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Twelve-year-old twin adventurers Cleopatra and Alexandra Dodge are reunited with their father and realize that two family heirlooms reveal the location of a treasure that is their birthright. When they set sail with Captain Tarboro on the Almira, they know they’re heading into danger —the ocean is filled with new and old enemies, including their nemesis, the infamous pirat Twelve-year-old twin adventurers Cleopatra and Alexandra Dodge are reunited with their father and realize that two family heirlooms reveal the location of a treasure that is their birthright. When they set sail with Captain Tarboro on the Almira, they know they’re heading into danger —the ocean is filled with new and old enemies, including their nemesis, the infamous pirate Felix Worley. But like a coral reef that lurks below the surface of the waves, trouble is brewing between the siblings. Alex is determined to become a sailor and is happy with his role aboard the Almira, but Cleo—the only girl on the ship—is tired of washing dishes in the galley. In an effort to find her own purpose, she begins studying sword fighting with Tarboro, but neither Alex nor her father approves. Can the twins remain close as they pursue different goals and dreams, or will their growing differences tear the family apart before the treasure can be found? In this follow-up to the New York Times bestselling COMPASS SOUTH, Hope Larson and Rebecca Mock once again create an outstanding seafaring adventure with KNIFE'S EDGE. A Margaret Ferguson Book


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Twelve-year-old twin adventurers Cleopatra and Alexandra Dodge are reunited with their father and realize that two family heirlooms reveal the location of a treasure that is their birthright. When they set sail with Captain Tarboro on the Almira, they know they’re heading into danger —the ocean is filled with new and old enemies, including their nemesis, the infamous pirat Twelve-year-old twin adventurers Cleopatra and Alexandra Dodge are reunited with their father and realize that two family heirlooms reveal the location of a treasure that is their birthright. When they set sail with Captain Tarboro on the Almira, they know they’re heading into danger —the ocean is filled with new and old enemies, including their nemesis, the infamous pirate Felix Worley. But like a coral reef that lurks below the surface of the waves, trouble is brewing between the siblings. Alex is determined to become a sailor and is happy with his role aboard the Almira, but Cleo—the only girl on the ship—is tired of washing dishes in the galley. In an effort to find her own purpose, she begins studying sword fighting with Tarboro, but neither Alex nor her father approves. Can the twins remain close as they pursue different goals and dreams, or will their growing differences tear the family apart before the treasure can be found? In this follow-up to the New York Times bestselling COMPASS SOUTH, Hope Larson and Rebecca Mock once again create an outstanding seafaring adventure with KNIFE'S EDGE. A Margaret Ferguson Book

30 review for Knife's Edge: A Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    It seems this volume wraps-up the story. I could be wrong, there may be more to come, but this is a great place to end. Alex and Pat have lost their traveling companions but they've found their father. Backstories are told, mysteries are solved, and surprises pop up here and there. It's a classic sea story adventure with a few new twists. Personally, though, I'm a bit miffed there had to be a romance and one that was a bit creepy. I mean, maybe don't fall for the guy who planned to kill your br It seems this volume wraps-up the story. I could be wrong, there may be more to come, but this is a great place to end. Alex and Pat have lost their traveling companions but they've found their father. Backstories are told, mysteries are solved, and surprises pop up here and there. It's a classic sea story adventure with a few new twists. Personally, though, I'm a bit miffed there had to be a romance and one that was a bit creepy. I mean, maybe don't fall for the guy who planned to kill your brother and wasn't very nice to you, either. Also, no one ever has to kiss anyone else and why that even came into play is beyond me. I was not at all pleased. I think the story would have been fine without that aspect. There has to come a point where we start telling kids that boys and girls can be friends, that friendships don't always have to morph into romance. Still highly recommended for its intended audience.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Deborah O'Carroll

    AAAAHHH! I loved this Middle Grade graphic novel duology SO MUCH!!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Gunderman

    Check out this and other reviews on my young adult book blog, Here's to Happy Endings! I read Compass South right before I read this one, and I'm glad that I did. While I've seen it said that this book can be read as a standalone, I highly recommend reading the first book of the two before reading this one, because it really fills you in on a bunch of essential background information that you'll appreciate knowing while reading this book. Knife's Edge picks up where Compass South leaves off, on th Check out this and other reviews on my young adult book blog, Here's to Happy Endings! I read Compass South right before I read this one, and I'm glad that I did. While I've seen it said that this book can be read as a standalone, I highly recommend reading the first book of the two before reading this one, because it really fills you in on a bunch of essential background information that you'll appreciate knowing while reading this book. Knife's Edge picks up where Compass South leaves off, on the boat with Alex and Cleo, as well as their father. They already know that both of their heirlooms from their mother - the pocket watch and the knife - are tools for solving a riddle and breaking a code that will take them both closer to finding a treasure. Since they are all setting sail with Captain Tarboro, who promises to take them to find their treasure in return for some of it (if they find it), there is some family drama...including both Alex and their father putting Cleo down because she wants to do things that they don't think are fit for girls, such as sword fighting. I really like how they add in some sibling rivalry here...it makes the main characters - both Alex and Cleo - seem a lot more real and it gives the story plenty of ways to branch off. Anyway, the entire graphic novel tells about the twins and their journey to find the treasure that was left to them by their mother. There is so much adventure, family drama, and even a tiny bit of romance going on here, and it's such an amazing sequel for the first book. The character that we love from the first book are back, including Alex, Cleo, Luther, and Captain Tarboro, and so is the twins' father, who really makes this book feel more loving and family oriented. There's adventure, betrayal, and just the right amount of romance in here to please everyone. If you haven't read Compass South I think you could still enjoy this book, but I really think it would be more enriching and enjoying to read that book first. Knife's Edge brings us so much more of what we know and love from the first book in the duology, with tons more excitement, pirates, and adventure! Like the first book, Compass South, the author and illustrator have created a one of a kind, amazing story for middle graders, young adults, and adults alike. This book is the kind of book that can change the way that some people view graphic novels - it's definitely become one of my favorites, and I plan on reading both books again very soon. Also, after reading these two books, I will definitely be adding anything by these two to my "must read" lists! Note: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review - Thank you!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    "Stories are precious. They contain our past and our future—our memories, secrets, and dreams. We do not give them to just anyone." This installment picks up right where the first left off, with the twins on their way to find and claim the lost treasure. It's just as engaging and fast-paced as the last book, but there's a renewed focus on Cleo here that I really enjoyed. Though she no longer needs to disguise herself, Cleo doesn't seem to mind her short hair and she continues wearing clothing that "Stories are precious. They contain our past and our future—our memories, secrets, and dreams. We do not give them to just anyone." This installment picks up right where the first left off, with the twins on their way to find and claim the lost treasure. It's just as engaging and fast-paced as the last book, but there's a renewed focus on Cleo here that I really enjoyed. Though she no longer needs to disguise herself, Cleo doesn't seem to mind her short hair and she continues wearing clothing that lets her pass as a boy. She's frustrated by the limits of womanhood and she wants to be able to do all of the things that her brother is allowed to do: sail, fight, be allowed to make choices. It was nice to see her being impulsive, going after what she wanted, and making mistakes. This is the kind of series that I wish were longer because I'm interested in the characters, especially the side characters like the twin's mom and Tarboro, and I'd love to learn more about their backstories. Or see the return of the other twins from book one! My one gripe is: (view spoiler)[Luther. I'm a sucker for a redemption arc, so that twist worked well for me. My complaint was the dangerous and creepy way he treated Cleo in the first book, and how some of those behaviors (like his obsession with kissing her) continue in this book. She does kiss him and seems like she may even be interested in him, which seems like a negative message to send to young readers, because he seems to always treat her as a /girl/ and an object, not a person. It undermines her character as well, since she's continuing to separate herself from her gender. (hide spoiler)] Overall, this is a really fun and exciting series that would be great for middle grade classrooms and older readers looking for a thrilling read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kitkat

    I loved everything about this book. I have no idea what else to say. I'll make a review soon!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Stoolfire

    Knife's Edge is such a fun sequel and a great finale to this MG graphic novel adventure series. I just wish there was going to be more to look forward to.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Veronica

    Ehhhhhh. It’s been a while since I read Compass South, but I was able to follow the plot without too much trouble. It just wasn’t all that enjoyable. This book mainly focuses on Cleo, who at age twelve is already experiencing tons of sexism and is mad about it — but the narrative is weirdly wishy-washy on whether she’s right to be angry. Her male relatives assume she should be cooking or cleaning and ignore her frustration, they don’t take her understandable desire to be able to protect herself Ehhhhhh. It’s been a while since I read Compass South, but I was able to follow the plot without too much trouble. It just wasn’t all that enjoyable. This book mainly focuses on Cleo, who at age twelve is already experiencing tons of sexism and is mad about it — but the narrative is weirdly wishy-washy on whether she’s right to be angry. Her male relatives assume she should be cooking or cleaning and ignore her frustration, they don’t take her understandable desire to be able to protect herself seriously, and she is supposed to apologize for punching her brother? Nah. Also the whole thing with the guy who wants to be with her and gets mad that she won’t kiss him when she is, I repeat, TWELVE. But she eventually decides that sure, she’s into him! Why is there romance in this book. She. Is. Twelve. It left a bad taste in my mouth.

  8. 5 out of 5

    D. H.

    I liked the second part of this story, which picks up right where the other left off, and the delicate storytelling continues, which I think is a good thing. I love stories about forgiveness and second chances. And I want to see a story in which an abusive man changes, makes amends, and redeems himself. However, I feel uncomfortable if he goes back into that old relationship. Let him be a better man in the next relationship. I enjoyed how it turned out that the twins without knowing it have always I liked the second part of this story, which picks up right where the other left off, and the delicate storytelling continues, which I think is a good thing. I love stories about forgiveness and second chances. And I want to see a story in which an abusive man changes, makes amends, and redeems himself. However, I feel uncomfortable if he goes back into that old relationship. Let him be a better man in the next relationship. I enjoyed how it turned out that the twins without knowing it have always been a part of treasure hunt, and I like how they find themselves and decide what they want to do with their lives in the course of this adventure.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gulshan Naqvee

    The best ever. Hope Larson Knows her STUFF!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shayla

    I'm glad to have finally gotten around to reading this series. It's pretty excellent, and I love that it features characters of color and women doing things that were more "manly" back then. Reminds me so much of Temeraire! Will definitely start recommending it to kids/parents at work

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Kotkin

    Story: 5 stars Art: 5 stars Full-color children's graphic novel. Sequel to Compass South, by these same creators. I'm really enjoying the swashbuckling adventures of these twelve-year-old twins. The historical time period (mid 1800s) adds to the interest. All the characters, even the villains, are fully fleshed out and multi-dimensional. Art is terrific. Highly recommend this Four Points series.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kate Atherton

    Even having not read the first installment of this series I ADORED this book. A perfect YA graphic novel, this book is a graphic novel reincarnation of such 90s kid classic reads as 'The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle' and Tamora Pierce books combined! This series (so far of two) written by Hope Larson and illustrated and colored BRILLIANTLY by Rebecca Mock follows to red haired twins Alex and Cleo as they journey the seas in search of a treasure that is their inheritance, their true parent Even having not read the first installment of this series I ADORED this book. A perfect YA graphic novel, this book is a graphic novel reincarnation of such 90s kid classic reads as 'The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle' and Tamora Pierce books combined! This series (so far of two) written by Hope Larson and illustrated and colored BRILLIANTLY by Rebecca Mock follows to red haired twins Alex and Cleo as they journey the seas in search of a treasure that is their inheritance, their true parents and ever fleeing from or fighting fearsome Pirate (who looks like a Malfoy) Felix Worley. These books have everything my young (and now adult) heart would desire ; mystery and intrigue, a cast of colorful characters, a girl learning to sword fight, mistaken identity, romance (low key, these characters are pre-teen), double crosses, ship wrecks....it's all there! The true BEAUTY of this drawing, its fluidity and richness of coloring are the icing on the cake of a good plot and strong characters. If I had a complaint, and mind you I am reading these out of order, it would be that the boy twin, Alex feels underdeveloped to me. I don't mind it, his sister and the captain and many other characters are so entrancing but...I don't really get him. I look forward to reading the first book! Highly recommend.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    I loved the art and I loved the premise. I did not like the execution. I really didn't like Luther and it really annoys me that Cleo had a forced romance with him. It was completely unnecessary, and it's very ironic to me that in the rest of the book Cleo's fighting against expectations of what girls can and can't do, and apparently girls are not able to get through a single book without having romantic complications while boys are allowed to have all kinds of adventures and character developmen I loved the art and I loved the premise. I did not like the execution. I really didn't like Luther and it really annoys me that Cleo had a forced romance with him. It was completely unnecessary, and it's very ironic to me that in the rest of the book Cleo's fighting against expectations of what girls can and can't do, and apparently girls are not able to get through a single book without having romantic complications while boys are allowed to have all kinds of adventures and character development without falling in love. Girls can do things other than be girlfriends to mediocre dudes. Stop doing this.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Vince

    Just a delightful conclusion to this story, absolutely loved it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I gave this and Compass South to my Raina Telgemeier-and-Marvel-comics-loving daughter and she’s already asking if there’s another book. Sadly, since Knife’s Edge came out in 2017 and I haven’t been able to find any news of a sequel, this series might be a casualty of low sales. I’ll definitely be seeking out more by this author and illustrator, though. The fast-paced plot will keep young readers engaged, but there are some nice meaty themes of family relationships and gender roles in here too, e I gave this and Compass South to my Raina Telgemeier-and-Marvel-comics-loving daughter and she’s already asking if there’s another book. Sadly, since Knife’s Edge came out in 2017 and I haven’t been able to find any news of a sequel, this series might be a casualty of low sales. I’ll definitely be seeking out more by this author and illustrator, though. The fast-paced plot will keep young readers engaged, but there are some nice meaty themes of family relationships and gender roles in here too, explored in a non-pedantic and age-appropriate way. Twins Cleopatra and Alexander Dodge are on the cusp of adolescence; this plays out in the form of big differences in expectations and opportunities for them, especially after Cleo gets a taste of the freedom that presenting as a boy offers. She’s no longer willing to confine herself to her expected role, which creates friction between her and her brother, her friends, and her father once they’re reunited. One thing I love about these books is the fully realized secondary characters. It feels like Larson knows each person’s backstory - even characters who appear on the page only briefly - and that goes so far toward making the books come alive. The illustrations of the places the twins visit - 1860 New Orleans, Honolulu, etc. - are similarly imagination-fueling. On the content and age appropriateness front: there’s plenty of swashbuckling violence (not too gory), and the main characters are in mortal peril quite a lot of the time, mainly from the ruthless Captain Felix and his minions. A couple of relatively chaste kisses happen. There’s an allusion to sexual abuse of younger crew members by pirates (probably nothing younger kids would pick up on, but a 10-12 year old might). Luther puts off some pretty strong Heathcliff energy, which presents a good opportunity for a talk with my 9yo about what constitutes a healthy romantic attachment.

  16. 5 out of 5

    laurel [the suspected bibliophile]

    The adventure continues as Alex and Cleo nurse their father to health about the Almira. While Alex is determined to learn enough to become a ship's captain one day, Cleo tries to convince Tarboro to teach her to fight, but her father quashes her attempts to learn. As she grows increasingly frustrated by Alex's growing advantages, the twins and company search for the missing treasure—and learn more about the mystery of their mother and their own past—Worley and his band of vicious pirates are hot The adventure continues as Alex and Cleo nurse their father to health about the Almira. While Alex is determined to learn enough to become a ship's captain one day, Cleo tries to convince Tarboro to teach her to fight, but her father quashes her attempts to learn. As she grows increasingly frustrated by Alex's growing advantages, the twins and company search for the missing treasure—and learn more about the mystery of their mother and their own past—Worley and his band of vicious pirates are hot on their trail. This adventure takes the crew through the Marshall Islands, and has a diverse representation of characters, including the native Pacific Islanders (along with their own story of dealing with invading Europeans). While the book is light on the topic of racism and the slavery running rampant throughout the world (and the US) during the mid-19th century, it does lightly touch upon the subject of advantage due to skin color, gender and class. Where Alex can't understand Cleo's anger and stifled abilities, Tarboro does (and, coincidentally, so does Worley, although for an entirely different reason). I'm looking forward to reading more on book 3, and to see where the big reveal at the ending takes Alex, Cleo and the rest of their friends.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bookish

    Alex and Cleo’s adventure continues in this thrilling sequel to Compass South. I loved the focus on Cleo in this book as she pushes back against sexist attitudes of the time and goes after what she wants. This is the kind of series that leaves you wanting more, and I was ecstatic to learn in my interview (https://www.bookish.com/articles/hope...) with Hope Larson and Rebecca Mock that there is potential for a spinoff. —Kelly (https://www.bookish.com/articles/staf...) Alex and Cleo’s adventure continues in this thrilling sequel to Compass South. I loved the focus on Cleo in this book as she pushes back against sexist attitudes of the time and goes after what she wants. This is the kind of series that leaves you wanting more, and I was ecstatic to learn in my interview (https://www.bookish.com/articles/hope...) with Hope Larson and Rebecca Mock that there is potential for a spinoff. —Kelly (https://www.bookish.com/articles/staf...)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Picking up right where its predecessor, Compass Point, left off, this graphic novel follows twelve-year-old twins Alexander and Cleopatra Dodge as they search for the treasure they are sure has been left for them. Not only do they hire Captain Tarboro to sail to the location, but they have their adoptive father along as well to provide support. But the siblings have reached a point in their lives during which they can't get along, and Cleo, in particular, bristles at being treated like a girl wh Picking up right where its predecessor, Compass Point, left off, this graphic novel follows twelve-year-old twins Alexander and Cleopatra Dodge as they search for the treasure they are sure has been left for them. Not only do they hire Captain Tarboro to sail to the location, but they have their adoptive father along as well to provide support. But the siblings have reached a point in their lives during which they can't get along, and Cleo, in particular, bristles at being treated like a girl while still crushing on the boy she left behind, and Alex is learning about the tasks necessary for maintaining a sail-worthy ship. All the while, the Dodges and their allies must keep an eye out for Felix Worley, the pirate who will stop at nothing to get the same treasure they are seeking. The book introduces new and familiar characters and will keep readers on the edge of their seats as risks are taken, mistakes are made, and unwise alliances formed. There is a surprise reunion at the end of this book, setting up even more possible adventures and stories. Middle grade readers will fly through this one, captivated by its setting, its imperfect characters, and the realization that even the worst villain has a story explaining how he came to be the way he is.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Krista

    I enjoyed the two books of this series, very fun and swash buckling, beautiful art. I gave this book three stars (l gave the first 4 stars) b/c of the romance aspect of it. I felt it was inappropriate to these characters (they are only 12 and the male romantic lead is a horrible character). Also, something seems unfinished; l feel like there needs to be a third installment to this series...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Diana Ault

    So good! I love the art style and colors and the characters are done very well. It's a great conclusion, but I hope there might be more adventures for the twins!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I was excited when it came out so I got it. I loved the mystery, action, and the ending.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    I liked this one better than book one of this series!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    The second volume of the series is as fun and adventure-filled as the first. I'd like to see another volume in the future, but this one ties up a lot of the loose ends in a satisfying manner.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

    Excellent comic. Nearly as good as the first, and in some aspects better. That epilogue seemed a bit rushed but maybe it's a setup for a third book?

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bookphile

    In general, I like this series. I like that Cleo and Alex don't always get along. I like that Cleo is frustrated and feels her ambitions are being thwarted because she's a girl. I like that she's feisty and has a mind of her own and won't sit down and be meek and gentle. But I really, really don't like the whole subplot with Luther. Across the two books, their relationship is extremely problematic. He's grossly possessive of her, and since she's a character who exemplifies so much agency, it both In general, I like this series. I like that Cleo and Alex don't always get along. I like that Cleo is frustrated and feels her ambitions are being thwarted because she's a girl. I like that she's feisty and has a mind of her own and won't sit down and be meek and gentle. But I really, really don't like the whole subplot with Luther. Across the two books, their relationship is extremely problematic. He's grossly possessive of her, and since she's a character who exemplifies so much agency, it bothers me that there's a romantic thread between her and one of the very characters who wants to deny her agency. Their relationship plays too much into the "misunderstood bad boy" trope, and it's a trope that needs to die because it's horrifically unhealthy for girls. Yes, Luther expresses a wish to change and says he's remorseful, but I don't feel there's enough evidence of that. When Cleo isn't sure if she wants to kiss him, he basically throws a fit and is petulant toward her. Not to mention the fact that Cleo is a twelve-year-old girl. That doesn't mean I don't think kids should be given this book. If anything, this makes for a valuable springboard for discussions about healthy relationships. However, the big caveat is that those discussions do need to happen, because if kids read books like this without context, they're getting the implicit message that it's okay for people who supposedly love one another to treat each other this way, and that's definitely NOT okay.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dolly

    This is the second book in the Four Points series by Hope Larson and Rebecca Mock. We really enjoyed readingCompass South, and were eager for this book to be released. The narrative continues just where the first book left off and it's just as dramatic and engaging. The illustrations are wonderful and really help to convey the emotions of the characters and the beauty and danger of a life at sea. Overall, it was a satisfying end to the tale, but with a series title like "Four Points," I certainl This is the second book in the Four Points series by Hope Larson and Rebecca Mock. We really enjoyed readingCompass South, and were eager for this book to be released. The narrative continues just where the first book left off and it's just as dramatic and engaging. The illustrations are wonderful and really help to convey the emotions of the characters and the beauty and danger of a life at sea. Overall, it was a satisfying end to the tale, but with a series title like "Four Points," I certainly hope there will be two more books forthcoming. interesting quotes: "I never met a captain yet who didn't earn 'is place swabbin' decks." (p. 34) "Killing is easy. Mercy requires honor, skill, an' confidence." (p. 47) "Stories are precious. They contain our past and our future - our memories, secrets, and dreams. We do not give them to just anyone." (p. 136) "Maybe our parents did love us, in their way. Maybe vengeance is how pirate-mothers show their children love." (p. 208)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Wolgemuth

    As with Compass South, the first book in this series, I read Knife's Edge with our 5yo, and we both enjoyed it. The storyline stretched her (it's a visual-centric tale about nearly identical twins after all...and there are some ship names and a variety of geographic settings - details to track), but - with a few pauses to review who characters were and where in the world they were - it was another fun story. Cleo's little romances weren't our favorite (or necessary, really), but I recognize that As with Compass South, the first book in this series, I read Knife's Edge with our 5yo, and we both enjoyed it. The storyline stretched her (it's a visual-centric tale about nearly identical twins after all...and there are some ship names and a variety of geographic settings - details to track), but - with a few pauses to review who characters were and where in the world they were - it was another fun story. Cleo's little romances weren't our favorite (or necessary, really), but I recognize that the book isn't targeted exactly for us. Also, as an adoptive dad I'm sensitive to how adoptive and birth parents are portrayed, and the "real mom" and "real dad" references to birth parents weren't my favorite. Even so, the twins' adventuring and exploits are fun and the characters and their relationships are interesting. It'd be fun to have a third book in the series, but the conclusion of this was satisfying and sufficient.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    More fun and adventure with my two favorite red-headed twins as the search for treasure . . . and, their mom.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was an enjoyable continuation of the series. I appreciate how its structure parallels the first volume, including a flashback that helps explain more backstory, and also seamlessly picks up from where the first volume left off, and ending with a happy family reunion. Though I am left wondering if this is also the conclusion of the series; the title Four Points suggests at least two more volumes, but all of the mysteries are concluded. There is more to the characters and the setting that cou This was an enjoyable continuation of the series. I appreciate how its structure parallels the first volume, including a flashback that helps explain more backstory, and also seamlessly picks up from where the first volume left off, and ending with a happy family reunion. Though I am left wondering if this is also the conclusion of the series; the title Four Points suggests at least two more volumes, but all of the mysteries are concluded. There is more to the characters and the setting that could be explored, but nothing with the same impetus as the first volume built. One niggling complaint: for all the focus given to Cleo learning to fight and earn her place in the world, there is a lot of attention given to who she has kissed. Perhaps just a reflection of the historical setting, or the intended audience, but it doesn't quite sit well with me. Particularly since she and Alexander seem to be more or less co-protagonists, but there is absolutely no hint of romantic interest connected to Alexander; the closest is him talking to a young, nameless island woman at the end, and that is a big stretch. A random note: I read Thornhill right before this, and there is a strange parallel in having stories of orphanages in both, and in both cases characters screwed-up by their experiences in them. Since Worley went on to become a vicious pirate, he really should be worse, but the story he exists in is more hopeful so that is obscured a bit. Also, Louisa is confirmed as female. In the first volume her appearance was a bit androgynous, and I don't think she was ever named, so I was never quite sure. I feel an inappropriately excessive sadness for her hat (;_;)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    I actually like the second book more than the first. Maybe because all the two-sets-of-twins nonsense was sorted and it was more the adventures of just Cleo and Alex. The story itself was a lot of fun. Pirates and treasure and a bit of mystery - always a good combination for an adventure story. There's a reason that books like Treasure Island and Kidnapped remain popular after 120+ years. I also liked the subplot with Cleo and feeling lost amongst all the men, especially as her brother is findin I actually like the second book more than the first. Maybe because all the two-sets-of-twins nonsense was sorted and it was more the adventures of just Cleo and Alex. The story itself was a lot of fun. Pirates and treasure and a bit of mystery - always a good combination for an adventure story. There's a reason that books like Treasure Island and Kidnapped remain popular after 120+ years. I also liked the subplot with Cleo and feeling lost amongst all the men, especially as her brother is finding his way. The sibling relationship and that friction were elements that helped keep the main characters very relatable. Supposedly, each of the two books can be read as a stand-alone. I suppose that's true, but reading them back to back was really the better choice. Like a lot of graphic novel series, each book was indeed a separate adventure, but there are a lot of details that were introduced in the first and really came into play in the second. Still not crazy about the art. Some things I really like (like the ship designs and settings), some I'm not as fond of (character design, mostly - especially faces/emotions). That's a personal preference thing, I suppose, so take it for what it's worth. Not bad at all, but just not my normal preferred graphic novel art style. I did like how they ended the story, with the passage of the tail from island to island and beyond, and what it brought back to the twins. An interesting way to do that, and I liked it. Definitely enjoyed the books. Like I said, very fun adventures. Hopefully with a series name "Four Points" there might be two more books to come? One can hope!

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