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King Arthur: A Life From Beginning to End (Royalty Biography Book 4)

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Dating back to the fifth century, the legend of King Arthur, his Queen Guinevere, and the Knights of the Round Table is an integral part of British national mythology. From its beginning as a few lines of Latin text written in a sixth-century monk’s hand, Arthurian legend has blossomed over the years into a unique universe built on the real foundations of Britain’s Dark Ag Dating back to the fifth century, the legend of King Arthur, his Queen Guinevere, and the Knights of the Round Table is an integral part of British national mythology. From its beginning as a few lines of Latin text written in a sixth-century monk’s hand, Arthurian legend has blossomed over the years into a unique universe built on the real foundations of Britain’s Dark Ages and the principles of ancient chivalry. Liberally expanded over the years to include romantic entanglements, an imaginary ancient empire, and the threat of the supernatural, the legend of King Arthur remains as engaging today as it was in medieval times. King Arthur’s life, whether it happened or not, cuts to the core of the Matter of Britain and reveals the heart of Britain’s fanciful idea of its origin.


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Dating back to the fifth century, the legend of King Arthur, his Queen Guinevere, and the Knights of the Round Table is an integral part of British national mythology. From its beginning as a few lines of Latin text written in a sixth-century monk’s hand, Arthurian legend has blossomed over the years into a unique universe built on the real foundations of Britain’s Dark Ag Dating back to the fifth century, the legend of King Arthur, his Queen Guinevere, and the Knights of the Round Table is an integral part of British national mythology. From its beginning as a few lines of Latin text written in a sixth-century monk’s hand, Arthurian legend has blossomed over the years into a unique universe built on the real foundations of Britain’s Dark Ages and the principles of ancient chivalry. Liberally expanded over the years to include romantic entanglements, an imaginary ancient empire, and the threat of the supernatural, the legend of King Arthur remains as engaging today as it was in medieval times. King Arthur’s life, whether it happened or not, cuts to the core of the Matter of Britain and reveals the heart of Britain’s fanciful idea of its origin.

30 review for King Arthur: A Life From Beginning to End (Royalty Biography Book 4)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nihal Lele

    For to die with honour is better than to live disgraced. Ancient history wasn't always my favourite part of history. There were some exceptions like Alexander the Great and Chandragupt Maurya. King Arthur is another exception. The life of King Arthur was written in many sources, but this book combines them to form a small book of about 40 pages. It was fun reading about him, but the story isn't written in order. This makes the book somewhat confusing, and that is what bugged me. Even if the For to die with honour is better than to live disgraced. Ancient history wasn't always my favourite part of history. There were some exceptions like Alexander the Great and Chandragupt Maurya. King Arthur is another exception. The life of King Arthur was written in many sources, but this book combines them to form a small book of about 40 pages. It was fun reading about him, but the story isn't written in order. This makes the book somewhat confusing, and that is what bugged me. Even if the book doesn't talk much about his life, it truly speaks about the stories written about him. And the numerous stories made on him makes the life of the legendary king a real legend.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Casey

    “Every representation of King Arthur over the years has been a product of the time and place in which it came into being.” That pretty well sums up this book. It takes you on a tour of the evolution of the Arthur legend, from his likely historical roots through his various iterations over time. In the end, Arthur and his knights are who we make them. They were always an allegory for something greater than ourselves, an ideal that never truly existed. In any case, it was very interesting to track “Every representation of King Arthur over the years has been a product of the time and place in which it came into being.” That pretty well sums up this book. It takes you on a tour of the evolution of the Arthur legend, from his likely historical roots through his various iterations over time. In the end, Arthur and his knights are who we make them. They were always an allegory for something greater than ourselves, an ideal that never truly existed. In any case, it was very interesting to track the changes and why they happened. A good starting place for those wanting to dive deeper into King Arthur.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Young Kim

    The Author Has Conducted a Great Analytical Work on the Popular Story Having read this book it crosses my mind that this book is like a high-quality Cliff Note, introducing all the works and stories of King Arthur from the ancient times up to the latest one we read and watch today with characters and themes all explained within 50 pages. And I think that the tales of King Arthur became at some point like one of the earliest examples of a popular adventure series, just like the present-day Harry Po The Author Has Conducted a Great Analytical Work on the Popular Story Having read this book it crosses my mind that this book is like a high-quality Cliff Note, introducing all the works and stories of King Arthur from the ancient times up to the latest one we read and watch today with characters and themes all explained within 50 pages. And I think that the tales of King Arthur became at some point like one of the earliest examples of a popular adventure series, just like the present-day Harry Potter Series with sec'ond/ sequ'ent stories developed continually. "Chapter Eight - King Arthur in the 15th Century" is a summary of the story we are familiar with. If it was all, however, I wouldn't bother reading this book. Looks like the author has conducted a great analytical work on the popular story. (Kindle Ed. pp. 37-38) ...The last print run of Le Morte d’Arthur happened in 1634, and no new versions of the book were published for 200 years. Dedicated antiquarian historians attacked the legitimacy of Arthurian legends and poked holes in the historical framework of a story that had been embellished beyond all recognition by romance poets. Sixteenth and seventeenth-century scholars challenged the idea that Arthur was the leader of the post-Roman British Empire with many rejecting the claim that King Arthur was a real person at all. Some scholars even rejected the notion of a post-Roman British Empire or any real British-Romano resistance to the Anglo-Saxon invasion...For nineteenth-century audiences, Malory’s medieval version of the life of King Arthur became the only Arthurian text; all previous Celtic, Latin, and French versions were disregarded. Partly because of this disregard for texts that pre-dated Malory’s, King Arthur and his knights came to represent Britishness in its purest form. Already, in the early nineteenth century, British identity was becoming anglicized. The cultural heritage of Scotland, Ireland, and Wales became more and more marginalized until, by the end of Queen Victoria’s reign, Britishness became almost synonymous with Englishness. Somehow a man who, if he was real at all, was a Romano-Briton, living in the fifth century and associating with the Celtic Old Way for the first few centuries of his legend, became a national hero for the English. Well, quelle surprise lol It's the same in almost all other modern "nationalist" identities except some like the history of U.S., or Turkey, which does not claim that the Native American history, or ancient Roman history in Asia-minor, is its own; some people know and do not deny their original identities although these are rare cases as a matter of fact. The French call the history of Gauls as their own while Frenc[h] history of Franc[e] was actually branched out of Germanic-Frank, and the Chinese call the ancient Yellow Riverbank Civilization the "Chinese Civilization" while Chin[a] was from ancient Chin from northwest (Eurasian Steppe-origin) and China's-first-emperor Chin-xi-Huangdi, who conquered the old civilization (You will be surprised to see the ancient portrait of first Kim/ Cimm'er King of Sir'a (seriously called either Sir-o, Sol-a or Shin-ra/ Sil-la) of modern-day Korean history). Just like the ancient Engl'o-/ Angl'o-Saxons were considered as barb'aric invaders by the ancient Romano-British, Chin, too, was clearly considered as "barbaric" invaders by the Riverbank people, but the civilizations and their old identities along with their earlier achievements were all stolen by the conquests after all. We don't even realize what the hi-stor'y we learn from our public educations and media really is. The problem is modern-nationalism tends to focus on the history of the current territory, not of the people. We, the final winners of our land, have taken, not just the land and resources, but even the victims' achievements, making their achievements our own proud history. This tendency has brought a lot of twisted confusions to our world today. For example, look how the entire West today takes ancient Roman history as its own while the people today are actually the descendants of Germanic tribesmen warriors from the Russian Steppe, who destroyed agricultural Latin'o-Roman civilization. This book makes the readers ponder, and an'y-one who likes to think hard would love to read it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie (Bookfever)

    I actually really liked this short book about King Arthur and where his myth came from. It doesn't go into deep about it all but it's only 37 pages so it's to be expected. The story of king Arthur and the knights of the round table has been a favorite of mine for ages so I really liked learning more about where it supposedly all started, which is around the time that the Romans left Great Britain and the remaining people needed a hero. The book also goes into the different stories that surround I actually really liked this short book about King Arthur and where his myth came from. It doesn't go into deep about it all but it's only 37 pages so it's to be expected. The story of king Arthur and the knights of the round table has been a favorite of mine for ages so I really liked learning more about where it supposedly all started, which is around the time that the Romans left Great Britain and the remaining people needed a hero. The book also goes into the different stories that surround the legend of Arthur and maybe it's just me but I couldn't help but notice how some of these stories, though not all of them, were very similar to some Greek myths that we all know very well. For example, I couldn't help but draw parallels between King Arthur and Hercules. It was striking actually. For a free book, King Arthus: A Life From Beginning to End was a pretty good one. It was a really quick read as all Hourly History books are since they can be read in way less than an hour and can be read in one sitting even.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Thom Swennes

    Many countries and peoples are proud of their mythological roots. Tales, steeped in history and folklore, form the base to an ideological society. Often admirable traits and deeds are incorporated into these stories, meant to encourage, motivate, and inspire a higher level of life. Before Christianity graced the western world, as it still holds today, people needed to believe in a greater power. Norse, Roman, and Greek mythology is filled with men and women possessing god-like powers. Around 500 Many countries and peoples are proud of their mythological roots. Tales, steeped in history and folklore, form the base to an ideological society. Often admirable traits and deeds are incorporated into these stories, meant to encourage, motivate, and inspire a higher level of life. Before Christianity graced the western world, as it still holds today, people needed to believe in a greater power. Norse, Roman, and Greek mythology is filled with men and women possessing god-like powers. Around 500 AD, Rome was collapsing, which necessitated troops and civil servants to be recalled from the far-flung reaches of the empire. This sudden exodus created a power-vacuum that begged to be filled. From all directions, England was invaded by peoples set on establishing a foothold on this rich island. King Arthur is a myth. There is no historical documentation to substantiate his existence. Very early literary prose alludes to his possible existence, but they can hardly be accredited as sound. Ambrosius Aurelianus, a Roman from around this time, comes closest to filling the Arthur bill but so little is known about him, it can hardly be credited as fact. Furthermore, this Roman lord would hardly resemble the medieval monarch, famed for his Excalibur, Avalon, Camelot Castle, roundtable knights, and beautiful wife, Queen Guinevere. Medieval chivalry, poetic justice, and inspirational rhetoric are hallmarks of this great tale of yore. There is no doubt that the Arthurian myth has been added to and abridged over the centuries, making it what it is today. Regardless of its truth or accuracy, the Legend of King Arthur continues to inspire and arouse the imagination, forming a cornerstone of English history. This book makes reference to a number of ancient, medieval, and later works of poetry, song, and lore, to roughly form the story we know today. It proves to be a treasure trove of trivia, which may surprise, bore, or excite you. I found the information both edifying and enlightening and was relieved that many of the facets and idiosyncrasies of this tale go further back than the Walt Disney Production Studios.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Goddess of Chaos

    WOW, I've already recommended this to two friends This quick read does a nice job of exploring the Myth of King Arthur, and how it changed and evolved over time, in the context of the history of the British Isles. It points out where Arthur first appeared in stories, and how, and follows his journey from a leader, a Prince, to a King... to part of a love triangle, to a side character in his own story as his Knights and the Round Table began to take center stage. "in Arthur, Victorian audiences fo WOW, I've already recommended this to two friends This quick read does a nice job of exploring the Myth of King Arthur, and how it changed and evolved over time, in the context of the history of the British Isles. It points out where Arthur first appeared in stories, and how, and follows his journey from a leader, a Prince, to a King... to part of a love triangle, to a side character in his own story as his Knights and the Round Table began to take center stage. "in Arthur, Victorian audiences found a man with impeccable morality, a hero for all time whose story was truly timeless." About the only things not touched on are the Musical Camelot, and "Might for Right", though the later is hinted at and alluded to with the references to impeccable morality, and chivalrous courtly behavior. This is a truly great read with a lot of little nuggets tucked in it, like where the term "Anglo-Saxon" came from. Not an in-depth detailed read... but a wonderful quick overview to get you thinking.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jerry Jares

    The author has an amazing grasp of Arthurian history.  Frankly, when I read that most likely the story of King Arthur was mythical, I was ready to close my iPad.  Yet I wondered how someone could write 50 pages about a myth.  Silly me. The author shows the reader where the original story probably came from and moves on to various writers who embellish the tale.  In Chapter 7, the author explains the extensive ceremony that takes place for a man to become a knight. Although the British think it is The author has an amazing grasp of Arthurian history.  Frankly, when I read that most likely the story of King Arthur was mythical, I was ready to close my iPad.  Yet I wondered how someone could write 50 pages about a myth.  Silly me. The author shows the reader where the original story probably came from and moves on to various writers who embellish the tale.  In Chapter 7, the author explains the extensive ceremony that takes place for a man to become a knight. Although the British think it is their story, in reality, there are Celtic, Latin, French, as well as English influences in the tale. I think the author summed up things nicely with, "King Arthur upheld the chivalric ideals of the time in the face of brutality, fought against magical enemies he didn't understand, and kept his integrity intact despite being double-crossed by his nephew.  King Arthur united a nation at war."

  8. 4 out of 5

    April Prosser

    King Arthur: The man and his legends If you, like me, have been fascinated by the story of King Arthur and at the same time completely frustrated trying to tie what has been written about him into one coherent history, this is the book for you. Clear and concise, the books written are tied to the times in which they were written, and at the same time whether or not there really was a King Arthur (I think so—these legends don’t spring up from nowhere) is examined and left for the reader to decide. King Arthur: The man and his legends If you, like me, have been fascinated by the story of King Arthur and at the same time completely frustrated trying to tie what has been written about him into one coherent history, this is the book for you. Clear and concise, the books written are tied to the times in which they were written, and at the same time whether or not there really was a King Arthur (I think so—these legends don’t spring up from nowhere) is examined and left for the reader to decide. Recommended.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Julian Harding

    An excellent primer. All the Hourly History books are, by necessity, short and this one is no different. It is however different in that it tells the history of the origins of the myth of King Arthur. A great little book which covers many aspects of the story and provides many references on where to look further if you are interested. It will also probably upset many Brexiters with its short history of Great Britain in the dark ages but you can't best history. Excellent, interesting read. An excellent primer. All the Hourly History books are, by necessity, short and this one is no different. It is however different in that it tells the history of the origins of the myth of King Arthur. A great little book which covers many aspects of the story and provides many references on where to look further if you are interested. It will also probably upset many Brexiters with its short history of Great Britain in the dark ages but you can't best history. Excellent, interesting read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Julian Orozco, Jr.

    King Arthur: Epic Chivalrous Knight This book is a very good resource for information about the legend of King Arthur. I have always been interested in the stories about Arthur Pendragon. Found out some new information and it has lit up that spark in me to start a quest for more of King Arthur.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anil Swarup

    So much has been written about the legendary King Arthur that it would have normally been difficult to add to it. However, the author, while admitting the limitations of authentic research on the subject, brings together in one place all that has been debated without any bias or conclusion.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Mihalchick

    Fascinating This was a fascinating telling of the Arthurian legend. It turned out to be older than I thought, and it's interesting to see the changes that occurred over the centuries. There's a bit of British history too. It's well written and researched as well. Fascinating This was a fascinating telling of the Arthurian legend. It turned out to be older than I thought, and it's interesting to see the changes that occurred over the centuries. There's a bit of British history too. It's well written and researched as well.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Larson

    The evidence that king Arthur really existed is scant. The author starts with what little evidence there is and then discusses the numerous authors who embellish and fictionalize the legend. The legend of Arthur is massive and as the author states is perhaps what England has needed over the centuries.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    This was so cool...was King Arthur real or wasn't he? Did he exist or didn't he? A historical mystery with a mystical and mythical twist. I found that idea so incredibly cool that it boggled my mind. I loved it!!! This was so cool...was King Arthur real or wasn't he? Did he exist or didn't he? A historical mystery with a mystical and mythical twist. I found that idea so incredibly cool that it boggled my mind. I loved it!!!

  15. 5 out of 5

    LynneV

    Good overview Of course, it's impossible to relay everything in such a short guide, but as a starting point, these short guides are great. What's lacking is a bibliography of cited works--useful for further reading--but otherwise this was a quick, well-structured read. Good overview Of course, it's impossible to relay everything in such a short guide, but as a starting point, these short guides are great. What's lacking is a bibliography of cited works--useful for further reading--but otherwise this was a quick, well-structured read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jean Hall

    This was mainly interesting, some parts more than others. It is definitely a short history of where the legend of King Arthur came from.

  17. 4 out of 5

    J

    A good description of the evolution of King Arthur, readable and just detailed enough (for the most part).

  18. 5 out of 5

    George Polansky

    Not sure if this is history or fiction.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Igor

    Fair account. As a Brazilian, I did not know how complex was his story and all the legend around him.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jon Meerdink

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Bryant

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel Benitez

    Una corta pero interesante introducción a la historia y la literatura detrás del famoso mito arturico. ¿Cómo llego el mito del rey Arturo a ser lo que es? ¿Fue un personaje real o fue solo leyenda? ¿Cuántas versiones y relatos existen sobre el Rey Arturo, El Santo Grial y Los caballeros de la mesa redonda? ¿Cuales fueron los exponentes más importantes del mito arturico? Este librito nos habla de todo ello antojandonos para más

  23. 4 out of 5

    Happy Girl Indiana

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chad Fernald

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Metzger

  27. 5 out of 5

    DEBrianKelley

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ramona Robert

  29. 4 out of 5

    David Laflin

  30. 5 out of 5

    K M Morey

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