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When Are You Going to Get a Proper Job?: Parenting and the Creative Muse

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"Drawing pictures all day. Nice work if you can get it, eh? I suppose you haven't had so much time to focus on a proper career..." This witty, insightful graphic novel explores the challenges faced by artists in today's society, through the life of a comics creator named Tariq. Creative block is the least of Tariq's worries, as he struggles to be a `good enough' father whil "Drawing pictures all day. Nice work if you can get it, eh? I suppose you haven't had so much time to focus on a proper career..." This witty, insightful graphic novel explores the challenges faced by artists in today's society, through the life of a comics creator named Tariq. Creative block is the least of Tariq's worries, as he struggles to be a `good enough' father while pursuing a career that is underpaid and underappreciated. Swapping notes with other parents in creative professions, and driven by his artistic muse, Tariq maps out a plan for making his art and his other responsibilities work together in harmony - most of the time.


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"Drawing pictures all day. Nice work if you can get it, eh? I suppose you haven't had so much time to focus on a proper career..." This witty, insightful graphic novel explores the challenges faced by artists in today's society, through the life of a comics creator named Tariq. Creative block is the least of Tariq's worries, as he struggles to be a `good enough' father whil "Drawing pictures all day. Nice work if you can get it, eh? I suppose you haven't had so much time to focus on a proper career..." This witty, insightful graphic novel explores the challenges faced by artists in today's society, through the life of a comics creator named Tariq. Creative block is the least of Tariq's worries, as he struggles to be a `good enough' father while pursuing a career that is underpaid and underappreciated. Swapping notes with other parents in creative professions, and driven by his artistic muse, Tariq maps out a plan for making his art and his other responsibilities work together in harmony - most of the time.

41 review for When Are You Going to Get a Proper Job?: Parenting and the Creative Muse

  1. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I almost passed this book by. The thought of another self-help book, telling how to raise your kids. Please, I am so over that, and besides, my kid is grown and out the door. But then, I read the description, that this was a graphic novel take on it, and then I read the book itself, and fell in love with Tariq and is little fiery muse. This story is so close to how it is for any freelancer, who wants to do some sort of art for their own pleasure. As someone who writes, it is hard to find the time I almost passed this book by. The thought of another self-help book, telling how to raise your kids. Please, I am so over that, and besides, my kid is grown and out the door. But then, I read the description, that this was a graphic novel take on it, and then I read the book itself, and fell in love with Tariq and is little fiery muse. This story is so close to how it is for any freelancer, who wants to do some sort of art for their own pleasure. As someone who writes, it is hard to find the time to do the art form you enjoy while raising kids. The voices that discuss this, and the actions that happen to Tariq in the book, reflect all the different ways to solve this problem. I like the solutions demonstrated, and enjoyed reading the story as well. Well done. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'When Are You Going to Get a Proper Job?: Parenting and the Creative Muse' with words and art by Richy K. Chandler is a graphic novel about the challenges of having a creative muse and limited time to do anything with it. Tariq is a stay at home dad. His wife holds down a good job and Tariq loves his daughter. Tariq is also trying to get his career as an artist going, but with the demands of parenting, he has little time to be creative. This book is his character working that out with other peopl 'When Are You Going to Get a Proper Job?: Parenting and the Creative Muse' with words and art by Richy K. Chandler is a graphic novel about the challenges of having a creative muse and limited time to do anything with it. Tariq is a stay at home dad. His wife holds down a good job and Tariq loves his daughter. Tariq is also trying to get his career as an artist going, but with the demands of parenting, he has little time to be creative. This book is his character working that out with other people and himself. It's an interesting inner monologue between this character and his creative muse. At no point does he consider letting parenting take a back seat, and I applaud that. He does find some creative solutions. The art wasn't my favorite, but it worked for the story. I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Singing Dragon, Jessica Kingsley Publishers, and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  3. 5 out of 5

    David Jenkins

    A series of short comics about the difficulties of raising a child, family life and trying to be an artist but most of it could apply to other creatives equally. The stories cover all the different aspects of family life competing with creativity from little distractions to kid’s sick days and in laws having a go at you for not being a breadwinner. The fact that the artist is male as well gives it an added depth as it challenges the perception of how society looks at stay at home parents. This i A series of short comics about the difficulties of raising a child, family life and trying to be an artist but most of it could apply to other creatives equally. The stories cover all the different aspects of family life competing with creativity from little distractions to kid’s sick days and in laws having a go at you for not being a breadwinner. The fact that the artist is male as well gives it an added depth as it challenges the perception of how society looks at stay at home parents. This is an inspirational book where Tariq (the artist) rather than letting the obstacles get him done, accepts and tries to adapt to them for instance when the school is closed due to a burst water pipe he takes his daughter to an art museum and they draw together that way he doesn’t feel like he’s ostracising her. While the book dialogue sounds like a self-help book at parts the inclusion of a creative Muse spirit creature makes it more a work of fiction. The Muse is an interesting character in that he’s occasionally helpful, easily agitated a bit in the beginning and at times depressive. In other words, he’s a lot more human than Tariq who seems too nice but also subdued kind of like Cleveland from Family Guy. The narration squares whilst telling us what people like and seeming a bit obtrusive are good at demonstrating quickly how everyone is different just like the splash page (last page) of Tariq’s Turn to Talk story where it has everyone with their Muses. Like the stories and use of Muses themselves, the layout is interesting like the part of the story Survival Guide To Working From Home With Kids with the different aspects of living at home drawn with a background of a house and the words following all around the house with the images. The different appearances of Tariq’s Muse to exemplify his feelings and help Tariq are amusing like the Genie from Aladdin he transforms himself into everything from a calculator to a ladder. I’ve not seen such a variety of backgrounds before in a comic but it works as it’s about showing how Tariq sees the world and his daughter’s drawings. It also distracts from the self-help element dialogue and narration which makes it more readable. One final note on the art is it’s a bit simplistic for my liking with its blocky figures but the backgrounds and the colours can’t be faulted as they suit the story perfectly. Overall, this is a unique comic with its self-help truthful stories which inspire and are told in an imaginative art style.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    ‘When Are You Going To Get a Proper Job’ is the touching and charming story of Tariq – a stay-at-home parent trying to pursue his ambitions of being a brilliant Dad and achieving creative success. Tariq suffers from all the standard work-life balance issues that parenting brings and is further troubled by the unique challenges of a creative career. Eventually, through the encouragement and affirmation of like-minded friends, creative solutions to his own problems, alongside the ever-reliable tric ‘When Are You Going To Get a Proper Job’ is the touching and charming story of Tariq – a stay-at-home parent trying to pursue his ambitions of being a brilliant Dad and achieving creative success. Tariq suffers from all the standard work-life balance issues that parenting brings and is further troubled by the unique challenges of a creative career. Eventually, through the encouragement and affirmation of like-minded friends, creative solutions to his own problems, alongside the ever-reliable trick of getting more organised, Tariq begins to achieve his ambitions. The comic strip format skips along at an effective pace and is regularly and imaginatively broken up with full-page and double-page illustrations. A close-up of Tariq’s own visual representations of his time-management challenges and a double-page survival guide to working at home with kids were both highlights for me. Whilst Tariq’s daughter Natasha is suitably delightful and Chris, the corporate executive, is an amusing anti-creative, my favourite character is Malcolm, Tariq’s creative muse, a floating-fireball companion and thought-bubble alternative who is always on hand to remind Tariq to return to creative pursuits amid every parenting demand. In these examples, and others, Chandler’s own abundant creativity and imagination is seen. This compact book could easily be misconstrued as a quick read, taking less than 30 minutes to complete, but in reality much, much longer is needed to absorb and appreciate the wonderful and considerable artistic endeavour that has gone into it. Whilst creative parents everywhere will relate to this beautifully-presented story, this isn’t a book just for them or indeed just for parents. It’s a heart-warming and remarkably-gripping tale of triumph over adversity.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

    The author/artist didn't write this from his own personal experience, but from interviews with artist-parents – and I think it shows. It feels quite surface-level, and doesn't delve deep into any of the issues. The solutions offered felt simplistic, and might work as a bandage in the short term but don't actually change anything. The art really wasn't to my taste either. I think this book might offer some soothing short-term solutions to overwhelmed artist-parents, but for me it felt far too lig The author/artist didn't write this from his own personal experience, but from interviews with artist-parents – and I think it shows. It feels quite surface-level, and doesn't delve deep into any of the issues. The solutions offered felt simplistic, and might work as a bandage in the short term but don't actually change anything. The art really wasn't to my taste either. I think this book might offer some soothing short-term solutions to overwhelmed artist-parents, but for me it felt far too light.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cherish

    Another great and interesting read. I found it intruiging to read about Tariq's life and how it evolves throughout the book. The various tips and pointers on how to improve your creativity when you have a family I believe were very useful. I hope to use them in the future. Another thing that I found hilarious was Tariq's muse Malcom. He made laugh a lot. Loooool! Another great and interesting read. I found it intruiging to read about Tariq's life and how it evolves throughout the book. The various tips and pointers on how to improve your creativity when you have a family I believe were very useful. I hope to use them in the future. Another thing that I found hilarious was Tariq's muse Malcom. He made laugh a lot. Loooool!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    Related to it as an artist, not so much as a parent (because I'm not one). Though the parts about balancing your work and parenting were insightful (and a bit discouraging if I'm being honest), especially since at some point in the far off distant future that might probably be me. Remove those parts (even though I know they're the point of the book) and it's a good look at the life of a freelancer. Just because you don't have kids of your own doesn't mean you won't have to deal with people (or th Related to it as an artist, not so much as a parent (because I'm not one). Though the parts about balancing your work and parenting were insightful (and a bit discouraging if I'm being honest), especially since at some point in the far off distant future that might probably be me. Remove those parts (even though I know they're the point of the book) and it's a good look at the life of a freelancer. Just because you don't have kids of your own doesn't mean you won't have to deal with people (or their kids) who demand your attention because "You're not really working." Often times the muses have to be put on hold just because, to some people, not going out to a place of work means availability and this makes a great point of that. I received this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Francescadare

  9. 4 out of 5

    ArchaeoLibraryologist

  10. 5 out of 5

    Serena Badesha

  11. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Tanudirdja

  12. 4 out of 5

    Christy

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ket

  14. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Noe

  15. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dre

  17. 5 out of 5

    Betty

  18. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Fantom

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kat

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andra

  23. 5 out of 5

    NormaCenva

  24. 5 out of 5

    Charissa Rate

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  26. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  27. 5 out of 5

    Melly Mel

  28. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Kennedy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Muscat

  30. 5 out of 5

    Carol McFarlane

  31. 4 out of 5

    Todd Rumsey

  32. 5 out of 5

    Michael MacKinnon

  33. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Hohler

  34. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Bradley

  35. 4 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  36. 5 out of 5

    Lana

  37. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Reader

  38. 4 out of 5

    Alexandria

  39. 4 out of 5

    Chandra Fry

  40. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

  41. 5 out of 5

    Marissa

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