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Suffragists in Washington, DC: The 1913 Parade and the Fight for the Vote

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A vivid narrative of the heroic struggle of Alice Paul and the National Woman's Party as they worked to earn the vote, framed by the demonstration known as The Great Suffrage Parade. The Great Suffrage Parade was the first civil rights march to use the nation's capital as a backdrop. Despite sixty years of relentless campaigning by suffrage organizations, by 1913 only six s A vivid narrative of the heroic struggle of Alice Paul and the National Woman's Party as they worked to earn the vote, framed by the demonstration known as The Great Suffrage Parade. The Great Suffrage Parade was the first civil rights march to use the nation's capital as a backdrop. Despite sixty years of relentless campaigning by suffrage organizations, by 1913 only six states allowed women to vote. Then Alice Paul came to Washington, D.C. She planned a grand spectacle on Pennsylvania Avenue on the day before Woodrow Wilson's inauguration - marking the beginning of a more aggressive strategy on the part of the women's suffrage movement. Groups of women protested and picketed outside the White House, and some were thrown into jail. Newspapers across the nation covered their activities. These tactics finally led to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. Author Rebecca Boggs Roberts narrates the heroic struggle of Alice Paul and the National Woman's Party as they worked to earn the vote.


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A vivid narrative of the heroic struggle of Alice Paul and the National Woman's Party as they worked to earn the vote, framed by the demonstration known as The Great Suffrage Parade. The Great Suffrage Parade was the first civil rights march to use the nation's capital as a backdrop. Despite sixty years of relentless campaigning by suffrage organizations, by 1913 only six s A vivid narrative of the heroic struggle of Alice Paul and the National Woman's Party as they worked to earn the vote, framed by the demonstration known as The Great Suffrage Parade. The Great Suffrage Parade was the first civil rights march to use the nation's capital as a backdrop. Despite sixty years of relentless campaigning by suffrage organizations, by 1913 only six states allowed women to vote. Then Alice Paul came to Washington, D.C. She planned a grand spectacle on Pennsylvania Avenue on the day before Woodrow Wilson's inauguration - marking the beginning of a more aggressive strategy on the part of the women's suffrage movement. Groups of women protested and picketed outside the White House, and some were thrown into jail. Newspapers across the nation covered their activities. These tactics finally led to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. Author Rebecca Boggs Roberts narrates the heroic struggle of Alice Paul and the National Woman's Party as they worked to earn the vote.

30 review for Suffragists in Washington, DC: The 1913 Parade and the Fight for the Vote

  1. 4 out of 5

    Teri

    A short review of the national suffrage movement concentrating on the years between the 1913 Washington DC suffrage parade designed to eclipse Wilson's inauguration through ratification of the 19th amendment. This book is not heavy on minute details but offers a nice overview of the major players in the movement and their activism. A good deal is spent on the protests, arrests, and hunger strikes that many endured and the schism between the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) an A short review of the national suffrage movement concentrating on the years between the 1913 Washington DC suffrage parade designed to eclipse Wilson's inauguration through ratification of the 19th amendment. This book is not heavy on minute details but offers a nice overview of the major players in the movement and their activism. A good deal is spent on the protests, arrests, and hunger strikes that many endured and the schism between the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) and the National Women's Party (NWP). This book is also heavy on pictures which is a great addition.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    I found this really interesting and enjoyed the DC walking tour of some of the notable sites (even though I’ve been to them already). There are just many interesting facts in this book, such as “suffragette” was a term used by detractors to make fun of suffragists and that the 1913 parade cost close to 400K in today’s dollars. This was a really nice companion read to the current Library of Congress exhibit on women’s right to vote—confirms much of the information there.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Juliet

    This is an excellent history of the fight for the right to vote featuring the stories of many brave determined women. These women put their lives on the line and the politics then are eerily familiar today. Includes lots of photographs and an appendix with suffrage walking tour of DC.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Diana Smith

    Really loved all the details about the later era of suffragists, and it was a good short read. Wish that the book had citations/footnotes to learn more about the sources.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    It's fairly good for a history book on a narrow subject. I got caught up in the middle with the progress the ladies were making and their arrests for the cause. It's fairly good for a history book on a narrow subject. I got caught up in the middle with the progress the ladies were making and their arrests for the cause.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I really enjoyed this book. A quick engaging read about a very interesting time in women's history. I really enjoyed this book. A quick engaging read about a very interesting time in women's history.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

  8. 4 out of 5

    Aryssa

  9. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kiersten Laclede

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dave Price

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mary Stephanos

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Hale

  14. 5 out of 5

    Long Island

  15. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

  16. 4 out of 5

    Susan Procter

  17. 4 out of 5

    Denise

  18. 5 out of 5

    Betty Roberts

  19. 4 out of 5

    EP Otter

  20. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Judy Price

  22. 5 out of 5

    Louise A. Vogel

  23. 4 out of 5

    Janice

  24. 5 out of 5

    Isha Punjabi

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marcia Anderson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marye Downs

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  28. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

  29. 5 out of 5

    Savanna Graves

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Swisher

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