it functions is couched within a story of a sister abducted and a sister searching. The illustrations are excellent and the diagrams of the brain and it’s parts labeled with precision. This is not the typical graphic novel with a simple storyline amid cartoon style drawings. Woollcott’s book is designed for a student who enjoys learning factual infor While my library owns several graphic novels from the Science Comics series, this is the first I’ve read. Detailed information on the brain and how it functions is couched within a story of a sister abducted and a sister searching. The illustrations are excellent and the diagrams of the brain and it’s parts labeled with precision. This is not the typical graphic novel with a simple storyline amid cartoon style drawings. Woollcott’s book is designed for a student who enjoys learning factual information and the comics are a bonus. Given the high level vocabulary and in-depth material on a complex organ, this book would serve little purpose in a library serving students in grades less than fifth. Thanks for the dARC, NetGalley.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Wow - the brain is amazing and so is this tour of what it accomplishes for us. Our guides through all that information are two sisters, Nour and Fahama, and a couple of their neighbors, a mad scientist and his assistant. It turns out that these neighbors are brain experts since one is a disembodied brain named Dr. Cerebrum and his assistant is a zombie ("Braaains"). As Fahama tries to keep her own brain inside her skull, she stalls for time by getting Dr. Cerebrum to explain all the intricacies Wow - the brain is amazing and so is this tour of what it accomplishes for us. Our guides through all that information are two sisters, Nour and Fahama, and a couple of their neighbors, a mad scientist and his assistant. It turns out that these neighbors are brain experts since one is a disembodied brain named Dr. Cerebrum and his assistant is a zombie ("Braaains"). As Fahama tries to keep her own brain inside her skull, she stalls for time by getting Dr. Cerebrum to explain all the intricacies of the brain and everything connected to it or controlled by it. Topics covered include the evolution of life from single-celled organisms to today's humans with their complex brains, the various types of cells that make up the brain and nervous system, the jobs of those cells, the five senses, memory, and everything else related. The discussion of sight and sound gets into the details of wavelengths and frequencies. The different types of memory are covered and there is even guidance on the best way to study for a test. One of my favorite sections describes the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. They are illustrated as a Star Trek bridge crew with the reaction to a perceived danger and the fight or flight response embodied by the captain (complete with gold command shirt), and the "chilling system" that helps you calm down when the danger is over portrayed by an ultra-calm crewman in science officer blue. (You gotta love a classic reference like that.) Although this topic is interesting, it is complex and full of difficult vocabulary - even with the illustrations for support. The several pages of glossary in the back are helpful, but this is not light reading. I would recommend it for middle grades and up. I read an e-book provided by the publisher through NetGalley.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    Science Comics: The Brain the Ultimate Thinking Machine by Tory Woollcott, illustrated by Alex Graudins. 118 pages. NON-FICTION/GRAPHIC NOVEL First Second (Macmillan), 2018. $13. Content: Language: G; Mature Content: G; Violence: PG-13. BUYING ADVISORY: MS, HS – OPTIONAL AUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGE Fahama and her sister are out selling cookies door to door when Fahama is kidnapped by a scientist and his zombie. The scientist wants to dissect Fahama’s brain, and in an attempt to buy herself more tim Science Comics: The Brain the Ultimate Thinking Machine by Tory Woollcott, illustrated by Alex Graudins. 118 pages. NON-FICTION/GRAPHIC NOVEL First Second (Macmillan), 2018. $13. Content: Language: G; Mature Content: G; Violence: PG-13. BUYING ADVISORY: MS, HS – OPTIONAL AUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGE Fahama and her sister are out selling cookies door to door when Fahama is kidnapped by a scientist and his zombie. The scientist wants to dissect Fahama’s brain, and in an attempt to buy herself more time Fahama gets the scientist to answer all sorts of questions about the parts of the brain and its processes. I am not a science person, so I enjoy these science comics. This book has a lot of information that is super interesting, but also can be overwhelming and has a high vocabulary. If students are interested in the brain and it’s function they will enjoy this or if you have a science teacher who wants to use parts of this book to supplement their teaching it would work fantastic. Your average graphic novel reader will be overwhelmed by the amount of information. Also the violence includes some nasty cartoonish pictures of times in history when people experimented on the brain. Reviewer, C. Peterson https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2019...

  11. 5 out of 5

    John

    My son is not really old enough for this, but he likes the illustrations so he insisted on checking it out and he makes us read it to him. I keep expecting him to bail on the thing, but he doesn't, which is probably a good review in and of itself. This is incredibly dense with scientific information about how the brain works, but it does explain things pretty clearly, and has nice, clear sequences about reflexes and things like that. And the framing story with Nour selling the cookies and the cr My son is not really old enough for this, but he likes the illustrations so he insisted on checking it out and he makes us read it to him. I keep expecting him to bail on the thing, but he doesn't, which is probably a good review in and of itself. This is incredibly dense with scientific information about how the brain works, but it does explain things pretty clearly, and has nice, clear sequences about reflexes and things like that. And the framing story with Nour selling the cookies and the crazy brain guy and the zombie trying to steal Fahama's brain is pretty funny. I know that doesn't make a lot of sense out of context, but it is very entertaining. I also get a kick out of this exchange: Evil Brain Guy: The neocortex is like a big piece of gooey newspaper that's been folded over and over so it can fit in your skull. If you flattened out the neocortex, it would be about half a meter square, or the size of a newspaper or pizza box. Fahama: That's both gross and cool! Evil Brain Guy: Most things in biology are.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Hudson

    If your middle-schoolers are interested in how the body works, then they’ll probably love the new title in the Science Comics series called The Brain: The Ultimate Thinking Machine by Tory Woollcott and Alex Graudins. The graphic novel format, along with a story to follow, is a great way to explain a complex topic. In this title, Fahama has been kidnapped by a mad scientist who is all brain and his zombie assistant. He wants to steal her brain so he can study it. To stall and give her sister time If your middle-schoolers are interested in how the body works, then they’ll probably love the new title in the Science Comics series called The Brain: The Ultimate Thinking Machine by Tory Woollcott and Alex Graudins. The graphic novel format, along with a story to follow, is a great way to explain a complex topic. In this title, Fahama has been kidnapped by a mad scientist who is all brain and his zombie assistant. He wants to steal her brain so he can study it. To stall and give her sister time to realize she’s missing, Fahama asks lots of questions the scientist has to answer. Some of the things she discovers are the different parts of the brain and which parts of the body they control, how memory works, how humans register touch, and more. A helpful glossary of terms can be found in the back. I recommend The Brain for ages 11 and up. The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    I have always been fascinated by the brain. So when I saw this book in the Science Comics series I've been meaning to investigate, I knew I had to have it. There is a bit of story here, enough to make it narrative non-fiction, but it is minimal. Two sisters split up to more efficiently cover the neighborhood for cookie sales. One sister falls into a mad scientist's lab, where he threatens to harvest her brain. He tells her all about the brain, and she encourages him to expand on his explanations I have always been fascinated by the brain. So when I saw this book in the Science Comics series I've been meaning to investigate, I knew I had to have it. There is a bit of story here, enough to make it narrative non-fiction, but it is minimal. Two sisters split up to more efficiently cover the neighborhood for cookie sales. One sister falls into a mad scientist's lab, where he threatens to harvest her brain. He tells her all about the brain, and she encourages him to expand on his explanations to buy time. I would have liked the ending to be a bit more drawn out. This book has a lot of content, and a lot of vocabulary. It is written for children but honestly reminded me of my college-level psychology sensation and perception class. I can see excerpts of this being used during anatomy or psychology lessons. I liked the format and I am curious to explore other titles in the series (they are by different authors, which is appropriate as they are content experts.)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Literary Strawberry

    Actual rating: 3.5 This was a lot of what I learned in my college Biology of Behavior and Cognitive Processes classes all condensed into a single comic with the addition of an evil brain robot. There is a /ton/ of information and vocabulary, none of it dumbed down in the slightest for the kids, and honestly even though I technically learned this stuff already I still think I'd have to read this book several times to really absorb it all. I don't know how much kids will get out of it, since someti Actual rating: 3.5 This was a lot of what I learned in my college Biology of Behavior and Cognitive Processes classes all condensed into a single comic with the addition of an evil brain robot. There is a /ton/ of information and vocabulary, none of it dumbed down in the slightest for the kids, and honestly even though I technically learned this stuff already I still think I'd have to read this book several times to really absorb it all. I don't know how much kids will get out of it, since sometimes all the complicated terminology could feel a little overwhelming, but the illustrations were fun and lively, the framing story engaging, and the jokes actually funny, so I think this can be a great learning tool. Honestly, this probably would have been helpful for me when studying for tests for those classes. I can see myself using this for my hypothetical future homeschooled children.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I had a harder time with this one, but I think it's due to my complete disinterest in biology LOL. It was never my strong suit in school, and this was very jargon heavy - although I'm sure for those that are interested, it is great! My other issue was that it seemed jumpy - or it lacked segues or something. I'd turn a page and it would be a completely different topic. Also, the "boss fight" at the end was lacking in details and I really want to know how they escaped!! (As always, bonus points fo I had a harder time with this one, but I think it's due to my complete disinterest in biology LOL. It was never my strong suit in school, and this was very jargon heavy - although I'm sure for those that are interested, it is great! My other issue was that it seemed jumpy - or it lacked segues or something. I'd turn a page and it would be a completely different topic. Also, the "boss fight" at the end was lacking in details and I really want to know how they escaped!! (As always, bonus points for the diverse characters - loved that the two main characters wore hijabs! - and the added humor :-) )

  16. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Another solid and informative entry in this popular series, this one focuses on the brain and how it works. By the time readers finish the graphic novel, they will be in awe at how all the parts of the body work together and wonder why it took so long for scientists to realize the importance of the brain. There are plenty of clever puns and a plot in which one character, Fahama, has been kidnapped by a mad scientist intent on studying her brain. She stalls him by asking questions about neurons, Another solid and informative entry in this popular series, this one focuses on the brain and how it works. By the time readers finish the graphic novel, they will be in awe at how all the parts of the body work together and wonder why it took so long for scientists to realize the importance of the brain. There are plenty of clever puns and a plot in which one character, Fahama, has been kidnapped by a mad scientist intent on studying her brain. She stalls him by asking questions about neurons, various types of memory, and how the brain and the five senses work together. As is always the case with this series, it is filled with lots of information that make brain science easy to digest.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Two sisters selling cookies door-to-door split up to double their sales. The older sister is kidnapped by an evil brain and a zombie and to keep the evil brain from stealing her brain, she asks him to explain how the brain works. But the fictional story is just a set-up for this otherwise non-fiction graphic novel explaining how the brain works and covering all kinds of topics from the evolution of the brain, to defining cells and neurons, to senses, to the parts of the brain and nervous system, Two sisters selling cookies door-to-door split up to double their sales. The older sister is kidnapped by an evil brain and a zombie and to keep the evil brain from stealing her brain, she asks him to explain how the brain works. But the fictional story is just a set-up for this otherwise non-fiction graphic novel explaining how the brain works and covering all kinds of topics from the evolution of the brain, to defining cells and neurons, to senses, to the parts of the brain and nervous system, to different types of intelligence. It includes an extensive glossary and would have been even better with the addition of chapter headings or an index.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    This is a nice series and I have read many of its books in the last few weeks with my 9 year old. This particular one is our favorite, because it thoughtfully explains scientific concepts and delivers a funny side story in the characters of Nour and Fahama. These books are NOT light on complex terminology: prepared to get extremely detailed descriptions of synapses, neurotransmitters, glial cells, astrocytes--just to name four of *many* examples. So, if you and/or your kid do not enjoy that, the This is a nice series and I have read many of its books in the last few weeks with my 9 year old. This particular one is our favorite, because it thoughtfully explains scientific concepts and delivers a funny side story in the characters of Nour and Fahama. These books are NOT light on complex terminology: prepared to get extremely detailed descriptions of synapses, neurotransmitters, glial cells, astrocytes--just to name four of *many* examples. So, if you and/or your kid do not enjoy that, these may not be right for you. While the new terms can border on overwhelming, they are accompanied by detailed and comical drawings that make understanding complex systems more digestible.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Akahayla

    Absolutely loved it. The only reason I picked it up was because of that cute little Muslim girl in the cover but I love how her ethnicity and religion had nothing to do with the book. After all, knowledge doesn't have boundaries. The only reason it loses a star is because all the information is just kind of piled up but hey! At least they've done it in a cute comical way so that it'd stick. Would definitely buy this series for my future kids. In the meantime, I personally, want a copy of Science Com Absolutely loved it. The only reason I picked it up was because of that cute little Muslim girl in the cover but I love how her ethnicity and religion had nothing to do with the book. After all, knowledge doesn't have boundaries. The only reason it loses a star is because all the information is just kind of piled up but hey! At least they've done it in a cute comical way so that it'd stick. Would definitely buy this series for my future kids. In the meantime, I personally, want a copy of Science Comics: Dinosaurs!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    SaraKat

    A wonderful book for middle grade and up about the inner workings of your noggin. The story is made less dry by including an evil brain and a zombie butler as well as a butt kicking little sister. The author deftly includes little tidbits about the Muslim family life as well such as how the hijab isn’t worn at home or by young girls. (I laughed at the dad’s apron ‘Halal of a good cook!’). The brain is complex and so is this information, but young readers will pick up more every time they read! Th A wonderful book for middle grade and up about the inner workings of your noggin. The story is made less dry by including an evil brain and a zombie butler as well as a butt kicking little sister. The author deftly includes little tidbits about the Muslim family life as well such as how the hijab isn’t worn at home or by young girls. (I laughed at the dad’s apron ‘Halal of a good cook!’). The brain is complex and so is this information, but young readers will pick up more every time they read! That's both gross and cool! Most things in biology are. he he he

  21. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- Start with a Big Bang and learn about space and the solar system in this volume of Science Comics, an action-packed nonfiction graphic novel series for middle-grade readers! Great book for people of all ages - I learned a lot and I am a 51-year-old librarian. Gret drawings and easy to read. Great for kids of all ages!!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Pam Page

    This graphic novel is full of information, perfect for children looking for a good non-fiction book. The use of a graphic novel to share this information makes the book intriguing. The authors make good use of the illustrations to relay information. A glossary appears at the back but no resources for where the authors discovered this information. There are many more books in the series on various topics.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Trish (readtmc)

    This is my first book I've read from the Science Comics books series and I can see why they're popular. I laughed out loud A LOT and the fun illustrations make difficult concepts easier to digest, but there's also A LOT of information lumped together that made it overwhelming. I bumped this review up a star because of how surprisingly entertained I was and would still recommend it to middle grade audiences interested in science. This is my first book I've read from the Science Comics books series and I can see why they're popular. I laughed out loud A LOT and the fun illustrations make difficult concepts easier to digest, but there's also A LOT of information lumped together that made it overwhelming. I bumped this review up a star because of how surprisingly entertained I was and would still recommend it to middle grade audiences interested in science.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kelley

    I love the main characters and the not-super-threatening villains. The art is delightful and I learned a LOT about the brain. This is a very complex topic for a Middle Grade comic, but I think the info was broken down well enough to be more or less understood by the target audience. And I think that even if some of the more technical info is a little too much, it's still an entertaining and informative comic. I love the main characters and the not-super-threatening villains. The art is delightful and I learned a LOT about the brain. This is a very complex topic for a Middle Grade comic, but I think the info was broken down well enough to be more or less understood by the target audience. And I think that even if some of the more technical info is a little too much, it's still an entertaining and informative comic.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    A fun story with diverse characters and jam-packed with facts. Presented in narrative form as Fahama is kidnapped by an evil villain (Dr. Cerebrum) and his Frankenstein-like butler, while helping her very smart, very ambitious, very bossy little sister sell girl scout cookies. The illustrations in this graphic novel were fun and colorful and there was a good amount of action both within the narrative and during the provision of facts about the brain. Will read more in this series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jes

    Once again, Science Comics managed to help me digest some pretty big concepts and complex mechanisms in a relatively simple way. The illustrations are cute and interesting, the sub plots in the explanation are usually hilarious and I feel like I came away from this book understanding my brain functions a little better. I recommend to nerds of all ages, kids with disorders who want to learn about their brains, anyone interested in getting a basic understanding of the human brain.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    I'm actually surprised these are for children, because I have to slow myself down and really take my time trying to grasp the concepts taught. They don't dumb down any language, but I worry that my daughter will give up reading with some of the big words and concepts. They are very educational and I will continue reading them for the things I learn, I just wish some of the concepts were presented in easier to understand analogies. I'm actually surprised these are for children, because I have to slow myself down and really take my time trying to grasp the concepts taught. They don't dumb down any language, but I worry that my daughter will give up reading with some of the big words and concepts. They are very educational and I will continue reading them for the things I learn, I just wish some of the concepts were presented in easier to understand analogies.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kaia

    My 9-year-old son and I enjoyed the facts in this book, and we certainly learned a lot about the brain. I felt there were some parts that seemed like they weren't in the right order, or they were repetitive, and with a lot of complicated scientifically vocabulary, I'm not sure how long the average young person would stick with this one. My 9-year-old son and I enjoyed the facts in this book, and we certainly learned a lot about the brain. I felt there were some parts that seemed like they weren't in the right order, or they were repetitive, and with a lot of complicated scientifically vocabulary, I'm not sure how long the average young person would stick with this one.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    This is amazing! They don't dumb things down at all and everything is taught so well. The graphics are amazing. A great book! It starts off with the history of brain studies....right back to the Egyptians who would keep all sorts of body parts, but throw the brain away. They thought the brain was just for cooling the blood! This is amazing! They don't dumb things down at all and everything is taught so well. The graphics are amazing. A great book! It starts off with the history of brain studies....right back to the Egyptians who would keep all sorts of body parts, but throw the brain away. They thought the brain was just for cooling the blood!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    The science is pretty dense, and the framing device is fine. The brain stealing mad doctor wore thin pretty quickly, though the ambitious younger sister was fun the whole way through. Definitely a lot to learn here, though I'm sure less motivated students will abandon it as soon as the terminology gets complicated. The science is pretty dense, and the framing device is fine. The brain stealing mad doctor wore thin pretty quickly, though the ambitious younger sister was fun the whole way through. Definitely a lot to learn here, though I'm sure less motivated students will abandon it as soon as the terminology gets complicated.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...