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Science Comics: Trees: Kings of the Forest

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Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic--dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and many more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty-year-old with a secret Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic--dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and many more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty-year-old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you! In Trees: Kings of the Forest we follow an acorn as it learns about its future as Earth's largest, longest-living plant. Starting with the seed's germination, we learn about each stage until the tree's maturation, different types of trees, and the roles trees take on in our ecosystem.


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Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic--dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and many more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty-year-old with a secret Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic--dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and many more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty-year-old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you! In Trees: Kings of the Forest we follow an acorn as it learns about its future as Earth's largest, longest-living plant. Starting with the seed's germination, we learn about each stage until the tree's maturation, different types of trees, and the roles trees take on in our ecosystem.

30 review for Science Comics: Trees: Kings of the Forest

  1. 5 out of 5

    Karen Holt

    In my retired life, I will study botany! Very informative and up-to-date. Comic science written for children.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Maximilian Lee

    I LOVED this book because it was very Very VERY informative. It had TONS of information in it. It was about trees! In this book an acorn explained how trees worked. The book was also very funny, like the part when the squirrel wanted to eat the acorn.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    super fantastic. might be better with middle school but OMG educational and funny!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Isaac

    Science Comics: Trees: Kings of the Forest is what i am reading and it is the boringest book i have ever read! It seems like it says the same thing over and over again. Blah blah blah we get it trees grow in the dirt and the roots do things and the leaves change colors. For example it talks about the cells of a tree and its plants for at least 30 pages it makes me want to die. If i could i would rather read an encyclopedia at least they teach me things. I already know that the sun gives the plan Science Comics: Trees: Kings of the Forest is what i am reading and it is the boringest book i have ever read! It seems like it says the same thing over and over again. Blah blah blah we get it trees grow in the dirt and the roots do things and the leaves change colors. For example it talks about the cells of a tree and its plants for at least 30 pages it makes me want to die. If i could i would rather read an encyclopedia at least they teach me things. I already know that the sun gives the plants life. Also it talks forever about how animals eat plants and how the plants eat the trees and get protein and that gets broken down and so on and it talks about roots and how they can go around rocks. It's so boring and the acorn is way too energetic to he gets so hyper about the gasses in a plant the book even goes down to the cells in a leaf its so boring. I also read some of the other comments and they like it because it is so informative for example, “I LOVED this book because it was very Very VERY informative. It had TONS of information in it. It was about trees! In this book an acorn explained how trees worked. The book was also very funny, like the part when the squirrel wanted to eat the acorn.” -Maximilian Lee I thought it was informative sure but it was also over informative they could of used the pages to make a good plot instead of doing dumb things. I think that the book can be 20 pages and get the point of the nook across in every detail it uses now. I truly dislike this book it is very annoying. I think i am too old for this book it teaches you things that even 5th graders know like it teaches you that the amount of rings a tree has equals the age of the tree. Like cmon now i need things that teach me things. Next time i will read a fictional book because they are actually fun to read i don't care about how short the book is it i want to read a good book this time. This is my book review on Science Comics: Trees: Kings of the Forest

  5. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic—dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and many more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty-year-old with a secret I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic—dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and many more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty-year-old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you! This volume: In Trees we follow an acorn as it learns about its future as Earth's largest, longest-living plant. Starting with the seed's germination, we learn about each stage until the tree's maturation, different types of trees, and the roles trees take on in our ecosystem. I am a fully-grown woman, a librarian and information junkie who loves and learned from this book. It is so hard to keep kids engaged these days so learning via comic strip seems like a smart way to do it. I recommend this book for every children’s library and any and every child you know as a gift! Who knew that trees were so complicated??? I certainly did not so this book as a delight to read --- I am not a science or math girl and I hate the mere mention of STEM but this made sense to me AND I enjoyed it!! (There is a whole series of books in the “Science Comics” series – everything from Plagues to The Solar system – they all look wonderful and I have every intention of buying the ENTIRE series – past, present and future – for our library.)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Another volume of Science Comics presents the topic of trees. A lively acorn is educated about the importance of plants and the life of trees. A small frog, a fern leaflet, a squirrel, and a mushroom all help explain things. They show Acorn photosynthesis, the structure of plant cells, and other details. Light absorption, allelochemicals, pollination, and the spread of seeds are explained. His instructors also point out that trees are a keystone species and help with weather control, while also Another volume of Science Comics presents the topic of trees. A lively acorn is educated about the importance of plants and the life of trees. A small frog, a fern leaflet, a squirrel, and a mushroom all help explain things. They show Acorn photosynthesis, the structure of plant cells, and other details. Light absorption, allelochemicals, pollination, and the spread of seeds are explained. His instructors also point out that trees are a keystone species and help with weather control, while also discussing species diversity and convergence. Several illustrations show plants as the bottom of the food pyramid and how Earth is a closed system. This would be a great title to use in a study of plant life, food chains, adaptations and related science topics. A large glossary, a page of facts about acorns, a two-page leaf guide, and suggestions for further reading are in the back matter. Highly recommended for middle grade readers and up. I read an e-book provided by the publisher through NetGalley.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    3.5 for this one, another terrific entry in the Science Comics series! In this graphic format, readers learn all sorts of interesting facts about trees and how they grow, survive, and even sense what's going on around them. Starting with an acorn, various animals take him and readers along a journey through forest terrain, simplifying concepts such as photosynthesis, transpiration, symbiosis, and tropism, among others, and explaining how trees reproduce. The colorful panels and easy-to-understan 3.5 for this one, another terrific entry in the Science Comics series! In this graphic format, readers learn all sorts of interesting facts about trees and how they grow, survive, and even sense what's going on around them. Starting with an acorn, various animals take him and readers along a journey through forest terrain, simplifying concepts such as photosynthesis, transpiration, symbiosis, and tropism, among others, and explaining how trees reproduce. The colorful panels and easy-to-understand language make this a good choice even for elementary science classrooms while older readers like me can still learn something from reading the book. I especially enjoyed pondering the question of whether trees are plants or all plants are trees. I now have a whole new respect for trees when they start to bud in spring and when their leaves begin to fall in the autumn season. Savvy teachers will know they need to start collecting these books for their own curious students if they want to nurture a curiosity in nature.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anita

    I'll never look at trees the same way again, and I thought that I knew a lot about trees. The author covers the essential topics such as photosynthesis and reproduction but also delves into the fascinating world of tree communication and species variety. For example, did you know that a forest of trees can communicate and stay healthier via a mycorrhizal network, i.e., fungi (mushrooms) that send chemical and nutrient information between trees or that Pando is an 80,000 year-old tree that stretc I'll never look at trees the same way again, and I thought that I knew a lot about trees. The author covers the essential topics such as photosynthesis and reproduction but also delves into the fascinating world of tree communication and species variety. For example, did you know that a forest of trees can communicate and stay healthier via a mycorrhizal network, i.e., fungi (mushrooms) that send chemical and nutrient information between trees or that Pando is an 80,000 year-old tree that stretches out over 107 acres? I find this series helpful in introducing and explaining difficult scientific concepts to kids in an accessible and enjoyable format. Students will see these same concepts in future biology courses. For people who are interested in hard science but want to be entertained as well, these Science Comics are for you, too. I received an e-ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    BeeEhn

    Sometimes kids non-fiction books can feel very “no duh” to me. You look at pictures but you don’t really learn anything. With Science Comics though, it’s amazing for both kids and adults. The vocabulary is really advanced for kids and even uses specific scientific works that escape me. I appreciate that they use them anyway. Concepts are so easy to understand but I actually am surprised by how much I didn’t know about trees. How they operate, survive, and even identify and “spread out” to maximi Sometimes kids non-fiction books can feel very “no duh” to me. You look at pictures but you don’t really learn anything. With Science Comics though, it’s amazing for both kids and adults. The vocabulary is really advanced for kids and even uses specific scientific works that escape me. I appreciate that they use them anyway. Concepts are so easy to understand but I actually am surprised by how much I didn’t know about trees. How they operate, survive, and even identify and “spread out” to maximize their species chances of survival. How roots operate. Natural defenses to keep animals from chewing them to death. The weird anti-human page of destruction that probably deserves to be there but was awkward anyway. Yeah. Trees, son.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    The type of book that would’ve kept me interested in science as a kid, filled with amazing illustrations and so much detail. Narrated by a plucky little acorn who comes upon some forest friends (frog, termite, squirrel, woodpecker) there’s plenty of brain wrinkles to be made: plants sensing gravity with root growth, auxin, monocots, mycorrhizal networks, and tree communication?! (Made me think of the Wish Tree by Applegate). As the entomologist noted in the intro: trees do so much more than just s The type of book that would’ve kept me interested in science as a kid, filled with amazing illustrations and so much detail. Narrated by a plucky little acorn who comes upon some forest friends (frog, termite, squirrel, woodpecker) there’s plenty of brain wrinkles to be made: plants sensing gravity with root growth, auxin, monocots, mycorrhizal networks, and tree communication?! (Made me think of the Wish Tree by Applegate). As the entomologist noted in the intro: trees do so much more than just stand there. After reading this, I walked out to observe trees with a new appreciation. Keep the Science Comics series coming, they’re great for adults too!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I know so much more about trees that I never knew! I mean, trees do so much I just never thought about before! And they're so diverse! Also, Squirrel was my favorite narrator character and I do hope he finds some nuts to eat soon :-) My only little complaint is that there were some very difficult science words in this one that younger readers especially (but even myself!) would benefit from having the pronunciation list too. Even if it was just in the back glossary, that would've been helpful! I know so much more about trees that I never knew! I mean, trees do so much I just never thought about before! And they're so diverse! Also, Squirrel was my favorite narrator character and I do hope he finds some nuts to eat soon :-) My only little complaint is that there were some very difficult science words in this one that younger readers especially (but even myself!) would benefit from having the pronunciation list too. Even if it was just in the back glossary, that would've been helpful!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    I received a copy of this book from #netgalley to preview. This Science Comic series is one of my favorite recently released non-fiction graphic novel series. They are fun to read, full of information, and the art and coloring is really well done. There was so much information in Trees that I had no clue about and this made it a really interesting read. This is one that I would highly recommend and would stock in my library.

  13. 5 out of 5

    SaraKat

    Great book! It explains everything about plants and trees and how they fit into the ecosystem. I learned some things that I didn't even know. I think they have figured out a bunch of new things since I took Botany in college. :) The characters are silly, but they don't talk down to the reader too much and there are humorous moments to break up all the exposition. I am definitely adding this one to my classroom library! Great book! It explains everything about plants and trees and how they fit into the ecosystem. I learned some things that I didn't even know. I think they have figured out a bunch of new things since I took Botany in college. :) The characters are silly, but they don't talk down to the reader too much and there are humorous moments to break up all the exposition. I am definitely adding this one to my classroom library!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ghanisse Gabrielle

    Tons of awesome information with detailed graphics, but a very difficult read! I will say it finally found a rhythm and picked up a bit about half way through. I Would consider using as a resource in my classroom during related units but could never use this as a read aloud. I couldn't pronounce most of the words on the first try so I feel that this would be a discouraging book for independent reading. Tons of awesome information with detailed graphics, but a very difficult read! I will say it finally found a rhythm and picked up a bit about half way through. I Would consider using as a resource in my classroom during related units but could never use this as a read aloud. I couldn't pronounce most of the words on the first try so I feel that this would be a discouraging book for independent reading.

  15. 5 out of 5

    KB

    Trees: Kings of the Forest offers a highly enjoyable introduction to the biology of trees. The protagonist of the narrative is an adorable anthropomorphic acorn who is guided on a journey of scientific enlightenment by various other forest denizens. Pleasantly colorful artwork illustrates the concepts that are explained along the way. This worthwhile graphic novel is best suited for adolescents ages ten and up, although adults will also find it to be quite entertaining and informative.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

    I enjoy this graphic novel series because it takes a deep look at something as common as trees and explains it scientifically with pictures so that someone as unscientific as me can understand. I've enjoyed the Science Comics on dogs and coral reefs as well (the robot one wasn't my favorite). They are best understood by middle or high school age and older. I enjoy this graphic novel series because it takes a deep look at something as common as trees and explains it scientifically with pictures so that someone as unscientific as me can understand. I've enjoyed the Science Comics on dogs and coral reefs as well (the robot one wasn't my favorite). They are best understood by middle or high school age and older.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sara Tiede

    This is a great non fiction series for kids. The characters help give the information clarification as well as purpose, and the graphic format makes complex subjects easier to visualize for younger learners. I read it with my 6 year old, and her biggest "wow!" moment was seeing how big the fungal and rrot network could be. Great addition to children's publishing! This is a great non fiction series for kids. The characters help give the information clarification as well as purpose, and the graphic format makes complex subjects easier to visualize for younger learners. I read it with my 6 year old, and her biggest "wow!" moment was seeing how big the fungal and rrot network could be. Great addition to children's publishing!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mimi

    Exciting, informative, and brilliant! I loved this look at trees and the broad science of them! The illustrations and story line (acorn isn't sure if he wants to become a tree) make this book an absolute pleasure to read. Science can actually be fun! I especially liked the note from the author and glossary of terms used in the book at the end. Exciting, informative, and brilliant! I loved this look at trees and the broad science of them! The illustrations and story line (acorn isn't sure if he wants to become a tree) make this book an absolute pleasure to read. Science can actually be fun! I especially liked the note from the author and glossary of terms used in the book at the end.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mary Thomas

    I really enjoy these books and feel like I learn a lot. I read this to my two oldest sons when we were studying botany, just as we had read the one on coral reefs when we were studying marine biology. I especially loved the part about the underground fungal network connecting trees. This blew my mind!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Enci Box

    Fantastic, fantastic book about trees that everyone should read, not just kids! This book has lots of humor that even little ones get. The drawings are simple and clear and every time after we read a few pages we went out into nature with more wonder and respect. Highly recommend this book to everyone, kids and grownups alike!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    I didn't love this one. It turns out that this was just more information about the biology of trees than I really wanted in my life. It also features one of my least favorite framing devices in Science Comics, multiple narrators. But it is very informative, and it goes beyond just the general biology of a tree to how they interact with their climates, animals, other plants, and even other trees. I didn't love this one. It turns out that this was just more information about the biology of trees than I really wanted in my life. It also features one of my least favorite framing devices in Science Comics, multiple narrators. But it is very informative, and it goes beyond just the general biology of a tree to how they interact with their climates, animals, other plants, and even other trees.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Super cute illustrations and a ton of information! Of course it talked about one of my favorite things about trees: the fungi network that connects trees and allows them to communicate and share resources. I just love trees so much!!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    Picked this up for my 8 year old and gave it a read myself. This is a wonderful resource with a ton of information and vocabulary, explained in a very engaging way. I'm excited to check out the rest in this series! Picked this up for my 8 year old and gave it a read myself. This is a wonderful resource with a ton of information and vocabulary, explained in a very engaging way. I'm excited to check out the rest in this series!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Raven Black

    While it is a fun book and can teach a lot (while having a lot of giggles) it was harder than the other books I've read in this series. Plants/trees are not something we think about, therefore, not something many of us have knowledge of. With that said, this is why we need to read this book! While it is a fun book and can teach a lot (while having a lot of giggles) it was harder than the other books I've read in this series. Plants/trees are not something we think about, therefore, not something many of us have knowledge of. With that said, this is why we need to read this book!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn

    This book was great. Very informative, colorful, funny and enjoyable. I will make sure to add more Science Comics to my bookshelf. After finishing, I was happy to discover there are History Comics. Well done to the author! My homeschool bookshelves thank you 1,000 times over.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

    Might trick some children into learning about plants!

  27. 4 out of 5

    wildct2003

    Good overall. A bit too heavy on the scientific terms for me.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    top notch science in an engaging presentation.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    The science in this book is great, kinda above the level of what we’d teach in middle school, but the story is best for grades 4-6 I feel.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Awjtf

    I learned so much!

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