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The Art of Star Wars: Episode III—Revenge of the Sith

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Packed with breathtaking visuals created by a team of world class artists The Art of Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith charts the visual genesis of this epic saga s climactic finale. For years George Lucas s handpicked group has created characters costumes droids star ships planetary vistas digi matte paintings and sculpturesevery type of visual imaginable. This e Packed with breathtaking visuals created by a team of world class artists The Art of Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith charts the visual genesis of this epic saga s climactic finale. For years George Lucas s handpicked group has created characters costumes droids star ships planetary vistas digi matte paintings and sculpturesevery type of visual imaginable. This extraordinary volume unveils never before seen imagesthus taking readers on a fascinating journey from the first concepts to the final movie. While marveling at hundreds of brilliant pieces of art readers will experience. Darth Vadera look at the sinister chamber where he is created stunning conceptual visions for the climactic light saber duel between Anakin Skywalker and Obi Wan Kenobi. The evolution of General Grievousthe new face of evil from initial sketches to ILM animation art fantastic full color renderings of costumes weapons landscapes and spacecraft intriguing insights from exclusive interviews with the artists whose groundbreaking work helped bring Lucas s ideas to life. New to this editionthe one and only Revenge of the Sith screenplay revealing every beat of the action. For Star Wars fans everywhere this treasure trove of images from the final fateful Star Wars movie will provide a visual feast that promises hours of endless excitement. Format: Trade Paperback 272 pages


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Packed with breathtaking visuals created by a team of world class artists The Art of Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith charts the visual genesis of this epic saga s climactic finale. For years George Lucas s handpicked group has created characters costumes droids star ships planetary vistas digi matte paintings and sculpturesevery type of visual imaginable. This e Packed with breathtaking visuals created by a team of world class artists The Art of Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith charts the visual genesis of this epic saga s climactic finale. For years George Lucas s handpicked group has created characters costumes droids star ships planetary vistas digi matte paintings and sculpturesevery type of visual imaginable. This extraordinary volume unveils never before seen imagesthus taking readers on a fascinating journey from the first concepts to the final movie. While marveling at hundreds of brilliant pieces of art readers will experience. Darth Vadera look at the sinister chamber where he is created stunning conceptual visions for the climactic light saber duel between Anakin Skywalker and Obi Wan Kenobi. The evolution of General Grievousthe new face of evil from initial sketches to ILM animation art fantastic full color renderings of costumes weapons landscapes and spacecraft intriguing insights from exclusive interviews with the artists whose groundbreaking work helped bring Lucas s ideas to life. New to this editionthe one and only Revenge of the Sith screenplay revealing every beat of the action. For Star Wars fans everywhere this treasure trove of images from the final fateful Star Wars movie will provide a visual feast that promises hours of endless excitement. Format: Trade Paperback 272 pages

30 review for The Art of Star Wars: Episode III—Revenge of the Sith

  1. 5 out of 5

    Parka

    (More pictures at parkablogs.com) Putting this book down is difficult after you flip through a few pages. There are hundreds of pieces of conceptual art and beautiful paintings. It is apparent right from the start that George Lucas only hire the best artists for his movie. The art genre is science fiction. You'll see a lot of concept art on cityscape, robots, planets, costumes, creatures, architecture, props and characters relating to the Star Wars movie. This book is all about art, you won't (More pictures at parkablogs.com) Putting this book down is difficult after you flip through a few pages. There are hundreds of pieces of conceptual art and beautiful paintings. It is apparent right from the start that George Lucas only hire the best artists for his movie. The art genre is science fiction. You'll see a lot of concept art on cityscape, robots, planets, costumes, creatures, architecture, props and characters relating to the Star Wars movie. This book is all about art, you won't see any movie stills. There are two versions of the book. The one with the movie script has 272 pages. The one I'm holding has only 224 pages. Design concepts are explained for the characters and set. There's not much text but enough. The level of detail, effort and creativity displayed by the artists is simply marveling. This genre is really a playground for artists to explore with their imagination. For Star Wars fans, there's no reason not to get this book. For art book lovers, especially those who like sci-fi, this book should be on your shopping list. This review was first published on parkablogs.com. There are more pictures and videos on my blog.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    This is a very interesting book in spite of a number of shortcomings. This book has a ton of concept art. It is shocking to me how little planning Lucas put into the prequel trilogy. He seems to have a few scenes in his head prior to making the movie, but for the most part it was a blank slate. It is just mind-blowing to me that Lucas wouldn't sit down prior to making the Phantom Menace and create a somewhat detailed outline of major plot points, characters, and locations. It sounds like he show This is a very interesting book in spite of a number of shortcomings. This book has a ton of concept art. It is shocking to me how little planning Lucas put into the prequel trilogy. He seems to have a few scenes in his head prior to making the movie, but for the most part it was a blank slate. It is just mind-blowing to me that Lucas wouldn't sit down prior to making the Phantom Menace and create a somewhat detailed outline of major plot points, characters, and locations. It sounds like he showed up to the art department and told them to come up with some worlds the clones could battle on, come up with a droid villain, and other stuff like that while he figures out what to do with the plot. Also, it'd be good if they had some cool artwork of interesting plot points for him to think about. It is understandable not having things planned out in the OT since they didn't expect to succeed the way they did. Lucas knew for a fact that he could basically do whatever he wanted in the prequel trilogy. He had the money and the time to do it right, and apparently he decided to just wing it. My main complaint for this book is how small many of the artwork are. There are way too many that you have to squint and try to see what you are looking at which is a big problem on a book whose focus is the artwork of a movie. While much of the art is very beautiful, it mostly doesn't compare in my eyes to the actual paintings done for the original trilogy. It is similar to how many of the settings from the original trilogy done with practical effects in the 70's and 80's look and feel more realistic than the CGI environments of the prequel trilogy. A lot of the art looks like it was drawn on a computer, which it was. What makes the old artwork so impressive is many of the landscapes look like they could be real places. When they were used as matte backgrounds, it was believable. The prequel artwork never really stop looking like CGI. It is very strange that the book ends with a little paragraph saying something along the lines of, "well, the movie comes out in a couple of months and so we don't have anything for the art past this point." I am guessing they wanted to get this book out as soon as possible after the release of the movie, but it seems dumb to not wait a few more months and have a complete book of artwork. I think the best part of the book is you really see quite a bit of the concept work that was the foundation for the entire movie. Since Lucas didn't have much planned, you get a glimpse of the different directions the movie could've gone. It was pretty fascinating thinking about what could've been. Some ideas, like the General Grievous concept, illustrated how a good idea can become dumb by having him do his stupid cough. Other ideas, like a prominent alien species of sentient lemurs, show you how many close calls there were with bad ideas. Other good ideas that didn't make the cut: After Obi-Wan falls into the sinkhole of Utapau, he has to fight a cave guardian. The pictures of that look pretty cool. Bad ideas: Having Han Solo being raised by Chewie and involved in this movie. A world of bridges, but the bridges (with all the huge buildings on them) are all built upside down. It creates interesting visuals, but it doesn't really make sense. The book is worth reading for any Star Wars fan, but it needed to be twice as long so that the pictures could've been big enough to appreciate.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Doug Penikas

    If anyone is interested in what it was like to be in the room with George Lucas, the producers, actors, and conceptual design artists, while they were making the movie, this book truly makes you feel like you are there! The artwork is breathtaking. Everything from sketches all the way to full color keyframes. Just stunning.

  4. 4 out of 5

    ♥ Patty ❥

    10/10 man, this book is just so gorgeous and likewise has its film script at the end. So good, just 😍

  5. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Lloyd

    There are few who would dispute that Revenge of the Sith is the best of the Star Wars prequels. Its success is perhaps in part because it presents a climax presumed by the original trilogy, even if the preceding two prequels completely failed to establish a route to that climax. Throughout The Art of Star Wars, Episode III - Revenge of the Sith there are references to A New Hope, as well as ideas and locations which have been part of the Star Wars mythology for decades without being realised on There are few who would dispute that Revenge of the Sith is the best of the Star Wars prequels. Its success is perhaps in part because it presents a climax presumed by the original trilogy, even if the preceding two prequels completely failed to establish a route to that climax. Throughout The Art of Star Wars, Episode III - Revenge of the Sith there are references to A New Hope, as well as ideas and locations which have been part of the Star Wars mythology for decades without being realised on film - Kashyyyk, Mustafar - and an accidental look forward to The Force Awakens on page 89, where Warren Fu is quoted as saying: "Star Wars is all about dangerous catwalks." But Revenge of the Sith is still a Star Wars prequel and is, thus, proverbially bad. There's so much still to get through that the film feels like a rush; I remember thinking back in 2005 that the film felt like a sequence of fights designed to answer variations on the question "who would win between..." - General Grievous and Obi-Wan; Mace Windu and Palpatine; Yoda and Palpatine; Obi-Wan and Anakin. To the latter, of course, we knew the answer - this time. The rematch would go quite differently. But how to get there? This film was supposed to provide the answer. The Art of Revenge of the Sith suggests that George Lucas had no idea where he was going with the prequels. There are a few scenes and locations known, but the process seems to have been to throw an idea at the artists and see what they could make of it, then craft these ideas into a film. On page 81 there's a quote from Lucas: "By the third film you have a lot of characters left over from before, and they're all running around yipping and yelling and saying, 'What about me?'". There was no overall plan for this trilogy; he had seemingly no clue where most of these characters would be when he created them - there seems to have been a question at one point whether Padmé would even give birth. The film ends up like a series of events which seemed cool at the time - Obi-Wan rides a lizard and fights a cyborg! Yoda fights Palpatine and is friends with Chewbacca! - which ultimately fail to carry the unsatisfactory plot. This method does produce the best of the prequel trilogy, but that bar was low and the film is far from classic. But, as a method, it results in a lot of art. In contrast to the arts of the original trilogy, The Art of Revenge of the Sith is huge, and detailed, and still needs to reduce some paintings to tiny thumbnails (despite page 165 being entirely devoted to a close-up of the floor of the Trade Federation Cruiser). There's not much description of what's going on - George Lucas asks for something, they paint it, he moves on to another idea - and because it's presented chronologically, the development of certain scenes requires looking backwards and forwards to follow to completion. There's a lot that's great, but mostly there's just a lot. It's characteristic of the prequel trilogy that digital creation reached a point where these designs didn't take as much time and money wasn't an obstacle so hundreds of them were produced. Many of them are fantastic. There's enough in here to have produced a couple more Star Wars films. As a process, it seems wasteful and indulgent. Again, characteristic of the prequels. Rather than focusing on making a few things well it seems like the aim was to make a lot of things look cool. To be fair, this process is more successful in Revenge of the Sith than in the previous two films. Ultimately, The Art of Revenge of the Sith is overwhelming and exciting, indulgent and exasperating, filling in a universe with places and things, but without character or personality. It's good to look at, but I was hoping for much more.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    This is the last of the star wars artwork books (for now) and just as colourful and rich in ideas and material as the attack of the clones book however they do not capture for me the same excitement as the original trilogy of books (but if you have read the earlier reviews you will know that i am biased) however its still a brilliant insight in to the various ideas and evolutions of characters, locations and their ships. Also the small snippets of dialogue (nothing too great to detract from the This is the last of the star wars artwork books (for now) and just as colourful and rich in ideas and material as the attack of the clones book however they do not capture for me the same excitement as the original trilogy of books (but if you have read the earlier reviews you will know that i am biased) however its still a brilliant insight in to the various ideas and evolutions of characters, locations and their ships. Also the small snippets of dialogue (nothing too great to detract from the art) give a tiny view in to creation of such icons.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dan Foster

    Beautiful art that speaks either to Lucas' genius or his folly. Fascinating to see conceptual artists working for a full year without GL telling them what the story will actually be about. Worth looking at the process and again, amazing art. Beautiful art that speaks either to Lucas' genius or his folly. Fascinating to see conceptual artists working for a full year without GL telling them what the story will actually be about. Worth looking at the process and again, amazing art.

  8. 5 out of 5

    (Jen) The Artist Librarian

    A great book to borrow from your library. As some have said, to look at and just see the process that movie concept artists go through --it's neat to read the thoughts and ideas these creative people had while coming up with character, costume, vehicle, and set designs ... A great book to borrow from your library. As some have said, to look at and just see the process that movie concept artists go through --it's neat to read the thoughts and ideas these creative people had while coming up with character, costume, vehicle, and set designs ...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

    One of thee most fascinating books to glance through, I now have a true appreciation for all the hard work that goes into making the visual concepts in movies, especially movies like Star Wars.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    this book is more to look at than to read - theh environment art here is amazing

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erica Truchon

  12. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Garris

  13. 5 out of 5

    Karl Hickey

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wesley

  15. 5 out of 5

    Richard Pires

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chuckschwa

  18. 4 out of 5

    Len

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  20. 5 out of 5

    Peter Lawson

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mateo

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Arnold

  23. 5 out of 5

    Agung Pribadi

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rozielyn

  25. 4 out of 5

    Karel

  26. 4 out of 5

    Corbin Witcher

  27. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sola Angle

  29. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Ferrante

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alon Gil

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