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To Green Angel Tower, Part 2: Storm (Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn, #3; Part 2) Audiobook

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In order for the Storm King to cement his power over Osten Ard, he must find and defeat the rebel forces massing against him. But the rebels, led by the exiled Prince Josua, have rallied at the Stone of Farewell and are ready to fight the Storm King with every power they can muster. The key to their victory lies in finding the third sword of legend, Memory - but the sword In order for the Storm King to cement his power over Osten Ard, he must find and defeat the rebel forces massing against him. But the rebels, led by the exiled Prince Josua, have rallied at the Stone of Farewell and are ready to fight the Storm King with every power they can muster. The key to their victory lies in finding the third sword of legend, Memory - but the sword has been lost for ages. Lost, that is, until Simon Snowlock realises that he knows exactly where the sword is and how to recover it. The only problem: An undead army, bolstered by powerful magic, lies between him and his destination. It will take every ounce of Simon's courage and intelligence to journey to and then recover the great sword, Memory, and bring peace to Osten Ard. If Simon's quest is to have any hope, Josua must move against the Storm King himself - a journey that will take him across endless seas, through ancient forests and into the stronghold of the Storm King himself. The finale to Tad Williams' breathtaking, beloved series Memory, Sorrow and Thorn. ©1993 Robert Paul 'Tad' Williams, published by permission of DAW Books (P)2016 Hodder & Stoughton


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In order for the Storm King to cement his power over Osten Ard, he must find and defeat the rebel forces massing against him. But the rebels, led by the exiled Prince Josua, have rallied at the Stone of Farewell and are ready to fight the Storm King with every power they can muster. The key to their victory lies in finding the third sword of legend, Memory - but the sword In order for the Storm King to cement his power over Osten Ard, he must find and defeat the rebel forces massing against him. But the rebels, led by the exiled Prince Josua, have rallied at the Stone of Farewell and are ready to fight the Storm King with every power they can muster. The key to their victory lies in finding the third sword of legend, Memory - but the sword has been lost for ages. Lost, that is, until Simon Snowlock realises that he knows exactly where the sword is and how to recover it. The only problem: An undead army, bolstered by powerful magic, lies between him and his destination. It will take every ounce of Simon's courage and intelligence to journey to and then recover the great sword, Memory, and bring peace to Osten Ard. If Simon's quest is to have any hope, Josua must move against the Storm King himself - a journey that will take him across endless seas, through ancient forests and into the stronghold of the Storm King himself. The finale to Tad Williams' breathtaking, beloved series Memory, Sorrow and Thorn. ©1993 Robert Paul 'Tad' Williams, published by permission of DAW Books (P)2016 Hodder & Stoughton

30 review for To Green Angel Tower, Part 2: Storm (Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn, #3; Part 2) Audiobook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    This is the final instalment in this classic fantasy series and it was a long overdue read for me. I have been marathoning the 2nd-4th books over the last few weeks in preparation for the new series Williams is about to launch into in the same world, and it was quite the experience to just dive in... This book was certainly the most enjoyable of the four for me, although I think the series gets stronger as it goes. Of course these books have a ver classic vibe to them, taking after LoTR and big e This is the final instalment in this classic fantasy series and it was a long overdue read for me. I have been marathoning the 2nd-4th books over the last few weeks in preparation for the new series Williams is about to launch into in the same world, and it was quite the experience to just dive in... This book was certainly the most enjoyable of the four for me, although I think the series gets stronger as it goes. Of course these books have a ver classic vibe to them, taking after LoTR and big epic quests, so I kind of knew it would be a slow start with an epic end, but Williams takes that to the extreme :) This book is part two of the climax where everything is coming together. I do think there was a lot for Williams to handle in this story, and it still had to be exciting and readable, and I think he did manage that. My only slight complaint was the Maegwinn (sp?) storyline really didn't feel that climactic to me and I would have liked to see something different done there, but as her story was largely side-lined that's not the focus of the plot. I really enjoy the combination of races and people in this book. There's a lot of magical creatures and types of people who all get drawn into the conflict, and although it's slow to build I did definitely enjoy the last 100ish pages where everything was madness. I think that since writing this series Tad Williams has probably only gone from strength to strength and I know I loved the Otherland series by him, so I am looking forward to reading more set in this world with his new book. I definitely think if you are a classic fantasy fan you may well want to try some Williams very soon :) 4*s for this one!

  2. 4 out of 5

    GrilledCheeseSamurai (Scott)

    I am finally done my re-read. It took longer than I would have liked (I read a few books in between) but have literally just closed the covers on this final volume. I have to admit, I don't really know how to express any of my feelings. These books have been of such HUGE importance to me as I grew up that I feel like anything I write here will not give it it's due reward. I suppose I should start by saying thank you. Thank you, Tad. The Memory Sorrow and Thorn trilogy is a gift that I will never I am finally done my re-read. It took longer than I would have liked (I read a few books in between) but have literally just closed the covers on this final volume. I have to admit, I don't really know how to express any of my feelings. These books have been of such HUGE importance to me as I grew up that I feel like anything I write here will not give it it's due reward. I suppose I should start by saying thank you. Thank you, Tad. The Memory Sorrow and Thorn trilogy is a gift that I will never be able to pay you back for. It is a story that I will forever hold close and will always find myself falling back into. Osten Ard has been a part of my life for so long now that I don't ever really remember a time that it wasn't a part of me. Your mastery of the written word has gifted me a place of magic and character that is so real and so personal that I am flabbergasted that it is not a real thing - but something made up by a normal person with an un-normal imagination. You are a gifted individual and I am forever in your debt for sharing this story with me. Normally I would say that the worst part of finishing this series is that the story is over and there isn't anymore. Well smack my ass and call me a donkey cuz now there's more. The whole reason I embarked on this epic re-read was so that I could dive into The Heart of What Was Lost and then the start of a new trilogy, The Witchwood Crown. And by all that's holy, that's what I'ma do. Right this second. So...bye! PS: Read this series. It's good. It is great. It's one of the best! I would give up chocolate if I had to. Maybe even cheese - although that would be pushing it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Choko

    *** 4.35 A wonderful Fantasy written in the classic tradition, entertaining and emotionally gripping! I really enjoyed reading all the volumes of this epic series, but one thing I could have done without - the teenagers being and acting like real life hormonal teenagers do. Yes, I think the author hit it spot on with how immature and annoying they can be! And in this last part of this arc, the attraction between two of those teenagers, as sweet as it was, brought way too much angst for my liking *** 4.35 A wonderful Fantasy written in the classic tradition, entertaining and emotionally gripping! I really enjoyed reading all the volumes of this epic series, but one thing I could have done without - the teenagers being and acting like real life hormonal teenagers do. Yes, I think the author hit it spot on with how immature and annoying they can be! And in this last part of this arc, the attraction between two of those teenagers, as sweet as it was, brought way too much angst for my liking, despite the realism. I rather have more attention to the main story, which is very good and interesting by itself. As I said, this is a very traditional Fantasy, complete with the kitchen boy dreaming to be a knight, a run away princess, dark and light Elves, magic swords, dragons, dwarves, good and bad guys working on their plans for their side to gain power and destroy their enemies... Despite it following in the footsteps of previous great works, this series succeeds in remaining fresh and enchanting, making it a must read for the fans of the genre. There is a follow -up series in the works and I am looking forward to reading it as well! Now I wish you all Happy Reading and may you always find what you need in the pages of a Good book!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maja Ingrid

    Had I known before this edition of the trilogy had Green Angel Tower split in two books I would likely search for another edition, because I don't really like when books are split in two parts. I was also bit cautious to pick up William's older high fantasy books. I read his UF series Bobby Dollar some years ago and me and that series has a complicated relationship. But I'm a curious girl and wanted fantasy books. This series was not all what I expected it to be. In one way I thought it would hav Had I known before this edition of the trilogy had Green Angel Tower split in two books I would likely search for another edition, because I don't really like when books are split in two parts. I was also bit cautious to pick up William's older high fantasy books. I read his UF series Bobby Dollar some years ago and me and that series has a complicated relationship. But I'm a curious girl and wanted fantasy books. This series was not all what I expected it to be. In one way I thought it would have more similarities to Feist's Magician in that Simon would learn magic from Morgenes like Pug would from Kulgan (for the sole reason both boys were "apprenticed" to a court magician (view spoiler)[so I was actually bit surprised Morgenes was killed early in book 1 (hide spoiler)] ). I liked the turn the series took though. It's a fun, easy read journey with your good old fantasy tropes. I liked the characters a lot. Especially Binabik and Qantaka (but I will always love an animal companion) and Simon came to grew on me through the series. He remains a mooncalf throughout the series but he' still very precious (view spoiler)[and his childish excitement when being reunited with Rachel had me in tears (hide spoiler)] .

  5. 5 out of 5

    Aldi

    Loved it madly, embarrassingly sad to have it end, excited and nervous beyond belief for The Witchwood Crown! Oddly, I do always seem to hit a snag around the 200-page mark in this particular volume (which I suppose translates to something like a mid-book lull if taking TGAT as a single book), but before and after that, I could hardly put it down. The build-up to the final climax is epic and the way all these plot strings come together is just a joy to read. I also remain in awe at Tad's trope sub Loved it madly, embarrassingly sad to have it end, excited and nervous beyond belief for The Witchwood Crown! Oddly, I do always seem to hit a snag around the 200-page mark in this particular volume (which I suppose translates to something like a mid-book lull if taking TGAT as a single book), but before and after that, I could hardly put it down. The build-up to the final climax is epic and the way all these plot strings come together is just a joy to read. I also remain in awe at Tad's trope subversion skills - I'll never forget the first time I read this and how I marvelled at how some of these events should be predictable or clichéd but never are: (view spoiler)[the kitchen boy gets the kingdom and the princess in the end, but because these characters are so real and go through so much, it's not the least bit contrived; sympathy for the enemy is his downfall, but because of the nature and history of the enemy that's been built for four books, it's nothing so trite as "and then we saved the world with the power of love." Not to mention the entire set-up and reversal of expectations with the three swords. Masterfully played. (hide spoiler)] I have a lot of feels and can't even express them properly. Let me just say that I love books that leave you like this: properly shattered, achingly happy, so sad to turn the final page but so content to leave them there. Reading experience perfection. BRING ON WITCHWOOD CROWN AND WHATEVER DELIGHTFUL MIDLIFE CRISES, MAGICAL OR MUNDANE, AWAIT.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    This book was just ok. A lot of it bothered me and only some of it was good. A few characters were interesting, but most got on my nerves. Miriamele was by far the most annoying. Her lack of common sense was mind numbing. And it was way too long. It dragged for most of it. How many times did a character begin to tell me something before being interrupted or deciding that the character they were talking to could be told the important information later. Things took so long to be explained that cha This book was just ok. A lot of it bothered me and only some of it was good. A few characters were interesting, but most got on my nerves. Miriamele was by far the most annoying. Her lack of common sense was mind numbing. And it was way too long. It dragged for most of it. How many times did a character begin to tell me something before being interrupted or deciding that the character they were talking to could be told the important information later. Things took so long to be explained that characters were yelling at other characters to get to the point. The climax ends abruptly and the next chapter takes place several hours later and somebody else explains the rest of what happened. Just weird. It was a very frustrating book. The first one in the series hooked me, the next two dragged but kept my interest and this last one annoyed me.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Wow I cannot believe it's over! Gah I'm sad lol I also cannot believe I finished this book in a couple weeks, it is a massive brick of a book XD I loved it alllllllll I don't even know what to say... I'm going to read the 2017 novella next Wow I cannot believe it's over! Gah I'm sad lol I also cannot believe I finished this book in a couple weeks, it is a massive brick of a book XD I loved it alllllllll I don't even know what to say... I'm going to read the 2017 novella next

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Awesome epic series BR with Richard, a great fellow knight of Osten Ard. A brilliant end to a brilliant series! A fantasy masterpiece of epic proportions! I loved every bit of it and highly recommend it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    I did really enjoy this trilogy. My impression during the first book was that it was eloquent but got off to a slow start, but ending on an exciting note. The second book tried to bring too many threads together and ended up having lots of viewpoints from seemingly disconnected people. The third book(s) brought people together so there were fewer "groups" to follow, and wrapped everything up pretty nicely, for the most part. The ending can be described as nothing short of epic, with a very vivid I did really enjoy this trilogy. My impression during the first book was that it was eloquent but got off to a slow start, but ending on an exciting note. The second book tried to bring too many threads together and ended up having lots of viewpoints from seemingly disconnected people. The third book(s) brought people together so there were fewer "groups" to follow, and wrapped everything up pretty nicely, for the most part. The ending can be described as nothing short of epic, with a very vivid scene and wound up nicely with the hope of rebuilding. It was a clean trilogy and very, very enjoyable. If I was a huge Tolkien fan, I'm quite certain that this would be pure gold for me. I really liked the book and would recommend it. That said, there were a few things that in my opinion lacked some polish (they might seem numerous but they are really more of nitpicks): A few things off the top of my head that I didn't think were really answered: what the drink continually served to Elias was doing to him (unbinding his soul? I don't know). Why was Prester John's body completely preserved? What was it about Camaris that Towser did not tell? His sin? A few complaints? There was a foreshadowing of Simon's ancestry (Miriamele thought his face looked like someone she'd seen before) but it wasn't something anyone reading could have guessed. Sort of out of the blue there. Bright-Nail turned to dust (said in passing in the midst of everything else). Nothing said of the other swords or even why that happened. Not much focus on it and no one even talks about the swords later. The timeline for Simon's ancestor (Eahlstan) didn't make sense to me. He apparently ruled hundreds of years before, but died killing the dragon, at which time John took up the throne. One would have expected the king to have been at most Simon's great-grandfather, but how could that be if it was many hundreds of years earlier? And in either case, Why would Simon have such a strong resemblance to his ancestor of 500 years ago, so much so that the statue in the throne room reminded people of Simon? I also didn't feel like there was ample reason given why Simon wasn't told this by before by all the people who knew about it. There didn't really seem to be a strong redemption or forgiveness for Miriamele. She had confessed her sin to Simon, they both seemed a little hard toward each other, and then suddenly she asks him to not leave her, he says he loves her, and they have sex. I would have liked to have seen her "purified" or "redeemed" somehow. The last paragraphs wrap up with Eolair being told about Maegwin's sacrifice, which I suppose is nice that he knows but it was an odd note to end on and I didn't really feel like it gave Eolair closure, relief, or joy. So maybe I should just make up my own ending and wrap up all these things :)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Shaitarn

    The final of Tad Williams epic trilogy/quartet (the last book was released as one volume in hardback, the paperback was split into two) gets a 4.5 review from me. it was good, it was really, really good, but (and I hate to say this) it wasn't great. This was due to a couple of reasons: (view spoiler)[ a couple of characters (noticeably Miriamele) behave in an incredibly stupid way to the point that I wanted to shake them there was a lot of wandering about in tunnels, which is a fantasy trope I pers The final of Tad Williams epic trilogy/quartet (the last book was released as one volume in hardback, the paperback was split into two) gets a 4.5 review from me. it was good, it was really, really good, but (and I hate to say this) it wasn't great. This was due to a couple of reasons: (view spoiler)[ a couple of characters (noticeably Miriamele) behave in an incredibly stupid way to the point that I wanted to shake them there was a lot of wandering about in tunnels, which is a fantasy trope I personally hate, so this section dragged incredibly for me (hide spoiler)] These are very personal, and may not bother you. I still think it's a brilliant book, and a brilliant series. The world building is so detailed and intense it feels very much like a real place with a very rich history and lore. It doesn't break any ground in fantasy, but is so engrossing that that doesn't really matter. A very good story, well told.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    Wow. Just.... wow I don't really know what to say, how to sum up this book, and the series as a whole in a coherent manner. Just.. epic. In scope, in world building and especially in characters. As with any series about war there where deaths that where extremely sad, more than a few tears where shed. SO many twists and turns from the small to the amazing. I don't really know what to say I want to rave about this book but I don't want to spoil it for anyone else Suffice to say its truly amazing Wow. Just.... wow I don't really know what to say, how to sum up this book, and the series as a whole in a coherent manner. Just.. epic. In scope, in world building and especially in characters. As with any series about war there where deaths that where extremely sad, more than a few tears where shed. SO many twists and turns from the small to the amazing. I don't really know what to say I want to rave about this book but I don't want to spoil it for anyone else Suffice to say its truly amazing

  12. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    Such a great, captivating final instalment in this series. There were many times when I wish this book — and series — had been shorter and less dense. But when I got to the final act of this one, I didn’t wish it anymore. The characters and their development arcs really stand out here. It’s a great book with a great, really meaningful ending for everyone. The author really kept his cards close to his chest for this entire series. More is kept secret than in any other fantasy series I’ve ever read, Such a great, captivating final instalment in this series. There were many times when I wish this book — and series — had been shorter and less dense. But when I got to the final act of this one, I didn’t wish it anymore. The characters and their development arcs really stand out here. It’s a great book with a great, really meaningful ending for everyone. The author really kept his cards close to his chest for this entire series. More is kept secret than in any other fantasy series I’ve ever read, especially for a longer time too, and it was really rewarding to see everything fit into place and make sense at the very end. This finale was so good that it improved this series’ ranking in my mind, which is saying something because I was a big fan of it already.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Vivone Os

    KUMSKI BOOK CLUB 2018 - 8 So I finally finished it! It really took me a while. At first, the book was sooo boring and I had to put it down. I continued reading a whole month later. It kind of didn't pull me to reading. And later, after I continued to read, there were parts that were uneventful and I would say redundant. For example, parts in which Simon and Guthwulf wandered through the corridors of Hayholt, or the length of the siege of Naglimund. The ending compensated to it all. It was so acti KUMSKI BOOK CLUB 2018 - 8 So I finally finished it! It really took me a while. At first, the book was sooo boring and I had to put it down. I continued reading a whole month later. It kind of didn't pull me to reading. And later, after I continued to read, there were parts that were uneventful and I would say redundant. For example, parts in which Simon and Guthwulf wandered through the corridors of Hayholt, or the length of the siege of Naglimund. The ending compensated to it all. It was so action-packed as if I were watching an action movie. The idea of combining the two worlds was very good. As for the characters, I loved reading how Simon evolved and also how some of the other characters changed. I found Miriamele rather annoying and I think she was not fair to Simon throughout most of the last book. That was one other reason why it took me longer to finish reading. There were several deaths which saddened me profoundly, esp. Maegwin's. I kind of very romantically hoped Eolair and her would have a happy ending. But apparently it wasn't meant to be. I loved Isgrimnur and Isorn too and I was sad for them. Luckily we also experienced a couple of turnovers just at the moment we thought all was lost. So there were still some happy endings. Now that I finished the whole series, I'm sad that it's over and I wish there were more to read about Joshua and Simon and Binabik and Miriamele. But I definitely liked Shadowmarch series much more than this one. Konačno sam ju završila! Trebalo mi jako puno vremena. U početku mi je bila toliko dosadna da ju nisam mogla čitati. Tek nakon mjesec dana sam je se ponovo uhvatila. Jednostavno me ništa nije vuklo čitanju. I za vrijeme tog drugog pokušaja, bilo je dijelova u knjizi koji su mi bili dosadni, bez nekih pravih događaja i iskreno suvišni. Primjerice dijelovi u kojima su Simon i Guthwulf hodali podzemnim hodnicima dvorca ili dužina opsade Naglimunda. Ali kraj je to sve nadoknadio. Toliko je bio napet i nabrijan, kao da sam gledala neki akcijski film. Ta ideja spajanja dva svijeta mi je bila stvarno dobra. Što se tiče likova, uživala sam čitajući kako se Simon razvijao te također kako su se neki od likova mijenjali. Iako, recimo Miriamele mi je baš išla na živce u ovom dijelu, mislim da uopće nije bila fer prema Simonu. To je još jedan razlog zbog kojeg mi je duže trebalo da pročitam knjigu. Nekoliko smrti u knjizi me baš rastužilo. Posebno Maegwinina. Nekako sam se kao prava romantičarka nadala da će ona i Eolair imati sretan kraj. Ali izgleda da im nije bilo suđeno. Isgrimnur i Isorn su mi također bili odlični likovi pa sam i zbog njih bila tužna. Srećom, dogodilo se i nekoliko preokreta u trenutku kad se sve činilo izgubljeno. Tako da su na kraju neke stvari ipak završile sretno. Sad kad sam napokon završila cijelu seriju, žao mi je što je gotova i voljela bih da ima još koja knjiga o Joshui, Binabiku, Simonu i Miriamele. Ali ipak mi se u globalu više svidio Williamsov serijal Sjenovita međa.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    (This review includes To Green Angel Tower, Part 1) “Forever is a long time to carry grudges.” Excellent. Successful and satisfying conclusion to a huge epic fantasy. Sixteen hundred pages (in this story) of complex plots, sub-plots and sub-sub-plots set in multiple, fully-realized cultures, many more than medieval Europe analogs. Language, history, clothing, religion, music, clothes, prejudices: the whole boatload. Immersive. Loads of quotable epigrams. “If what we have experienced lately has been (This review includes To Green Angel Tower, Part 1) “Forever is a long time to carry grudges.” Excellent. Successful and satisfying conclusion to a huge epic fantasy. Sixteen hundred pages (in this story) of complex plots, sub-plots and sub-sub-plots set in multiple, fully-realized cultures, many more than medieval Europe analogs. Language, history, clothing, religion, music, clothes, prejudices: the whole boatload. Immersive. Loads of quotable epigrams. “If what we have experienced lately has been God’s way of showing his favor, I think I would be willing to try a little of his punishment, for a change.” Religion is a major part of these cultures and the stories. The various faiths are treated respectfully. A realistic variety of responses by people to the religion of their and other cultures. Some are redeemed; some are lost. “One day I would have to send my son off to do something I could not do. And I would never sleep again.” What’s not to like? The 1600 pages may be a clue. Williams almost pulls a Robert Jordan. (Not a complement.) Basically, he lost control of his story. The best epic fiction is a balance between immersion and focus. Williams succeeded in volumes one and two, but the story seems to have gotten away from him here. Eight hundred pages should have been enough. Oh, it was great story-telling and wonderful detain, but the story got lost in there somewhere. (Some readers will disagree and want more. Well, Williams is accommodating you, too. More Osten Ard books are coming.) He pulled it together at the end, though he had to cheat a bit. (Some surprises; some obvious) “You must forgive, starting with yourself.” We view knights and knighthood with twenty-first century eyes, often Marxist or at least class warfare. Williams reminds us that for many knights it was a holy and honorable life. A way to serve as well as to accumulate wealth or power. “All the choices seemed between one unpleasant possibility and another, with only the faintest reference to good and evil.” Quibbles: The usual: horses that run 150 miles in a day. There’s a time mismatch in tunnels: Simon is there over a “fortnight,” others who enter right behind him are there less than a week. “A banned book has a powerful fascination, but a truly evil book … draws the curious as honey lures flies.” Uneven inking of the paperback book makes reading hard. No excuse for such sloppy quality control. “Memory is the greatest of gifts.” (Ebook buyers beware. My niece bought me Part One, thinking she was getting the entire book.)

  15. 4 out of 5

    L

    A majestic fantasy masterpiece of epic proportions which beautifully blends magic and adventure for a thrilling tale. ‘To green angel tower Storm’ is book 4 in the series “Memory, Sorrow and Thorn” by international bestselling author Tad Williams. This dazzling series of incredible worlds and deadly intrigue is greatly impressive and hugely ambitious, on such a breathtaking scale. I am constantly astonished by how vividly creative Tad’s world-building is and the sheer remarkable substance that i A majestic fantasy masterpiece of epic proportions which beautifully blends magic and adventure for a thrilling tale. ‘To green angel tower Storm’ is book 4 in the series “Memory, Sorrow and Thorn” by international bestselling author Tad Williams. This dazzling series of incredible worlds and deadly intrigue is greatly impressive and hugely ambitious, on such a breathtaking scale. I am constantly astonished by how vividly creative Tad’s world-building is and the sheer remarkable substance that is contained within his work, which epitomizes this genre in a nutshell. Assured and strong, ‘Memory, Sorrow and Thorn’ is a well-written saga of profound depth and cleverly crafted narrative that will delight from beginning to end. In book 4 one follows Simon’s journey as a Knight of Osten Ard, wherein terrible horrors and powerful dark magic unfolds. This splendid conclusion to a landmark series is intensely gripping, heart-pounding and so stunning as to leave you awed by the inspired plot. Prepare to be taken on a long journey of discovery as you plunge into a complex world that is filled with refreshing originality and distinctive flair; unique to this author. ‘Storm’ I feel is certainly one of the most dramatic, memorable and supremely singular endings to any fantasy series and which lingers upon your mind long after finishing the book. I was drawn into a colorful world filled with interesting characters and brilliant storytelling, and so lost within this story I was sad when it finally came to an end. It felt as though the One Ring had at last been tossed into Mount Doom, and as Frodo and Sam lay on a rock his words “It’s gone. It’s done” were brought to mind as I finally read… ‘Firelight and the sound of laughing voices reached out to welcome them.’ - page 796 Simon and Miriamele’s dangerous quest across war-and-magic torn lands is really exciting, and I enjoyed being able to really get to know each character inside out. Utterly believable, compelling and simply fantastic the final installment within this brilliant series is the perfect end to an incredibly long story. It did seem like a terribly long wait until I was able to grasp hold of this book, but it was well worth it as I was so elated by how Tad Williams constructed the ending with such excellence. I would say that ‘Memory, Sorrow and Thorn’ has to be right at the top of my list for all-time favorite fantasy series of the epic kind!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marina

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Although it pains me to read about Maegwin death, I'm glad that Joshua lives. The end of this book was so rewarding. Reading this book was such a pleasure, the Simon journey below Hayholt through ruins of Asu'a was so inspiring. This book was so magical, epic and touching I wish Tad's new installment follows the same path. Although it pains me to read about Maegwin death, I'm glad that Joshua lives. The end of this book was so rewarding. Reading this book was such a pleasure, the Simon journey below Hayholt through ruins of Asu'a was so inspiring. This book was so magical, epic and touching I wish Tad's new installment follows the same path.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David Zerangue

    The end to an incredibly long trilogy. The series has a bit of The Grapes of Wrath feel to it in that obstacles are constantly put in front of the character and sorry and misery is all that ever remains. Even when there is a glimmer of hope, something worse happens. However, unlike The Grapes of Wrath, this series does end with a happy ending (which was refreshing). The story itself is quite epic and at times I could not understand why I was investing so much time reading it. However, if you tak The end to an incredibly long trilogy. The series has a bit of The Grapes of Wrath feel to it in that obstacles are constantly put in front of the character and sorry and misery is all that ever remains. Even when there is a glimmer of hope, something worse happens. However, unlike The Grapes of Wrath, this series does end with a happy ending (which was refreshing). The story itself is quite epic and at times I could not understand why I was investing so much time reading it. However, if you take a sneak peek at the author's comments about this series on his website, you'll find he was just as daunted with writing it. There's a whole lot of traveling and discovery and an incredible amount of mystery which can be quite frustrating. However, this final installment does finally bring it all together and it ends up being a worthwhile read in the end. It took me almost 15 years to complete this read because I could not compel myself to read this final installment. Truly, I am glad that did.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kyleigh

    This was one of the best books I’ve read in a long time. I read it in two sections, with two other short books falling in between. I don’t think it hurt the story any though. The interplay between Simon and Miriamele was fantastic. I was amazed by Williams’ descriptions of kissing or touching for the first time. The second half of the book really drew me in and I had a hard time putting it down. The ending left a little bit to be desired. There was so much build-up throughout the whole 2,000 pag This was one of the best books I’ve read in a long time. I read it in two sections, with two other short books falling in between. I don’t think it hurt the story any though. The interplay between Simon and Miriamele was fantastic. I was amazed by Williams’ descriptions of kissing or touching for the first time. The second half of the book really drew me in and I had a hard time putting it down. The ending left a little bit to be desired. There was so much build-up throughout the whole 2,000 page series and then the end was just rushed through. I had a very hard time visualizing all the magic and sorcery as Williams describes it at the climax. There were a lot of twists to the plot as it neared the end though, and I enjoyed that thoroughly.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chris Gousopoulos

    What a journey. Four books full of unforgettable moments. Haunting battles, beautiful harsh vast landscapes, terrifying labyrinthine subteranean places, great climaxes and even very well executed horror scenes. A classic epic. A twisted and original Lord Of The Rings type. The worldbuilding was incredible. Characters too. It might be kinda slow, especially compared to modern fantasy, but I savored almost every page. Its really a shame that these books are not hyped nowadays because there are so What a journey. Four books full of unforgettable moments. Haunting battles, beautiful harsh vast landscapes, terrifying labyrinthine subteranean places, great climaxes and even very well executed horror scenes. A classic epic. A twisted and original Lord Of The Rings type. The worldbuilding was incredible. Characters too. It might be kinda slow, especially compared to modern fantasy, but I savored almost every page. Its really a shame that these books are not hyped nowadays because there are so many moments that could inspire artists. Especially those Elves. All of their subraces. Compared only to Tolkien's. All an all a very fulfilling and satisfying experience for everyone who likes traditional epic fantasy.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nevena

    Finally! I grew very tired reading it, some situations were repeating over and over again, and after all, the ending didn't surprise me as much. It's a decent series, but I recommend it only if you have spare time and true love for fantasy books because you'll find nothing new and thrilling here. Finally! I grew very tired reading it, some situations were repeating over and over again, and after all, the ending didn't surprise me as much. It's a decent series, but I recommend it only if you have spare time and true love for fantasy books because you'll find nothing new and thrilling here.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Beth S.

    Well I was going to give this three stars for being moderately entertaining until I got to the climax of the plot and rolled my eyes so hard it hurt. A million pages of just different people slogging through the same tunnels for this bullshit? Of the denouement, let us not even speak. Ugh.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sambora

    Finishing To Green Angel Tower: Storm marks the end of a series that I've been following for the past 6 months. I have enjoyed my time with Memory, Sorrow and Thorn, but - in my opinion, it suffers a slight dip in quality going into it's second half. These books were written in the early 90's, and BOY has the genre evolved since then. The audience and their tastes have also grown and changed. What at one point was new, creative and distinct now reads as cliché and trope-ish. This isn't meant as mu Finishing To Green Angel Tower: Storm marks the end of a series that I've been following for the past 6 months. I have enjoyed my time with Memory, Sorrow and Thorn, but - in my opinion, it suffers a slight dip in quality going into it's second half. These books were written in the early 90's, and BOY has the genre evolved since then. The audience and their tastes have also grown and changed. What at one point was new, creative and distinct now reads as cliché and trope-ish. This isn't meant as much of a criticism, as I grew up on fantasy much like this and the story telling characteristics and style gave me a strong sense of nostalgia for the fantasy genre pre-grimdark. Kitchen boys turn hero's, dark and mysterious overlords of bygone eras returning, soft magic systems, quests for magical swords imbued with powers enough to thwart the enemy and a variety of races - inspired by elves and dwarves, falling on one side or the other of a world shattering fight between good and evil. It's classic and a lot of fun. But, as I said, the past two entries, (Part 1 and 2 of To Green Angel Tower) seemed a little stale to my mind. Many of the POVs we've met throughout the world start to merge, the stage gets smaller and smaller and characters, both those fighting for good and those fighting for power, congregate in the capital of Osten Ard for the final confrontation. Somehow despite this convergence, it still seemed as though the plot had been spread a little too thin, therefore the culmination of the story felt a little lackluster. Keeping it spoiler-free, I shall just say that maybe the story would have benefitted somewhat from a character/POV culling? Maybe that's the modern expectation of darker fantasy talking, but our primary characters DID feel very safe, so this last book felt a little cluttered from all the overlapping scenes. Of course, the ending is a very important and difficult thing to pull off with a series of this size. This ending in particular didn't fail... but neither did it wow me. It wrapped up a great many of the characters plot lines, leaving a couple open for the obligatory connections to a following series set in the same world, but it was all a bit predicable, or at least predicable in it's attempts to be unpredictable. The characters and their evolutions are always one of my favourite elements of epic fantasy, and Williams did this very well with his chosen few characters; Simon, Miriamele, Tiamak, Elias and Rachel. They all grew and changed and reacted on a personal and emotional level to their situation. The rest, however, I felt didn't change at all over the course of the books. They certainly learned and achieved a lot (and failed at times too!), but knowledge and experience didn't change their outlook or behaviour. I shall admit, it frustrated me at times, particularly as some of these were my favourite characters; looking here at Cadrach, Binabik and Jiriki. This book, To Green Angel Tower: Storm, I have given 3 stars. The series on a whole, I believe, deserves the same. It's good. It's fun. It's nostalgic. However, unfortunately, I can't see it being very memorable for me. I don't think I'll be reading anything else by Tad Williams, but as I said in the opening of this review - despite what may seem like harsh criticism throughout, I have enjoyed my time with this series. ____________________________________ Thank you for reading my review! Feel free to add me as a friend here on Goodreads - I am always looking to connect with more SFF people and check out what everyone else is reading. And, if you have any reading suggestions, be sure to comment them below! I'm open to any and all! I received some more proofs and ARCs recently too, which I'm 100% sure will be a VERY mixed bag. I'll have them read and reviewed pre-release. Next review: Count Zero by William Gibson. Thanks again and I hope you have a good day!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kate (BloggingwithDragons)

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Originally posted on Blogging with Dragons I read the Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn series for over a year, in between other books. I put off reading the last book in the series because I simply didn’t want this epic series to end. This was a huge change from when I initially began reading the series and barely made it through the first book, The Dragonbone Chair, because I found it so boring. I hated the main character Simon, whom I still haven’t really learned to like despite all of his heroic deed Originally posted on Blogging with Dragons I read the Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn series for over a year, in between other books. I put off reading the last book in the series because I simply didn’t want this epic series to end. This was a huge change from when I initially began reading the series and barely made it through the first book, The Dragonbone Chair, because I found it so boring. I hated the main character Simon, whom I still haven’t really learned to like despite all of his heroic deeds (plus anyone who slays a dragon is dumb in my book—dragons are for riding into battle, etc.), and couldn’t find his life as a scullion at all worth my attention. But knowing that these books served as inspirations for George R.R. Martin for A Song of Ice and Fire, I kept pushing forward. And boy, was I glad I did. The world building in this series is rich and complex, with the sense of impending doom surrounding three mystical swords, which decide the fate of the world, inescapable. The characters are flawed; Prince Josua is depressed and indecisive, the hero Simon attention-seeking and selfish, the Princess Miramele is snobbish and impulsive, and her father the evil King Elias, both sympathetic and utterly detestable. Pyrates, the dark sorcerer is the impetus for the end of the world, and is a repugnant evil villain, swathed in red robes and wielding magic and mystery from which all of the characters fear and cringe. Pyrates successfully ensnares King Elias with false promises in the very beginning, and plunges the world into ever-encroaching chaos. The evil beings the Norns that serve Pyrates are utterly chilling, the gardenborn Sithi majestic, and the League of Scrolls utterly joinable, what with its brilliant members who are dedicated to researching and deciphering the forces at work in the world of Osten Ard. I was sad to read the last book, for I didn’t want to leave the world and its complex characters. However, in finally reading it, I was rewarded with my favorite book in the series. It was full of not only action, strife, and even romance, but also the eerie clashes between the Sithi and their evil counterparts, the Norns, which were fought via haunting songs, and even the final battle with the Storm King, Ineluki. Though I was disappointed with what I found to be the short appearance of the Storm King himself, he certainly made quite the entrance and impression. Pus, everything leading up to the confrontation was just as powerful as the pulse of the swords that drove Simon, Caramis, and Elias to their confrontation with the Elias, Pyrates, and the Storm King. Like our heroes, I was driven forward through the book and when I heard birds chirping and found it be 4am, I was stunned. But there was no way I was sleeping until I knew what happened! The ending was a little too happy for my taste, and the final battle with Simon’s optimism defeating Ineluki, seemed far too simple. For Ineluki was so powerful, he turned the time of the world back to when he existed, allowing him entry into the body of long-suffering King Elias. In moments, the Storm King dissolved traitorous Pyrates, the most feared and powerful sorcerer of Osten Ard, into firey ash. So Simon simply defeating the Storm King with mere positive thoughts and sympathy, made me think of my similar disgust with Harry PotterView Spoiler » Exaggerations aside, Simon did have some help from Miramele, who shot the white Sithi arrow into her father’s chest, hoping to put him out of his misery and freeing him from the Storm King’s possession at last. I was very happy and found it fitting that she played such a role, as she toiled as much as anyone in the hopes of saving the world and her father. Besides, I’ve always loved heroines who don’t sit back and leave the work to the men, and Miramele is the absolute definition of this, even to a fault, often putting herself and others around her in danger, but capably handling herself and her bow when things get rough. And ultimately, I was glad to witness many characters find their own happy endings after all that they endured. I was most thrilled that Prince Josua found a way out of having to rule and could finally find his own happiness as a presumed “dead man.” I was also overjoyed that Jir’iki and Aditu survived their own battle with Utuk’ku, the Norn Queen, which was just as hauntingly and beatifically described as Simon’s own battle with Ineluki. It was also a wonderful, heartfelt touch for Cadrach to finally find his own redemption through sacrifice, which allows Simon, Miramele, and Binabik to escape the crumbling castle. Truly and heart-twistingly well done. But conversely, I found it a little too convenient that Simon just happened to be the lost and rightful heir to the throne and that he could marry his beloved Miramele and finally receive the recognition and hero worship he so desperately craved. Though the stage had been set for Simon’s heritage throughout the series, I would have preferred that he live with the Sithi or Binabik for several years to help them rebuild or record all of what had transpired in Green Angel Tower, only to reemerge later, even more mature. Likewise, I would have preferred that Miramele be forced to take the throne and right her father’s wrongs on her own, as she was a strong-willed and capable woman. She could have fallen in love with Simon after his reappearance. It just seemed too much of a fairy tale ending for me after so much suffering and destruction. But not all of the characters met similarly happy fates. I was quite sad that Maegwin and Eolair did not get their much longed for love. I was really rooting for Maegwin throughout the series, even after her descent into madness, and felt that she and Eolair deserved their happy ending more than Simon and Miramele. However, I was pleased how Simon made known to a bereaved Eolair of Maegwin’s sacrifice, which not only saved his life at the cost of her own, but also allowed him to move forward to defeat Ineluki. It was a touching tribute and showed Simon’s growth as a character. Though I could never quite like Simon, he was a very well-developed and flawed character, like the rest of the cast, and I am confident that Miramele, his queen, will be able to keep his “Mooncalf”-ness or childishness in line. Though the series was over and the reader was able to glimpse the world a year after the final battle, I was still extremely interested in Osten Ard. For instance, what would become of Josua’s twins? After all, Aditu gave such a curious prophecy concerning them! I want to know more and I am hoping for another series where this question is answered! Plus, I would love to revisit the world of Osten Ard all over again. And with the Norn Queen still living, Josua’s twins growing, and the League of Scrolls still going strong, I imagine that author Tad Williams isn’t quite done with this world yet and I will be more than ready when he revisits it!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Wonderful end to a wonderful series (though it recently has been taken up again!). I still believe the first book is the best, though. It got too epic here, and the writing style suffered in the name of utilitarianism. An expertly guided arc, both story-wise and character-wise, as well as tying up all loose ends, though a little too conveniently/fatefully well in some cases for my taste (without revealing spoilers). Nicely opens up the possibility for stories for the sequels! I have deliberately k Wonderful end to a wonderful series (though it recently has been taken up again!). I still believe the first book is the best, though. It got too epic here, and the writing style suffered in the name of utilitarianism. An expertly guided arc, both story-wise and character-wise, as well as tying up all loose ends, though a little too conveniently/fatefully well in some cases for my taste (without revealing spoilers). Nicely opens up the possibility for stories for the sequels! I have deliberately kept aloof of all synopses of the brand-new book that was just released, or the novella and short story either. Some remaining questions (relatively spoiler-free, but be warned!!) that were not answered by the end (but perhaps have an open window to do so in the next series): 1. Why did Prester John hate the Sithi? The book implies that it was an insufficient motive that it was just for the lie we discover in the last quarter. And for that matter, why did he lie? 2. Why doesn't Isgrimnur make Sludig a knight, as he was yearning for? 4. What did Camaris do with Sithi? We had a tiny glimpse only. 5. I am unclear how much gap there was between the Fisher King and Prester John? Were there many kings between them? 6. How did the cat know what to do in the caverns? was it really acting on its own instinct?

  25. 4 out of 5

    John

    It feels so good to finally be able to finish a fantasy series! So many of the ones I'm currently reading aren't finished and its so frustrating having to wait years for the story to continue. To green angel tower, part 2 is the second half of the final book in the Memory, Sorrow and Thorn trilogy. It was exactly what I've been waiting for while reading series. The first two books of the trilogy were kind of a roller-coaster, good at times but I also find myself daydreaming during other parts of It feels so good to finally be able to finish a fantasy series! So many of the ones I'm currently reading aren't finished and its so frustrating having to wait years for the story to continue. To green angel tower, part 2 is the second half of the final book in the Memory, Sorrow and Thorn trilogy. It was exactly what I've been waiting for while reading series. The first two books of the trilogy were kind of a roller-coaster, good at times but I also find myself daydreaming during other parts of the books. But part 1 and part 2 of the final book was very exciting throughout almost the whole book. Even though the ending was somewhat anti-climactic I still enjoyed it and I finished very satisfied. My favorite part of this series? What these books lack in action they make up for in character development. You really get to know each and every one of the main characters and they are pretty believable as well. When I finished the series it was bittersweet because I knew it was the last time I'd read about these characters. I give this book 4.5/5 stars. At times, Tad Williams showed signs of brilliance in it but I think the book falls short of being 5 stars. For the series I give 4/5 stars. Even though it wasn't amazing it was still pretty good. I'm glad I decided to stick with it after the awful first 400 pages of the Dragonbone Chair.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Hamza

    I waited until completing the entire series before writing a review to see if it would redeem itself somehow. It didn't. The point I enjoyed most was when it finally ended. This story did not need four (long) books for its telling. The plot is unsophisticated. It could have been easily condensed into three books. This was clearly a scheme to milk it for all its worth. To say the plot moved at a snail's pace is an understatement. It's bogged down by the same rehashed descriptions of people and pl I waited until completing the entire series before writing a review to see if it would redeem itself somehow. It didn't. The point I enjoyed most was when it finally ended. This story did not need four (long) books for its telling. The plot is unsophisticated. It could have been easily condensed into three books. This was clearly a scheme to milk it for all its worth. To say the plot moved at a snail's pace is an understatement. It's bogged down by the same rehashed descriptions of people and places and mindless monologues and dialogues that do not develop the plot whatsoever. The author never misses a chance to tell us how bird-like and graceful the Sitha are or how cold and alien the Norns are. And Simon has got to be the worst protagonist to grace fantasy literature. The author failed to arouse in me even a shred of concern for the main character. There's nothing about him to like. He constantly wallows in self-deprecation. He has no self respect and is always pining for the attention and affection of others. To top it off, the final showdown that had been alluded to for the entire series was severely anticlimactic. This was one of the worst endings I've ever read. Do yourself a favour and obliterate this series from your 'want to read' list.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Éowyn Amroth

    Four wonderful books with great characters and plot. Magical scenes, horror scenes, epic elements, twists and an amazing narrative. I really enjoyed them all and take my hat off to Mr Williams for the creation of all those wonderful (and very different from what we are used to) races.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Scarletine

    Where do i get my medal for finishing this behemoth? I enjoyed the first three books, however book 3 part 2 was stretched like a hippo in Lycra pants. It wasn't pretty at all and at times i was about to DNF. I got to the stage that i was so bored with everything being dragged out, i didn't care what happened to the characters. I can't believe that these books weren't edited sufficiently that they fitted into three novels. But I've finished at last. Yesss. Where do i get my medal for finishing this behemoth? I enjoyed the first three books, however book 3 part 2 was stretched like a hippo in Lycra pants. It wasn't pretty at all and at times i was about to DNF. I got to the stage that i was so bored with everything being dragged out, i didn't care what happened to the characters. I can't believe that these books weren't edited sufficiently that they fitted into three novels. But I've finished at last. Yesss.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Pete Victor

    A fantastic warming finish to a great series of book. Tad Williams is a tremendous author and a crafty storyteller. His world building abilities are top notch and his prose is marvelous. I listened to this series of books all the way through from the very beginning. I recommend the audiobooks for the Memory, Sorrow and Thorn books. Andrew Wincott is such a talented narrator. I loved his voice acting so much in this series. Great work all around 💯💯

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pickle

    Im glad that's over and i cant see me rushing back to read any more Tad Williams The book was overly long but so were the previous three and it really could have been cut from 800pages to about 400, so much detail for so little story. Im glad that's over and i cant see me rushing back to read any more Tad Williams The book was overly long but so were the previous three and it really could have been cut from 800pages to about 400, so much detail for so little story.

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