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The Mozart Effect: Tapping the Power of Music to Heal the Body, Strengthen the Mind, and Unlock the Creative Spirit

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Anyone who has ever seen a two-year-old start bouncing to a beat knows that music speaks to us on a very deep level. But it took celebrated teacher and music visionary Don Campbell to show us just how deep, with his landmark book The Mozart Effect. Stimulating, authoritative, and often lyrical, The Mozart Effect has a simple but life-changing message: music is medicine for Anyone who has ever seen a two-year-old start bouncing to a beat knows that music speaks to us on a very deep level. But it took celebrated teacher and music visionary Don Campbell to show us just how deep, with his landmark book The Mozart Effect. Stimulating, authoritative, and often lyrical, The Mozart Effect has a simple but life-changing message: music is medicine for the body, the mind, and the soul. Campbell shows how modern science has begun to confirm this ancient wisdom, finding evidence that listening to certain types of music can improve the quality of life in almost every respect. Here are dramatic accounts of how music is used to deal with everything from anxiety to cancer, high blood pressure, chronic pain, dyslexia, and even mental illness. Always clear and compelling, Campbell recommends more than two dozen specific, easy-to-follow exercises to raise your spatial IQ, "sound away" pain, boost creativity, and make the spirit sing!


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Anyone who has ever seen a two-year-old start bouncing to a beat knows that music speaks to us on a very deep level. But it took celebrated teacher and music visionary Don Campbell to show us just how deep, with his landmark book The Mozart Effect. Stimulating, authoritative, and often lyrical, The Mozart Effect has a simple but life-changing message: music is medicine for Anyone who has ever seen a two-year-old start bouncing to a beat knows that music speaks to us on a very deep level. But it took celebrated teacher and music visionary Don Campbell to show us just how deep, with his landmark book The Mozart Effect. Stimulating, authoritative, and often lyrical, The Mozart Effect has a simple but life-changing message: music is medicine for the body, the mind, and the soul. Campbell shows how modern science has begun to confirm this ancient wisdom, finding evidence that listening to certain types of music can improve the quality of life in almost every respect. Here are dramatic accounts of how music is used to deal with everything from anxiety to cancer, high blood pressure, chronic pain, dyslexia, and even mental illness. Always clear and compelling, Campbell recommends more than two dozen specific, easy-to-follow exercises to raise your spatial IQ, "sound away" pain, boost creativity, and make the spirit sing!

30 review for The Mozart Effect: Tapping the Power of Music to Heal the Body, Strengthen the Mind, and Unlock the Creative Spirit

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    This is a hilarious piece of 1990s culture that is a relic of the hysteria over classical music as an IQ-boosting, tumor-shrinking, purifying cure-all (more recent studies suggest that there's nothing special about classical music - any music that puts you in a good mood will boost your IQ, because being in a good mood increases your IQ). The book relies almost solely on anecdotal data, and the scientific studies that are cited are vague. I read this book for my research on the relationship betw This is a hilarious piece of 1990s culture that is a relic of the hysteria over classical music as an IQ-boosting, tumor-shrinking, purifying cure-all (more recent studies suggest that there's nothing special about classical music - any music that puts you in a good mood will boost your IQ, because being in a good mood increases your IQ). The book relies almost solely on anecdotal data, and the scientific studies that are cited are vague. I read this book for my research on the relationship between middle-class America and classical music from the 1980s to the early 2000s and on that topic, at least, it was quite enlightening. Mozart is compared to Jesus at least twice (as a healer of the incurably ill) and music is compared to angels and atoms. Honestly, I came to love the author's cheesy earnestness - the book reads like it was written by Ned Flanders and has chuckle-inducing lines like, "Other than the fall of the Berlin Wall and the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the greatest unanticipated event of our time, in my view, has been the phenomenal popularity of Gregorian chant.” Wow! Though the author does admit (once or twice, and far into the book) that miraculous cures are not the point of listening to music, the book is organized by diseases which can be cured miraculously through listening to the "correct" music (i.e. Baroque is good for breast cancer! Mozart is good for potty training! Jazz is good if you're about to commit suicide!). Ah...the 1990s...a simpler time.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Charlene Mathe

    I have been missing music in my life!! I used to listen to a lot more music --back in the day when we played LP records; back before talk radio and world news occupied so much of my attention. I used to sing a lot more, too; and had more opportunity to sing in groups. This book discusses the power of music in our emotional AND PHYSICAL vitality. Granted the romanticism noted by other reviewers, I think the overall points hold up. The information and sources are comprehensive and detailed; and ex I have been missing music in my life!! I used to listen to a lot more music --back in the day when we played LP records; back before talk radio and world news occupied so much of my attention. I used to sing a lot more, too; and had more opportunity to sing in groups. This book discusses the power of music in our emotional AND PHYSICAL vitality. Granted the romanticism noted by other reviewers, I think the overall points hold up. The information and sources are comprehensive and detailed; and excellent read and reference.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Yang

    I gave this a bonus star for sheer entertainment value. In the eighth grade, I did a science fair project on the effects of music, and read this book. Although many good points are brought up about the benefits of music, the fluffiness and lack of scientific evidence for many of his arguments rendered this book wholly unconvincing. Although the concept of the benefits of music does hold merit, I would not recommend this book if you wish to gain definite, factual information.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Music is wonderful medicine for the body and soul. This book gives accounts of how healthcare professionals use music to deal with everything from anxiety, cancer, high blood pressure, etc. It's a great, informative read

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    I'm learning how I can use sound to help me on a daily basis.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sonic Catharsis

    When this book was originally written, it inspired a bunch of Mozart Music to fly off the shelves and a Generation of Babies was raised to Mozarts classical lullabies. While much of the information in this book is subjective and anecdotal, this generation of Mozart babies is only now reaching adulthood and the long-term benefits of Mozart playing our babies to sleep remains to be assessed. Anecdotally, My first born, whom was raised in this Mozart Lullaby generation is a Genius, his brain is pri When this book was originally written, it inspired a bunch of Mozart Music to fly off the shelves and a Generation of Babies was raised to Mozarts classical lullabies. While much of the information in this book is subjective and anecdotal, this generation of Mozart babies is only now reaching adulthood and the long-term benefits of Mozart playing our babies to sleep remains to be assessed. Anecdotally, My first born, whom was raised in this Mozart Lullaby generation is a Genius, his brain is primed for Math and Science and he is currently studying mechanical engineering in college. (Sorry, proud mom moment) I would have liked more about the specific healing of music and obviously more support to back up the statements he claims in the book. While the book addresses mental, physical, emotional and physical healing anecdotes the research is vague and anecdotal. I have however, very much enjoyed Campbells campy approach and found it an easy read. Science has advanced much since this book was written it would be a fantastic book to update with current research to make its case presentations more palatable to the scientific community. With that said, this book was a jumping off point for me. I have always innately known music to be a powerful therapeutic modality, this book renewed my interest into research and development in this field.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Green

    Wow this book was terrible. It was written more dryly than a textbook but without any actual information and infused with massive bouts of egoism. Hard pass.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Canning

    A fascinating study on the effects of sound on human development Campbell's book is a fascinating study on the effects of sound in general and music in particular on human development, intellect, psyche, creativity, and mood. His findings are based on the research of Dr. Alfred A. Tomatis (1991) of France who contends that listening to Mozart promotes the development of the brain, learning, and health. According to Tomatis, the fetus is capable of hearing at the four and a half month stage and th A fascinating study on the effects of sound on human development Campbell's book is a fascinating study on the effects of sound in general and music in particular on human development, intellect, psyche, creativity, and mood. His findings are based on the research of Dr. Alfred A. Tomatis (1991) of France who contends that listening to Mozart promotes the development of the brain, learning, and health. According to Tomatis, the fetus is capable of hearing at the four and a half month stage and the mother's voice acts as "a sonic umbilical cord for her developing baby and a primary source of nurturing." Thinking that many childhood disorders could be the result of a breakdown in the "auditory environment," Tomatis devised a process that he called the "Sonic Birth" to recreate what an infant hears during birth. These sounds go from those of "the watery environment in the womb to those in the outside world of air." To facilitate the rebirthing process (or the birthing process, for that matter), Tomatis recommends Mozart: "Mozart is a very good mother. Throughout fifty years of clinical and experimental process, I have voluntarily chosen one composer and one only. I continue to test new forms of music and willingly use forms of chanting, folk music, classical, but the powers of Mozart, especially the violin concertos, create the greatest healing effect on the human body." In the middle chapters of The Mozart Effect, Campbell takes up toning and chanting. Campbell defines toning as making a "sound with an elongated vowel for an extended period." Although the "Om" ("aum") of Tibetan Buddhism is probably the most well-known variety of this, Campbell introduces four others; "hum," "ahhhh," "ee," and "oh." According to Campbell, producing any of these sounds for five minutes a day will release stress and energize the body and the mind. Chanting is the repetition of a word or phrase with a rhythmic pattern that is usually associated with prayer. It often takes the form of a psalm or song and has tremendous power to uplift the spirit and to heal. Campbell writes at length about the wonders of Gregorian chant and claims that its popularity is one of "the greatest unanticipated event[s] of our time." He recommends a recording by the Benedictine monks of Santo Domingo de Silos in Spain and believes that its worldwide sales of more than four million copies is evidence "that the modern psyche is ready for recharging through the regenerative power of sound." Skeptics have countered with studies of their own that challenge the scientific validity of the Mozart effect. Their studies prove that any gains in intellect are ephemeral and just as easily attributable to other factors than what someone was listening to at the time they performed a certain task. The same goes for creativity. Most do agree, however, that music enhances mood. In the end, there is much in The Mozart Effect that cannot be scientifically proven and Campbell readily admits this. To bolster his case that the "soft data" of testimonials be included in the debate, Campbell cites from Dr. Andrew Weil's Spontaneous Healing, "Testimonials are important pieces of evidence. They are not necessarily testimony to the power or value of particular healers and products. Rather, they are testimony to the human capacity for healing." Like most things outside the box, this one is best field-tested on your own. If it works for you, there's no reason to doubt the efficacy of it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Nielsen

    The phrase 'Mozart Effect' is now well known thanks to this book by Don Campbell. It refers to the idea that particular sounds, tones, and rhythms (including but not exclusively classical music) strengthen the mind, unlock creative chambers in the brain and can even help the human body heal itself. Going into this book having spent more than half my life being a piano teacher probably makes me a little biased, but I believe in the power music can have over us and I have seen first hand the 'aha' The phrase 'Mozart Effect' is now well known thanks to this book by Don Campbell. It refers to the idea that particular sounds, tones, and rhythms (including but not exclusively classical music) strengthen the mind, unlock creative chambers in the brain and can even help the human body heal itself. Going into this book having spent more than half my life being a piano teacher probably makes me a little biased, but I believe in the power music can have over us and I have seen first hand the 'aha' moments of my students as their coordination and ability grow. Parts of the book are a slow read but I really enjoyed the studies; half an hour of Mozart has the same effect on brain waves as 10 milligrams of Valium, on average students who play a musical instrument have higher ACT scores, and those exposed to ten minutes of music with slow even undertones tested higher in their Spatial Reasoning abilities. I also really liked the last chapters that listed different disabilities, diseases, and medical conditions and combinations of music that have worked for other people. I don't necessarily believe in music in the place of medicine but I believe music in addition to medicine can help our brains focus, relax, or become stimulated. I like that he included a reminder not to overstimulate; in a house full of people trying to talk over each other, a blaring TV, the vacuum, a crying baby, idling diesel outside or maybe a noisy air conditioner, ten minutes of silence would help a child with ADHD or an autistic child to focus and calm in the place of Mozart. Can music change who we are? Yes. It can take us by the hand and lead us into our childhood. We can find ourselves submersed in overwhelming feelings of love, joy, grief, or even anger. From a choir/music class/piano teacher point of view, I think this concept is great and I agree with most of it. I would like to move away from the unseen power music has and remember that teaching a child to create their own music is giving them an invaluable gift to express feelings and emotions that are at times overwhelming and expressed in no other way. Having taken care of my Dad through a horrific small intestinal cancer for a year and then losing him, I have a renewed sacred appreciation for the ability I have to sit at the piano and let buried feelings flow from my fingertips.

  10. 4 out of 5

    David

    this is an excellent book concerning the interpretation of music in all its genera's which spans the notes of each individual style from prayer drums, , & tribal dances then on to the pomp & circumstance of classical music yes the explanations can go on and on as is said in the book,, music can drum out evil spirits, sing the praises of the virgin Mary, invoke the Buddha of universal salvation, enchant leaders & nations captivate, soothe, resurrect & transform. the speech of angles & atoms...in th this is an excellent book concerning the interpretation of music in all its genera's which spans the notes of each individual style from prayer drums, , & tribal dances then on to the pomp & circumstance of classical music yes the explanations can go on and on as is said in the book,, music can drum out evil spirits, sing the praises of the virgin Mary, invoke the Buddha of universal salvation, enchant leaders & nations captivate, soothe, resurrect & transform. the speech of angles & atoms...in this book their is a chapter( the healing breeze of sound)...why are you so en-lighted asked the author, it is because ( i am awake).. was the reply... in Sanskrit " Buddha" means (the awakened one).. so through application and trial i have been able to help others.. he states if enlightenment is also the interpreting of rhythmic styles then this writer is so blessed, he has the zest of a Martial-arts master all the reader needs is to have the confidence to use this book as plainly as it it written.. and any one can benefit yet on page 17 he is asked why Mozart,...why not Beethoven, or the Beatles, or Gerswin Louis Armstrong, then there is the Gregorian-chants, Tibetan-mantras & singing bowl.. maybe it is because Mozart transcends his era, and it was a radical time john Wesley, Voltaire, Thomas Jefferson, Mary Wollstonecraft, Goethe, who stated that you could tell a persons charter by the way they laughed..!!! all were beyond reproach beneath the powdered wigs & make-up...traded in the politics & religion of the day...in a federal society yet thought the shape of sound remained constant to each composer. they moulded it to there own, like fathering a child.. ( cymatics).. how sound vibrations interact with matter gymnastics of the ear, as stated by alfred-tomatis...M.D " i don not teach children...i waken them...music affects the heartbeat, pulse, blood pressure, it can increase endorphins and enhance unconscious receptivity to symbolism (movie-scores)... and then to the voices of Venus & mars... sexual unity... THE TAO OF RAP.... the brain process rhyme & rhythm differently from regular speech..

  11. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    he Mozart Effect was published just 3 years after my eldest was born. I remember the burst of media attention as Mozart Effect CD’s were scooped off the shelves and folks who never were interested in it before began turning to classical music. It was amazing, a boon for my colleagues. I wondered if it were all hype, but with two young children, I had no time to read the book or follow the frenzy more than just having a vague awareness of it. Don Campbell outlines the research that had been done he Mozart Effect was published just 3 years after my eldest was born. I remember the burst of media attention as Mozart Effect CD’s were scooped off the shelves and folks who never were interested in it before began turning to classical music. It was amazing, a boon for my colleagues. I wondered if it were all hype, but with two young children, I had no time to read the book or follow the frenzy more than just having a vague awareness of it. Don Campbell outlines the research that had been done since I was an undergrad in the 70’s, when I remember only one person pursuing a music therapy degree. A quick look at numerous pages of his bibliography shows that most of his resources were written in the 90’s, a few in the 80’s and barely a handful in the 70’s. It is not surprising then that I was not aware of any of the information Campbell calls our attention to, as fascinating and intriguing as it is. But the book was difficult to finish. There is an overabundance of enthusiastic consideration of every possible avenue of musical use. After awhile, one tires of his enthusiasm. After going through the extensive list of known and acknowledged methodologies of his time, Campbell devotes a quarter of his book to testimonials about how these differing methods have helped and/or cured ailments ranging from head aches to cancer, an impressive list but anecdotal and tedious. Obviously, it is also biased, as nothing can cure everything. It is exciting to see these new healing developments and that there is some scientific research that backs it up. I wanted more, though. The power of music and sound should be recognized and acknowledged as scientifically valid, but this volume is dated and falls short.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lionkhan-sama

    After having read the first chapter or two, I found myself trying to just finish my way through this book. I personally found this book to be much too full of pretence. The author presents information as if it were set in stone, when most of it is merely his own biased speculation. Do not get me wrong, I can't deny that this book contains some interesting information in regards to sound frequencies and human development/well-being, however the writers style was too much for me. His over-the-top love After having read the first chapter or two, I found myself trying to just finish my way through this book. I personally found this book to be much too full of pretence. The author presents information as if it were set in stone, when most of it is merely his own biased speculation. Do not get me wrong, I can't deny that this book contains some interesting information in regards to sound frequencies and human development/well-being, however the writers style was too much for me. His over-the-top love for music and Mozart creates far too big of a bias for his so-called "research" to be taken seriously. Also, most of his stories and studies that he references are extremely weak, based on personal and optimistic interpretation. I find it humorous how all the studies he mentions to prove a point only contain a minimal amount of human subjects (less than 100 people is a pitiful number for a study and it's conclusions to be based on). All in all, I was extremely disappointed with this book, however I cannot deny that there are some bits of information that I am sure will come in handy in my life as well as some food for thought regarding how sound affects humans. Also worth noting is that I am in no way denying the potential for sounds/music to heal/cure multiple aspects of human illness and imbalance. A lot of what the author mentions within this book definitely is correct within reason.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    I need to get this back to the library, so it's on hold. So far, there have been a lot of inspirational, but not necessarily scientifically verified, stories about how music has helped people. It has been slow reading. I am hoping for more practical uses in my life & home. There has been very little of that so far, but future chapter titles and headings look promising. So, I'll probably check it out again in the future and continue. ******* Later (finally checked out again and finished) No such luc I need to get this back to the library, so it's on hold. So far, there have been a lot of inspirational, but not necessarily scientifically verified, stories about how music has helped people. It has been slow reading. I am hoping for more practical uses in my life & home. There has been very little of that so far, but future chapter titles and headings look promising. So, I'll probably check it out again in the future and continue. ******* Later (finally checked out again and finished) No such luck. I read the book hoping to find ideas for using music in my home: to help us get moving in the morning, to generate creative thought, to calm tension, etc. It reads more like a research-paper-slash-collection-of-miraculous-stories. The resources at the end are helpful, and I got a few ideas from the text (I did like the quick application ideas he interspersed throughout the book as 'Interludes'). I appreciate that the author accepts a variety of music as valuable - not just the 'classical'. At various times, he lists musicians such as John Williams, Elvis, etc. and discusses how their music can help/heal. In general, it didn't give me what I was hoping for, and most of the stories seem a little unbelievable, but it has motivated me to gather a larger collection of music and use it in various ways for my family.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    Campbell is very subjective in his descriptions about the powers of music to aid in healing, but as a musician (and occasional hospital patient)I've been wondering how it is that those who pursue a degree in Music Therapy wish to base their livelihood on it. At any rate, I enjoy the reminders that listening to music is very important to the psyche, and it can have quite an effect on our day to day living. I used to listen to baroque organ music in my dorm room to fall asleep despite noisy roomma Campbell is very subjective in his descriptions about the powers of music to aid in healing, but as a musician (and occasional hospital patient)I've been wondering how it is that those who pursue a degree in Music Therapy wish to base their livelihood on it. At any rate, I enjoy the reminders that listening to music is very important to the psyche, and it can have quite an effect on our day to day living. I used to listen to baroque organ music in my dorm room to fall asleep despite noisy roommates. Nearly a decade later, I find it helps with insomnia and chronic pain, as well.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gloria

    This was written in 1997 which is not that old, but I'd be interested in finding out what the medical profession has learned about music and healing since then. There is also a distinct absence of web sites mentioned and too many cassette tapes ARE mentioned which dates this a bit. Nevertheless, this is an enthusiastic though probably biased endorsement of the effect of music on the human brain. While it is clear (to me) that music certainly does influence behaviors and conditions, am not sure t This was written in 1997 which is not that old, but I'd be interested in finding out what the medical profession has learned about music and healing since then. There is also a distinct absence of web sites mentioned and too many cassette tapes ARE mentioned which dates this a bit. Nevertheless, this is an enthusiastic though probably biased endorsement of the effect of music on the human brain. While it is clear (to me) that music certainly does influence behaviors and conditions, am not sure the explanation is especially clinical here. Lots of good references to music though.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Larry

    This book confirmed what I have experienced in my own life i.e. the power of music to heal and strengthen the mind. Well presented though somewhat repetitive at times. The kernel of truth here is something that the world has generally come to realize (I hope) but for those who have doubts they need to not only read this book but also practice some of the life changing recommendations found therein.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    I enjoyed reading about the many therapies for many different disorders that are very "fringe" right now. If you are looking for scientific proof, this is not the book. It is mainly full of anecdotes about how some sound therapy or another helped to heal. If you are at your wits end and looking for some relief of a condition after exhausting other avenues, this might serve as a good resource. Really, only a limited portion of the book was about music.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Bonetti

    This book is an ear-opener! Campbell really proves the value of listening to music, even better, of playing it. I like the way he integrates wide ranging research with clues to enhance quality of life: e.g. 'When we listen to a good singer we breathe deeper, our muscles relax, endorphins flow.' While some medico types may look askance, I find this book wholly convincing of the power of music. It should be obligatory reading for health practitioners.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Luis Villasenor

    If you want to know what the Mozart effect is according to those that believe in it then this is a good book. However, if you read this book you must read what is written about the opposite. Very interesting read. Would not recommend it to anyone who is not willing to do the researh for both sides.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary Daly

    I found this book very interesting. My father adored Mozart and as a result, we listened to the works of Mozart since we were very young. It was interesting to learn that his music, as well as the music of Bach, Vivaldi, etc. have such a great impact on our conscious and subconscious minds. I highly recommend reading this book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alona Perlin

    I liked it. However, I thought the book was going to focus more on the music on Mozart and its specific healing effects. Instead, it focused on how music in general has a healing effect on the body and its varying conditions and diseases. It had examples of how people were treated with music therapies for various physical, mental and emotional situations.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Roz C

    This book was just SUCH an eye-opener all those years ago, and for anyone who is a music lover, a musician, a parent, a carer - of which I am all - this book is a must-read. For a deeper insight into prenatal studies, newborns and children, follow up with "The Mozart Effect: For Children". I must read those two books again, actually! It's been too long.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Eva

    Music is good for everyone This good was inspiring and interesting to read something that I already knew; music is helping childrens to focus and help them to have better results. I like the facts that the atuthors explains that music is everywhere and could be use to have a positive impact on people with learning disabilities or for people at work etc...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tamsyn

    I think I'm not going to finish this book for awhile so I'm taking it off my currently reading list. It seems to be a good book, but as I've heard a lot of controversial things about it and whether its really effective, I'm going to shelf it until I can do more research and the interest returns.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Read the first 5 chapters or so. Interesting tribute to music, but its scientific claims are not convincing. Very anecdotal. It motivated me to gather and learn lullabies. Probably nice reading for anyone who loves music, but beware of Campbell's sincere, but unproven claims and his sales pitch.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    This books is being used for the book group for my new ward in the Baltimore area. I'd heard of it before, let's see if I like it. This book was interesting. He makes most of the points with anecdotal evidence. It was okay, just a little repetitive and not very compelling.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Judith

    This book talked more about healing then strengthing the mind. I was looking for Alpha learning type information. It talked about various recording you can buy and I plan on getting them through my library.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I have wanted to read this ever since I heard that listening to classical music can raise SAT scores. So far, the book is good for a musician, but really is written for a non-musician. I skimmed quite a bit of the beginning but the examples and stories are fascinating.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mm

    This book is great! It really teaches you about mind over matter and how music can affect a persons mind. I am inspired to listen to more classical music and less head banging music! Hahahaha

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    An interesting read about how music can affect not only your brain activity but the health of your body. Been listening to Mozart before bed and believe it or not, has helped me fall asleep faster and longer than without.

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