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Is who we are really only skin deep? In this searing, remonstrative book, Toni Morrison unravels race through the stories of those debased and dehumanised because of it. A young black girl longing for the blue eyes of white baby dolls spirals into inferiority and confusion. A friendship falls apart over a disputed memory. An ex-slave is haunted by a lonely, rebukeful ghost Is who we are really only skin deep? In this searing, remonstrative book, Toni Morrison unravels race through the stories of those debased and dehumanised because of it. A young black girl longing for the blue eyes of white baby dolls spirals into inferiority and confusion. A friendship falls apart over a disputed memory. An ex-slave is haunted by a lonely, rebukeful ghost, bent on bringing their past home. Strange and unexpected, yet always stirring, Morrison’s writing on race sinks us deep into the heart and mind of our troubled humanity. Includes selections from the books Song of Solomon, The Bluest Eye, Beloved by Toni Morrison VINTAGE MINIS: GREAT MINDS. BIG IDEAS. LITTLE BOOKS. A series of short books by the world’s greatest writers on the experiences that make us human For the full list of books visit vintageminis.co.uk Also in the Vintage Minis series: Sisters by Louisa May Alcott Love by Jeanette Winterson Babies by Anne Enright Language by Xiaolu Guo


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Is who we are really only skin deep? In this searing, remonstrative book, Toni Morrison unravels race through the stories of those debased and dehumanised because of it. A young black girl longing for the blue eyes of white baby dolls spirals into inferiority and confusion. A friendship falls apart over a disputed memory. An ex-slave is haunted by a lonely, rebukeful ghost Is who we are really only skin deep? In this searing, remonstrative book, Toni Morrison unravels race through the stories of those debased and dehumanised because of it. A young black girl longing for the blue eyes of white baby dolls spirals into inferiority and confusion. A friendship falls apart over a disputed memory. An ex-slave is haunted by a lonely, rebukeful ghost, bent on bringing their past home. Strange and unexpected, yet always stirring, Morrison’s writing on race sinks us deep into the heart and mind of our troubled humanity. Includes selections from the books Song of Solomon, The Bluest Eye, Beloved by Toni Morrison VINTAGE MINIS: GREAT MINDS. BIG IDEAS. LITTLE BOOKS. A series of short books by the world’s greatest writers on the experiences that make us human For the full list of books visit vintageminis.co.uk Also in the Vintage Minis series: Sisters by Louisa May Alcott Love by Jeanette Winterson Babies by Anne Enright Language by Xiaolu Guo

30 review for Race

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alice Lippart

    How have I not read any Toni Morrison before? I've been totally missing out! How have I not read any Toni Morrison before? I've been totally missing out!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ely

    Still annoyed I got sucked into buying some of these Vintage Minis thinking they were full-length essays rather than the excerpts of books that they are. That being said, the essay that was in here—'Making America White Again' was amazing. It's been a while since I read any Morrison, but I hope this has given me the little push I needed. Still annoyed I got sucked into buying some of these Vintage Minis thinking they were full-length essays rather than the excerpts of books that they are. That being said, the essay that was in here—'Making America White Again' was amazing. It's been a while since I read any Morrison, but I hope this has given me the little push I needed.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    'Making America White Again' is a fantastic essay. 'Making America White Again' is a fantastic essay.

  4. 4 out of 5

    thehalcyondaysofsummer

    Opening lines: ‘At fifty-two, Macon Dead was as imposing a man as he had been at forty-two, when Milkman thought he was the biggest thing in the world.’

  5. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

    4.25 Holy moly! I've been reticent about reading Morrison forever. Every time I see one of her books on a bookstore shelf my inner voice says, "nope". If I hadn't been attracted to this little Vintage Mini for Black History month, who knows when/if I would have picked her up. Thank you Vintage Mini for you have opened my mind and my heart! Toni Morrison is truly brilliant! Not only in her mind blowing prose, but she sees peoples souls. Her stories discuss racial, social and political topics most 4.25 Holy moly! I've been reticent about reading Morrison forever. Every time I see one of her books on a bookstore shelf my inner voice says, "nope". If I hadn't been attracted to this little Vintage Mini for Black History month, who knows when/if I would have picked her up. Thank you Vintage Mini for you have opened my mind and my heart! Toni Morrison is truly brilliant! Not only in her mind blowing prose, but she sees peoples souls. Her stories discuss racial, social and political topics most don't want to touch, but she approaches it in a way that teaches, awakens one to the truth, but without turning them off. This mini contains excerpts from Song of Solomon, The Bluest Eye, Beloved (my least favorite), a short, Recitatif and an essay, Making America White Again. I underlined quite a bit in such a little book and made quite a few annotations. Making America White Again had me a bit riled, obviously I still have some lessons to learn, and brought up many questions- which I'm dying to discuss! I'm going to share some of my favorite/most affecting quotes. Song of Solomon - the life of a black man in Michigan "But people who lynch and slice off people's balls- they're crazy, Guitar, crazy. Every time somebody does a thing like that to one of us, they say the people who did it were crazy or ignorant. That's like saying they were drunk. Or constipated. Why isn't cutting a man's eyes out, cutting his nuts off, the kind of thing you never get to drunk or ignorant to do? And more to the point, how come Negroes, the craziest, most ignorant people in America, don't get that crazy and that ignorant? No. White people are unnatural. As a race they are unnatural. And it takes a strong effort of the will to overcome an unnatural enemy." The Bluest Eye - a story about what a black girl thinks makes one pretty " He does not see her because there's nothing to see." " She has seen it lurking in the eyes of white people. So. The distaste must be for her, her blackness. All things in her flux and anticipation. But her blackness is static and dread. " Beloved- told through an escaped slaves perspective- women having equality and choices " ... there was Sweet Home ... It never looked as terrible as it was and it made her wonder if hell was a pretty place too. Fire and brimstone alright, but hidden in lacy groves. Boys hanging from the most beautiful sycamores in the world." Recitatif - a short " Racial strife. The word made me think of a bird- a big shrieking bird..."' Making America White Again - This essay is loaded! I am going to form some questions and if you would like to discuss them I would love to, respectful manner. 1- What are some ways white people try to keep their perception of white superiority? 2- Is America defined by color? 3- Does America expect immigrants to assimilate so "it can hold whiteness as a unifying force"?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Astridrv

    What a masterful writer. This short book is a collection of a short story, an essay, and extracts from three novels (which I wish were more contextualized, but I am going to read them soon anyways). I can't recall feeling as strongly about any English prose as I do about Morrison's, how it manages to bring together poetry, and cruelty, and intricate images, and very, very deep thinking. I am clearly out of my depth when I read her and I keep her words with me, her questions too, to slowly hear h What a masterful writer. This short book is a collection of a short story, an essay, and extracts from three novels (which I wish were more contextualized, but I am going to read them soon anyways). I can't recall feeling as strongly about any English prose as I do about Morrison's, how it manages to bring together poetry, and cruelty, and intricate images, and very, very deep thinking. I am clearly out of my depth when I read her and I keep her words with me, her questions too, to slowly hear her as fully as I can. Some quotes: "When I learned how repulsive this disinterested violence was, that it was repulsive because it was disinterested, my shame floundered about for refuge. The best hiding place was love. Thus the conversion from pristine sadism to fabricated hatred, to fraudulent love. I learned much later to worship her, just as I learned to delight in cleanliness, knowing, even as I learned, that change was adjustment without improvement." "Somewhere between retina and object, between vision and view, his eyes draw back, hesitate, and hover. At some fixed point in time and space he senses that he need not waste the effort of a glance. He does not see her, because for him there is nothing to see. How can a fifty-two-year-old white immigrant storekeeper with the taste of potatoes and beer in his mouth, his mind honed on the doe-eyed Virgin Mary, his sensibilities blunted by a permanent awareness of loss, /see/ a black girl? Nothing in his life even suggested that the feat was possible, not to say desirable or necessary." "Here they learn the rest of the lesson begun in those soft houses with porch swings and pots of bleeding heart: how to behave. The careful development of thrift, patience, high morals, and good manners. In short, how to get rid of the funkiness. The dreadful funkiness of passion, the funkiness of nature, the funkiness of the wide range of human emotions. Wherever it erupts, this Funk, they wipe it away; where it crusts, they dissolve it; wherever it drips, flowers, or clings, they find it and fight it until it dies. They fight this battle all the way to the grave. The laugh that is a little too loud; the enunciation a little too round; the gesture a little too generous. They hold their behind in for fear of a sway too free; when they were lipstick, they never cover the entire mouth for fear of lips too thick and they worry, worry, worry about the edges of their hair. they never seem to have boyfriends, but they always marry."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Larissa

    4.5* I really loved all the abstracts. I had already read Beloved, but not Song of Solomon and The Bluest Eye, which I definitely want to read completely now. This is a great introduction to some of Toni Morrison's works and the issue of race. 4.5* I really loved all the abstracts. I had already read Beloved, but not Song of Solomon and The Bluest Eye, which I definitely want to read completely now. This is a great introduction to some of Toni Morrison's works and the issue of race.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Zohal

    Half of this were excepts and forewords from her books I had already read. Still good though!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Emmanuel

    *3.5 stars Nowadays, Race is a touchy subject. And with good reason; having so many negative emotions and experiences connoted with it can make it difficult to discuss, but it's something we should never stop discussing, which is why I'm happy books like this exist. 'Race' consists of 3 Toni Morrison novel extracts, 1 short story to follow up, and a very short essay at the end. While I did very much enjoy the layout of this book, I thought the lengths of each section were out of proportion. There' *3.5 stars Nowadays, Race is a touchy subject. And with good reason; having so many negative emotions and experiences connoted with it can make it difficult to discuss, but it's something we should never stop discussing, which is why I'm happy books like this exist. 'Race' consists of 3 Toni Morrison novel extracts, 1 short story to follow up, and a very short essay at the end. While I did very much enjoy the layout of this book, I thought the lengths of each section were out of proportion. There's something to be said about showing as opposed to just telling, which is why I think it was a great idea to open the book with extracts from novels that deal with race, but the final essay should have been a lot longer, or there should have been multiple essays included in place of the short story which I thought was the weakest part of the book. Showing is essential for this kind of subject yes, but these extracts needed to be put into context more than they were here. I felt the essay at the end didn't do enough to explain why the stories were important, and that people still go through what the fictional characters went through. It focused more on the mindset responsible for electing Trump, which is important, but shouldn't have been the sole focus of the essay. As for the novel extracts themselves, I thought they were brilliant! Each one followed a different type of character, from a vengeful young black man to a helpless, conflicted little black girl and were all so powerful. They highlighted how anger and racism - more often than not - only breed more of the same, from both sides, from white and black people alike. They highlighted the ways in which black people were forced to adapt to racism before slavery was abolished. And they highlighted how being a victim of racism can haunt you for the rest of your life. So yeah while I had problems with the final two sections of this book, I still can't help but recommend this to everyone, on the strength of the first three sections, and the fact that it isn't a very long read!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Suad Shamma

    This was a very strong collection of stories and essays by Toni Morrison where she discusses race and racism from many different perspectives. I loved that she was able to show different sides of racism, not only from white people, but black people as well. She was able to convey how much racism or being a product of racism really affects you, and how that stigma never goes away no matter how much time has passed. My favorite excerpt was from her novel The Bluest Eye, about a young black girl wh This was a very strong collection of stories and essays by Toni Morrison where she discusses race and racism from many different perspectives. I loved that she was able to show different sides of racism, not only from white people, but black people as well. She was able to convey how much racism or being a product of racism really affects you, and how that stigma never goes away no matter how much time has passed. My favorite excerpt was from her novel The Bluest Eye, about a young black girl who feels ugly, and has always wished for blue eyes, so that she will be as beautiful and beloved as all the blond, blue-eyed children in America. This story explores the notions of race and beauty and how a woman is adversely affected when she does not fit the stereotypical profile of what constitutes beauty. Toni Morrison reminds readers how hurtful racism is, and that the effects of racism trickle down to people's self-esteem and confidence and self-worth for the rest of their lives. Morrison brings forward a point of view that is not usually discussed in stories depicting race, and for that I felt that this book and these stories would remain with me much longer than other books would.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mary Adeson

    This is a great introduction to Toni Morrison’s work. Race features extracts from Song of Solomon, The Bluest Eye, Beloved, the short story Recitatif and the essay Make America White Again. Both Recitatif and Make America White Again were the works that really stood out for me, for the relevance they currently still have. Recitatif the short story of the friendship between a black and white girl from pre-teens to adulthood, had me confronting my own assumptions and prejudices about race. From the This is a great introduction to Toni Morrison’s work. Race features extracts from Song of Solomon, The Bluest Eye, Beloved, the short story Recitatif and the essay Make America White Again. Both Recitatif and Make America White Again were the works that really stood out for me, for the relevance they currently still have. Recitatif the short story of the friendship between a black and white girl from pre-teens to adulthood, had me confronting my own assumptions and prejudices about race. From the outset you’re made aware that one of girls are black the other white, however you don’t know if this is Twyla or Roberta. Make America White Again provides an explanation of where the hate crime against people of colour stems from.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dane Cobain

    I really enjoyed this one, if you can talk about enjoyment when you’re reading stories about race and racism. I also thought it was interesting that she showed the racism of some of the black characters, as well as some of the white ones. It certainly gave me a lot of food for thought. This is another one of the books in the Vintage Mini Modern series that I’ve been working through, and it features selections from Song of Solomon, The Bluest Eye and Beloved, as well as a few other bits and bobs i I really enjoyed this one, if you can talk about enjoyment when you’re reading stories about race and racism. I also thought it was interesting that she showed the racism of some of the black characters, as well as some of the white ones. It certainly gave me a lot of food for thought. This is another one of the books in the Vintage Mini Modern series that I’ve been working through, and it features selections from Song of Solomon, The Bluest Eye and Beloved, as well as a few other bits and bobs including an essay on racism in Trump’s America. That makes it more relevant than ever, even if it is a little depressing sometimes. Read it!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Aditi Barman Roy

    The last essay of the book "Making America White Again" is a must read for everyone interested in the politics of Black oppression and by extension the politics of universal repression and bigotry. The book consists of sections selected from three novels of Morrison viz. The Song of Solomon, Beloved and The Bluest Eye. In addition to this it also comes with a short story all of which presents a scathing commentary on the effects of racial fanaticism and how it effects both white and black lives. The last essay of the book "Making America White Again" is a must read for everyone interested in the politics of Black oppression and by extension the politics of universal repression and bigotry. The book consists of sections selected from three novels of Morrison viz. The Song of Solomon, Beloved and The Bluest Eye. In addition to this it also comes with a short story all of which presents a scathing commentary on the effects of racial fanaticism and how it effects both white and black lives.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Elke de Echte

    “All things in her are flux and anticipation. But her blackness is static and dread.” These small slivers of different books by Toni Morrison focus on the matter of Race. And how. Capturing immeasurable anger as well as equal human empathy, Morrison pushes this theme to the foreground with something like pride felt between the lines. The only disappointment is being thrown from one extract to another, rather than being able to plunge into the entire novel.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Reading this just made me want to read all of the books whose excerpts were included. It’s beautiful and powerful writing but, having read Beloved in full, I think it doesn’t contain the power of a full story. Read this for a work book club where we’re reading several books on race (coincidental timing with the prominence of the BLM movement right now), so will be interested in hearing the perspectives from others on how the contents of this book made them feel about race. Especially the essay M Reading this just made me want to read all of the books whose excerpts were included. It’s beautiful and powerful writing but, having read Beloved in full, I think it doesn’t contain the power of a full story. Read this for a work book club where we’re reading several books on race (coincidental timing with the prominence of the BLM movement right now), so will be interested in hearing the perspectives from others on how the contents of this book made them feel about race. Especially the essay Making America White Again, which was written so recently.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I’m having real trouble rating this one. Not because that I absolutely love how Morrison writes. I just didn’t expect this book to be a small collection of earlier works without her own reflections where she discusses why she wrote those passages. I have to say, though, this is a great introduction to her works and it could be a good basis for discussion about race among those who don’t have that much knowledge about racial issues. But it’s not something I would recommend to those who are already I’m having real trouble rating this one. Not because that I absolutely love how Morrison writes. I just didn’t expect this book to be a small collection of earlier works without her own reflections where she discusses why she wrote those passages. I have to say, though, this is a great introduction to her works and it could be a good basis for discussion about race among those who don’t have that much knowledge about racial issues. But it’s not something I would recommend to those who are already familiar with her work and have read these works before.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Short excerpts from Toni Morrison's various books. Biting looks at race and race relations. Short excerpts from Toni Morrison's various books. Biting looks at race and race relations.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rachel rachandalotabooks

    The last part was an accurate reflection of our time

  19. 5 out of 5

    montserrat

    Toni Morrison's writing is out of this world. Her language goes from concise to ornate and she always knows just what tone to use. She's truly an icon. Toni Morrison's writing is out of this world. Her language goes from concise to ornate and she always knows just what tone to use. She's truly an icon.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mimi

    Powerful! A great introduction into Toni Morrison's work. I have already read Beloved and now I really want to read more by her. Powerful! A great introduction into Toni Morrison's work. I have already read Beloved and now I really want to read more by her.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Tsipouras

    Toni Morrison is a great writer, no doubt about that, and I really enjoyed the included short story Recitatif, but I must admit that I struggled with the excerpts of her novels. As I'm not American I didn't recognize immediately all name or event references and thus I could not easily understand what period of time she was talking about - and that seems to change quite often. What is it that keeps the idea of white supremacy so alive, not only in the USA? Changing the laws obviously wasn't enoug Toni Morrison is a great writer, no doubt about that, and I really enjoyed the included short story Recitatif, but I must admit that I struggled with the excerpts of her novels. As I'm not American I didn't recognize immediately all name or event references and thus I could not easily understand what period of time she was talking about - and that seems to change quite often. What is it that keeps the idea of white supremacy so alive, not only in the USA? Changing the laws obviously wasn't enough.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Vishal

    'What good is a man's life if he can't even choose what to die for?'. I don't normally read minis, and feel cheated if I just read parts of novels (probably an OCD thing- which, however didn't prevent me from giving back on books in the past because they just weren't worth it), but - as I normally do - I wandered into a bookshop on my travels, saw the pertinence of this to both the world and my life, and picked it up. I've never read Toni Morrison before, but I was especially intrigued by the exce 'What good is a man's life if he can't even choose what to die for?'. I don't normally read minis, and feel cheated if I just read parts of novels (probably an OCD thing- which, however didn't prevent me from giving back on books in the past because they just weren't worth it), but - as I normally do - I wandered into a bookshop on my travels, saw the pertinence of this to both the world and my life, and picked it up. I've never read Toni Morrison before, but I was especially intrigued by the excerpt from The Bluest Eye. She captures with delicate precision the insecurities and pangs of one who grows up different from the majority. What I also liked is that she tackles the kind of racism that is rampant between non-whites, that we also tend to ignore; abhorring those of our race who are darker or lighter than us. Recitatif is a smartly written short-story where the reader is kept guessing about the racial identity of the two main characters. In essence, it helps to strip away the stereotypes we tend to apportion to characters based on their colour or background. The collection ends with a thought-provoking, balanced essay about what America is coming to. I've always had a special place in my heart for the country, but recent events have challenged this; a rottenness seems to have set in, leading to ugly confrontations. One can only hope that mutual understanding emerges from this confrontation. Perhaps such a book in the hand might enlighten the ignorant, assuming they are literate or intelligent enough. Somehow, that's highly in doubt.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sam Still Reading

    The Vintage Minis series are a great way to test drive a new author, which is why I picked up several when they were released back in 2017. On a recent book clean up, I found this collection on race and decided it would be an appropriate time to read it. I haven’t read any of Toni Morrison’s novels before, which was stupid of me. She’s a gifted writer and this mini offers a great taste of her work. There are extracts from Beloved, Song of Solomon and The Bluest Eye, as well as a short story (‘Rec The Vintage Minis series are a great way to test drive a new author, which is why I picked up several when they were released back in 2017. On a recent book clean up, I found this collection on race and decided it would be an appropriate time to read it. I haven’t read any of Toni Morrison’s novels before, which was stupid of me. She’s a gifted writer and this mini offers a great taste of her work. There are extracts from Beloved, Song of Solomon and The Bluest Eye, as well as a short story (‘Recitatif’) and an essay (‘Making America White Again’). I enjoyed the last two the most, probably because they were complete works and well…Trump is continually in today’s headlines across the world. This collection demonstrates how well Morrison can write over a breadth of subjects and across fiction and non-fiction. Her writing is great at conjuring up images in the reader’s head and tackling issues of race and class directly. What was very clever about the short story is that it wasn’t clear to me which character was black and which was white – and did it really matter? The Bluest Eye had a fantastic character in a girl who wanted blue eyes so she could be as pretty as other girls and the dolls she likes to destroy (to me, a sign of an inquiring mind). I knew some of the plot of Beloved, but the extract was wonderfully creepy at times and heartbreaking in others. The conflict raised between two black men in the Song of Solomon excerpt added another layer to the different thoughts and actions within the community to white people. Overall, the collection was very powerful and gave me some ideas for which Toni Morrison novel I will read in the future. These minis are excellent tasters for a new author or to explore issues in a quick to read format. http://samstillreading.wordpress.com

  24. 5 out of 5

    Maryam Adhikarie

    The first time I ever heard the name Toni Morrison was at my first Open Book Festival last year amongst authors discussing her influence in their very own writing last year. Yes, only last year, and nearly a year later I purchased her book and finally had the privilege of reading a book many authors draw inspiration from. I thought it be befitting to read a book about Race because the climate surrounding it is getting blunter. Her book just hits different, I hope that is formal enough. It really The first time I ever heard the name Toni Morrison was at my first Open Book Festival last year amongst authors discussing her influence in their very own writing last year. Yes, only last year, and nearly a year later I purchased her book and finally had the privilege of reading a book many authors draw inspiration from. I thought it be befitting to read a book about Race because the climate surrounding it is getting blunter. Her book just hits different, I hope that is formal enough. It really does. The book titled race involves snippets of her stories she wrote and including her essay titled ‘Making America White Again.’ These stories and that essay showcases the historic subliminal oppression that tumbles into something bigger and dangerous. It is not a book that explains racism or what is a racist, this book explains the American history of black people through stories so that we, as outsiders, can understand the life of a black person in the United States. Morrison has a way of putting the reader in the characters mindset and grabbing your attention continuously. Her writing genuinely feels like her own as if the author’s personality is in the writing and not the author changing her personality according to the story.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Minikiwii

    This book is a collection of some of Morrison's writings. I liked a lot the first one, "From the novel Song of Solomon", where you can find a reflection on the differences between killing a black person versus a white person. My second favorite chapter was "From the novel The Bluest Eye". Here she talks about the beauty canon (white, blue eyes, blonde...). The last one is also wonderful, " 'Making America White Again', an essay". She shows the importance whiteness has always have (and still does This book is a collection of some of Morrison's writings. I liked a lot the first one, "From the novel Song of Solomon", where you can find a reflection on the differences between killing a black person versus a white person. My second favorite chapter was "From the novel The Bluest Eye". Here she talks about the beauty canon (white, blue eyes, blonde...). The last one is also wonderful, " 'Making America White Again', an essay". She shows the importance whiteness has always have (and still does, in the Trump era) for white people: it assures them their privileges. Overall I liked it a lot, I had already read The Bluest Eye and I enjoyed it. The main downside is that it's a collection of other novels, so if you have already read them, you're not going to find almost anything new here. But I reccommend it for someone who hasn't read anything by her yet, or for someone who has read only one of them, because then you will find a lot of important things in here. Even if you have read one of her novels, reading again the fragments she has selected is very powerful, because those chapters she has chosen are among the most meaningful ones in the books.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nouran

    This was a great introductory book to Morrison's literature, especially with the focus on the perception of race. This is a new literature category I'm reading but it was quite intriguing to move through the different lenses in which Morrison addressed racial issues in her writings. I particularly took a liking to the last short story (Recitatif). It's a good reminder that hate is born out of a system. If there is one thing I was not particularly a fan of, is Morrison's view point in her essay " This was a great introductory book to Morrison's literature, especially with the focus on the perception of race. This is a new literature category I'm reading but it was quite intriguing to move through the different lenses in which Morrison addressed racial issues in her writings. I particularly took a liking to the last short story (Recitatif). It's a good reminder that hate is born out of a system. If there is one thing I was not particularly a fan of, is Morrison's view point in her essay "Making America White Again". To claim that white violence is the result of fear and cowardice is -in my opinion- to somehow infantalize whatever oppression that is currently taking place (and has been taking place since the start of colonization). Fear makes these acts of violence viable for forgiveness which I definitely know is not the intention but that's how I view this word connotation. Overall, this book will be great especially if -like myself- one was not very familiar with Morrison's creations. 4.5/5

  27. 4 out of 5

    Valorie

    This little collection of excerpts from several of Toni Morrison's books serves as a great introduction to her writing. I'd never read any of her work before picking up this collection and I was floored by the wonderful breadth and energy of her writing. The excerpts all deal with race, with characters who have been defined, debased, dehumanized because of it. The various parts explore the totality of ways race influences a situation when you think it shouldn't, and sinks deep into the mind and This little collection of excerpts from several of Toni Morrison's books serves as a great introduction to her writing. I'd never read any of her work before picking up this collection and I was floored by the wonderful breadth and energy of her writing. The excerpts all deal with race, with characters who have been defined, debased, dehumanized because of it. The various parts explore the totality of ways race influences a situation when you think it shouldn't, and sinks deep into the mind and our vision of humanity. This collection--or one of the full novels--should be required reading for everyone.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Linz

    This book is a collection of short stories, an essay and chapters from Toni Morrison’s novels. All texts somehow focus on racial problems in America. Morrison’s skillful and rich writing style evokes many emotions. I love how her characters are created very realistically and how they develop. It’s so important for people to read about black people, their lives and their struggles. Especially for white people who have no clue what problems the black community has to face. This book is a perfect i This book is a collection of short stories, an essay and chapters from Toni Morrison’s novels. All texts somehow focus on racial problems in America. Morrison’s skillful and rich writing style evokes many emotions. I love how her characters are created very realistically and how they develop. It’s so important for people to read about black people, their lives and their struggles. Especially for white people who have no clue what problems the black community has to face. This book is a perfect introduction to Morrison’s work and it could be used for many occasions. Education in black history and literature, perhaps? Education in relevant activism?

  29. 4 out of 5

    Fadi Kharoufeh

    "Anger is better. There is a sense of being in anger. A reality and presence. An awareness of worth." "The comfort of being ‘naturally better than,’ of not having to struggle or demand civil treatment, is hard to give up." This short story extracts from Toni Morrisons books, shows how much talent this author has. The writing is exquisite, provocative and to the point. I will get myself copies of 'Song of solomon' and 'The Bluest eye' as these two take 5 stars easily. I wasn't a fan of this script f "Anger is better. There is a sense of being in anger. A reality and presence. An awareness of worth." "The comfort of being ‘naturally better than,’ of not having to struggle or demand civil treatment, is hard to give up." This short story extracts from Toni Morrisons books, shows how much talent this author has. The writing is exquisite, provocative and to the point. I will get myself copies of 'Song of solomon' and 'The Bluest eye' as these two take 5 stars easily. I wasn't a fan of this script from 'Beloved' hence why I took a star away. I enjoyed the last short story 'Recitatif' and the essay as well.

  30. 5 out of 5

    neen

    2.5/5 - “I wanted rather to feel something on Christmas Day. The real question would have been “dear Claudia what experience would like on Christmas” I could have spoken up, “I want to sit on the low stool in big mama’s kitchen with my lap full of lilacs and listen to big papa play his violin for me alone.” The lowness of the stool made for my body, the security and warmth of big mamas kitchen, the smell of the lilacs, the sound of the music, and since it would be good to have all of my senses enga 2.5/5 - “I wanted rather to feel something on Christmas Day. The real question would have been “dear Claudia what experience would like on Christmas” I could have spoken up, “I want to sit on the low stool in big mama’s kitchen with my lap full of lilacs and listen to big papa play his violin for me alone.” The lowness of the stool made for my body, the security and warmth of big mamas kitchen, the smell of the lilacs, the sound of the music, and since it would be good to have all of my senses engaged, the taste of a peach perhaps afterward. - The excerpt from Song of Solomon was really good and the short story Recitatif was excellent.

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