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'Wives in the avocados, babies in the tomatoes!-and you, García Lorca, what were you doing by the watermelons?' Profane and prophetic verses about sex, death, revolution and America by the great icon of Beat poetry. Penguin Modern: fifty new books celebrating the pioneering spirit of the iconic Penguin Modern Classics series, with each one offering a concentrated hit of its 'Wives in the avocados, babies in the tomatoes!-and you, García Lorca, what were you doing by the watermelons?' Profane and prophetic verses about sex, death, revolution and America by the great icon of Beat poetry. Penguin Modern: fifty new books celebrating the pioneering spirit of the iconic Penguin Modern Classics series, with each one offering a concentrated hit of its contemporary, international flavour. Here are authors ranging from Kathy Acker to James Baldwin, Truman Capote to Stanislaw Lem and George Orwell to Shirley Jackson; essays radical and inspiring; poems moving and disturbing; stories surreal and fabulous; taking us from the deep South to modern Japan, New York's underground scene to the farthest reaches of outer space.


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'Wives in the avocados, babies in the tomatoes!-and you, García Lorca, what were you doing by the watermelons?' Profane and prophetic verses about sex, death, revolution and America by the great icon of Beat poetry. Penguin Modern: fifty new books celebrating the pioneering spirit of the iconic Penguin Modern Classics series, with each one offering a concentrated hit of its 'Wives in the avocados, babies in the tomatoes!-and you, García Lorca, what were you doing by the watermelons?' Profane and prophetic verses about sex, death, revolution and America by the great icon of Beat poetry. Penguin Modern: fifty new books celebrating the pioneering spirit of the iconic Penguin Modern Classics series, with each one offering a concentrated hit of its contemporary, international flavour. Here are authors ranging from Kathy Acker to James Baldwin, Truman Capote to Stanislaw Lem and George Orwell to Shirley Jackson; essays radical and inspiring; poems moving and disturbing; stories surreal and fabulous; taking us from the deep South to modern Japan, New York's underground scene to the farthest reaches of outer space.

30 review for Television Was a Baby Crawling Toward That Deathchamber

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rhys

    I have wanted to read some of Ginsberg's poetry for a long time, simply because he is considered to be such an important voice in 20th Century literature. Having read this short book, I am now grateful that I somehow managed to avoid his work until now, and I am dismayed that I finally took the plunge. But first let me state that I have no intention of disparaging anyone who finds merit and inspiration in his poetry. It's simply a case of it being not for me, but there are reasons why it isn't f I have wanted to read some of Ginsberg's poetry for a long time, simply because he is considered to be such an important voice in 20th Century literature. Having read this short book, I am now grateful that I somehow managed to avoid his work until now, and I am dismayed that I finally took the plunge. But first let me state that I have no intention of disparaging anyone who finds merit and inspiration in his poetry. It's simply a case of it being not for me, but there are reasons why it isn't for me and these reasons are manifold: The poems feel vastly self-indulgent, demented and often puerile rants, word splurges obsessed with narcissistic reaffirmations, scatological, irrational and shallow tirades. Ginsberg's penchant for name dropping is just one of his very irritating mannerisms, and many of his political/topical references have dated so badly that they have simply become obscure. His scatological examinations are puerile rather than whatever they are supposed to be (political? psychological? liberating?) and morbidly distasteful without any compensations. He reads like Burroughs without the wit and invention, just with the word salad mind and an overwhelming sense of bitterness disguised as activism. The poems are really just a long litany of barely-articulate complaints from someone who feels excluded from power, and his criticisms of that power appears to stem less from a philosophical or moral conviction than from some kind of weird twisted envy that he isn't the one in control. The title poem especially reads like a hebephrenic tantrum put into words. And even though there are occasional shards of beauty in some of the poems, they feel more like accidental fusions of random phrases rather than the products of a deliberate creative force. Sorry.... :-(

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ria

    ''He fucked me in the East He fucked me in the West He fucked me South My cock in his mouth He fucked me North No sperm shot forth.'' ''He fucked me in the East He fucked me in the West He fucked me South My cock in his mouth He fucked me North No sperm shot forth.''

  3. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    While a few pieces were interesting the over all feel was the ramblings of a whiner. I want some whine with my food, Vintage whine, A Ginsberg red whine, Red whine, The kind of whine that will make you sick, A whine from the beat, As red as the meat I eat, A whine that will fall with a "FUCK", Like I give because the meat is old, A Ginsberg whine that leaves me cold, Mescaline bullshit to go, Ginsberg bullshit style, SHIT FUCK CUNT BOLLOCKS, because I can, Red whine that punctures the skin. Potty mouth shit wi While a few pieces were interesting the over all feel was the ramblings of a whiner. I want some whine with my food, Vintage whine, A Ginsberg red whine, Red whine, The kind of whine that will make you sick, A whine from the beat, As red as the meat I eat, A whine that will fall with a "FUCK", Like I give because the meat is old, A Ginsberg whine that leaves me cold, Mescaline bullshit to go, Ginsberg bullshit style, SHIT FUCK CUNT BOLLOCKS, because I can, Red whine that punctures the skin. Potty mouth shit will make a legend, A dated writer of whine it's not mine, The meat is cold, My Ginsberg '58 is stale, Whine, Red whine, Ginsberg whine,

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Anderson

    Ginsberg is considered one of the greats for good reason. His abrupt and invigorating language is exciting and interesting. Some critique him as being aggressive but in a time where being gay, Jewish and a communist was a deadly combination, his refusal to be made silent is heroic. A true pioneer of sexual and political liberation, Ginsberg's lines are profane yet profound, fuelling many revolutions. "To see Void vast infinite look out the window into the blue sky."

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cody

    I don't share some Goodreads reviewers' impressions of Ginsberg as incoherent, whiny or vulgar - his work in this volume is indeed marked by an ambitiously wide-reaching, actually global perspective that rails and pleads by turns against increasingly dominant imperialist and capitalist forces in world and US politics of his time, but a look at his biography (which, being easily enough available online, I don't fault Penguin for leaving out of this volume, as in the other Mini Modern Classics of I don't share some Goodreads reviewers' impressions of Ginsberg as incoherent, whiny or vulgar - his work in this volume is indeed marked by an ambitiously wide-reaching, actually global perspective that rails and pleads by turns against increasingly dominant imperialist and capitalist forces in world and US politics of his time, but a look at his biography (which, being easily enough available online, I don't fault Penguin for leaving out of this volume, as in the other Mini Modern Classics of this set) reveals a sincere and lifelong preoccupation with these issues that manifested in travel, study of Eastern religions, and activism. His supposed incoherence can be ascribed both to the breadth of the themes he wishes to address (which to my mind still come through in clear thematic units despite the abstract, elusive or "obscure" individual lines, allusions, and images) and to his receptivity to different forms of consciousness inspired by meditative practice, family history of mental illness, personal hallucinatory and mystical experiences, and experiments with a range of drugs. The volume also presents a range of Ginsberg's work with samples taken from his 20s to his 70s. Taking the author's life story, broad social network, and cultural/historical context into account should help us see him as something more than a juvenile provocateur, as some seem to, but rather as a distinctly American voice with a conscientious worldly perspective conditioned by upbringing and deep personal experience with the world around and within.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty

    This new collection of Beat poet Allen Ginsberg's work, Television Was a Baby Crawling Toward That Deathchamber, is the second book in the Penguin Moderns series. Whilst the poems have been printed before, in Ginsberg's Collected Poems 1947-1977 (2006), they have not appeared in this particular selection before. Throughout the admirable poems exhibited here, Ginsberg tackles many issues which were contemporary to him - atom bombs, the political system in the United States, Communism, the Cold War This new collection of Beat poet Allen Ginsberg's work, Television Was a Baby Crawling Toward That Deathchamber, is the second book in the Penguin Moderns series. Whilst the poems have been printed before, in Ginsberg's Collected Poems 1947-1977 (2006), they have not appeared in this particular selection before. Throughout the admirable poems exhibited here, Ginsberg tackles many issues which were contemporary to him - atom bombs, the political system in the United States, Communism, the Cold War, propaganda, the state of the world, and oppression, to name but a few. With regard to their approach, some of the poems here are far more structured; others read like stream-of-consciousness pieces, or monologues. In Television Was a Baby Crawling Toward That Deathchamber, Ginsberg presents a fascinating and creative view of a bygone time, whose issues are still relevant to our twenty-first century world. Despite the vulgarity at times, the wordplay here is impressive, and there is such a variance to the selection which has been made.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Miriam Cihodariu

    I understand why Ginsberg is an important icon of his times and the transformation of poetry, and admire the candid, matter-of-factly manner of his exhibitionism, but I'm afraid his poems are, overall, not really my cup of tea. There were a few images I liked, about the American social landscape he was in at the time; they were so powerful I could picture it, though I can't recall any verses once I've put the book down.

  8. 4 out of 5

    ✩⋆ Victoria ⋆✩

    God this was long and derivative and obscene I think my favourite out of this collection was the one titled 'America', which really reminded me of The 1975's song 'I Like America and America Likes Me' aha

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hind

    I am so confused... this guy makes no sense

  10. 5 out of 5

    Miltiadis Michalopoulos

    the kind of books I hate and I would banish if I could. I would love to give it ZERO stars but I can't.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Charlie Ottaway

    This was my first introduction to Ginsberg, and it did not disappoint. It is intense and i've already started learning more about him, his poetry and the Beat Generation. I highly recommend this as a starting point. It doesn't shy away from topics and questions that he asks are still relevant today. Some beautifully written pieces, my favourite is "I Am a Victim of Telephone Works included; - Pull My Daisy -A Supermarket in California -America -Death to Van Gogh's Ear! -Television Was a Baby Crawling This was my first introduction to Ginsberg, and it did not disappoint. It is intense and i've already started learning more about him, his poetry and the Beat Generation. I highly recommend this as a starting point. It doesn't shy away from topics and questions that he asks are still relevant today. Some beautifully written pieces, my favourite is "I Am a Victim of Telephone Works included; - Pull My Daisy -A Supermarket in California -America -Death to Van Gogh's Ear! -Television Was a Baby Crawling Toward That Deathchamber -I Am a Victim of Telephone -Mind Breaths -Fourth Floor, Dawn, Up All Night Writing Letters -Love Comes -Sphincer -Personal Ad -American Sentences -C'mon Pigs of Western Civilization Eat More Grease

  12. 4 out of 5

    Russio

    Prophetic in the extreme, the wild sentiments of Ginsberg's writings - on culture, business, sexuality, politics - are all writ large this century. He understood internal monologue and wrote very bravely and knowledgeably - it is stunning to read the title poem and consider how dead-on it seems now - even if it is rambling. This has aged well on the whole. Death to van Gogh's Ear is sublime: "The American Century betrayed by a mad senate that no longer sleeps with its wife."

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Well, now I can check the "Allen Ginsberg" box off my list. This was quite the trip, especially his early poetry, which reads like a stream of consciousness rant designed more to evoke images than convey information – which I guess is the point of poetry, but I've never read any so aggressively vulgar, or really just so aggressive, period. Further, as is always a risk with political writings, numerous references have passed from timely to obscure over the past fifty years, making what little unde Well, now I can check the "Allen Ginsberg" box off my list. This was quite the trip, especially his early poetry, which reads like a stream of consciousness rant designed more to evoke images than convey information – which I guess is the point of poetry, but I've never read any so aggressively vulgar, or really just so aggressive, period. Further, as is always a risk with political writings, numerous references have passed from timely to obscure over the past fifty years, making what little understanding I was able to glean from them all the more fragmented and useless. Ginsberg's later poems, however, are mellower – I won't say "better" since art is art, but I certainaly got a lot more out of them. Overall, though, this small book took me three days to read, which isn't a good sign. I enjoyed a small fraction of these poems, and the angriest of them – the ones I was most inclined to like because of their political content – were lost amid a torrent of hyperbolic rage that has not aged well.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Terese

    What I knew going in: I don't like poetry all that much. I don't hate it. But I don't love it. What I didn't know going in: That Allen Ginsberg was a poet. What I know now: Beat poetry is the worst. I have nothing kind to say about this.

  15. 4 out of 5

    George Fairweather

    the sex bits were a mood

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stefanie

    Poetry and me, we won't become friends anytime soon, I think.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maciek Walas

    Pretentious AF, gay AF, artsy AF, what more could you want

  18. 5 out of 5

    Millie

    Most of them were excellent and/or fascinating, but there was definitely also a few moments where I felt like I didn’t really understand the purpose (although that may well have been the point). ‘America’ was definitely my favourite as I felt there was just SO MUCH in there to dissect and I imagine if I read it again I would probably find even more. I also really liked ‘Fourth Floor, Dawn, Up All Night Writing Letters’ and found it fascinating in terms of thinking about the immortality of poetry Most of them were excellent and/or fascinating, but there was definitely also a few moments where I felt like I didn’t really understand the purpose (although that may well have been the point). ‘America’ was definitely my favourite as I felt there was just SO MUCH in there to dissect and I imagine if I read it again I would probably find even more. I also really liked ‘Fourth Floor, Dawn, Up All Night Writing Letters’ and found it fascinating in terms of thinking about the immortality of poetry. Glad I’ve also now read a collection of beat poetry and I’m sure I’ll continue to read some more because I did really enjoy it. I think I probably liked this specific collection most when it was focused on ideas of materialism and revolution rather than desire, but that may well be due to the fact that I felt somewhat uncomfortable reading the poems about desire given the whole pedophile thing. Ultimately did really enjoy it though and can see how it influenced lots of others!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    Ginsberg poetry isn't something that I liked. Full review to come

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andy Hickman

    PM#02 “Television was a Baby Crawling Toward that Death-Chamber” by Allen Ginsberg Multiple poems in this Penguin Modern book #2. One of the most honest and quirky writers you'll ever read is Allen Ginsberg, who was a close friend and early influence of Bob Dylan. Some of the oddly titled poems in this collection include: .. A Supermarket in California: “Where are we going, Walt Whitman?” .. “America I've given you all and now I am nothing.” “America when will we end the human war? Go fuck yourself with y PM#02 “Television was a Baby Crawling Toward that Death-Chamber” by Allen Ginsberg Multiple poems in this Penguin Modern book #2. One of the most honest and quirky writers you'll ever read is Allen Ginsberg, who was a close friend and early influence of Bob Dylan. Some of the oddly titled poems in this collection include: .. A Supermarket in California: “Where are we going, Walt Whitman?” .. “America I've given you all and now I am nothing.” “America when will we end the human war? Go fuck yourself with your atom bomb.” .. 'Death to Van Gogh's Ear!' Poet is Priest Money has reckoned the soul of America Congress broken thru to the precipice of Eternity the President built a War machine which will vomit and rear up Russia out of Kansas The American Century betrayed by a mad Senate which no longer sleeps with its wife Franco has murdered Lorca the fairy son of Whitman just as Mayakovsky committed suicide to avoid Russia Hart Crane distinguished Platonist committed suicide to cave in the wrong America just as millions of tons of human wheat were burned in secret caverns under the White House while India starved and screamed and ate mad dogs full of rain and mountains of eggs were reduced to white powder in the halls of Congress no godfearing man will walk there again because of the stink of the rotten eggs of America and the Indians of Chiapas continue to gnaw their vitaminless tortillas aborigines of Australia perhaps gibber in the eggless wilderness and I rarely have an egg for breakfast tho my work requires infinite eggs to come to birth in Eternity eggs should be eaten or given to their mothers   Paris, December 1957 - - - 'Mind Breaths' Go on a intimate reflective journey around the world “… I breathed ... up thru Darwin Land ...” - - - “C’mon Pigs of Western Civilization, Eat More Grease.” by Allen Ginsberg Eat Eat more marbled Sirloin more Pork 'n gravy! Lard up the dressing, fry chicken in boiling oil Carry it dribbling to gray climes, snowed with salt, Little lambs covered with mint roast in rack surrounded by roast potatoes wet with buttersauce. Buttered veal medallions in creamy saliva buttered beef, glistening mountains of french fries Stroganoffs in white hot sour cream, chops soaked in olive oil surrounded by olives, salty feta cheese, followed by Roquefort & Bleu & Stilton thirsty for wine, beer Cocacola Fanta Champagne Pepsi retsina arak whiskey vodka Agh! Watch out heart attack, pop more angina pills order a plate of Bratwurst, fried frankfurters, couple billion Wimpys', MacDonald burger to the moon & burp! Salt on those fries! Boil onions & breaded mushrooms even zucchini in deep hot Crisco pans Turkeys die only once, look nice, next to tall white glasses sugarmilk & icecream vanilla balls Strawberrry for sweeter color milkshakes with hot dogs Forget greenbeans, everyday a few carrots, a mini big spoonful of salty rice'll do, make the plate pretty; throw in some vinegar pickles, briney sauerkraut check yr. cholesterol, swallow a pill and order a sugar Cream donut, pack 2 under the size 44 belt Pass out in the vomitorium come back cough up strands of sandwich still chewing pastrami at Katz's delicatessen Back to central Europe & gobble Kielbasa in Lodz swallow salami in Munich with beer,Liverwurst on pumpernickel in Berlin, greasy cheese in a 3 star Hotel near Syntagma, on white bread thick-buttered Set an example for developing nations, salt, sugar, animal fat, coffee tobacco Schnapps Drop dead faster! make room for Chinese guestworkers with alien soybean curds green cabbage & rice! Africans Latins with rice beans & calabash can stay thin & crowd in apartments for working class foodfreaks — Not like western cuisine rich in protein cancer heart attack hypertension sweat bloated liver & spleen megaly Diabetes & stroke — monuments to carnivorous civilizations presently murdering Belfast Bosnia Cypress Ngorno Karabach Georgia mailing love letter bombs in Vienna or setting houses afire in East Germany — have another coffee, here's a cigar. And this is a plate of black forest chocolate cake, you deserve it. - Athens, 19 December 1993 …...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Francisco

    A small collection of Ginsberg poems which range from the late 40s until his death in 1997, this is a nice pocket sized overview of many of his themes and style. His most famous poem, The Howl, isn't here, but neither does it need to be, you know that, and if you don't you should and there are plenty of other ways to get it. This collection shines a light on his other work which while never reaching the heights of that poem is fascinating in its own right. One trend that you can see in his career A small collection of Ginsberg poems which range from the late 40s until his death in 1997, this is a nice pocket sized overview of many of his themes and style. His most famous poem, The Howl, isn't here, but neither does it need to be, you know that, and if you don't you should and there are plenty of other ways to get it. This collection shines a light on his other work which while never reaching the heights of that poem is fascinating in its own right. One trend that you can see in his career as is presented here is a drift towards a more coherent, "understandable" writing in his poetry, his early works function more as word association sometimes seemingly random but with a cool image here and there which almost seems like a happy accident of fate which jumps out at you. He is excellent in these poems at giving a sense of the disorientation of modern life while giving a glimmer here and there of sense which just make his poems all the more fascinating. Later on, particularly in the 80s the poems take a turn to the more erotic and autobiographical, well, not so much erotic as downright pornographic with a great infusion of humor. Poems like "Love Comes" and "Sphincter" are particular highlights, they are at the same time gross, funny and touching as they really represent an older man's sexual concerns (like how proud he is that his sphincter is still supple and how he fears future looseness). So as you can imagine this is fun for all the family, gather round the fire and declaim some of you favorite Ginsberg poems!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Read.Dream.Repeat.Blogger

    2019: 14 . 🍁 . Allen Ginsberg. Television was a Baby Crawling toward that Death Chamber. 2006. "His tongue is the prick of a devil." A collection of 13 poems by the ever controversial writer and poet, this book is about everything worldly. Allen Ginsberg speaks on behalf of the common American man, on social, political, economic as well as cultural issues, raising conflicts. And as the blurb says ~ The book contains "profane and prophetic verses about sex, death, revolution and America by the icon of B 2019: 14 . 🍁 . Allen Ginsberg. Television was a Baby Crawling toward that Death Chamber. 2006. "His tongue is the prick of a devil." A collection of 13 poems by the ever controversial writer and poet, this book is about everything worldly. Allen Ginsberg speaks on behalf of the common American man, on social, political, economic as well as cultural issues, raising conflicts. And as the blurb says ~ The book contains "profane and prophetic verses about sex, death, revolution and America by the icon of Beat poetry." . . . Not my cup of tea. It's better suited for someone more aware of the history of the country. It'll be a good read if you understand the relevance, which I unfortunately couldn't. #bookstagramindia #bookstagrammer #delhibookstagrammer #indianblogger #igreads #delhiblogger #unitedbookstagram #delhibookstagram #bookishfeatures #poetry #penguin #penguinmodernclassics #february #februaryreads #rereads #shortbooks #readdreamrepeat #readinggoals #readingprompts #slaythattbr #martinlutherking #politicalessays 14 down @htbrunch #htbrunchbookchallenge #BrunchBookChallenge #htbrunch

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    3.5 Stars I read this after becoming interested in in the Beat poet gang when watching On the Road, I read up on the original members and was lent a copy of some of their work so went for it. It's not all for me, I give it that. I find with most poets I will love some work and not like others. It's a very short read and if you decide you don't want to risk it - I urge you to read through and just skip those poems that aren't for you. He is very diverse in his writing, some weird comedy and some 3.5 Stars I read this after becoming interested in in the Beat poet gang when watching On the Road, I read up on the original members and was lent a copy of some of their work so went for it. It's not all for me, I give it that. I find with most poets I will love some work and not like others. It's a very short read and if you decide you don't want to risk it - I urge you to read through and just skip those poems that aren't for you. He is very diverse in his writing, some weird comedy and some sad parts too. He's very politic, very imaginative and quite wordy. I tend to drift towards female poets which is why I went for something like Ginsberg- it was different to the mythological rambles that I normally enjoyed. You can tell my type of poetry by the lines I've highlighted here. Quotes: My ambition is to be the President despite the fact that I'm a Catholic -America I'm nearsighted and psychopathic anyway -America I am the defense early warning radar system I see nothing but bombs -Death to Van Gogh's Ear Poets should stay out of politics or become monsters I have become monsterous with politics -Death to Van Gogh's Ear

  24. 5 out of 5

    R Reddebrek

    How now brown bureaucrats? *much clicking of fingers* That joke from an episode of the Simpsons is as close as I got to the "Beat" generation of American poets before reading this little book. Much of it went over my head, the poems are backed with cultural and political references but a lot of is disjointed, manic and random. So I often struggled to figure out what point or statement was trying to be made. About half way through while reading the title poem the thought struck me that maybe that w How now brown bureaucrats? *much clicking of fingers* That joke from an episode of the Simpsons is as close as I got to the "Beat" generation of American poets before reading this little book. Much of it went over my head, the poems are backed with cultural and political references but a lot of is disjointed, manic and random. So I often struggled to figure out what point or statement was trying to be made. About half way through while reading the title poem the thought struck me that maybe that was the point. These poems were written at a time when American certainties were breaking down and political and cultural subversion were bubbling up, and of course Ginsberg was living an unconventional and hardly stable life at the time. The poem Love Comes is my favourite, easily the most romantic description of the mechanics of male and male love making. "Both knees on the bed his head to my head he shoved in again I loved him then"

  25. 5 out of 5

    Annu

    Ginsberg writing style is something that I am not a fan of. It’s different, yes. However, not my cup of tea. This rebellious poet wrote about his political views, sex, prophecy, and revolution. Some of his poems aren’t very coherent with the use of shortened form of words and sometimes, no punctuations. It could be an artsy style he went for. However, I feel like it missed its mark and fell short drastically. Having a partner of same sex when it was still illegal in all American states, Allen Gi Ginsberg writing style is something that I am not a fan of. It’s different, yes. However, not my cup of tea. This rebellious poet wrote about his political views, sex, prophecy, and revolution. Some of his poems aren’t very coherent with the use of shortened form of words and sometimes, no punctuations. It could be an artsy style he went for. However, I feel like it missed its mark and fell short drastically. Having a partner of same sex when it was still illegal in all American states, Allen Ginsberg didn’t conform to the code of society. His ideologies are well represented in his works. Even though, his writing isn’t my favorite, I know a conversation with him would have been anything but prosaic.

  26. 5 out of 5

    PolicemanPrawn

    I rarely read poetry, so that might be why I didn't totally appreciate this book. They are extremely rambling and somewhat hard to read, not obeying the rules of punctuation and jumping from topic to topic. They delve in degenerate and unsavoury topics, which can be done in a good way (Charles Bukowski), but here it’s off-putting. There is a lot of name-dropping of things I don’t know about (and possibly don’t care about). Activism runs throughout the book, but in a book of poetry it's hard to g I rarely read poetry, so that might be why I didn't totally appreciate this book. They are extremely rambling and somewhat hard to read, not obeying the rules of punctuation and jumping from topic to topic. They delve in degenerate and unsavoury topics, which can be done in a good way (Charles Bukowski), but here it’s off-putting. There is a lot of name-dropping of things I don’t know about (and possibly don’t care about). Activism runs throughout the book, but in a book of poetry it's hard to give a developed treatment of it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonas Pihl

    Television Was a Baby Crawling Toward That Deathchamber is a collection of poems by Allen Ginsberg. I get why there are people that dislike Ginsberg. He's vulgar and provocative. I think his poems are very nice and interesting. However, not all of them were my cup of tea. I'm not generally a big fan of poems, so some of these were just not enjoyable at all to me. Others were absolutley amazing. So with a range of terrible to amazing poems in this collection, I'll settle for a mediocre rating. 3 s Television Was a Baby Crawling Toward That Deathchamber is a collection of poems by Allen Ginsberg. I get why there are people that dislike Ginsberg. He's vulgar and provocative. I think his poems are very nice and interesting. However, not all of them were my cup of tea. I'm not generally a big fan of poems, so some of these were just not enjoyable at all to me. Others were absolutley amazing. So with a range of terrible to amazing poems in this collection, I'll settle for a mediocre rating. 3 stars.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Fredrikke Wongraven

    quite enjoyed this majority of this book, however some of the poems and a lot of his sayings didn't really do it for me. don't really understand why the sayings especially were included in the book. why are a lot of men so concerned with poo? half this book was concerned with poo. i also wish that i could have someone read the book to me out loud, as i feel it would have been a different experience.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cindy He

    Reminds me of Rorschach's soliloquies in Watchmen. Brutally candid, crude, sexual, violent, macabre, angry, disillusioned - all within the nonsensical ramblings of a man who has witnessed the worst of humanity. Sometimes, what he writes makes no sense at all, it seems more the encapsulation of a feeling(s). Other times, there will be pithy one liners worth memorising, if not for the imagery it conjures, then for its completely unabashed attack on capitalism and corruption.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

    I get that it's important in its context, because people were so prudish, but it's now mostly gibberish stringing together out-of-use euphemisms, unknowable historical figures and shocking metaphors. I've gone for 3 stars because there are moments of brilliance, but they are short. The title piece was disappointing: it makes a great book cover but it's long and difficult. I'd love to see someone doing this with contemporary politics. Something to search for in the new year.

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