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The stories of H. P. Lovecraft have been a source of fascination for readers since they were published in the early twentieth century, and legions of fans continue to reinvent his dark and fantastical world to this day. This collection of short stories by the master of the macabre contains more than a dozen of his most popular works, including -The Call of Cthulhu,- -The S The stories of H. P. Lovecraft have been a source of fascination for readers since they were published in the early twentieth century, and legions of fans continue to reinvent his dark and fantastical world to this day. This collection of short stories by the master of the macabre contains more than a dozen of his most popular works, including -The Call of Cthulhu,- -The Shadow Over Innsmouth,- and -The Dunwich Horror.- Each story will leave the reader feeling unsettled and uncertain, but also appreciative of the unique elements that Lovecraft introduced to the literary world.


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The stories of H. P. Lovecraft have been a source of fascination for readers since they were published in the early twentieth century, and legions of fans continue to reinvent his dark and fantastical world to this day. This collection of short stories by the master of the macabre contains more than a dozen of his most popular works, including -The Call of Cthulhu,- -The S The stories of H. P. Lovecraft have been a source of fascination for readers since they were published in the early twentieth century, and legions of fans continue to reinvent his dark and fantastical world to this day. This collection of short stories by the master of the macabre contains more than a dozen of his most popular works, including -The Call of Cthulhu,- -The Shadow Over Innsmouth,- and -The Dunwich Horror.- Each story will leave the reader feeling unsettled and uncertain, but also appreciative of the unique elements that Lovecraft introduced to the literary world.

30 review for H. P. Lovecraft Tales of Horror

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Compendiums are tough, man. Don’t know what I was thinking, starting off the New Year with one, but I do own a number of them and have never actually finished one. So this brings me a sense of achievement. It also made me realise that if you read almost all of Lovecraft’s stories in one go, you can’t expect to remember the plots of every one. So here’s my pro tip for reading this book: don’t rush through it. Take your time, and space them out. Now to the review: What I like about Lovecraft The slow Compendiums are tough, man. Don’t know what I was thinking, starting off the New Year with one, but I do own a number of them and have never actually finished one. So this brings me a sense of achievement. It also made me realise that if you read almost all of Lovecraft’s stories in one go, you can’t expect to remember the plots of every one. So here’s my pro tip for reading this book: don’t rush through it. Take your time, and space them out. Now to the review: What I like about Lovecraft The slow-burn dread. The cosmic horror. That realisation that you’re just this tiny little spec in a world which is ruled by these Elder Gods that you can’t fathom. These cosmic and terrible things, some of which can’t even be described properly. There is no doubt he has been incredibly influential. He inspired Ridley Scott, Stephen King and Neil Gaiman. I think they even named a fossil after Cthulhu. That’s a big deal. What I don’t like about Lovecraft The casual racism. Yes, Lovecraft was a product of his time, and his time was exceedingly racist. But for a modern reader, it’s exactly this sort of thing which pulls you out of the story. I remember reading “The Rats in the Walls”, and thinking, “heck, this is pretty creepy. I would have actually enjoyed this story if it weren’t for the fact that every time I read the name he gave his damned black cat, I did a double take.” Look it up, cause I’m not willing to repeat it here. And it’s a fecking weird name to give your cat anyway! Favourite story: The Shadow Over Innsmouth When people start off a list of top Lovecraft stories, they usually list The Call of Cthulhu, or The Dunwich Horror. Both are great stories, but my favourite is The Shadow Over Innsmouth. I read it for the first time in high school, and I remember enjoying it back then too. It’s definitely in my top Lovecraft stories list. The main downside is the length of the dialogue. There is a LOT of exposition. For example the ticket office agent at the station goes into a spiel on the background to Innsmouth, which goes on for 5 PAGES (he must have zero customers). And when the main character meets old Zadok Allen, his spiel goes on for 8 PAGES (in an accent)! It’s not easy reading, so maybe it helped that I used an audiobook. I did enjoy the twist at the end though, and this is one of the charms of Lovecraft’s better stories. He pulls off the twists well. Pleasant surprise: The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath I want to drop this one in here as another story which I enjoyed. Not a top pick, but I think it stood out. And it may be a weird choice to most people (including Lovecraft himself), but I liked it. It was the one story where I didn’t mind Lovecraft’s verboseness, and actually thought it worked in his favour. It was dreamy, it was surreal, it had an army of cats and a little cat general, and made me think of Murakami and all the cats in his stories. Maybe it’s also the fact that it was a departure from the usual Lovecraftian form. It had its own unique charm, but I don’t think it’s for everyone. Least Favourite: At the Mountains of Madness I just know this is going to be a controversial view because ATMOM is listed as one of the top Lovecraft stories. Now, I didn’t actually take notes as I went along, and given that there are plenty of short stories in this mammoth book, it is not inconceivable that there was one (or more) stories that I disliked more than ATMOM. However, ATMOM was the only story I didn’t finish. And not for a lack of effort. Let me explain. Back in law school, I had this professor right? He taught EU law. No doubt he knew what he was talking about, but for some reason whenever he started on a lecture, I’d zone out within two minutes. Without fail. Every single time. I once asked him a question, and then zoned out during his response WHILE LOOKING DIRECTLY AT HIM! I have no explanation for why this always happened, but it did. That is exactly what happened with this story. I cannot even count the number of times I started it, got part of the way through, and then realised I hadn’t been paying attention. And it genuinely surprises me because I was sure I’d love it! Arctic exploration leads to lost civilisation steeped in unexplained and terrifying secrets – it’s right up my alley! And yet ATMOM just didn’t work for me. The story got lost in all the detail. Our narrator Dyer is the last person I’d ever want to have a conversation with, because it would probably go something like this: Me: So Dyer, tell me about the weird shit that happened to you in Antarctica. Dyer: Very well, but you must promise to never go there! Me: Yeah, sure. Dyer: We set sail from Boston Harbour on September 2, 19:30. We established a base above the glacier in Latitude 86 degrees 7 minutes, East Longitude 174 degrees 23 minutes… Me: Mate, if you don’t want me to go there, why you giving me coordinates? Dyer: Lake went off and found some strange fossils. We heard about it on the radio. Me: Ooh, okay, tell me about those! Dyer: But I should first describe these Mountains of Madness Me: You’ve been describing them for the past 2 hours. Can we move the story along a little bit? Dyer: And the eldritch horrors in cyclopean cities mentioned in the dreaded Necronomicon of the “Mad Arab” Abdul Alhazred. Me: Has everyone read that damned book? Godsdammit man, what did you SEE in those “Mountains of Madness”?? Dyer: No, don’t distract me. The proper way to tell a story is to give an hour by hour account. So as I was saying, at 4 pm on September 3rd…etc. etc. Lord give me strength... This was definitely one of those plots with waaaay too much padding. If Dyer wanted to warn people off sending a follow-up expedition to Antarctica, the verbose git should have done so in fewer words! Maybe I’ll try ATMOM again sometime in the future, and maybe next time I’ll enjoy it. But at present, it’s my least favourite story in the compendium. Having said that, as a compendium, this was pretty comprehensive. It doesn't include all of Lovecraft's stories, but it does have all the important ones, and it is a pretty book to boot!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael Burnam-Fink

    It's with some dismay that I realized that I didn't actually own any H.P. Lovecraft, and this from a guy who doodled Elder Signs over all his high school notebooks. While his works are public domain, there's something to be said for physical books. This Canterbury Classics edition comes with a beautiful leather binding, an iridescent octopus on the cover, gold leaf pages, and an introduction giving an overview of his life and work. Inside are 26 short stories, arranged in chronological order, an It's with some dismay that I realized that I didn't actually own any H.P. Lovecraft, and this from a guy who doodled Elder Signs over all his high school notebooks. While his works are public domain, there's something to be said for physical books. This Canterbury Classics edition comes with a beautiful leather binding, an iridescent octopus on the cover, gold leaf pages, and an introduction giving an overview of his life and work. Inside are 26 short stories, arranged in chronological order, and covering the essential Lovecraft: The Call of Cthulhu, At the Mountains of Madness, The Shadow over Innsmouth, etc. Reading them all in order is a burden. Early Lovecraft is not great, little gothick tinglers that require much faith and imagination from the reader that this is horrifying. When he hits his stride, Lovecraft is every bit as good as his titanic reputation deserves. The later stories contrast the growing insanity of their narrators against the dizzying cosmological nihilism of deep time, and the ancient civilizations of Elder Things and Old Ones and Mi Go and Deep Ones who once warred over Earth, and who's remnants trouble our dreams. Selling an collection of free stories is always a little tricky, but this is worth it for the physical qualities of the binding, and for a strong editorial voice. A little bigger than the "core" Lovecraft, a little more portable than the "complete" Lovecraft, this is a great collection for any fan.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    At times difficult to read due to the dense prose, but it is really interesting to know what a wide influence H.P. Lovecraft has had on modern day literature, movies and video games. By far my favorite story in the anthology was The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath. Minor spoilers, but it has a cat army. Cat. Army.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    These are not bedtime stories! You would no sooner read them to your children than you’d read “Murders in the Rue Morgue.” ( Oh, wait, my Dad actually did read that awful story to us!) At any rate, H. P. Lovecraft was certainly the soul brother of Poe. And his stories are even more fantastical and gruesome. I don’t recommend reading them late at night, especially if you have trouble sleeping.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Mitofsky

    This was one of the most challenging books I have ever read. Lovecraft certainly has a very unique and detailed writing style that makes getting through his stories an arduous, though fun, task. It is easy to see Lovecraft’s influence on current horror novels and movies. While some of these stories were a bit out there, they were all fun and entertaining to read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Fabienne

    These reviews are merely my own opinion and may vary strongly from others. Warning! Although I aim (!) to give no large/direct/essential spoilers, I always recommend first reading the story yourself, even just for the sake of gaining your own opinion first. For anyone aiming to read through the whole collection from beginning to end (like I did too), I strongly recommend reading other books at the same time so you can switch it up and start each story with a fresh mind. Otherwise, Lovecraft can These reviews are merely my own opinion and may vary strongly from others. Warning! Although I aim (!) to give no large/direct/essential spoilers, I always recommend first reading the story yourself, even just for the sake of gaining your own opinion first. For anyone aiming to read through the whole collection from beginning to end (like I did too), I strongly recommend reading other books at the same time so you can switch it up and start each story with a fresh mind. Otherwise, Lovecraft can become very very Lovecraftian and predictable. The sad truth about Lovecraft's work, is that his xenophobia shows from it (as it does from modern humanity all the same, just in a more "politically correct" form - according to our current standards). Every time I read a passage containing xenophobic content, I pauze, sigh at Lovecraft and the world we live in, and continue. You could start a new hobby, just picking out these references (someone probably already did). I have enough hobbies though. Therefore, this note goes for many, if not all Lovecraft stories. Let us hope that humanity grows up at some point.. The same can be said of his misogyny showing at times. Ironically, Lovecraft (p. 142) may have unintentionally explained his own bias in one of his tales (Cool Air): "... the abnormal always excites aversion, distrust, and fear." Where I define '(ab)normal' as 'most frequent' in Lovecraft's social contacts. I.e. what deviates from Lovecraft's personal perspective of "normal". His trademark writing using the "fear of the unknown" can be seen from a whole different perspective too.. (again referring to Lovecraft's own 'known' social contacts and his cultural background). Dagon: * Since I read Lovecraft's collection of short horror stories in chronological order, as presented in this version, this first story sadly made me doubt if I should have bought it after all. As some others agree: it misses a "punch". The first paragraph, which I read in the bookstore before I bought the book, is promising but sadly didn't develop much. A common risk of short stories, I'd say. Statement of Randolf Carter: *** Similar to Dagon and most other Lovecraft stories, this story revolves around a monstrosity from another world and/or age. The big difference to Dagon, in my opinion, is the increased suspense and more scary setting (some weird cemetery during nighttime). Also, the reader is "exposed" to the monster - be it indirectly, through the communication with Warren while he is down in the tomb - more intensely and for a longer period of time. The fact that Carter lost his consciousness in the middle of his horrible situation until he woke up in the hospital also gave me an uneasy feeling, which I didn't experience reading Dagon, even though that main character also fainted. Like Dagon, however, it didn't stick with me very long after the read, so I felt like there is still room for more. The Cats of Ulthar: **** If found this story quite different from the other two I read so far. It struck me with its creative theme and plot and I thus found it very amusing to read. Although I found it less "scary" than 'The Statement of Randolf Carter', probably mainly due to the setting (mainly daytime in a village as opposed to nighttime in a cemetary) and perspective (third-person as opposed to first-person), its creative plot stuck with me much longer. I liked it so much that I had my most beknown cat-lover friend read it immediately after and, that way, conducted my own little act of horror. The Temple: ***** By the time I read this story, the doubts I had during the first two stories completely dissolved, and this tale became one of my favorites. During my thus-far short curriculum of horror stories, it became definite that setting is very important to me: the mysterious and increasingly dark underwater world, especially as perceived from a submarine, fed my anxiety throughout the read. To me, this story combined the positive points of the previous tales in one: creative theme and plot (following a German W.W. I commander on duty in a submarine ensuring the reader's downright apathy and hate towards him and his deeds/views, while from that wicked starting point still aiming/managing to gain the readers "sympathy" for the horrors he endures), scary setting (dark, undiscovered, deep underwater world) and first-person perspective. The single starting sentence "Manuscript found on the coast of Yucatan", also does a lot with just a few words. The Picture in the House: *** Again a story with a setting that starts off my nerves immediately. To me, the strength of this tale lies with its seemingly realistic plot, through which I was able identify myself with the unlucky stranded traveler. Only as the story develops, strange things seem to be occurring at the house, of which only a part refers to supernatural occurances. Sadly, the actual end, especially in contrast to its well built story, seems hurried and random. The Outsider: **** As this is one of Lovecraft most famous tales, I might have had a biased start. It started exciting, with the mysterious, seemingly eternal, hermit-existence of the first-person in a ever dark world without others. When she/he (?) discovers the reason for her/his sole and dark world and existence, I was flabbergasted and felt like the story developed to its celebrated fame. Sadly, the storyline of her/his dark world was not pursued. Lovecraft took another turn, which to me was much less exiting and seemed clear in the beginning of the story after Lovecraft deemed it necessary to note that: "My aspect was a matter equally unthought of, for there were no mirrors in the castle, and I merely regarded myself by instinct as akin to the youthful figures I saw drawn and painted in the books." I read Frankenstein just before I started Lovecraft and I can see that it is supposed that he may have been influenced by Mary Shelley's story. The Music of Erich Zann: **** Seen by Lovecraft as one of his best works, and I understand why. The mysterious notes urged by Zann's violin alone fed into my imagination of some horrible experimental classical music which I have heard at some point prior to this read. The suspense is well-balanced and although the horrors which haunt Zann remain vague, this underexplicitness works well without the story losing its "punch", in my opinion. Herbert West - Reanimator: **** Another Frankenstein inspired story by Lovecraft, but with a great and different way of addressing the topic of (re)animation. The story relates to the Frankenstein story in more aspects than just the theme, though. The main anxiety of doctor West and doctor Frankenstein is also the same: fearing that their creation(s) will return to do more harm, resulting into paranoia. It is nice to read another story with some more body (literally), although Lovecraft seems to summarize a bit too frequently for my taste - i.e. in the first paragraphs of each new chapter. The Lurking Fear****: The "Martense" family name sounded strangely familiar. It didn't take long until I realized why, as Lovecraft reveals that the family is of Dutch origin, like myself. It didn't immediately hit me, because I only know people by the name of Martens (like our star football player Lieke Martens) - without the E. Anyways, trivia aside, the quality of this story mainly lies in the long suspense before Lovecraft reveals what exactly is "lurking". The fact that he develops a more detailed background story to this "entity", made it even more exciting to read. For me, a solid four-star story. The rats in the walls***: After reading more and more of Lovecraft I seem to reach a point in each tale where I feel like it going the same or similar way as some of the other stories; this one reminding me strongly of 'The Lurking Fear', and ofcouse 'The Cats of Ulthar'. Nevertheless, Lovecraft so far always manages to leave me surprised at the stories' next turn and brings new horrifying aspects into the story. This is also true for this tale, in my opinion. However, I did struggle with understanding all of his texts in the middle of the showdown in the end (I'm not a native speaker). I thus had to re-read the plot summary on Wikipedia to fully understand the unraveling of the myth of The Priory, which took away some of the impact (which is the main reason for the 3 stars). Some of it. But by far, not all. On the upside, though, now I also know that Lovecraft argued that the story was "suggested by a very commonplace incident—the cracking of wall-paper late at night, and the chain of imaginings resulting from it". And I thought I my thoughts dwell easily. The Festival**: I felt like this story was promising its build-up and the setting was appealing to me. Although it has a bit more "punch" in its closing than, say, 'Dagon', I feel like it still missed some body in the end where the narrator's escape seems simplified. But then again, it is a short story. The Shunned House****: This tale gripped me. Especially in its showdown, of course. I feel like Lovecraft really shows his strength when the stories are just about long enough to develop fully and, thus, the end is - unlike in some of his shorter stories - not rushed. I am not sure whether or not it is a good or bad thing, that I haven't read Dracula (or anything similar) before though. In The Vault****: This tale has an exciting setting, following a careless undertaker in his work. This is also the first time (following the chronology of this book) Lovecraft clearly shows a moral lesson to be learnt by the unlucky main character: karma! Karma gets Mr. Undertaker into trouble in the first place ("For the long-neglected latch was obviously broken, leaving the careless undertaker trappen in the vault, a victim of his own oversight.") and finally makes his unlucky experience into a real horror trauma! Even though  I would count this story as one of the short ones I've read so far, the ending is extensive and nicely done. Really happy about that! Cool Air***: I've noted in a quite a few reviews so far, that setting seems to be very important to me in a horror tale. In the second paragraph of Cool Air, Lovecraft argues against this: "It is a mistake to fancy that horror is associated inextricably with darkness, silence, and solitude." Although I see how this is true for the narrator in Cool Air, her/his experiences with her/his upstairs neighbour being truly horrifying, it is not the same for a reader who knows they are reading fiction 😉 Nevertheless, the plot of this short story excited me enough to give it three stars. The Call of The Cthulhu: *** Knowling that this book is core to Lovecraft's modern fame and his mythos, I had a biased start (again). After having read quite a few Lovecraft stories now, this one does not seem to stand out as much as I'd had hoped. I am very curious, however, how the whole Cthulhu mythos comes together as I read the rest of the stories in this bundle, which is also one of the reasons for giving it some stars nonetheless. For some reason, it reminds me most of (my experience of) the Dagon tale (see review above). However, here, the open-ended plot does work very well! Pickman's Model: **** For some reason, I loved to see Lovecraft use a different story-telling perspective in this tale: someone telling a friend or other significant other their Lovecraftian horror experience without stating the other's reactions explicitly (like hearing one speak on the phone). Again, the setting in an old cellar at night did a lot for me and is clearly repeated by Lovecraft in other stories. I liked how the storyteller in this tale expressed their horror AND admiration for Picman's work simultaneously. The Dream-Quest Of Unknown Kadath: **** Reactions to this novella seem to be either very negative or very positive. For someone who is just starting to get to know the world of Lovecraft, this tale helps piecing together a lot of info from other stories I have so far read (for example, Pickman's Model and The Cats of Ulthar which I also liked). I personally like (or even love) travelogues - something which is sometimes seen as a con to this story. The story also had a nicely rounded off ending and could be read as a way of saying: "be thankful for what you have" (especially since Lovecraft himself had next-to-nothing during his life). As a 'horror' story, however, I have to confirm Lovecraft's own doubt: "[...] the very plethora of weird imagery may have destroyed the power of any one image to produce the desired impression of strangeness" (H.P. Lovecraft, Selected Letters vol. 2, pp. 94-95). Also, this story is indeed almost 'unreadable' at times. A free audio book on YouTube (HorrorBabble) helped me through some though sections in no time. The Case of Charles Dexter Ward: ***** I truly adored this novella, even though Lovecraft himself did not agree at the time he wrote it. Having more body, it is built up strongly and had quite a few moment when the many pieces come together excitingly - although I must say that some can be expected when knowing Lovecraft's mythos. The story's plot tended to remind me of "The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" by Stevenson, and the portrait scenes hinted at "The Picture of Dorian Grey" by Oscar Wilde. Funny note - Wilde is actually referenced to when describing how Curwen (one of the main characters) was attempted to be forgotten: "It can be compared in spirit only to the hush that lay on Oscar Wilde's name a decade after his disgrace [...]." p. 299. The Colour Out of Space: *** This was Lovecraft's personal favorite story of his writing, and many critics agree with him. I definitely enjoy the story, like I do most of Lovecraft's writing, but it does not make my favorite. Sorry, Howard. Then again, I did like stories Lovecraft himself thought were poor (e.g. 'The Dream Quest Of Unknown Kadath' and 'The Case of Charles Dexter Ward'). Maybe it is because I am getting used to Lovecraft's way of writing, that his usage of "fear of the unknown" is not always enough. Either way, I liked that Lovecraft incorporated something that we cannot imagine: the idea of a colour out of our spectrum. The Dunwich Horror: **** I am happy that I've read quite a bit of Lovecraft by this time, so that I could enjoy this tale to the fullest and understand more and more about the Lovecraft Mythos. I liked the start and introduction to the Dunwich town a lot: "When a traveler in North Central Massachusetts takes the wrong fork at the junction [...] he comes upon a lonely and curious country." (p. 396) After which Lovecraft described the indescribable uneasiness one would experience passing the road there and then concludes with: "Afterward one sometimes learns that one has been through Dunwich" (p. 397). Which is a scary thought to me after having read the Dunwich Horror, of course. This story again pieces together some of the (apparently many) demonic efforts of some to bring back the things of horror from another time and space. "Man rules now where They ruled once; They shall soon rule where man rules now." (p. 408) Finally, I understand the chanting of Yog-Sothoth in the incantations I have seen in other stories.. The Whisperer in Darkness: **** Another typical Lovecraftian setting, with (too) curious scientists and their love for discovery. I kept thinking: 'Akeley, stop nosing around, you stubborn son of a gun.' The reason Lovecraft presented for Akeley staying at his farm while being attacked by frigging Aliens all the time ("its his long-time home"), was a bit poor and made me convinced he brought this on himself. Nonetheless, I really liked the ending on this one. It was a pleasure to see how our Wilmarth discoveres with whom he had met: the one who "shall put on the semblance of men, the waxen mask and the robe that hides" (as Wikipedia describes it).. At the Mountains of Madness: ** If you are looking for something like an enceclopedia about the origin Lovecraftian entities - this is your find. Sadly, however, the story is slow. Very slow. I do like the travel-log style and setting, but that comes from my personal preference for travel stories. The Shadow over Innsmouth: **** This story really grew on me. While I thought it had a slow start, it seems to increase in velocity and thrill throughout. I was really feeling the tension when our main character was being pursued and the ending was really well done. The on the down side, though, I have to conclude that dialog really isn't Lovecraft's strength.. The Dreams in the Witch House: **** I am really happy about the chosen chronology of the selection of tales in this book - this story follows up "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" perfectly. Both stories grew on me. This one I specifically liked because Lovecraft finally describes a direct horror confrontation with more "earthly fears" (e.g. fighting and strangling). The Thing on the Doorstep: *** This one reminded me a lot of "Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" by Stevenson, which I liked about as much as this Lovecraftian story. The interconnected background from the Cthulhu mythos I've read so far makes it that much more exciting to read! Sadly, Lovecraft is back on his superiority-rant here. This time tackling women - probably as a reaction to his recent devorce at the time he wrote this story. "This explains why The Thing on the Doorstep is one of the few Lovecraft stories with a major female-presenting character, and also why it’s so unreservedly misogynistic. Not only do we get Ephraim-as-Asenath’s rants about the inferiority of the female brain, but when one looks closer, women in this story are almost entirely effaced. Derby asks: 'Asenath… is there such a person?' There was, and her story is even more horrific than Derby’s. But we never see her or hear her voice." (https://www.tor.com/2014/08/05/h-p-lo...) The Shadow Out Of Time: **** I was pleasantly introduced to the Great Race of Yith for the first time in this story. I really like the idea that Lovecraft poses here on time (and place) travel in the form of a mind swap. The story not only gave the reader the opportunity to learn about the ways of the Great Race, but at the same time, feel connected to the may human minds that were possessed by Yithians who interacted with our main character, Nathaniel. I must say, I felt admiration rather than horror toward the Yithians due to their endless knowledge and libraries. Okay, they do leave others to die in their place when shit hits the fan, but then again, that makes them all the more "human" - am I right? The Haunter of the Dark: **** A great short story to close off the series. I liked the setting again, this time in an old black church. When Blake - our main character - tries to get to the church that he could see from his window at home, he asks someone for the way there. The person, however, plainly said they do know of a church like that. At first I thought the plot would be that only Blake could "see" the church. I though that that would also have been a great plot, but Lovecraft did not go that way. But anyway, I liked the story and it fits nicely in my know large knowledge of the Cthulhu Mythos. Average stars: 3,5 (thus I rounded it to 4, for I am very happy to have read it all)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    I can see the inspiration for quite a few horror movies that I've watched along with several TV shows, not the least of which is Stranger Things. This is an anthology, and for me, not really being familiar with his stories, the first ones didn't really make sense until later when I started to realize they were all connected. I'll have to go back and reread the first ones again. There were many stories that I liked, but almost as many that I didn't, so hard to say really if I liked the entire boo I can see the inspiration for quite a few horror movies that I've watched along with several TV shows, not the least of which is Stranger Things. This is an anthology, and for me, not really being familiar with his stories, the first ones didn't really make sense until later when I started to realize they were all connected. I'll have to go back and reread the first ones again. There were many stories that I liked, but almost as many that I didn't, so hard to say really if I liked the entire book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andrés Astudillo

    Finally I finished reading this one. It has been an honour having the time and opportunity to read and to successfully finishing this "lovecraftian cycle". This book contains 26 of his horror tales. They are chronologically ordered, and are just awesome. There's no way to pick just one story. Lovecraft, as far as Im concerned, was a solitary man, and just plain lonely in every sense of the word. However, I dont know if it was because of his partially destroyed childhood, or maddening circumstanc Finally I finished reading this one. It has been an honour having the time and opportunity to read and to successfully finishing this "lovecraftian cycle". This book contains 26 of his horror tales. They are chronologically ordered, and are just awesome. There's no way to pick just one story. Lovecraft, as far as Im concerned, was a solitary man, and just plain lonely in every sense of the word. However, I dont know if it was because of his partially destroyed childhood, or maddening circumstances in his life that were the reason why his imagination became the way to bring out those feelings. There's a piece of him in every story, and he was a genius.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    i listened to a few of these at a time. i recommend listening to horrorbabble on youtube if you're looking for some spooky stories with background noises... they're awesome!!! i listened to a few of these at a time. i recommend listening to horrorbabble on youtube if you're looking for some spooky stories with background noises... they're awesome!!!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cep Subhan KM

    Firstly i like its design: the book has a leather hardback and thick papers. It is designed to be a collector's edition, a book published as an artwork. Secondly i always like horror stories since the horror stories commonly possible to be written by giving a psychological conflict instead of giving a physical conflict only for presenting an amazing story. To depict a psychological conflict, the author should understand deeply about psychology and it becomes the cause of providing good character Firstly i like its design: the book has a leather hardback and thick papers. It is designed to be a collector's edition, a book published as an artwork. Secondly i always like horror stories since the horror stories commonly possible to be written by giving a psychological conflict instead of giving a physical conflict only for presenting an amazing story. To depict a psychological conflict, the author should understand deeply about psychology and it becomes the cause of providing good characterization technique. Surely H. P. Lovecraft is a great horror author even if his horror is different with Edgar Allan Poe's horror. Besides, even if I admire Poe but I am a little late to read Lovecraft and thank to God that i still have a time to enjoy great horror stories presented by a maestro in this collection. It is a collectible book not only because of its great appearance but also because of its possibility to be read again and again.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hyrum

    As a disclaimer I should mention that I listen to this as an audiobook and that I am not totally sure this is the same book I listened to. It has the same title and author but it is listed at a much longer length than my time listening seems to justify. That said I listened to the short stories: The Color Out of Space, The Cat of Ulthar, Pickman’s Model, Polaris, The Picture in the House, and The Outsider. The first and last stories were my favorites of the bunch. Mostly they felt like mysteries As a disclaimer I should mention that I listen to this as an audiobook and that I am not totally sure this is the same book I listened to. It has the same title and author but it is listed at a much longer length than my time listening seems to justify. That said I listened to the short stories: The Color Out of Space, The Cat of Ulthar, Pickman’s Model, Polaris, The Picture in the House, and The Outsider. The first and last stories were my favorites of the bunch. Mostly they felt like mysteries where you never got the full answer about what was going on. The Picture in the House was probably my least favorite because it seemed like the author left too much off at the end. There are points when the stories seem a bit dated but they exude a delightful level of creepy.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Solid 3.5 stars for now, rounded down. Moving this off my currently-reading because it's definitely the type of book one just decides to come back to here and there for a short story or a horror fix, not one to read continuously from front to back. Neither sci-fi nor horror is one of my favourite genres so I'm probably rating this a little lower (relatively) but overall from what I've read they're interesting stories, and well creepy. I can definitely see their influence on future horror works. L Solid 3.5 stars for now, rounded down. Moving this off my currently-reading because it's definitely the type of book one just decides to come back to here and there for a short story or a horror fix, not one to read continuously from front to back. Neither sci-fi nor horror is one of my favourite genres so I'm probably rating this a little lower (relatively) but overall from what I've read they're interesting stories, and well creepy. I can definitely see their influence on future horror works. Lastly, the cover design is so cool and this edition in general looks sick. So that's a plus!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jaz

    I am a new reader of Lovecraft and I have to say, so far, my preferred stories are the ones that I assume are quintessentially Lovecraftian: a vague/disconnected, unreliable/insane narrator; a mysterious lost civilization; dark bodies of water; a sense of dread, uncertainty, and unresolvedness. The Temple, along with Dagon, are my favourite short stories so far in my quest to discover Cthulu. The book itself is absolutely gorgeous: I am a sucker for a hardcover, but the shiny octopian creature o I am a new reader of Lovecraft and I have to say, so far, my preferred stories are the ones that I assume are quintessentially Lovecraftian: a vague/disconnected, unreliable/insane narrator; a mysterious lost civilization; dark bodies of water; a sense of dread, uncertainty, and unresolvedness. The Temple, along with Dagon, are my favourite short stories so far in my quest to discover Cthulu. The book itself is absolutely gorgeous: I am a sucker for a hardcover, but the shiny octopian creature on the front and the gold gilded pages add an increased sense of luxuriousness to this decidedly gothic read. Best enjoyed with a "Lovecraftian" playlist (see Spotify) and a neat whiskey.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jen Sangiovanni

    some of these stories are quite drawn out, you kind of wait for it to get to the point. otherwise i enjoyed most of the short stories, they were descriptive, unique and moody. i think it is a good representation of his time period, and like most horror from this era, it is more eerie that scary, and i appreciate that. there is a preface to the book where it talks about the author himself, which i think is important. the conversation of his views of race is addressed, rightfully, and i always fel some of these stories are quite drawn out, you kind of wait for it to get to the point. otherwise i enjoyed most of the short stories, they were descriptive, unique and moody. i think it is a good representation of his time period, and like most horror from this era, it is more eerie that scary, and i appreciate that. there is a preface to the book where it talks about the author himself, which i think is important. the conversation of his views of race is addressed, rightfully, and i always felt like horror was an allegory for aspects of human behavior and society. being able to align the two makes for an interesting read. my main complaint is the tiny font and paired with almost transparent pages, making this book version a little challenging to read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Isaiah Espinoza

    H.P. Lovecraft is not an easy read. It’s not the causal racism which there is plenty but the dryness of his writing. To finish the book was like pulling teeth. Most of the popular stories are different from their adaptations and I felt they much of them were overrated. That said I can see that many writers are influenced by his cosmic horror.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rafa Pangilinan

    I feel immersed while reading Different kind of horror compared to televised media Gives you a different perspective in life Can be hard to read at some points Some stories are extremely slow starting Liked the world building Poor cats

  17. 4 out of 5

    Albert

    I really love your story, it deserves a lot of audience. If you have some great stories like this one, you can publish it on NovelStar, just submit your story to [email protected] or [email protected]

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Cobb

    Absolutely loved this collection. As a volume edition, there wasn't really anything special added. However, the selected stories are fantastic and very enjoyable. This was my first exposure to Lovecraft, and I highly recommend it. Absolutely loved this collection. As a volume edition, there wasn't really anything special added. However, the selected stories are fantastic and very enjoyable. This was my first exposure to Lovecraft, and I highly recommend it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ben Mariner

    Well who can really argue with the master of oceanic horror? This was pretty tough to get through simply because of its age. Most stories felt laborious at the least, though the creepy nature of them made up for it, in most cases. Really just made me want to listen to some Metallica.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brett Plaxton

    There were some not bad stories in there, I think Herbert West: Re-Animator was my favourite one.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cam

    I really like the stories. The shadow over innsmouth was my favorite. They repeat to much for my liking.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Camilo Ordoñez

    Great selection of some of the best horror stories by the master of cosmic horror

  23. 5 out of 5

    Iain

    A great collection of Lovecraftian horror nicely bound and presented. See individual titles for reviews.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Duna Quasar

    Real nice for the lay Lovecraft reader, or someone just beginning to understand his work.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elier Mancilla

    Leer a Lovecraft es leer a un genio. Literalmente no pude quitar los ojos del libro ni por un minuto.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mouse

    Love this book, very well done, love the design, the feel, the look, the pages, etc... truly classic Lovecraft! One question though... Why the f**k is there a giant octopus on the cover?!?!?! Is that supposed to be Cthulhu?!?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cash

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey VanNoord

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

  30. 4 out of 5

    Savannah

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