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Life at sixty isn't quite what Kay Carrera expected. She's working as a skip-tracer for a PI who is desperate to land his own reality TV show. She has a new roommate who arrived with more than the usual amount of baggage. And her attempts at knitting are less than stellar – way less than stellar. Worse, the cataract surgery that restored her sight has also delivered an une Life at sixty isn't quite what Kay Carrera expected. She's working as a skip-tracer for a PI who is desperate to land his own reality TV show. She has a new roommate who arrived with more than the usual amount of baggage. And her attempts at knitting are less than stellar – way less than stellar. Worse, the cataract surgery that restored her sight has also delivered an unexpected and disturbing side-effect. Kay sees ghosts. And when the dead turn to her for help, she just can't say no.


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Life at sixty isn't quite what Kay Carrera expected. She's working as a skip-tracer for a PI who is desperate to land his own reality TV show. She has a new roommate who arrived with more than the usual amount of baggage. And her attempts at knitting are less than stellar – way less than stellar. Worse, the cataract surgery that restored her sight has also delivered an une Life at sixty isn't quite what Kay Carrera expected. She's working as a skip-tracer for a PI who is desperate to land his own reality TV show. She has a new roommate who arrived with more than the usual amount of baggage. And her attempts at knitting are less than stellar – way less than stellar. Worse, the cataract surgery that restored her sight has also delivered an unexpected and disturbing side-effect. Kay sees ghosts. And when the dead turn to her for help, she just can't say no.

30 review for The Tell All

  1. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    The Tell- All (Locust Point Mystery Book 1) by Libby Howard is a 2017 publication This is the first book in the Locust Point Mystery series, which features widow Kay Carrera, a skip-tracer working for a Private Investigator who is angling for his own TV show. In her sixties, Kay realizes she can’t afford to live in the big home she and husband shared. She is sick at the thought of selling the house, so she begins to entertain the idea of taking in boarders. Meanwhile, her recent eye surgery has The Tell- All (Locust Point Mystery Book 1) by Libby Howard is a 2017 publication This is the first book in the Locust Point Mystery series, which features widow Kay Carrera, a skip-tracer working for a Private Investigator who is angling for his own TV show. In her sixties, Kay realizes she can’t afford to live in the big home she and husband shared. She is sick at the thought of selling the house, so she begins to entertain the idea of taking in boarders. Meanwhile, her recent eye surgery has left her with an unusual side effect… Not a bad start to the series. The groundwork is laid out nicely, introducing the characters and Kay’s new special abilities. It’s straightforward mystery, a little formulaic, but not predictable. There’s a wonderful cat and a paranormal element which is fun. The story is short, and could have been a little more fleshed out, and just a bit more suspenseful, but I think this is a good foundation to build on. I’ll give the second book in the series a try and see how things go from there. 3 stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tulay

    Good story. Do relate to Kay character, so glad she decided to adopt Taco. There is nothing like their unconditional love. She might be sixty years old, but does her investigations better than small town police department. Short mystery.

  3. 4 out of 5

    TL

    An okay story I enjoyed getting to know Kay but was indifferent to the other characters. The mystery was interesting but felt rushed and plus the ending felt anticlimatic. Don't regret reading it but won't be continuing with the series. An okay story I enjoyed getting to know Kay but was indifferent to the other characters. The mystery was interesting but felt rushed and plus the ending felt anticlimatic. Don't regret reading it but won't be continuing with the series.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Aly

    What a lovely little mystery book. I enjoyed being cozy and reading a cute, fun book. A interesting book I didn't expect to like as much as I did. This book had me from the first chapter until the end. It made me laugh a little too. *This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.* What a lovely little mystery book. I enjoyed being cozy and reading a cute, fun book. A interesting book I didn't expect to like as much as I did. This book had me from the first chapter until the end. It made me laugh a little too. *This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.*

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

    Not normally the type of book I would purchase, but... Knowing that Libby Howard is actually one of my favorite UF authors I decided to give her cozy mysteries a chance. The Tell All was an engaging mystery centering around a 60 yr old widow. It shows how she copes with her husband's death and creating a new life. Quite sweet actually... although I'd have loved to heard more about the "floater" aka ghost. Probably more of a 3.75 than a 4, but I'm rounding up because of my favorite imp! Not normally the type of book I would purchase, but... Knowing that Libby Howard is actually one of my favorite UF authors I decided to give her cozy mysteries a chance. The Tell All was an engaging mystery centering around a 60 yr old widow. It shows how she copes with her husband's death and creating a new life. Quite sweet actually... although I'd have loved to heard more about the "floater" aka ghost. Probably more of a 3.75 than a 4, but I'm rounding up because of my favorite imp!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anna at A Wondrous Bookshelf

    Kay Carrera is in her sixty and going through a lot. She is grieving the loss of her husband Eli and recovering from cataract surgery. Kay knows she can't afford her house anymore and her only options are to either sell her home or have it repossessed. Luckily, her friend advises her to get a roommate to help pay for the costs. Judge Beck is going through a divorce and looking for a place to live for a couple of years with his children. It seems like the perfect solution for Kay's problems, but Kay Carrera is in her sixty and going through a lot. She is grieving the loss of her husband Eli and recovering from cataract surgery. Kay knows she can't afford her house anymore and her only options are to either sell her home or have it repossessed. Luckily, her friend advises her to get a roommate to help pay for the costs. Judge Beck is going through a divorce and looking for a place to live for a couple of years with his children. It seems like the perfect solution for Kay's problems, but when she accidentally finds a body, she is going to need all the help in the world to elude the killer who's coming after her. This is book one in the Locust Point Mystery Book series. At barely one hundred and sixty pages, this little story is interesting enough from a character development point of view but lacks substance for plot development. One of the first things I noticed about the book was that the summary on Goodreads alluded to ghosts and Kay's ability to see ghosts. I believe that might be something that will get covered in other books in the series, but this first book does not mention it at all. The Tell-All is a cute, cozy mystery that gives an introduction of the main characters in this series. Kay is a lovable widow in her sixties who is just trying to rebuild her life after the death of her husband. She works part-time for a P.I. she finds a body and a mystery she needs to resolve. She owns a cat named Taco, and her best friend is Daisy. About half of the book is just about presenting these characters, and whatever is left of the book is rushed to explain the mystery. I'm hopeful that the other books will have more room to develop an exciting plot and mystery.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lexxi Kitty

    This is the 25th book that I've read by this author. An odd comment, eh? Libby Howard has published 9 books (ninth might not actually be out yet). So am I counting lots of re-reads? Nope. I'm counting those 24 of her books that had 'Debra Dunbar' on the cover. I've had this book, for free, since March 2018. I do not recall how interested, or not, I was in the book when I had picked it up, but I'd completely forgot its existence until a few days ago when I'd read Dunbar's most recent release and This is the 25th book that I've read by this author. An odd comment, eh? Libby Howard has published 9 books (ninth might not actually be out yet). So am I counting lots of re-reads? Nope. I'm counting those 24 of her books that had 'Debra Dunbar' on the cover. I've had this book, for free, since March 2018. I do not recall how interested, or not, I was in the book when I had picked it up, but I'd completely forgot its existence until a few days ago when I'd read Dunbar's most recent release and saw the ninth book for a series I didn't recognize on Amazon. With Dunbar's name on it. Well the cover had Libby Howard, but the book page had Debra Dunbar. Weird mistake okn Amazon's part, eh? Except, I did a little looking around on the internet and saw a Dunbar blog post noting that she was about to release a book under a pen name. Oddly enough, I already owned that book, and had for more than a year. So then ... This book is more of a straight up cozy mystery book starring a 60 year old recent widow who has a huge house, a cat, and a job at a private investigator agency. Said 60 year old woman: opens the book about to out her house up for sale but gets talked into renting some of her rooms to lodgers, works her job doing detective work via computer (while her boss does the physical type detecting), has a cat & starts picking up 'old woman' habits like trying to sew & the like, while also investigating crimes. Mostly straight forward cozy mystery. Except for the fantasy part. That part is obvious when it's on page to be seen but isn't a huge part of the book or of her life. Mostly. She had cataract surgery, after which she saw, as her eye doctor calls them'floaters'. Though they appear less like floaters and more like shadow people. Who point at things, like dead bodies. Quite interesting story. Rating: 4.3

  8. 5 out of 5

    Pam Mooney

    A fun mystery full of charming characters. I loved the elusive ghosts - possibly there is another book in the works for this series. I enjoyed the comfortable old college buddy boss and skip tracer relationship. It was fun to have teens and room mates and a cat - it just all came together so well. A great mystery and a good read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Haddock

    Wow, this is a winner I wasn't sure I'd get through this book after the first chapter but I got into it fast and for good after that. The book may have a format goof or two, but I loved the characters and story. Well wriitten well paced and well worth reading! The next book is in my sights. Wow, this is a winner I wasn't sure I'd get through this book after the first chapter but I got into it fast and for good after that. The book may have a format goof or two, but I loved the characters and story. Well wriitten well paced and well worth reading! The next book is in my sights.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jody Joy

    Kay is an armature sleuth detective in her little town of Locust point. This was a very good cozy mystery it wasn't like other cozy mysteries, it didn't give away Whodunnit too early into the book. I really enjoyed that. I think that Kay and Judge Beck are going to make a good crime solving team. This won't be my last book I read by Libby Howard Kay is an armature sleuth detective in her little town of Locust point. This was a very good cozy mystery it wasn't like other cozy mysteries, it didn't give away Whodunnit too early into the book. I really enjoyed that. I think that Kay and Judge Beck are going to make a good crime solving team. This won't be my last book I read by Libby Howard

  11. 5 out of 5

    Minx

    As far as a cozy mystery goes this story was not what I was expecting. I liked the main character and her background story. I liked that she had a plausible reason for "sticking her nose where it doesn't belong." What I didn't like was that 50% of the story was getting to know the MC and then the rest of the story was more about the MC with about 25% overall being a mystery which was wrapped up too quickly. Not what I was looking for but it had its charm. As far as a cozy mystery goes this story was not what I was expecting. I liked the main character and her background story. I liked that she had a plausible reason for "sticking her nose where it doesn't belong." What I didn't like was that 50% of the story was getting to know the MC and then the rest of the story was more about the MC with about 25% overall being a mystery which was wrapped up too quickly. Not what I was looking for but it had its charm.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nikk the Sapphired Book Dragon

    I quite enjoyed this start of a new series. IT had a quiet a relaxed pace in the beginning as the stpry was slowly being set up and it seemed to suit the tale but then started to get a little slow towards the middle. Fortunately though it got more interesting again round about the 60 % mark and I flew through the rest of the tale. The mystery wasn't too easy ( nor was it too hard) and I really liked the characters in the story. The set up makes it sound like its going to be quite a fun series. The I quite enjoyed this start of a new series. IT had a quiet a relaxed pace in the beginning as the stpry was slowly being set up and it seemed to suit the tale but then started to get a little slow towards the middle. Fortunately though it got more interesting again round about the 60 % mark and I flew through the rest of the tale. The mystery wasn't too easy ( nor was it too hard) and I really liked the characters in the story. The set up makes it sound like its going to be quite a fun series. There were a few grammatical and typo type errors which detracted from it a little bit but over all this was an enjoyable start to the series and I will definitely be reading on.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Julie Heyneman

    Cozy Infeed This cozy mystery is just that. Being roughly the same age as our main character I can understand her mindset. A woman of character with a sense of what is right and went the extra mile to see that right comes out on top.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tari

    This was a quick and enjoyable read. I really enjoyed that the protagonist, Kay Carrera is a little older, 60 (like me!) to be exact. She's been widowed and her good friend/realtor has suggested that she take on a roommate or two to help pay for her mortgage. Kay had a great job that she loved. She was a skip-chaser for J.T. Pierson Investigating but it alone wouldn't pay her mortgage. So she agree to let her friend Carson send the man over, Judge Nathaniel Beck who had two older kids, a teen gi This was a quick and enjoyable read. I really enjoyed that the protagonist, Kay Carrera is a little older, 60 (like me!) to be exact. She's been widowed and her good friend/realtor has suggested that she take on a roommate or two to help pay for her mortgage. Kay had a great job that she loved. She was a skip-chaser for J.T. Pierson Investigating but it alone wouldn't pay her mortgage. So she agree to let her friend Carson send the man over, Judge Nathaniel Beck who had two older kids, a teen girl and a middle school boy. Judge Beck came and okayed the house, saying yes he would be interested in three rooms but his soon to be ex-wife would need to approve or she wouldn't agree to joint custody. She came and approved as well. In the meantime, the small town of Locust Point has a murder and a scandal both going on. The scandal was that a local woman was brought in on charges of being a madam and word was out that she may release her little black book to get lesser charges. She ended up dead so along with her job duties, Kay started investigating, as she didn't want history to repeat itself and have the wrong person charged for this crime. I thought it was really cool how the judge and his kids quickly became fond of Kay and she was treating them like a grandma. She and her hubby never were able to have kids so it was especially sweet. There is supposed to be a hint of paranormal in this which is in the form of the shadowy floaters Kay was experiencing since cataract surgery but the description of the book wasn't quite the same as what actually happened. Unless that part got edited out, there is nowhere that anyone dead asks for Kay's help. At first I thought maybe the floater was representing Kay's husband Eli keeping a watchful eye out for his beloved wife but again, the description was a little confusing so who knows what happens between the blurb and the edits, right? All that matters is that I really enjoyed this and I'm anxious to see what happens next to my new friends in Locust Point. After all, the judge signed a two-year lease so I hope he and the kids will be in the next books too.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Greg Rothenberger

    I got this book on a whim, because I enjoy cozy mysteries. It turns out this one isn't quite so cozy after all. Still, I enjoyed it very much. Clues are liberally sprinkled throughout the book, so it's not too difficult to figure out who the bad guy is, but it's the characters that really make it. Kay, her boss J.T., and the judge and his family are all really enjoyable to get to know, and I'm looking forward to learning more about them in the next book. My only complaint, and it's not a huge on I got this book on a whim, because I enjoy cozy mysteries. It turns out this one isn't quite so cozy after all. Still, I enjoyed it very much. Clues are liberally sprinkled throughout the book, so it's not too difficult to figure out who the bad guy is, but it's the characters that really make it. Kay, her boss J.T., and the judge and his family are all really enjoyable to get to know, and I'm looking forward to learning more about them in the next book. My only complaint, and it's not a huge one, is that it was such a quick read. At times, it felt rushed and it was over before I realized it or wanted it to be. Recommended for those who enjoy cozy mysteries, but feel ready to tackle something a little less cozy. Reminiscent of an episode of "Murder She Wrote"

  16. 4 out of 5

    Edshara

    This was a fun read. I loved that Kay had some experience in sleuthing, even if she was still an amateur. The subject matter that lead up to the crime was a bit more risqué than I would have expected for a cozy mystery, however it made this more interesting and not so cliche. I was also happy to see that some things, regarding Kay, weren’t all laid out in the first book. I like that it’s set up to share more as the series continues. Some of the sentences and transitions to different topics were a This was a fun read. I loved that Kay had some experience in sleuthing, even if she was still an amateur. The subject matter that lead up to the crime was a bit more risqué than I would have expected for a cozy mystery, however it made this more interesting and not so cliche. I was also happy to see that some things, regarding Kay, weren’t all laid out in the first book. I like that it’s set up to share more as the series continues. Some of the sentences and transitions to different topics were a tad abrupt, as was, the ending. However, I am excited to continue the series.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eden

    2020 bk 367. I enjoyed the character and the long back story, but such a long back story deserved a longer book than the reader had in this story. Libby Howard did a good job of setting up the story, but then I felt like wham, bang, it is over and what happened and why so quickly. I have a feeling that if I ordered the next several books in the series, I would feel as if I had actually read one full length book. As it was, I felt cheated.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bridget Vollmer

    3 1/2 stars. A slower start by picked up half ways through. Interested to see how the next one plays out.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Casey Grist

    This was a good intro to the series! I enjoyed it and shall look forward to the next!

  20. 4 out of 5

    moxieBK

    The Tell All (Locust Point Mystery # 1) — Libby Howard (27 chapters) April 25, 2018 So, I can’t believe I read this in one day. But that made me really happy. I like books that read fast enough, but not so fast that I feel like I’m missing something. The first part of the book seemed really repetitive though. Yeah, I get it: you lost your partner and you feel lost. And there was no mystery until chapter 12 (which was when the paranormal aspect really makes it’s appearance.) The thing I like about t The Tell All (Locust Point Mystery # 1) — Libby Howard (27 chapters) April 25, 2018 So, I can’t believe I read this in one day. But that made me really happy. I like books that read fast enough, but not so fast that I feel like I’m missing something. The first part of the book seemed really repetitive though. Yeah, I get it: you lost your partner and you feel lost. And there was no mystery until chapter 12 (which was when the paranormal aspect really makes it’s appearance.) The thing I like about this ghosty story: it’s not your normal, the ghost: The normal being: s/he looks identical to real life; no, this ghost looks about the way I think ghosts really are: black, blurry figments that may be of our imagination or that may not. I liked that rendering so much better. I also liked how the female protagonist does try different things to move on. Maybe not the way I’ve seen other women her age move on (that aspect in the story is soooo cliché.) I also liked how the family that when moved in, and especially the gentleman, (and even his wife,) gave her a sounding board that she needed. It’s like she suddenly comes to life though being able to have conversations with someone that’s not familiar. I also liked how she could see the real in this guy, even if he can’t quite yet. The presentation of the family and wife was very realistic. I’ve been out of reading for awhile due to family issues. It was nice getting back into it again with this particular story. It was, honestly, the best story for me to read to come back to reading. Yes, the protagonist is a 60-something woman…but you know, it really didn’t read like that to me. It didn’t feel like it was squarely aimed at that target audience. And for that, I am eternally grateful. As to the relationships with the other characters: they all were adequately fleshed out. Enough information, but not too much. The conversations were realistic. I liked how the protagonist didn’t sweep infractions under the rug, and took care of issues head on. (I honestly wish I could be more like her.) In that way, I appreciate the realistic portrayal of actions and consequences from those actions. That is a nice breath of fresh air in a sea of looking the other way books; or not addressing those infractions at all. There were no absent parents here. Even when the one goofed up, she wasn’t really absent. I would definitely read another book in this series. I am curious as to how things will play out with these characters. The humor was on point and came at the right times. I did not notice any glaring typos. I enjoyed the story, except for the rambling for the first several chapters. That might be a turn off for some readers. Overall, I’m glad I stuck through that first part. Tightening that up would’ve gotten another star. Three stars.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    This is a refreshing first-in-series mystery with an over-50 sleuth. Newly widowed Kay Carrera is trying to re-define her life after the death of her husband. She's found a job as a researcher for a PI, adopted a cat, adding new roommates to her Victorian house, and trying to learn how to knit. As she steps cautiously into her new life, she finds herself researching her way through a murder case. While some of the clues Kay finds would certainly be discovered by the police "in real life", her rol This is a refreshing first-in-series mystery with an over-50 sleuth. Newly widowed Kay Carrera is trying to re-define her life after the death of her husband. She's found a job as a researcher for a PI, adopted a cat, adding new roommates to her Victorian house, and trying to learn how to knit. As she steps cautiously into her new life, she finds herself researching her way through a murder case. While some of the clues Kay finds would certainly be discovered by the police "in real life", her role in the case is believable based on who she is. I enjoyed watching her friendship with the Judge and his children develop, and think that they will be interesting characters in other books in the series. I was surprised that the "sees ghosts" angle of the story wasn't played up more than it was - especially given the play it received in the published synopsis -- and the ending of the story seemed very abrupt. Overall, I am interested in the town of Locust Point and its citizens and definitely would consider reading the next installment.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne Taylor

    Lots of fun!! Such a good book!! Well written. The characters were great!! I did not want the book to end and I look forward to reading more in this series.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kat Lebo

    The Tell-All, Locust Point Mystery, #1 by Libby Howard This was a fun, quick read. The main character, Kay, is a new widow. Her husband suffered a debilitating stroke about a decade ago, and passed away just one month prior to the opening of the book. She's still a bit at loose ends; mourning, yet needing to make plans for her future, besides getting herself a companion in the form of a cat named Taco. She knows that she will not be able to keep her home on her income alone, but hates the thought The Tell-All, Locust Point Mystery, #1 by Libby Howard This was a fun, quick read. The main character, Kay, is a new widow. Her husband suffered a debilitating stroke about a decade ago, and passed away just one month prior to the opening of the book. She's still a bit at loose ends; mourning, yet needing to make plans for her future, besides getting herself a companion in the form of a cat named Taco. She knows that she will not be able to keep her home on her income alone, but hates the thought of selling their lovely old Victorian and moving into a small apartment. Her realtor friend recommends that she look to renting out part of the house. She's not 100% sold on the idea, but is given a name and number. Kay has recently had cataract surgery and is having an unusual side effect. She sees ghosts. Oh, she doesn't realize that, and just thinks the amorphous forms she sees in her peripheral vision are large floaters -- but does that explain how one in particular seems to be following her or the cold spots that turn up whenever she sees the form? Through the story, she seems to come to the realization that she is seeing more than a floater in her eye, although that is not stated in the text. Her new tenant is a local judge who is going through a messy divorce, and needs somewhere larger than an apartment for himself and his two children. As Kay's house is a 6-bedroom home with bedrooms on the second and third floors, a fully remodeled basement rec room and movie theater, as well as an office, living room and library, etc. on the first level, the house fits his needs, while still allowing both he and Kay to have their own space. Kay's job as a skip-tracer for a local bail bondsman keeps her busy and engaged in life outside her home. As the Judge is moving in, her work is heating up. Her boss has bonded a local woman who was arrested for running an escort service in the small town of Locust Point. She is refusing to turn over her black book or identify any of the women who work for her. When she turns up missing, the speculation is that she has skipped out on her bond and left the area. However, Kay isn't buying it. When one of her "floaters" seems to be directing her to look in the grassy ravine next to the big box store where she has been shopping, she discovers the woman's body. From there, Kay is obsessed with discovering who killed her and why. The author does a good job of plotting and pacing, with the story flowing along well from start to finish. Her characterizations are well-fleshed out. The editing and proofing leave a bit to be desired 4 spelling errors being easily spotted. The first comes at 297 on my Kindle: "They were narrow, oak, with little brass nobs and old-fashioned keyholes." Unless there was a cribbage board affixed to those doors, I doubt there were nobs. The second is found at 1251: "It was something I hoped would ever happen again." I'm pretty sure there is a missing 'n' in there. The third is at 1336: "...the money was really good but they guys all wanted weird stuff..." They guys? And the worst was the last -- not because it was any worse than the others, but because it occurs in the middle of the big climax scene, taking the reader instantly out of the action. Not a good place for this (at 1964): "...and before I could craw out from under the desk, ..." Sigh. Note to authors. If you are only going to proofread some of the time, make sure the action scenes get the attention. So, good mystery, nice plotting, flow and pacing, consistent and fleshed-out characterizations, likeable characters, plenty of action, and no cliff hanger ending. I'll take it! I think there are a few more books in this series, and I will be looking them up.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Sharpnack

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was a really quick read (less than two hours) and a relatively forgettable little mystery, which really wasn’t much of a mystery, but more a procedural on how to find out anything about a person via his/her social media accounts. Kay is a 60-year-old recent widow. For ten years before her husband died, she’d been his caretaker after an accident which robbed him of his surgeon’s skills and much of their Life. To pay her bills, she works as a skip-tracer for a bail bondsman. Kay had Been a repo This was a really quick read (less than two hours) and a relatively forgettable little mystery, which really wasn’t much of a mystery, but more a procedural on how to find out anything about a person via his/her social media accounts. Kay is a 60-year-old recent widow. For ten years before her husband died, she’d been his caretaker after an accident which robbed him of his surgeon’s skills and much of their Life. To pay her bills, she works as a skip-tracer for a bail bondsman. Kay had Been a reporter before her Husband’s accident, so enjoys her internet sleuthing. However, her job doesn’t pay enough to cover her mortgage. Does she sell or take in boarders? She decides upon boarders. Judge Beck and his two children rent rooms from her and they all become friendly awfully fast. Anyway, more in that plot failing later. Local law enforcement is trying to find the “little black book” of a young Madam whose body Kay finds behind the local MegaMart. Having a sex scandal in town is one thing, but now the Madam was murdered? As this is a very short book, leads arrive in rapid succession, especially after Kay finds a picture of one of the Madam’s parties w/ her teenage boarder in it. Of course, Kay has to tell the girl’s father and give him parenting advice, even though Kay has never been a parent herself. The girl forgives Kay and her father far too quickly for realism. The bad guy is confronted by Kay and the Judge, but it turns out that he is innocent of the sex-play-turned-bad episode that resulted in the Madam’s death. So who was the guilty party? Did the “little black book” turn up? Was it helpful? As I said, this “mystery” is a quick read, mostly b/c I never really felt like part of the story. It started hopefully for me, as the heroine is the right age, has been a caregiver, and recently lost the object of her care, all like me. But Kay’s too-quick friendship w/ the Judge and his kids; her ability to continue her job and grow in friendships even after only losing her husband a month earlier; her ability to find out EVERYTHING she needs about this case all on social media—ALL these plot points feel unrealistic to me. And what the heck is this shadow she keeps seeing out the corner of her eye? According to the blurb, it’s supposed to be a ghost, but this is never explored in the story. I’ll give it 3.5 stars b/c it was a promising start to a series, but didn’t quite get there to me. And a 60-year-old is NOT too old to still want male attention!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    A fun little mystery The Tell All is a fun little mystery reminiscent of Miss Marple. Kay Carrera is sixty years old, recently widowed, and still reeling from the arduous task of caring for her invalid husband for the previous ten years. It seems that Kay woke up one day after the funeral and suddenly realized that she is old. Only she isn't old, not really, but she has no idea how to carry on with her own life now that she is no longer a full time caregiver. So, she tries to do old lady things, A fun little mystery The Tell All is a fun little mystery reminiscent of Miss Marple. Kay Carrera is sixty years old, recently widowed, and still reeling from the arduous task of caring for her invalid husband for the previous ten years. It seems that Kay woke up one day after the funeral and suddenly realized that she is old. Only she isn't old, not really, but she has no idea how to carry on with her own life now that she is no longer a full time caregiver. So, she tries to do old lady things, like getting a cat, taking up knitting, and taking in borders so that she doesn't lose her beloved old house, which really is much too big for one person. The cat is a resounding success, the knitting not so much, and the jury is still out on the borders, the local judge and his teenage children, but things are looking positive so far. Kay has also developed a periodic visual impairment in the form of a moving shadow, usually just at the range of her peripheral vision, which she attributes to her recent cataract surgery. Luckily for Kay, she has her old journalism profession to fall back on, which she leverages to get a job as a researcher for the local skip tracer, who harbors dreams of reality TV stardom. Her work provides her plenty of opportunities to exercise her nosy side in the interests of tracking down bail jumpers and delinquent loan assets for her boss. When the local party planner is arrested for being a closet madame and Kay finds her corpse, Kay's curiosity is peaked when the pieces of the investigation don't add up. The mystery is not completely transparent but it's not a surprise either. Fortunately, right about the time it becomes blatantly obvious who the murderer has to be, Kay reaches the same conclusion and proceeds to do something about it rather than wandering around like a clueless wonder. The characters are enjoyable, if not entirely developed. We get the whole story from Kay's point of view which may contribute somewhat to the lack of depth. All in all, it's an enjoyable if largely straightforward story.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stanley McShane

    Kay Carrera is sixty and a recent widow with no support network of children or grand-children. Facing a silent home, she stops at a local shelter and picks out what appears to be an independent adult cat that shouldn't require a lot of exercise or attention. A journalist prior to being a caregiver for her husband, she has managed to wrangle a position with a local PI as a skip-tracer. It still won't be enough to forestall foreclosure on her beloved Victorian, however, so she accepts the suggesti Kay Carrera is sixty and a recent widow with no support network of children or grand-children. Facing a silent home, she stops at a local shelter and picks out what appears to be an independent adult cat that shouldn't require a lot of exercise or attention. A journalist prior to being a caregiver for her husband, she has managed to wrangle a position with a local PI as a skip-tracer. It still won't be enough to forestall foreclosure on her beloved Victorian, however, so she accepts the suggestion to take on a boarder. Also, she recently had cataract surgery and decides it's time to learn to knit. The eye surgery leaves her with a small, but interesting side effect. Then Kay discovers that her aloof cat, Taco, is actually a thigh buddy in fur. The judge and his baggage might be more than she bargained for, and the knitting isn't going so well. Kay's neighbor, Daisy, is a perfect foil. It's Kay's job, however, that provides the plot for the book when one of her boss's newly installed bail contracts goes missing. It's a cozy mystery. I enjoyed the page-turning information about this widow and how she is coping with her new life. When the plot does heat up, it's a gulper, and you'll have to look at the cover again to remind yourself this is a cozy mystery with a 60 year old protagonist. It is NOT a subject you expected. Nor is it all that difficult to figure out the antagonist. It is the subject that still has me shaking my head. WOW! I did NOT see that coming! And, I couldn't buy the quirky results of Kay's cataract surgery. Still, it's a neat little story and holds your interest to the end. The apparent ghost activity is a twist to the fun, but once the plot gets down to serious business, it wraps up pretty quickly. I liked the way Ms. Howard spins her yarn and as this was the first in a 3-part series would be interested in reading the others. I received this download from Ms. Howard's assistant; thank you Erin! Thoroughly enjoyed the read and can heartily recommend. See my full review on http://rosepointpublishing.com

  27. 4 out of 5

    Leigh Holland

    The Tell All (Locust Point Mystery Book 1) by Libby Howard, 153 pages, July 24th, 2017, Format: Kindle. Genre: Women Sleuths, Ghosts, Mystery. Warning: May Contain Spoilers. Review by Leigh Holland.     A quick and charming read, The Tell All by Libby Howard is a fresh take on the cozy mystery. Kay Carrera is a sixty-year-old widow, having recently lost her husband of many years. Prior to that loss, she dealt with not being able to have kids and her husband’s debilitating illness. Kay’s had some r The Tell All (Locust Point Mystery Book 1) by Libby Howard, 153 pages, July 24th, 2017, Format: Kindle. Genre: Women Sleuths, Ghosts, Mystery. Warning: May Contain Spoilers. Review by Leigh Holland.     A quick and charming read, The Tell All by Libby Howard is a fresh take on the cozy mystery. Kay Carrera is a sixty-year-old widow, having recently lost her husband of many years. Prior to that loss, she dealt with not being able to have kids and her husband’s debilitating illness. Kay’s had some rough life experiences. However, she doesn’t let the past weigh her down. She is determined to move forward and build a renewed life for herself. What makes this a fresh take? Most modern American cozy mysteries jump into the action and plot pretty quickly. Howard gives us time to get to know Kay. Kay doesn’t feel like a stock character by the time the action begins. Kay feels like a real person, heading into a scary and exciting new phase of her life. Other characters are also introduced and we get to know a little more about them before the plot takes off.     Although a few hints and a couple of clues dot the landscape over the first half of the book, the bulk of the investigation takes place over the last half of the pages. In fact, it felt like it was over too fast. The story was believable; the characters relatable. Howard makes it a breeze to sympathize with the main character and her supporting cast. The plot was interesting, although I figured out the solution a bit earlier than I would’ve liked. As for the writing, the engaging style kept me turning the pages, although I did find a couple of minor editing errors in the text.     I’d recommend this one to readers who like cozy mysteries and quick reads of around an hour. I look forward to reading the next book and seeing how Kay’s new life develops.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Tooker

    Full disclosure – I was provided a copy of this book by the author however I have voluntarily chosen to write a review. All opinions are my own A Clean Cozy with a likeable lead character At sixty, Kay Carrera has found herself starting over. With the death of her beloved husband Eli, Kay is now alone in her vintage Victorian in Locust Point. Her job as a skip tracer for a local PI doesn’t quite make enough to pay the mortgage and she just can’t bring herself to sell her family home. At the advice Full disclosure – I was provided a copy of this book by the author however I have voluntarily chosen to write a review. All opinions are my own A Clean Cozy with a likeable lead character At sixty, Kay Carrera has found herself starting over. With the death of her beloved husband Eli, Kay is now alone in her vintage Victorian in Locust Point. Her job as a skip tracer for a local PI doesn’t quite make enough to pay the mortgage and she just can’t bring herself to sell her family home. At the advice of a friend, she grudgingly takes a roommate – a local judge who needs a stable place to live with his two teenage children while going through a divorce. If getting used to her new living arrangement wasn’t bad enough, Kay has also landed herself knee deep in a scandal involving a madam, a dead body and a well-kept secret in a town full of gossips. The Tell All is a clean cozy mystery and the first book I have read by author Libby Howard. Kay is a likeable older lady who is just trying to adjust to life after the death of her husband. Her town Locust Point is one of those sleepy little affairs where there probably isn’t more than 2000 people, and everyone knows everyone else’s business. The story is simplistic, but that is not a bad thing because it is a very easy read. The characters and locations are such that one does not have difficulty envisioning the story. In fact, Locust Point could be in practically any city in the world. Kay could be your neighbor. Judge Beck, Daisy and even Kay’s employer J.T. with his aspirations of landing a reality TV show based on the exciting life of a PI are all very relatable characters who also add a bit of comedy to the story. I really enjoyed The Tell All and may check out the other two titles in this series. I would be interested to see the whole “seeing ghosts” aspect developed a little further as that was an interesting premise but was only barely touched on. Possible in Howard’s later books, this element is fleshed out in more detail. If you like your mysteries clean, with likeable characters and a generous dose of humor, The Tell All would be a good one to try.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis Freeman

    “How many lives do we go through in the course of one?” Having lived in the same house for thirty-five years Kay was now considering selling her home or bringing in a roommate so she could afford to keep her home. Kay Carrera did freelance research for the last ten years which had kept her sane as she cared for her husband after a severe accident and later a stroke leading to his death. Locust Point was a tiny town, but now was shocked with the news of a Madam in town with high-class clients, and “How many lives do we go through in the course of one?” Having lived in the same house for thirty-five years Kay was now considering selling her home or bringing in a roommate so she could afford to keep her home. Kay Carrera did freelance research for the last ten years which had kept her sane as she cared for her husband after a severe accident and later a stroke leading to his death. Locust Point was a tiny town, but now was shocked with the news of a Madam in town with high-class clients, and everyone wanted to discover the details. A local judge was soon to be divorced and shared custody of his two teenagers. With five empty bedrooms, Kay’s home was ideal to rent and establish himself as a settled single dad. Judge Beck moved into an upstairs suite of rooms. This book is an easy read and gives insight into a mature woman’s questioning of her value now that her husband is gone and life is changing. They never had kids and now she is alone except for her one close friend, Daisy. She didn’t feel like an attractive, eligible woman. She didn’t want a man, but she wanted to know her life counted. Kay deals with cataracts, shadowy figures, dark eye-floaters, learning to knit, and a cat. When the accused Madam in town turns up dead, Kay is determined to follow the clues. Throughout the book, Kay’s feelings of insecurity give way to more self -confidence as she learns to relate her new roommate, his teenage children, and the secrets of Locust Point.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carol Caldwell

    Kay's situation hit close to home for me. Her husband suffered an accident and she took care of him for ten years until he died. She had given up everything, hobbies, friends, activities while she did that. While my husband is still alive, I am a caretaker, and I know what it is to give up interests. As I read Kay's thoughts, I tended to put myself in her place, feeling a connection. Now Kay is faced with a huge house she can't afford, but doesn't want to sell, when a friend suggests she take in Kay's situation hit close to home for me. Her husband suffered an accident and she took care of him for ten years until he died. She had given up everything, hobbies, friends, activities while she did that. While my husband is still alive, I am a caretaker, and I know what it is to give up interests. As I read Kay's thoughts, I tended to put myself in her place, feeling a connection. Now Kay is faced with a huge house she can't afford, but doesn't want to sell, when a friend suggests she take in a renter. She does and is faced with not only a strange man in her home, but also his two teenagers. While Kay and her renter are setting up house rules and learning how to live around each other, the author drops in a hint of a "madam" arrested for providing entertainment in a small town where everyone knows everyone else. Kay and her friend Daisy gossip about the goings on, but they know little and do not even suspect what lies in the near future for Kay. The plot moves quickly and with a first person point of view, I learned a lot about Kay. It is easy to read and I wonder where this renter and his teens will take her.

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