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Mortal of the Gods: The History of a Man and His People

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Dike was different from the other Achalangada children. He did not speak until he was ten and then only at the urging of a god. His saliva could heal degrees of burns on the skin, and his impressive physique made him the object of every maiden’s affections. To the Achalangada, Dike was nothing less than a gift from the gods. To his father, however, Dike was a source of pa Dike was different from the other Achalangada children. He did not speak until he was ten and then only at the urging of a god. His saliva could heal degrees of burns on the skin, and his impressive physique made him the object of every maiden’s affections. To the Achalangada, Dike was nothing less than a gift from the gods. To his father, however, Dike was a source of pain and frustration. The headstrong young man longed for the excitement of battle and could not understand why his father—a blacksmith known for the sharpness of his blades—despised war. War would come, however, as it always did, and when it did, Dike, now called Ezedike by his adoring people, embarked on a path that would end in glory but also in tragedy and betrayal. Author Henry Philip Onyeachonam Asaa’s first novel, Mortal of the Gods, tells the tale of Dike of Achalangada, a man blessed by the gods. Suffused with Achalangada culture, language, and traditions, this tale of heroes, war, and self-sacrifice takes readers to a time few remember—a time before the new God came to Africa, when the old deities still held sway over the Achalangada kingdom.


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Dike was different from the other Achalangada children. He did not speak until he was ten and then only at the urging of a god. His saliva could heal degrees of burns on the skin, and his impressive physique made him the object of every maiden’s affections. To the Achalangada, Dike was nothing less than a gift from the gods. To his father, however, Dike was a source of pa Dike was different from the other Achalangada children. He did not speak until he was ten and then only at the urging of a god. His saliva could heal degrees of burns on the skin, and his impressive physique made him the object of every maiden’s affections. To the Achalangada, Dike was nothing less than a gift from the gods. To his father, however, Dike was a source of pain and frustration. The headstrong young man longed for the excitement of battle and could not understand why his father—a blacksmith known for the sharpness of his blades—despised war. War would come, however, as it always did, and when it did, Dike, now called Ezedike by his adoring people, embarked on a path that would end in glory but also in tragedy and betrayal. Author Henry Philip Onyeachonam Asaa’s first novel, Mortal of the Gods, tells the tale of Dike of Achalangada, a man blessed by the gods. Suffused with Achalangada culture, language, and traditions, this tale of heroes, war, and self-sacrifice takes readers to a time few remember—a time before the new God came to Africa, when the old deities still held sway over the Achalangada kingdom.

1 review for Mortal of the Gods: The History of a Man and His People

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

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