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HBR's 10 Must Reads on Mental Toughness (with bonus interview "Post-Traumatic Growth and Building Resilience" with Martin Seligman) (HBR's 10 Must Reads)

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Come back from every setback a stronger and better leader If you read nothing else on mental toughness, read these ten articles by experts in the field. We've combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the most important ones to help you build your emotional strength and resilience--and to achieve high performance. This boo Come back from every setback a stronger and better leader If you read nothing else on mental toughness, read these ten articles by experts in the field. We've combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the most important ones to help you build your emotional strength and resilience--and to achieve high performance. This book will inspire you to: Thrive on pressure like an Olympic athlete Manage and overcome negative emotions by acknowledging them Plan short-term goals to achieve long-term aspirations Surround yourself with the people who will push you the hardest Use challenges to become a better leader Use creativity to move past trauma Understand the tools your mind uses to recover from setbacks. This collection of articles includes "How the Best of the Best Get Better and Better," by Graham Jones; "Crucibles of Leadership," by Warren G. Bennis and Robert J. Thomas; "Building Resilience," by Martin E.P. Seligman; "Cognitive Fitness," by Roderick Gilkey and Clint Kilts; "The Making of a Corporate Athlete," by Jim Loehr and Tony Schwartz; "Stress Can Be a Good Thing If You Know How to Use It," by Alla Crum and Thomas Crum; "How to Bounce Back from Adversity," by Joshua D. Margolis and Paul G. Stoltz; "Rebounding from Career Setbacks," by Mitchell Lee Marks, Philip Mirvis, and Ron Ashkenas; "Realizing What You're Made Of," by Glenn E. Mangurian; "Extreme Negotiations," by Jeff Weiss, Aram Donigian, and Jonathan Hughes; and "Post-Traumatic Growth and Building Resilience," by Martin Seligman and Sarah Green Carmichael.


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Come back from every setback a stronger and better leader If you read nothing else on mental toughness, read these ten articles by experts in the field. We've combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the most important ones to help you build your emotional strength and resilience--and to achieve high performance. This boo Come back from every setback a stronger and better leader If you read nothing else on mental toughness, read these ten articles by experts in the field. We've combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the most important ones to help you build your emotional strength and resilience--and to achieve high performance. This book will inspire you to: Thrive on pressure like an Olympic athlete Manage and overcome negative emotions by acknowledging them Plan short-term goals to achieve long-term aspirations Surround yourself with the people who will push you the hardest Use challenges to become a better leader Use creativity to move past trauma Understand the tools your mind uses to recover from setbacks. This collection of articles includes "How the Best of the Best Get Better and Better," by Graham Jones; "Crucibles of Leadership," by Warren G. Bennis and Robert J. Thomas; "Building Resilience," by Martin E.P. Seligman; "Cognitive Fitness," by Roderick Gilkey and Clint Kilts; "The Making of a Corporate Athlete," by Jim Loehr and Tony Schwartz; "Stress Can Be a Good Thing If You Know How to Use It," by Alla Crum and Thomas Crum; "How to Bounce Back from Adversity," by Joshua D. Margolis and Paul G. Stoltz; "Rebounding from Career Setbacks," by Mitchell Lee Marks, Philip Mirvis, and Ron Ashkenas; "Realizing What You're Made Of," by Glenn E. Mangurian; "Extreme Negotiations," by Jeff Weiss, Aram Donigian, and Jonathan Hughes; and "Post-Traumatic Growth and Building Resilience," by Martin Seligman and Sarah Green Carmichael.

30 review for HBR's 10 Must Reads on Mental Toughness (with bonus interview "Post-Traumatic Growth and Building Resilience" with Martin Seligman) (HBR's 10 Must Reads)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    Good ideas on how to cope with stress and rebound from difficult situations. Key points: - If you want to get to the top, you need to train with the best people. - Continuous detailed feedback. How can I improve my performance? - Pay attention to what you did well too. - "Those with real mettle will get back into training again. That’s what truly separates elite performers from ordinary high achievers." - Learn from negative experiences. - Happiness is a function of outlook on life. - When adversity Good ideas on how to cope with stress and rebound from difficult situations. Key points: - If you want to get to the top, you need to train with the best people. - Continuous detailed feedback. How can I improve my performance? - Pay attention to what you did well too. - "Those with real mettle will get back into training again. That’s what truly separates elite performers from ordinary high achievers." - Learn from negative experiences. - Happiness is a function of outlook on life. - When adversity hits, learn from that experience, and get back to work. - "We discovered that people who don’t give up have a habit of interpreting setbacks as temporary, local, and changeable." - "Play games Activities like bridge, chess, sudoku, and the New York Times crossword puzzle all provide good neural workouts. There are ever more possibilities online, too, with the growing popularity of role-playing games. Try new games that challenge your left hemisphere, such as pool." -Tale notes of everything interesting you see. - Learning to play a musical instrument is a good mental workout. - "Physical well-being is its foundation. Above that rests emotional health, then mental acuity, and at the top," - Name your stress. - What would the person I admire do in this situation? - " Determine why you lost, identify new paths, and seize the right opportunity" - To survive you need at least one believer. - "It’s easier to create new dreams than to cling to broken ones Adversity alters relationships and may even ruin them. It destroys some dreams and renders others unlikely. Certain things will be irrevocably lost, and pretending otherwise is foolish. But adversity also provides an opportunity to houseclean—to pack old"

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    In my current attempt at helping myself get a promotion at work, reading management books alongside taking management courses online, hopefully this will work (something has to eventually right?). This was a very interesting collection of essays about 'mental toughness' usually in regards to things like 'crucibles'; which is a term for a "super crazy crappy moment that happened that tested everything about me - who I am, what I am, my resolve, etc.". And then how do we handle ourselves, our surr In my current attempt at helping myself get a promotion at work, reading management books alongside taking management courses online, hopefully this will work (something has to eventually right?). This was a very interesting collection of essays about 'mental toughness' usually in regards to things like 'crucibles'; which is a term for a "super crazy crappy moment that happened that tested everything about me - who I am, what I am, my resolve, etc.". And then how do we handle ourselves, our surroundings, etc, afterwards of this crucible. Do we get PTSD or do we overcome the adversity? Do we get "post-traumatic growth" or "post-traumatic stress". A lot of the articles were based around the military and military practices and training of drill sergeants and similar personnel. A very well rounded, informative, educational read. Worth the pickup at the library definitely and made me interested in others of the HBR's '10 Must Reads' series.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Malpiszon

    This book clearly got into my hands these days for a reason... I do believe in post-traumatic growth even more now. Life's adversities are like broken bones for me .. hurts at the beginning, but when the bone grows together again, it's stronger then ever before. This book clearly got into my hands these days for a reason... I do believe in post-traumatic growth even more now. Life's adversities are like broken bones for me .. hurts at the beginning, but when the bone grows together again, it's stronger then ever before.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alysha Puducheri

    Quick and impactful read. The kind of book I would go back to and revisit specific chapters based on my environment and the circumstances around me. Offers actionable takeaways. Should be required reading for all managers, but there’s a lot to take away as an employee too.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brian Nwokedi

    Introduction On Mental Toughness is a collection of ten essays originally published in the Harvard Business Review on you guessed it, mental toughness. Each of these ten articles have been hand selected to create a collection of impactful readings on building resilience and thriving in life. When it comes right down to it, we can all use some help strengthen our ability to be resilient and bounce back from setbacks. Why You Should Read This Book? Mental toughness and overall grit are some of the Introduction On Mental Toughness is a collection of ten essays originally published in the Harvard Business Review on you guessed it, mental toughness. Each of these ten articles have been hand selected to create a collection of impactful readings on building resilience and thriving in life. When it comes right down to it, we can all use some help strengthen our ability to be resilient and bounce back from setbacks. Why You Should Read This Book? Mental toughness and overall grit are some of the more important characteristics that we need to develop and maintain. Life is full of ups and downs from both a personal and professional setting, and the only way to successfully navigate these rollercoasters is through mental toughness. The ten articles within this book will help facilitate your improvement in the area of mental toughness. The following is a quick summary/overview of the ten articles within this book: 1. How the Best of the Best Get Better and Better: you have to make the choice to devote yourself passionately to self-improvement and seek out competition that will push you to your max. 2. Crucibles of Leadership: one of the most reliable indicators and predictors of true leadership is an individual’s ability to find meaning in negative events and learn from even the most trying circumstances. 3. Building Resilience: the personas of Douglas and Walter help us realize that optimism in the face of failure is one of life’s most important characteristics. Without it, resilience in the face of adversity is improbable. 4. Cognitive Fitness: a state of optimized ability to reason, remember, learn, plan, and adapt that is enhanced by certain attitudes, lifestyle choices, and exercises. Cognitive fitness is directly correlated with better decision making, problem solving, and stress management. 5. The Making of a Corporate Athlete: every corporate athlete needs to subscribe to the ideas within the High-Performance Pyramid. 6. Stress Can Be a Good Thing If You Know How to Use It: we all need to redefine our relationship with stress shifting our view to “Stress is Enhancing” rather than “Stress is Bad.” Purposefully acknowledging stress lets us pause our visceral reaction, and allows us to choose a more enhancing response. 7. How to Bounce Back from Adversity: we have to learn to turn negative experiences into productive ones through resilience. Psychological resilience is the capacity to respond quickly and constructively to crises. 8. Rebounding from Career Setbacks: determine why you lost, identify new paths, and seize the right opportunity when it’s within your reach. 9. Realizing What You’re Made Of: toughness and resilience is not the same thing. Resilience is not about deflecting challenges but about absorbing them and rebounding stronger than before. 10. Extreme Negotiations: five highly effective strategies for extreme negotiations: (1) understand the big picture, (2) uncover hidden agendas and collaborate with the other side, (3) get genuine buy-in, (4) build relationships that are based on trust rather than fear, and (5) pay attention to process as well as desired outcomes. You should read this book if you are interested in learning some simple traits and effective tools to improve your overall resilience and mental toughness. When it comes right down to it, we can all use some help strengthen our ability to be resilient and bounce back from setbacks, and this book gives you some things to start on. Final Thoughts The goal of On Mental Toughness is to help people become more resilient in their day to day lives, but sometimes the hype is better than the actual product. On Mental Toughness falls into this bucket for me. While the subject matter is very interesting and the book is complied in an easy to digest fashion, it falls short from being massively impactful. When you expect a book to hit a homerun, singles and doubles are a little less than appealing. It’s still worth reading especially the 5th Essay on “The Making of a Corporate Athlete.” Easy to Read: (4.5/5) 90% Deep Content: (3/5) 60% Overall Rating: (3/5) 60%

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    Fantastic topics on mental fortitude. A few folks already neatly summarized key points in other reviews, but here were my main takeaways: 1) You have the power to change your mindset (and your life). To strengthen your resilience, shift from reflexive, cause-oriented thinking to active, response-oriented thinking. The below are active, response-oriented questions rather than brooding on the causes. - CONTROL: What features of your situation can you improve, or even try to improve? - IMPACT: What k Fantastic topics on mental fortitude. A few folks already neatly summarized key points in other reviews, but here were my main takeaways: 1) You have the power to change your mindset (and your life). To strengthen your resilience, shift from reflexive, cause-oriented thinking to active, response-oriented thinking. The below are active, response-oriented questions rather than brooding on the causes. - CONTROL: What features of your situation can you improve, or even try to improve? - IMPACT: What kind of positive impact can you have on what happens next? - BREADTH: How can you contain the negatives of the situation and generate currently unseen positives? - DURATION: What can I do to begin addressing the problem now? 2) When having conversations with people, especially where you may disagree, focus on understanding their perspective. Don't assume the other side is biased, but you're not. Don't assume their intentions. Instead, be curious - understand the situation from their view. Be humble - ask what you have wrong. Be open-minded - ask yourself if there is another way to explain the situation. 3) Post-traumatic growth is a very real thing. Difficult obstacles arise, but what happens next depends on your mindset. Every challenge is an opportunity for positive change.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shivai

    Great short afternoon read. Rational and objective strategies for the workplace. Key takeaways: -Always sit with the smartest person in the room, and if you are the smartest, change the room. - Don't quit working on strengths - Negative experiences aren't supposed to be the end of the world. - Adversity will hit, just let it affect you based on importance - Greatest mental workout- learning to play a musical instrument. - There is a difference between exceptionally great performers and a regular hig Great short afternoon read. Rational and objective strategies for the workplace. Key takeaways: -Always sit with the smartest person in the room, and if you are the smartest, change the room. - Don't quit working on strengths - Negative experiences aren't supposed to be the end of the world. - Adversity will hit, just let it affect you based on importance - Greatest mental workout- learning to play a musical instrument. - There is a difference between exceptionally great performers and a regular high achievers. - What would the person I look up to do in this situation - Neural workouts are emphatic for growth -People who don’t give up have a interpret a losing situation as temporary, local, and changeable. -Motivation in the most cliche terms is not over rated. It is important. - Getting to the top- train with the best. - Goals setting isn't taxable. If you don't achieve one, make new ones, just don't forget identifying what the cause of the failure was. -Make and interpret notes - REGULARLY IN SHOUTY CAPITALS

  8. 5 out of 5

    Whalente

    This is an exceptional book, especially for leaders. As a naval officer who has had several challenging assignments, I am always looking for ways to toughen up (me and my Sailors). The essays in this compilation are written by business/military leaders, coaches, academics, etc. They are relatively short and packed with ideas and best practices. My favorite article was "Stress Can Be a Good Thing if You Know How to Use It." There is a passage about how "owning your stress" can motivate. "A metaph This is an exceptional book, especially for leaders. As a naval officer who has had several challenging assignments, I am always looking for ways to toughen up (me and my Sailors). The essays in this compilation are written by business/military leaders, coaches, academics, etc. They are relatively short and packed with ideas and best practices. My favorite article was "Stress Can Be a Good Thing if You Know How to Use It." There is a passage about how "owning your stress" can motivate. "A metaphor we often use to describe this state is "It's just a cold, dark night on the side of Everest." If you were climbing Mt. Everest, you could imagine that there might be some cold, dark nights on your journey up. But what did you expect - that climbing Everest would be a walk in the park? Do you really expect that raising a child, running a business, living a life of impact would be easy? Owning your stress won't necessarily make those cold, dark nights go away but they will likely be a bit more tolerable as you discover a sense of motivation and meaning."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Soomin

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was a tremendous read that gave me further wisdom and insight into building resilience and rebounding from failure. As humans, we inevitably face failures / downfalls small or big, frequently or randomly - yet some of us get trapped in the initial emotional 'response' stage of the hardship while others successfully rise from the failure. This book has given me wisdom into how the hardest part, yet the most critical part to recovery, is 'acceptance'; you have the option to accept setbacks as This was a tremendous read that gave me further wisdom and insight into building resilience and rebounding from failure. As humans, we inevitably face failures / downfalls small or big, frequently or randomly - yet some of us get trapped in the initial emotional 'response' stage of the hardship while others successfully rise from the failure. This book has given me wisdom into how the hardest part, yet the most critical part to recovery, is 'acceptance'; you have the option to accept setbacks as they occur, move on, and create new possibilities. Because failure happens to all of us and "it's fruitless to wish you could change the past, and it's overwhelming to obsess about the future". But you can choose to focus on things over which you can control - the present. So if failure happens, accept/absorb that setback and be resilient because what doesn't kill you will make you stronger.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. ABCD: C (emotional consequences) stem not directly from A (adversity) but from B (one's belief's about adversity). The sergeants work through a series of A's and learn to separate B's--heat of the moment thoughts about the situation (I'm a failure) from C's, the emotions generated from those thoughts (feeling down and performing poorly). They then learn D--how to quickly and effectively dispel unrealistic beliefs about adversity" (32) Example: overgeneralization or judging a person from a single ABCD: C (emotional consequences) stem not directly from A (adversity) but from B (one's belief's about adversity). The sergeants work through a series of A's and learn to separate B's--heat of the moment thoughts about the situation (I'm a failure) from C's, the emotions generated from those thoughts (feeling down and performing poorly). They then learn D--how to quickly and effectively dispel unrealistic beliefs about adversity" (32) Example: overgeneralization or judging a person from a single action: "A soldier in your unit struggles to keep up during physical training and is dragging the rest of the day. His uniform looks sloppy, and he makes a couple of mistakes during artillery practice. It might be natural to think that he lacks the stuff of a soldier. But what effect does that have on both the thinker and the other soldier?" "We also discuss "icebergs"--deeply held beliefs such as "Asking for help is a sign of weakness"--and teach a technique for identifying and eliminating those that cause out-of-kilter emotional reactions: Does the iceberg remain meaningful? Is it accurate in the given situation? Is it overly rigid? Is it useful?" (33) "minimize catastrophic thinking by considering worst-case, best-case, and most likely outcomes." For example: negative performance evaluation, follow plan, improve "Just as positive emotions ignite the energy that drives high performance, negative emotions--frustration, impatience, anger, fear, resentment, and sadness--drain energy. Over time, these feelings can be literally toxic, elevating heart rate and blood pressure, increasing muscle tension, constricting vision, and ultimately crippling performance." Notice stress triggers, reframe anxiety as a positive benefit, something to be "used" or employed, "own the experiences we have been through and use them to fuel our future . . . thrive, not in spite of stress but because of it." (75) "...you can create a narrative of your trauma, arise and you can go, like Orpheus, come back from the underground and make sense of what's in the underground, and tell the world what's in the underground, that there's a reason to think there's an important enabling condition after trauma." (128) Response-oriented thinking: Control: What feature of this situation can I even potentially improve? Impact: What sort of positive impact can I have on what happens next? Breadth: How can I control the negatives of the situation and generate potentially unseen positives? Duration: What can I do to begin addressing the problem now? "Your happiness is more important than righting injustices." (104) Negotiations: (108) 1. Understand the big picture 2. Uncover hidden agendas and collaborate with the other side 3. Get genuine buy-in 4. Build relationships that are based on trust rather than fear 5. Pay attention to process as well as desired outcomes Avoid assuming. Instead: Be curious. Help me understand the situation. Be humble. What do I have wrong? Be open-minded. Is there another way to explain this? Uncover and collaborate: Ask: Why is that important to you? Propose solutions: Here's a possibility. What might be wrong in it? Elicit buy-in Appeal to fairness: what should we do? Appeal to logic and legitimacy: I think this makes sense because... Consider constituent perspectives: How can each of us explain this agreement to colleagues? Be respectful. Focus on process: I can't agree, but I'd prefer not to walk away either. Unless you're willing to work toward a mutually acceptable outcome, I can't afford to spend more time negotiating.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Spencer

    Great book, I'd recommend this to anyone going through adversity or challenging times. Covers many topics and provides tangible actions as well as overall support. I took notes and below are some things that stood out to me while reading. (view spoiler)[ Feedback: when someone's feedback seems more like insults, find 'what's behind the negative feedback'. Which is to say, find why they are delivering feedback this way. Then get specific. Ask what exactly could you have done better. Approach feedback Great book, I'd recommend this to anyone going through adversity or challenging times. Covers many topics and provides tangible actions as well as overall support. I took notes and below are some things that stood out to me while reading. (view spoiler)[ Feedback: when someone's feedback seems more like insults, find 'what's behind the negative feedback'. Which is to say, find why they are delivering feedback this way. Then get specific. Ask what exactly could you have done better. Approach feedback by saying 'I'm not trying to change the decision, I just want to understand why it was made.' Ask questions like: what did I do that contributed to the decision; or ask did I size up the opportunity correctly or accurately and did I handle myself appropriately; finally, you can ask something along the lines of 'what would I do differently, given a second chance' It's important to 'find meaning in negative events' Adversity makes for great leaders so 'learn from the most trying circumstances' Pattern recognition, according to Novel laureate Herbert Simon can be improved by learning new things, putting yourself in new situations amongst other things. The key is to do it consistently. In a mentor and mentee relationship, while many think the person being mentored gets the most value, it's important to realize that the mentor is getting exposure to new ideas and ways of thinking that the mentee provides by asking insightful questions. While working and exerting yourself is of course important, the book touches on why recovery is so important and how to do it effectively. Successful tennis players between points, for example, will use the 15 - 20 seconds to refocus on the next point (letting go of the previous one) and eliminate all distractions. They will also assume a confident posture and finally, visualize how they want the next point to go. The book dives deep into how all three of these things contribute to better performance, but the key here is that the rituals involved in your recovery are just as important as your rituals while you work. The book continues talking about recovery by offering five general ways to improve your recovery. Hydrate, get moving, change emotional state, change what you're thinking about or eat something. The book suggests working in increments of 90 to 120 minuets and then using one of these five options to effectively recover so you're able to return to work and perform. The key here, with all positive actions, is to work them so they become habits and a part of your life. About adversity, the book suggests that rather than focusing on asking why or who caused it or thinking you're not good enough to overcome it, focus instead on taking action. What can you do to make the situation better? Furthermore, if you're not sure how to take action, you're underlying beliefs about adversity may be the problem. Uncover what those biases or beliefs are and then ask, 'what's the best way to respond?' If you're still stuck, the book offers specific questions to ask in the face of different types of adversity. These specific questions considered specifying, visualizing or collaborating questions. An example of a specifying question is: 'what can I do, explicitly, to turn [the situation] around?' An example of a visualizing question is: 'what would ____ do?' fill in the blank with a mentor An example of a collaborating question is (the ones I found most insightful): 'who can help and what's the nest way to engage them?' (Pg 82) (hide spoiler)]

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shweta Jha

    This is my second book from the HBR series, the current COVID situation has changed so much for all of us and at times even doing routine things and keep us in the business requires mental discipline and agility. I thought this book may be good read and may help me in dealing with current situation in better way. The book is great and gives you perspective on how to not just survive but thrive under pressure, how to focus on your strengths and why we need to work on cognitive fitness and more. F This is my second book from the HBR series, the current COVID situation has changed so much for all of us and at times even doing routine things and keep us in the business requires mental discipline and agility. I thought this book may be good read and may help me in dealing with current situation in better way. The book is great and gives you perspective on how to not just survive but thrive under pressure, how to focus on your strengths and why we need to work on cognitive fitness and more. Five key takeaways for me are: Managing pressure – personally, I perform better under certain level of pressure, the key to deal with pressure is to focus on your own excellence, look through what you can and can’t control. Understand the long term goal and channelize your energy. Competition can be good, use the competition – its opportunity for you to retrospect and reinvent. Keep the desire to win and finally don’t forget to celebrate. 😊 Building resiliency – failures are tough to deal with, no one likes to fail, but it’s part of our professional career and essentially of our lives. Sometimes, we feel so helpless and its okay to feel that way, there is always a way to bounce back, focus on your strengths, be optimistic. It’s important that you have emotional, social and spiritual fitness. Reach out and develop your signature strengths, it will help you lead though setbacks. Cognitive fitness – this one is my favorite, cognitive fitness is equally important as physical fitness, sometimes in a situation where you have to take a decisions or you are dealing with conflicts it is must. Both physical fitness and cognitive fitness are complementary to each other. Many of us follows a regime for physical fitness, but very less people focuses on building cognitive fitness. There are few great ideas stated in this book – if you are under stress - start walking, read funny books, play games, find out what you are not learning, take notes and go back and read them, learn new things, indulge in hobbies and exercise, exercise and exercise. The more cognitively fit you are, the more you will be able to solve the problems, take business decisions and deal with the stress and change. The making of the corporate athlete – if there is one quality that executives seek for themselves and their employees, it is the sustained high performance in the face of ever increasing pressure and change. The books has great example on performance management and how one can improve by addressing different aspects of the body, the emotions, the mind and the sprit. Physical capacity – helps build endurance and promotes mental and emotional recovery, take break, go out on walk, hit the gym. Emotional capacity – create the internal climate that drives the ideal performance state, - find value, learn to recognize negative emotions and engage yourself with positives. Mental Capacity – focus physical and emotional energy on the task at the hand, don’t limit yourself by defining mental boundaries, challenge to do more, set small targets and continue working towards it. Visualize the success, it generates positive energy and help you push beyond. Spiritual capacity – provides powerful source of motivation, determination and endurance. You can increase spiritual capacity by tapping into deepest value and defining strong sense of purpose. A great example could be - how Satya Nadella and his SLT team are inculcating and thriving on our responsibility towards each and every person on the earth and the environment we live in. Dealing with extreme negotiation – we go through negotiations all the time, be it your pay raise discussion, promotions, getting feature committed or bring everyone to the same page. The key points are to understand the big picture, uncover hidden agendas and collaborate with other side, get genuine buy-in, build relationship that are build on trust, pay attention to the process as well as desired outcome. Few example in the book during Afghan war is great.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Robert Montalbo

    This is a great book on leadership, strategy and tactics. I especially enjoyed the section entitled, " Play The Game." To be more specific, how to play the long game. The game of building relationships. Why its important to do so, even if we do not want to, or see the immediate benefit. There are different approaches to building relationships, certainly the heavy handed approach might produce short term results, but for long term success, its best to develop meaningful and healthy relationships, This is a great book on leadership, strategy and tactics. I especially enjoyed the section entitled, " Play The Game." To be more specific, how to play the long game. The game of building relationships. Why its important to do so, even if we do not want to, or see the immediate benefit. There are different approaches to building relationships, certainly the heavy handed approach might produce short term results, but for long term success, its best to develop meaningful and healthy relationships, especially with your boss. To do this, one has to play the long game. Building relationships not for personal gain, but building relationships to better the organization and help the overall cause. This is the measure of true success. I plan to read this book again in two weeks as I'm sure I will find it useful long term. I highly recommend this read for those who want to lead others. It just makes sense. Robert

  14. 5 out of 5

    Przemek Kotowski

    One of the main factors distinguishing between successful and unsuccessful leaders is how one responds to adversity. We live in times of unprecedented hardship that will put leaders to the extreme test. These leaders do not know how to react to a global pandemic and what the post-Covid world will look like. This collection of articles is a timely and very relevant read reminding us of the need to view challenges as opportunities and helping us understand the physiological and emotional toll hard One of the main factors distinguishing between successful and unsuccessful leaders is how one responds to adversity. We live in times of unprecedented hardship that will put leaders to the extreme test. These leaders do not know how to react to a global pandemic and what the post-Covid world will look like. This collection of articles is a timely and very relevant read reminding us of the need to view challenges as opportunities and helping us understand the physiological and emotional toll hardships have on us and our organizations. This is also a great source of inspiration, strategies, and case studies originating from professional sports, military, and business that can be easily applied. For example, how to change post-traumatic stress into post-traumatic growth, what is the role of crucibles of leadership and what is their role in leadership growth, how to manage stress, and how to apply professional athlete’s regimen in business.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Yordanos

    This is a must read book for anyone. You don’t have to be a leader/manager to get value out of the insights packed in the book — they’re generally applicable and the frameworks/tools presented can be effective for all. I read this book slowly because there was much to digest and synthesize. Most of the pages of my copy are filled with underlined lines, margin notes, exclamation marks, reminders to look up/read further upon an author/idea, etc. The point being that the material in this book requir This is a must read book for anyone. You don’t have to be a leader/manager to get value out of the insights packed in the book — they’re generally applicable and the frameworks/tools presented can be effective for all. I read this book slowly because there was much to digest and synthesize. Most of the pages of my copy are filled with underlined lines, margin notes, exclamation marks, reminders to look up/read further upon an author/idea, etc. The point being that the material in this book requires active and deliberate engagement, and follow through and practice to truly get the intended value from it. I’ll certainly be revisiting chapters in the future and practicing + sharing the frameworks outlined.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Omar Mohamed Alaa

    So this was one of these books that had a halo about it even before I started reading it, I felt that this book will have an impact, and it didn’t disappoint. This is a selection of articles from Harvard Business Review discussing the concepts around being more resilient and mental toughness. The book is stock jammed with fascinating insight and data and helpful advice. Yet one of the key messages I came out with, was that it’s all in our minds, the way we choose to view struggles is up to us and So this was one of these books that had a halo about it even before I started reading it, I felt that this book will have an impact, and it didn’t disappoint. This is a selection of articles from Harvard Business Review discussing the concepts around being more resilient and mental toughness. The book is stock jammed with fascinating insight and data and helpful advice. Yet one of the key messages I came out with, was that it’s all in our minds, the way we choose to view struggles is up to us and we can change it, and you will be amazed by the positive impact on your life they will have if you choose to see them in a different light. Definite Read, Definite Buy. Thanks to the walking school of knowledge Karim Mamdouh for lending me this amazing read. Love u Bro.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Colin Bonatti

    A great collection of inspiring articles about strategies to help us thrive in fast-paced work-intensive environments, endure professional failures, and use them for personal growth. As a short summary, remember that maintaining a healthy and balanced lifestyle ultimately yields better results than focusing on work alone (quality over quantity), and that you should see problems and setbacks as challenges and learning experiences (outlook is key).

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    As an avid reader of all things HBR, I found this a collection of articles on mental toughness touch and go. I absolutely loved "The making of a Corporate Athlete" and "Cognitive Fitness". I felt both articles conveyed their points in a manner that held my attention the entire time. The remainder I felt were dry and meandering. Glad I picked this one up from Half Price Books for half the price (No pun intended). As an avid reader of all things HBR, I found this a collection of articles on mental toughness touch and go. I absolutely loved "The making of a Corporate Athlete" and "Cognitive Fitness". I felt both articles conveyed their points in a manner that held my attention the entire time. The remainder I felt were dry and meandering. Glad I picked this one up from Half Price Books for half the price (No pun intended).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Karmen Knezevic

    Pragmatic and informative book on resilience and mental toughness. Simple takeaways that we constantly need to be reminded of, such as this one: Personal program for exercising your brain 1.Read funny book 2. Play games 3. Act out 4. Find what you are not learning 5. Get the most out of the business (personal) trips 6.Take notes and then go back and read them 7. Try new technology 8.Learning a new language or an instrument 9. Exercise, Exercise, Exercise

  20. 4 out of 5

    George

    It's an interesting read. I don't believe you will find something extraordinary or super new but it contains structured information from different aspects of mental toughness.. It can guide you, challenge you and even more trigger you to start thinking from different perspectived of how to improve your reactions over challenging situations around you. It's an interesting read. I don't believe you will find something extraordinary or super new but it contains structured information from different aspects of mental toughness.. It can guide you, challenge you and even more trigger you to start thinking from different perspectived of how to improve your reactions over challenging situations around you.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Said AlMaskery

    Covid19 must read This book on mental toughness is a must read at the age of Covid19. Most of the lessons are beyond a single event or adversary, its life long lessons that deal with multiple types of chaos and vulnerability are much needed for nearly everyone. Some articles were better than others. However this might be due to the relevance to my specific situation.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Vishnu Ramasubramanian

    A good read on mental toughness! A good summary of research on mental toughness with some great real life stories. The stories are very inspiring and turns these popular wisdom in to something very interesting...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Miguel Pinto

    borderline self-help book, this presents in nice and easy to read way a set of case studies that helps the reader to build a toolkit on how to get mentally stronger. if you feel strong of in the weak spot I recommend reading this. it gives you an interesting perspective on corporate world.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Wei Cui

    I like this book. Especially the articles "Cognitive Fitness" and "The Making of a Corporate Athlete". I fully agree that excellent performers in the professional world are similar to top athletes. They keep growing and never stop pushing them harder to get stronger. I like this book. Especially the articles "Cognitive Fitness" and "The Making of a Corporate Athlete". I fully agree that excellent performers in the professional world are similar to top athletes. They keep growing and never stop pushing them harder to get stronger.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Keith Irby

    A good perspective for finding your approach to mental toughness. I thought the best "life hacks" here was the premise of short periods of disconnecting/rest from the grind. This purposeful period of rejuvenation is a most strategy to survey in our ever-increasing speed of life. A good perspective for finding your approach to mental toughness. I thought the best "life hacks" here was the premise of short periods of disconnecting/rest from the grind. This purposeful period of rejuvenation is a most strategy to survey in our ever-increasing speed of life.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rogelio

    It's interesting how a few articles can concentrate that much of practical advice. Every each of it has a very focused and precise knowledge to the reader's improvement in his skill set at work and life. It's not strange that this compilation of top material came from Harvard. Highly recommended. It's interesting how a few articles can concentrate that much of practical advice. Every each of it has a very focused and precise knowledge to the reader's improvement in his skill set at work and life. It's not strange that this compilation of top material came from Harvard. Highly recommended.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gayatri Vaidya

    HBR series never fails to inspire me to have a different perspective to a managerial issue. This book speaks on resilience and at instances, I saw myself extending it to even some personal life experiences.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Robert Kagiri

    This book is not only life changing and profound but what I needed to deal with what I went through. I feel so well equipped to face my struggles in life. Am entirely grateful to whoever was involved in the writing and producing the content.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    As with most HBR 10 must reads, this one contains some excellent articles and some duds. Particularly great in this collection were Martin Seligman's "Building Resilience," and "How to Bounce Back from Adversity," by Joshua Margolis and Paul Stoltz. As with most HBR 10 must reads, this one contains some excellent articles and some duds. Particularly great in this collection were Martin Seligman's "Building Resilience," and "How to Bounce Back from Adversity," by Joshua Margolis and Paul Stoltz.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amie Preston

    Quick read. Valuable cognitive strategies for maintaining perspective.

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