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The Happiness Hack: How to Take Charge of Your Brain and Program More Happiness Into Your Life

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For years, Ellen Leanse worked with the biggest technology titans that fight for our attention, including Apple, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft... programming habits that revolved around our devices. By mapping how the mind works, innovators like Ellen are able to ingrain habits for all of us, revolving around our technology. But what if we could instead create habits tha For years, Ellen Leanse worked with the biggest technology titans that fight for our attention, including Apple, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft... programming habits that revolved around our devices. By mapping how the mind works, innovators like Ellen are able to ingrain habits for all of us, revolving around our technology. But what if we could instead create habits that revolve around happiness? In this refreshing, practical book, you'll learn Ellen's proven methods to hack your mind in order to: - Stop living your life on auto pilot - Reclaim focus for the things that matter - Have more time to do things you love - Create real connections to the world around you - And most importantly, REDUCE STRESS By the end of The Happiness Hack, you'll be back in control of your mind and living the life you wish to live. Only you can define your happiness -- take control today!


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For years, Ellen Leanse worked with the biggest technology titans that fight for our attention, including Apple, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft... programming habits that revolved around our devices. By mapping how the mind works, innovators like Ellen are able to ingrain habits for all of us, revolving around our technology. But what if we could instead create habits tha For years, Ellen Leanse worked with the biggest technology titans that fight for our attention, including Apple, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft... programming habits that revolved around our devices. By mapping how the mind works, innovators like Ellen are able to ingrain habits for all of us, revolving around our technology. But what if we could instead create habits that revolve around happiness? In this refreshing, practical book, you'll learn Ellen's proven methods to hack your mind in order to: - Stop living your life on auto pilot - Reclaim focus for the things that matter - Have more time to do things you love - Create real connections to the world around you - And most importantly, REDUCE STRESS By the end of The Happiness Hack, you'll be back in control of your mind and living the life you wish to live. Only you can define your happiness -- take control today!

30 review for The Happiness Hack: How to Take Charge of Your Brain and Program More Happiness Into Your Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anton

    Netgalley ARC. Well, this is more like a TED-talk (of sorts) in a written form. Relentless motivational pitch (well delivered) with a simplified intro summary on how the brain works, some old wisdoms and new (blog-style) tips. Curious but not profound. I guess it could work as a quick pick-me-up if you are suddenly feeling blue.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Xiomara Canizales

    Is a book that talks about how we need to train our brain to be more mindful and be default more happy. I won’t describe more of the book because I would be given it all away. I found it interesting and well written. However I felt that it wasn’t about persuading for Happiness but for Mindfulness or Being Focus. My rating is 2.75/5

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Best for: No one In a nutshell: Adviser to tech folks (I think) attempts to turn what must have started as a TED talk into a book. Line that sticks with me: N/A Why I chose it: I saw some tips from it in a magazine I was reading and it sounded cool. Lesson learned. Review: This is a pretty short book, so I read it in a couple of evenings. Last night I was about 75% through and I said to my husband “What’s the music that builds and builds but never pays off? Is that EDM? Because this book is the EDM Best for: No one In a nutshell: Adviser to tech folks (I think) attempts to turn what must have started as a TED talk into a book. Line that sticks with me: N/A Why I chose it: I saw some tips from it in a magazine I was reading and it sounded cool. Lesson learned. Review: This is a pretty short book, so I read it in a couple of evenings. Last night I was about 75% through and I said to my husband “What’s the music that builds and builds but never pays off? Is that EDM? Because this book is the EDM of books.” Seriously, there is so much build up and explaining of why our brains might be easily distracted, and how that is keeping us from being happy, but she doesn’t ever get to the point. She doesn’t land the plane. I’m sold! I believe you that distractions and technology can have negative impacts and disconnect us from loved ones (although for some people it makes connection better): so what do you think I should do about it? I don’t know. I’m not sure if the author knows. There are a lot of colorful pages with quotes from wise people, but other than reconnecting with loved ones, there’s no THERE there. And there are certainly no happiness hacks.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Hartman

    This was an amazing book that gave you a lot of information that deep down you already knew but never thought about. The power of the brain is an amazing tool. I would recommend this book to everyone that maybe questioning their own happiness.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mickey Vo

    A fine intro for someone who wants to learn about how your brain sticks to familiar habits, which can lead to anxiety, depression, etc., and how to break those habits to find more meaning in your life. The book was a bit too "quick and dirty" for me, however, as it doesn't go into too much depth on one subject. It bounces around from one tip to another, and I found the quotes that the text was interspersed with a little distracting. If you're looking for something quick and basic, this is a fine A fine intro for someone who wants to learn about how your brain sticks to familiar habits, which can lead to anxiety, depression, etc., and how to break those habits to find more meaning in your life. The book was a bit too "quick and dirty" for me, however, as it doesn't go into too much depth on one subject. It bounces around from one tip to another, and I found the quotes that the text was interspersed with a little distracting. If you're looking for something quick and basic, this is a fine book. If you're looking to dive deeper into how your brain works in handling core emotions, I recommend "It's Not Always Depression" by Hilary Jacobs Hendel.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Valda Rubio

    I bought this for my granddaughter, a millennial who has anxiety and who is striving towards some sort of balance in life. This is a great book for anyone who just wants a multitude of reminders and strategies to circumnavigate the huge ups and downs some of us experience in life. You can dip in pretty much anywhere and find something very useful, important, or comforting. This is not a road map to finding happiness as if it is a destination. It is more about mindfulness; managing life and being I bought this for my granddaughter, a millennial who has anxiety and who is striving towards some sort of balance in life. This is a great book for anyone who just wants a multitude of reminders and strategies to circumnavigate the huge ups and downs some of us experience in life. You can dip in pretty much anywhere and find something very useful, important, or comforting. This is not a road map to finding happiness as if it is a destination. It is more about mindfulness; managing life and being accountable to oneself. Some people might find some of the instruction a bit obvious, however, it’s not simplistic. It’s quite difficult to effect any type of change without a fairly high level of self awareness, but there are lots of small things that can still help or get people started. I loved the graphics, and layout too.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ms. McGregor

    This book did not appeal to me personally, but it’s pragmatic approach would likely be very helpful to many of my teen students at a competitive high school specializing in math and science. I do plan to purchase a copy for the school library I am employed by upon publication. I don’t think this will “solve” any person’s unhappiness, but the book provides biological and psychological insights and tools that would be a great starting point for people who are struggling to find happiness and most This book did not appeal to me personally, but it’s pragmatic approach would likely be very helpful to many of my teen students at a competitive high school specializing in math and science. I do plan to purchase a copy for the school library I am employed by upon publication. I don’t think this will “solve” any person’s unhappiness, but the book provides biological and psychological insights and tools that would be a great starting point for people who are struggling to find happiness and most importantly, personal connections in their daily life. Especially those who are particularly linear thinkers or who have social anxiety or awkwardness. I was provided an advanced copy of this book via netgalley, which afforded me this opportunity to write an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    The Happiness Hack by Ellen Petry Leanse The author study and researched extensively to learn how other people answerd the questions about meaning, purpose and the pursuit of happiness. Her purpose of the book is to share her finding and shorten our path to finding it. It may be a short book but delivers a powerful punch in giving you ideas to change your brain and reduce your stress. Simple but not always easy. You have to take the first step. I am a fan of neuroscience so I enjoyed this book an The Happiness Hack by Ellen Petry Leanse The author study and researched extensively to learn how other people answerd the questions about meaning, purpose and the pursuit of happiness. Her purpose of the book is to share her finding and shorten our path to finding it. It may be a short book but delivers a powerful punch in giving you ideas to change your brain and reduce your stress. Simple but not always easy. You have to take the first step. I am a fan of neuroscience so I enjoyed this book and felt the author explained it in a way we can all understand. I received this book from Netgalley. I was not required to write a positive review. You can see my full review at More Than a Review dot com where I rate the level of sex, violence, language and drug/alcohol use in books.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    This book was a great introduction to useful techniques for getting yourself on the track to happiness. I can see myself using this book more as a toolkit I can refer to than as a read-again-cover-to-cover. If I'm struggling with productivity, I'll look to that section for some inspiration on ways forward. Struggling with focus - I'll look to another chapter. The main thesis is that happiness isn't an end goal (we all know it isn't), it's the journey. The book gives you tools based on what we kn This book was a great introduction to useful techniques for getting yourself on the track to happiness. I can see myself using this book more as a toolkit I can refer to than as a read-again-cover-to-cover. If I'm struggling with productivity, I'll look to that section for some inspiration on ways forward. Struggling with focus - I'll look to another chapter. The main thesis is that happiness isn't an end goal (we all know it isn't), it's the journey. The book gives you tools based on what we know of the brain and how it works to use on yourself while on your journey that will help you through roadblocks and rough patches.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Meagan

    The message conveyed in this book is simple & helpful: be more mindful. The author spends the first part of the book providing a Cliff’s Notes version of how the brain works (helpful). In the second half, she focuses on how to apply that basic knowledge of how the brain works to make it work for you: to feel happier, accomplish your goals, make changes in your life, etc. I’m glad I read it. I recommended it for anyone who would like to get out of that rut, is struggling to find some meaning in the The message conveyed in this book is simple & helpful: be more mindful. The author spends the first part of the book providing a Cliff’s Notes version of how the brain works (helpful). In the second half, she focuses on how to apply that basic knowledge of how the brain works to make it work for you: to feel happier, accomplish your goals, make changes in your life, etc. I’m glad I read it. I recommended it for anyone who would like to get out of that rut, is struggling to find some meaning in their life, and/or make changes that will lead to more happiness.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn Asher

    I have gifted this long-awaited book for family members and friends to offset turbulent times. This great read unlocks readers' potential by helping them realize that neuroscience is the basis of our decisions and providing formulas for happiness to enhance personal and business relationships. If you ever have a chance to be in the company of the author for a book signing, I know through personal experience that your life will be richer. I have gifted this long-awaited book for family members and friends to offset turbulent times. This great read unlocks readers' potential by helping them realize that neuroscience is the basis of our decisions and providing formulas for happiness to enhance personal and business relationships. If you ever have a chance to be in the company of the author for a book signing, I know through personal experience that your life will be richer.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alex Leviton

    So many tidbits of wisdom. So much good to remind ourselves. I was fortunate enough to meet the author a few months ago, and hear her speak. Ellen knows her subject inside and out. She explains beautifully the toll of our culture of distraction. Here’s how I read this book: Read several paragraphs. Mull over the lessons. Think about the application in my own life. Write in my journal.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ionut

    Well, it was ok-ish. With some good insights, but nothing mind-blowing. Easy to follow, easy to read. The main ideas are related to the chemical functionality of the brain, how human connection is good for our mind, and how bad influence is social media and Internet technologies. Of course, the author includes some tips for unblocking the brain and activate the mind.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stephani Hren

    Colorful and informative. I loved the drawings depicting the different chemicals and hormones that affect happiness. This book presents neuroscience in a very approachable way. I did feel like it lacked a little bit of direction; the information was good but it didn't leave me with any sort of concrete actionable steps to follow. Colorful and informative. I loved the drawings depicting the different chemicals and hormones that affect happiness. This book presents neuroscience in a very approachable way. I did feel like it lacked a little bit of direction; the information was good but it didn't leave me with any sort of concrete actionable steps to follow.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    While the first half of the book is all about the brain, the second half gets into our obsession with screen time and how it's affecting our happiness. We are constantly distracted and I couldn't agree more. Let's put down the devices and focus on what can make us happy. While the first half of the book is all about the brain, the second half gets into our obsession with screen time and how it's affecting our happiness. We are constantly distracted and I couldn't agree more. Let's put down the devices and focus on what can make us happy.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dana *

    super easy to read (although found all the "pop up" quotes a little DISTRACTING (HA) but good advice and no big breakthroughs. hacks are simple ways to make life easier, so i think the advice in this book qualifies. If may be too simplified for some readers though. super easy to read (although found all the "pop up" quotes a little DISTRACTING (HA) but good advice and no big breakthroughs. hacks are simple ways to make life easier, so i think the advice in this book qualifies. If may be too simplified for some readers though.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christa Van

    I think this started out as a TED talk and then became a book. I will save you a little time and give you the number one recommendation contained within: PUT DOWN YOUR PHONE and leave it down for awhile. Maybe I should say "STEP AWAY FROM YOUR DEVICE." There you have it. I think this started out as a TED talk and then became a book. I will save you a little time and give you the number one recommendation contained within: PUT DOWN YOUR PHONE and leave it down for awhile. Maybe I should say "STEP AWAY FROM YOUR DEVICE." There you have it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Misti

    If you're looking for somethignthat breaks down the brain science into readable chunks, this is the book for you. it really illustrates how the brain actually processes and stores information. Cute graphics accompany the text and lots of pull-out quotes to help break up the monotony. If you're looking for somethignthat breaks down the brain science into readable chunks, this is the book for you. it really illustrates how the brain actually processes and stores information. Cute graphics accompany the text and lots of pull-out quotes to help break up the monotony.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Leifer

    Succinct and thoughtful. Interesting book--almost like a manual I could re-read every three years or so. Makes an important point that choosing positive thinking is choosing to operate your brain in a physiologically successful manner.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Batchelder

    I really liked how this book was put together. Much of the information in it I had encountered previously, but not all in one easy to read book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Markita

    This was just a picture book. It didn't add that much to my knowledge base that I already didn't have. So it did reaffirm what I already knew, but it was nothing new for me. This was just a picture book. It didn't add that much to my knowledge base that I already didn't have. So it did reaffirm what I already knew, but it was nothing new for me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    - ̗̀ mari ̖́-

    I like this. it’s positive and breezy but not smarmy. I wish she had gone more in depth, but she suggests further reading at the end.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Micha Goebig

    It’s a nice summary, but I don’t think I learned anything new.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    Format was a little trite. But some of the suggestions were relatively unique.

  25. 5 out of 5

    John Lowe

    Ellen gets it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Pereira

    Leave your phone down and start living your life.

  27. 4 out of 5

    John

    All good ideas. 100 pages of wisdom. Learn, then hack.

  28. 4 out of 5

    John Norton

    Dopamine isn’t always good, and serotonin can be self served. Those are my takeaways.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    Quick read packed with tangible information and takeaway points

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marcus

    Basic information that comes as no surprise if you've read anything else about psychology. Basic information that comes as no surprise if you've read anything else about psychology.

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