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Two hundred women from a variety of backgrounds are asked the same five questions. Their answers are inspiring human stories of success and courage, love and pain, redemption and generosity. From well-known activists, artists, and innovators to everyday women whose lives are no less exceptional for that, each woman shares her unique replies to questions like "What really m Two hundred women from a variety of backgrounds are asked the same five questions. Their answers are inspiring human stories of success and courage, love and pain, redemption and generosity. From well-known activists, artists, and innovators to everyday women whose lives are no less exceptional for that, each woman shares her unique replies to questions like "What really matters to you?" and "What would you change in the world if you could?" Interviewees include conservation and animal welfare activist Jane Goodall, actor and human rights advocate Alfre Woodard, along with those who are making a difference behind the scenes around the world, such as Marian Wright Edelman, head of the Children's Defense Fund. Each interview is accompanied by a photographic portrait, resulting in a volume that is compelling in word and image—and global in its scope and resonance. This landmark book is published to coincide with an immersive traveling exhibition and an interactive website, building on this remarkable, ever-evolving project. With responses ranging from uplifting to heartbreaking, these women offer gifts of empowerment and strength—inviting us to bring positive change at a time when so many are fighting for basic freedom and equality.


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Two hundred women from a variety of backgrounds are asked the same five questions. Their answers are inspiring human stories of success and courage, love and pain, redemption and generosity. From well-known activists, artists, and innovators to everyday women whose lives are no less exceptional for that, each woman shares her unique replies to questions like "What really m Two hundred women from a variety of backgrounds are asked the same five questions. Their answers are inspiring human stories of success and courage, love and pain, redemption and generosity. From well-known activists, artists, and innovators to everyday women whose lives are no less exceptional for that, each woman shares her unique replies to questions like "What really matters to you?" and "What would you change in the world if you could?" Interviewees include conservation and animal welfare activist Jane Goodall, actor and human rights advocate Alfre Woodard, along with those who are making a difference behind the scenes around the world, such as Marian Wright Edelman, head of the Children's Defense Fund. Each interview is accompanied by a photographic portrait, resulting in a volume that is compelling in word and image—and global in its scope and resonance. This landmark book is published to coincide with an immersive traveling exhibition and an interactive website, building on this remarkable, ever-evolving project. With responses ranging from uplifting to heartbreaking, these women offer gifts of empowerment and strength—inviting us to bring positive change at a time when so many are fighting for basic freedom and equality.

30 review for 200 Women: Who Will Change The Way You See The World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nat

    200 Women was the ultimate badass way to kick-off my reading of Nonfiction November. Gloria Steinem once said, ‘You can’t empower women without listening to their stories.’ We agree.  Interviews with 200 women from a variety of backgrounds provide a snapshot of female life around the globe. Interviewees include: · Jane Goodall, conservation and animal welfare activist · Margaret Atwood, author and winner of The Booker Prize · Roxane Gay, author and feminist · Alicia Garza, activist and co-founder of B 200 Women was the ultimate badass way to kick-off my reading of Nonfiction November. Gloria Steinem once said, ‘You can’t empower women without listening to their stories.’ We agree.  Interviews with 200 women from a variety of backgrounds provide a snapshot of female life around the globe. Interviewees include: · Jane Goodall, conservation and animal welfare activist · Margaret Atwood, author and winner of The Booker Prize · Roxane Gay, author and feminist · Alicia Garza, activist and co-founder of Black Lives Matter · Marian Wright Edelman, head of the Children's Defense Fund · Dolores Huerta, labor activist, community organizer, and co-founder of the National Farm Workers Association · Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, author and Macarthur Foundation fellow Each woman shares her unique reply to the same five questions: What really matters to you?, What brings you happiness?, What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?, What would you change if you could?, and Which single word do you most identify with? With responses ranging from uplifting to heartbreaking, these women offer gifts of empowerment and strength-inviting us to bring positive change at a time when so many are fighting for basic freedom and equality. I’ve been craving for a new feminist collection to release out into the world, ever since i finished Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls. Upon seeing the promotional clip, I went into this expecting the perfect companion and follow-up to Grace Bonney's In the Company of Women. Though we have the same style of clean-cut portraits, 200 Women narrows down to having the same five-question structure apply to everyone, rather than a fitted question to each interviewee. At first I was really welcoming of the unwavering question format presented, thinking how I didn’t want the book to feel like a Wikipedia-esque entry of each woman. But I grew tired overtime and wished they wouldn’t have stuck to it with every single interviewee. Unsurprisingly, having 200 women answer the same five questions, page after page, meant answers were repeated till the words lost all meaning to the reader. So I do wish they would’ve mixed it up a bit overtime to keep us on our toes. But that's my only minor inconvenience with the work; otherwise, reading this collection was a welcome reminder that all hope isn’t lost in today’s world with all the injustices that are engulfing us. It's truly rewarding to know that there are these utterly incredible women out there in the world, fighting for what’s right and deserving. The bright light at the end of a hauntingly dark tunnel. From talks of being a conscious consumer to the effect tiny gestures of kindness can have, the women in this diverse collection were able to shine a light on much-needed conversation starters. Also, getting introduced and familiarized with unknown and well-known faces, who all had something enlightening to add to the table on empowering girls and women, was as exciting as always. Some of my personal highlights from the collection include: #1 Inna Modja: #2 Eva McGauley: “... because I want to give more in life than I’ve taken.”  #3 Gabourey Sidibe: #4 Sabila Khatun: I can't stop thinking about Khatun's life story and her children's support system. #5 Yassmin Abdel-Magied: Her take on the question What brings you happiness? and answering with faith, spirituality and religion was fascinating: I wonder if we sometimes conflate happiness with hedonism. Is doing something that makes you happy in a single moment – for the pure pleasure of it – actual happiness, or is it filling a hole that we don’t even realise we have? ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Publication Date: October 31, 2017 Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying 200 Women, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission! Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with Ko-fi.com/bookspoils

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carole

    200 Women by Geoff Blackwell is an examination of women of all walks of life, sharing what is most important to them by answering the same five questions. The audiobook, which can’t show the photographs that appeared in the book, has the definite advantage of the reader being able to hear each woman’s voice, making this a very personal experience. Hearing these voices is encouraging, as each one denotes the possibilities of today’s world. The outlook of these women reminds us that anything is po 200 Women by Geoff Blackwell is an examination of women of all walks of life, sharing what is most important to them by answering the same five questions. The audiobook, which can’t show the photographs that appeared in the book, has the definite advantage of the reader being able to hear each woman’s voice, making this a very personal experience. Hearing these voices is encouraging, as each one denotes the possibilities of today’s world. The outlook of these women reminds us that anything is possible, if we believe in ourselves and our goals and set about to make a real difference in all aspects of life. Highly recommended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I received this book for free through LibraryThing’s Early Reviewers. First off, I just have to say that this book is massive. It’s no wonder that it retails for $50. It is so heavy. Content-wise, this book is great. It showcases a very diverse group of women and their lives and thoughts. Some of them are famous and some of them are just regular, everyday women. But each and every one of them is inspiring. The photographs that accompany the interviews are stunning. Each woman is beautifully high I received this book for free through LibraryThing’s Early Reviewers. First off, I just have to say that this book is massive. It’s no wonder that it retails for $50. It is so heavy. Content-wise, this book is great. It showcases a very diverse group of women and their lives and thoughts. Some of them are famous and some of them are just regular, everyday women. But each and every one of them is inspiring. The photographs that accompany the interviews are stunning. Each woman is beautifully highlighted on her own page. Overall, this is a great feminist coffee table book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tiyahna Ridley-Padmore

    In 200 Women: Who Will Change The Way You See The World", artist Geoff Blackwell captures photographs and quotes from over 200 women from various walks of life as they answer the same five questions: 1. What really matters to you? 2. What brings you happiness? 3. What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery? 4. What would you change if you could? 5. Which single word do you most identify with? The book features the reflections of well-known women such as Gabourey Sidibe, Chimimanda Ngozi Adichi In 200 Women: Who Will Change The Way You See The World", artist Geoff Blackwell captures photographs and quotes from over 200 women from various walks of life as they answer the same five questions: 1. What really matters to you? 2. What brings you happiness? 3. What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery? 4. What would you change if you could? 5. Which single word do you most identify with? The book features the reflections of well-known women such as Gabourey Sidibe, Chimimanda Ngozi Adichie and Margaret Atwood as well as non-famous women such as Kakali Sen and Laura Hubidos. I like how diverse the selection criteria was (there is representation across nationality, race, ability, age, profession, body type, gender identity and sexual orientation). However, the author very much took an "equality" instead of an "equity" approach to this project. The lesson that 200 women was trying to make, according to Blackwell, is that “there are no ordinary women, and there is no ‘us and them.’ There’s just us (Blackwell, 2017, p.19).” While that lesson is lovely in theory, in practice, while there are certainly commonalities in the experience of womanhood, women also possess intersecting identities that can create glaring disparities in the experience. For example, although all of the questions were standardized, the way the women were represented was unequal. The more successful women often had biographies rooted in their accomplishments while some of the lesser known women, such as Nomvula Sikhakhane, had biographies rooted in their disadvantages. Further, I ended up flipping through most of the pictures but I didn't read every profile -- even with very different backgrounds, the repetitive question format became tedious after a couple dozen. Either way, I appreciate what this book is trying to do. The photographs are gorgeous and the book quality is superb. I think 200 Women would make for a great gift or coffee table book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    BELLETRIST

    Our next AMUSE BOOK [and contest!] is in! @200Women from @chroniclebooks asks #200women from a variety of backgrounds the same five questions. Their answers are inspiring human stories of success and courage, love and pain, redemption and generosity.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Cristiani

    beautiful photography. I found the names, captions and stories disjointed - it was hard to match them up sometimes - but it's a comprehensive, inspiring list, and I learned a lot even when just flipping the pages. We can all hope to be as dedicated and compassionate as these women. beautiful photography. I found the names, captions and stories disjointed - it was hard to match them up sometimes - but it's a comprehensive, inspiring list, and I learned a lot even when just flipping the pages. We can all hope to be as dedicated and compassionate as these women.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nadia

    Question: "What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?" Response: "There's a very powerful narrative that is dividing the United States in really toxic ways - it is the thing we have to transform. It has to do with notions of 'us versus them' and with a scarcity mentality. I fundamentally disagree with the notion that, somehow, there is not enough beauty, resources, joy and connection in the world for all of us; it is a notion that is turning us against each other. This kind of division is Question: "What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?" Response: "There's a very powerful narrative that is dividing the United States in really toxic ways - it is the thing we have to transform. It has to do with notions of 'us versus them' and with a scarcity mentality. I fundamentally disagree with the notion that, somehow, there is not enough beauty, resources, joy and connection in the world for all of us; it is a notion that is turning us against each other. This kind of division is creating a toxicity that is incredibly destructive. It is really terrifying to watch it rise in new ways. I know people say it's always been there, but it seems like we're adding to it. Yes, the kerosene was on the ground, but it wasn't necessarily on fire - and now we're lighting matches." Ai-jen Poo - Pittsburgh, USA - Labour Activist for 20yrs - Executive Dir. National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA) - pg. 140 Question: "What really matters to you?" Response: "Apart from my writing, I invest myself in conservation issues, freedom of expression and women's rights; since I take the radical view that women are human beings, I consider women's rights to be a subset of human-rights issues" Margaret Atwood CC - Ottawa, Canada - Bestselling Author of over 40 books - Granted the Order of Canada in 1973 - pg. 269 I relished every second reading about these innovative & exemplary 200 Women who are in myriad ways changing the World! The photos were stunning and captured a unique facet of each. The questions although limited were an efficient mechanism in having them succinctly address some aspects of their contributions in the World, as well as giving an inviting glimpse of their personalities. I would have given this book 5 stars if it wasn't for these three hindrances; the size & weight of the book, which I put on the scale came in at 8 pounds, measuring 12 inches in length and 9 inches in width, which makes it awkward & unwieldy, especially in smaller hands. Although I understand this is a coffee table book, I still feel that the Authors, Geoff & Ruth did a great disservice to the overall engagement of this work by making it inaccessible for many. The font used was sans-serif, which means it has no 'hooks' to assist the eye, making the eyes weary much quicker, and sized at about a 10, it contributed to an overall struggle in reading. And lastly, there were 83 Women, who got full-page photos; however, you had to go to the back of the book in order to read about them, which to me makes zero sense, especially when added to the ungainliness of the work. In spite of these obstacles, I still recommend this as a stimulating and inspirational exploration of Female contribution, capability, and fierceness.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    200 Women across the globe are asked the same 5 questions and their responses fill the pages next to their photograph in this coffee table book. The photography that graces the pages of 200 Women are beautiful and show the souls of these women. The stories are each unique and different, from the woman who must beg on the streets to world leaders such as Winnie Mandela. Did the book change the way I see the world? No. Their was no remarkable "ah-ha" moment. It is the story that I've heard through 200 Women across the globe are asked the same 5 questions and their responses fill the pages next to their photograph in this coffee table book. The photography that graces the pages of 200 Women are beautiful and show the souls of these women. The stories are each unique and different, from the woman who must beg on the streets to world leaders such as Winnie Mandela. Did the book change the way I see the world? No. Their was no remarkable "ah-ha" moment. It is the story that I've heard through so many other channels, and the thoughts, the personal, where not challenging enough. While their is a range of diversity, inspiring role models and accomplished subjects, I was looking for something more than a tabletop book. I would share it with other individuals, read a few stories and then pass it on to the next person. Part of the disappointment is that reading 200 stories dulls the meaning after awhile. So just pick a few and pass it on. You'll get more out of it in this way.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    A mediocre book. Not bad, just strange. A book about women, written by a man, nearly every woman’s photo is filtered and glamorous. All of them are famous. Many sound like they are doing PR, and the writing is a bit disjointed. Serial abuser Amber Heard is in it, and nothing from an average woman.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Khris Sellin

    So many inspiring women, from all walks of life! I got this for Mother's Day last year. I've been reading each story a little bit at a time. It's a great one to keep as a coffee table book and to reference whenever i want. So many inspiring women, from all walks of life! I got this for Mother's Day last year. I've been reading each story a little bit at a time. It's a great one to keep as a coffee table book and to reference whenever i want.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    This book is L O N G. If you’re going to enjoy it, you have to commit, because it’s going to take time to wade through everything. These women, though, are incredible. Each of them brings their personal experience to the feminist fight, using their stories to make the world a better place and be “the ones who go before.” I found the unintentional themes throughout the book to be eye-opening, as well as both encouraging and disheartening: They all want justice, equality, and peace. This gives me h This book is L O N G. If you’re going to enjoy it, you have to commit, because it’s going to take time to wade through everything. These women, though, are incredible. Each of them brings their personal experience to the feminist fight, using their stories to make the world a better place and be “the ones who go before.” I found the unintentional themes throughout the book to be eye-opening, as well as both encouraging and disheartening: They all want justice, equality, and peace. This gives me hope for the future, while also breaking my heart for the present. Many of them volunteer with or have started their own non-profits to promote the female experience, or to support the LGBTQ community, those with special needs, refugees, or any other marginalized group. And they’re not all Americans. The authors are from New Zealand, so they do have a fair number of women from there, but there are also women included in this book from various other parts of the world, all saying the same thing. They each come from unique backgrounds: different family units, different culture, different religion (if any), different lifestyle, different experiences, and yet they all want the same things. I felt that many of these women were high-profile, which removed the idea that these are just “everyday women” changing the world, but at the same time—they’re changing the world because they took what they were given in their own everyday lives and have used it to improve the world around them. Everything they have they have put to good use for others, and any recognition they have received has been well-earned. They are a diverse collection of women who will inspire anyone who reads the book to get off their butts and DO SOMETHING. Because these women make you feel like we can do anything. In fact, they already are.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lyndsay

    200 Women is an inspiring (and huge!) coffee table book with content that couldn’t be more important or relevant than it is right now. Each woman answers the same five question in her own unique and personal voice. Many of the women you’ve heard of and many you haven’t. This book is a lovely collection of quotes, answers, thoughts and portraits. Highly recommend.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maurya

    This book is a work of art. It's a table coffee table worth reading. The women in this book are inspirational and down to earth. I am a better person for having read about these amazing women. Thank you to my sister Killi for gifting me this book. (I read it over 9 months, so I could savor each of the ladies and their stories.) This book is a work of art. It's a table coffee table worth reading. The women in this book are inspirational and down to earth. I am a better person for having read about these amazing women. Thank you to my sister Killi for gifting me this book. (I read it over 9 months, so I could savor each of the ladies and their stories.)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sherilyn

    What an amazing book. Anyone who wants to see the heart of the issues in this world should read this book. It's an inspiration while at the same time heartbreaking. The photography is beautiful too. It's the sort of book you should share but at the same time are reluctant to let it go. What an amazing book. Anyone who wants to see the heart of the issues in this world should read this book. It's an inspiration while at the same time heartbreaking. The photography is beautiful too. It's the sort of book you should share but at the same time are reluctant to let it go.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shahrun

    This book has been created by a very simple idea: Interview a broad spectrum of women to ask them the same 5 questions and take their portrait. I would love to buy the team behind this amazing work and all the women included a drink/meal to thank them for sharing their stories. What a dinner party that would be! I have taken something away from each and every woman’s words I read. I’m not saying I agree with everything they said, but it is so refreshing and fascinating to read my way through suc This book has been created by a very simple idea: Interview a broad spectrum of women to ask them the same 5 questions and take their portrait. I would love to buy the team behind this amazing work and all the women included a drink/meal to thank them for sharing their stories. What a dinner party that would be! I have taken something away from each and every woman’s words I read. I’m not saying I agree with everything they said, but it is so refreshing and fascinating to read my way through such a collection of ideas and experiences. I did feel a slight restriction to the window of wisdom as - I do appreciate the authors and photographers couldn’t visit every country in the world - there was a little repetition of women selected from the same places. That doesn’t take anything away from this volume as no two people (even siblings) experience the same things in the same way, but perhaps it paves the way for further volume(s)... Maybe even 200 Men? I’m not sure how I came across this book - but I’m so glad I did, as I know I will be picking this book up for many years to come. Now if I may be so bold, here are my answers... What really matters to you? That my actions don’t cause a negative impact. I like to make people happy and laugh. And feed them. What brings you happiness? Doing something random that makes someone else happy (random acts of kindness), happiness in people around me, feeding people, learning new things, making things, reading, travelling and exploring. What do you regard as being the lowest depth of misery? Being trapped. Trapped in toxic relationships, situations or in your own head. What would you change if you could? I would make everyone see that all people have value and give everyone self worth. If you can see that, how can you go around causing harm, take aw some body’s dignity or any if the other disgusting things that we keep doing to each other. I hope that would also end the horrendous fashion of leisure plastic surgery. Our beauty is in our differences! And give people a thirst for knowledge. We have a lot of work to do don’t we? Which single word do you most identify with? Trying. I am very trying and I always do keep on trying.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Ibarra

    I commend the author for her great effort and work of interviewing 200 women, asking them to answer five questions: What really matters to you? What brings you happiness? What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery? What would you change if you could= and Which single word do you most identify with? Most of the women are educated in their field of interest, having bachelor's or master's degrees at least. They feel that this privilege makes them responsible for doing something for less fortu I commend the author for her great effort and work of interviewing 200 women, asking them to answer five questions: What really matters to you? What brings you happiness? What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery? What would you change if you could= and Which single word do you most identify with? Most of the women are educated in their field of interest, having bachelor's or master's degrees at least. They feel that this privilege makes them responsible for doing something for less fortunate people. Being women, it is obvious that the topics most mentioned are woman's empowerment, home abuse, lack of opportunities, discrimination, among others heard so often nowadays. More women willing to devote their life to others are needed. However, I feel that the author lost a very valuable opportunity by not giving a voice to those uneducated, forgotten, invisible women. It would have been very interesting to also have the opinion of those women who are victims. Contrary to the spirit of the book, I found the selection of women interviewed skewed and somewhat discriminatory. One of the most emotional interviews for me was when a very poor woman said that what she would like the most is to have more goats.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andie

    This is a visually beautiful coffee table book in which 200 accomplished women from around the world are asked the same 5 questions: --What Really Matters to You? --What Brings You Happiness? --What Do You Regard as the Lowest Depths of Misery? What Would You Change If You Could? --With What Single Word Do You Identify? The answers are as varied as the women what are asked the questions. Some replies are short and sweet, some funny, some heart breakingly tragic and some profound. But all will have mea This is a visually beautiful coffee table book in which 200 accomplished women from around the world are asked the same 5 questions: --What Really Matters to You? --What Brings You Happiness? --What Do You Regard as the Lowest Depths of Misery? What Would You Change If You Could? --With What Single Word Do You Identify? The answers are as varied as the women what are asked the questions. Some replies are short and sweet, some funny, some heart breakingly tragic and some profound. But all will have meaning to someone reading this book. This is a physically big book & not something that one reads curled up in an easy chair. This is a book to dip into when the mood strikes and to savor the thoughts of the women featured inside I received this book from Library Thing's Early Reviewer program in exchange for an honest review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Leonard

    This is a big and thick book, but it's worth every hour you devote to it. Here you will meet Eva McGauley from New Zealand, diagnosed with terminal cancer at the age of fifteen; and Sergut Belay who had to leave Ethiopia after her husband became a political prisoner, and escape to Sweden leaving her children behind; and Ruchira Gupta from India, who produced the award winning film, "The Selling of Innocents," about sex trafficking. With large portraits and a surprisingly amount of information it This is a big and thick book, but it's worth every hour you devote to it. Here you will meet Eva McGauley from New Zealand, diagnosed with terminal cancer at the age of fifteen; and Sergut Belay who had to leave Ethiopia after her husband became a political prisoner, and escape to Sweden leaving her children behind; and Ruchira Gupta from India, who produced the award winning film, "The Selling of Innocents," about sex trafficking. With large portraits and a surprisingly amount of information it will take while to absorb this book, but it is very satisfying, and awakens the reader to all the work that is being done by women and girls to make this planet a healthier place, and all that still needs to be done. If I could give it more than five stars, I would.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    First, this amazing book is not a set of biographies but does provide some biographical information. Secondly , in a library situation it is heavy and huge and will need some looking after. It's a great addition to those books which purport to be about achieving women and who are nearly all well known and featured in book after book. These are women who are mostly not famous although some are well known in their fields or amongst their peers, e.g. business, human rights. It's refreshing and insp First, this amazing book is not a set of biographies but does provide some biographical information. Secondly , in a library situation it is heavy and huge and will need some looking after. It's a great addition to those books which purport to be about achieving women and who are nearly all well known and featured in book after book. These are women who are mostly not famous although some are well known in their fields or amongst their peers, e.g. business, human rights. It's refreshing and inspiring and emotionally packs quite a punch through both the photos and text. Approx 7/8 women are New Zealanders.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Lawson

    200 Women is a HUGE, well made book with a ton of color photographs. The women featured are from all walks of life--art, business, philanthropy, fashion, relition--you name it. The women here are powerful, inspiration figures who have reached the pinnacle in their field. The text asks each woman questions such as, "What really matters to you," and "What would you change if you could?" Outstanding photographs + Inspiring stories. Advance Review Copy courtesy of Chronicle Books. 200 Women is a HUGE, well made book with a ton of color photographs. The women featured are from all walks of life--art, business, philanthropy, fashion, relition--you name it. The women here are powerful, inspiration figures who have reached the pinnacle in their field. The text asks each woman questions such as, "What really matters to you," and "What would you change if you could?" Outstanding photographs + Inspiring stories. Advance Review Copy courtesy of Chronicle Books.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Tankersley

    Lots of inspiring words and stories by 200 remarkable women from around the world - not always the names you think of either. Had to take it in small bites to let each testimony/interview settle in my mind. Print is a tad small too. LOL Any person, especially women, who think they're in a bad place or not being treated equal to others needs to read this book. Then you may think twice or thrice about where you are and how you can change your circumstances. Enlightening! Lots of inspiring words and stories by 200 remarkable women from around the world - not always the names you think of either. Had to take it in small bites to let each testimony/interview settle in my mind. Print is a tad small too. LOL Any person, especially women, who think they're in a bad place or not being treated equal to others needs to read this book. Then you may think twice or thrice about where you are and how you can change your circumstances. Enlightening!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I loved this book. It was colorful, beautiful, and thought provoking. It really opens up your eyes to the way the world is outside your own. My only complaints are the sheer size of this book (It's so heavy!) and the font is quite small, but overall a brilliant book and I would recommend it. 4.5 stars. I loved this book. It was colorful, beautiful, and thought provoking. It really opens up your eyes to the way the world is outside your own. My only complaints are the sheer size of this book (It's so heavy!) and the font is quite small, but overall a brilliant book and I would recommend it. 4.5 stars.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Durand

    Absolutely amazing. It took me about a year to read this because I would read 3-4 at a time and then just relish in the stories of these ispirational women. I love the concept of the 5 questions and the photography. I know it is a book I will return to over and over.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

    This is a big book! Loved reading the inspiring stories of each woman. Such different journeys but with a common theme of wanting to help other people.

  25. 5 out of 5

    nicole

    Loved reading the insights of 200 interesting women. Lack of hope was by far the most prominent answer to what lowest depths of misery means to them. I also got introduced to so many great charities Some of the quotes that resonated with me were “What are beliefs? Beliefs are habits, habits that were downloaded onto us by our parents, our society, and our culture.Some of us go through life defending these habits - sometimes to the death - habits that aren’t even ours. So I want people to be able Loved reading the insights of 200 interesting women. Lack of hope was by far the most prominent answer to what lowest depths of misery means to them. I also got introduced to so many great charities Some of the quotes that resonated with me were “What are beliefs? Beliefs are habits, habits that were downloaded onto us by our parents, our society, and our culture.Some of us go through life defending these habits - sometimes to the death - habits that aren’t even ours. So I want people to be able to say “Wait a minute. This is not working for me.” We all have to come to the terms with the cost of holding on. Because there is a huge cost of walking this earth with beliefs that aren’t even ours And being someone that we’re not.” “What matters is how I show up in the face of my children and my husband and the people I love. What matters to me is to assist them in finding freedom. Their true freedom. Misery - when my voice isn’t heard. When in doubt - do the kindest thing For me, God is not necessarily a religious God, but rather a spiritual being of the greatest universal expression of love. You may not control life’s circumstances but as the author of your life - you have control with what you do with them. The arc of the moral universe is long but it bends towards justice. What matters to me is emotional connection - to my family, friends, and community. Being surrounded by positive people, people that challenge my mentally and physically Of course I want my kids to be happy but it’s important that they be on the right path Interested in technology that amplifies humanity We need to realize that we are all other or that there is no other Ubuntu - i am because you are My community brings me happiness. This includes both my families - blood and chosen. My family is also my friends. The people I’ve been through things with. Stand with me, support me, let each other just be because we understand each other. Capitalism - there is nothing that makes people as miserable, that kills people as avidly, and that robs people of their dignity so completely as an economic system that prioritized profits over human needs. Apne Aap - Ruchira Gupta We affect one another - the minute I run into somebody, their energy moves my energy and vice versa TIDDA - Aboriginial generic word for sisters Tiddas are the friends you choose as your sisters. People who support me and don’t judge me. They have my back even if they don’t necessarily agree. I can call them in the middle of the night and they will give it to me straight. They will march next to me and share a cocktail with me laying under a palm tree. They are what really matters in life - without them - my life would be half what it is. I wish that compliments came in the form of glasses, so the recipient could put them on and see how they are seen by others. Hold against the Catholic chuch is that the idea of intimacy is for the purpose of producing children ino the world when they cannot ensure their safety or food security. I thrive on encounters with others. Human relationships are a true source of joy and happiness. Just knowing i’m surrounded by people that care for me is a great resource in the face of adversity. Creating makes me happier than consuming Expectations kill happiness. They kill joy and courage. A lot of weight is put on people’s appearances which just slows people down from simply getting on with living life The veil of ignorance states in order for self interest to not dictate resources, rights, and positions are spread out in society, there needs to be a veil over a person’s characteristics. This forces policy makers to effect distributions based on moral considerations. The eureka moment of insight and epiphany when things come together in my mind and i uncover something truly great - that brings me happiness. Happiness - the sense of unfettered safety that you can freely express yourself and do the things that are important to you. Being healthy brings me happiness Happiness is when you completely forget yourself - who you are and what informs your actions - kind of like a child at play Sharing stories is what I love to do. I think it’s a crime if stories told - especially great stories - aren’t shared. Helping people feel like they are part of something bigger - that sense of belonging. Being with others is what gives meaning My community of family and friends sure have helped me have a strong foundation but I’m always wanting to connect and bring more people as a part of it. That defines community for me. That sense of belonging.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This coffee-table-style book is a collection of interviews with 200 women from all over the world and from various socio-economic backgrounds. Each woman is asked the same 5 questions: What really matters to you? What brings you happiness? What do you regard as the lowest depths of misery? What would you change, if you could? What single word do you most identify with? Be prepared to read these stories without judgement and to ponder your own answers. Would your answers be different if you were your This coffee-table-style book is a collection of interviews with 200 women from all over the world and from various socio-economic backgrounds. Each woman is asked the same 5 questions: What really matters to you? What brings you happiness? What do you regard as the lowest depths of misery? What would you change, if you could? What single word do you most identify with? Be prepared to read these stories without judgement and to ponder your own answers. Would your answers be different if you were your younger self or when you are older? The stories are sometimes horrifying, always inspiring. There were particular pages – interviewees – that I marked because their words rang true to me. Marian Wright-Edelman asks the rhetorical or maybe not-so-rhetorical question, "How can it be that – as our demographics show – the majority of our children are going to be non-white in a few years, and yet over 80 per cent of the black children cannot read a computer at grade-school level?" How can that be happening in the richest country of the world? Yet there are horrible things happening all over the world that we turn a blind eye to. Many of the women address the issue of inequality. Some reviewers have labeled 200 Women a feminist book. So be it. Inequality is real in this world in regards to race and gender. If women don't speak up for themselves, who will? When Roxane Gay is asked what she would change, she answers, "Absolutely no doubt in my mind on this answer: a year of male silence. No speaking from men for a year." Amen! In regards to race and gender, Aminatta Forna spoke words that I find myself thinking about. She states, "I find it sad that we concentrate far too often on differences and not on similarities." Later she says, "the only thing that needs to change in the world is a quite tiny shift of perspective. It comes back to the idea that you have to see that people are more like you than unalike." On the subject of men, she doesn’t think they are that different than women except that they have different experiences. She explains, "One of these is that men are much freer to move through the world than women are because they don't have to think about their own personal safety to the constant extent that women do – they don't have to fear rape so much and are not seen as victims in the way that women are." That lack of fear, in my opinion, is that men are not, typically, objectified. Women are. So, yes women MUST speak up. Aminatta Forna is an author – whose works I will definitely be exploring. Not everything that rang true to me was on the subjects of racism and gender bias. Sahm Venter reminds me, especially in this heated atmosphere of unrest, that "it's really important that we stay true, as a country and as a world to the values that we held high at our best moments: democracy, freedom, integrity, humanity, sincerity." AND Ruth Reichl reminds me that "…it is a blessing just to be a sane ordinary person who can count on herself" and that the secret of life is …"learning to find joy in ordinary things." As I read the stories of these 200 extraordinary women, I made two lists – one was the answers for the lowest depths of misery and the other was the single word you most identify with. Before reading 200 Women, I don't know what my answers would have been, what they would have been 20 years ago , or what they will be 20 years from now. Right now, I think the lowest depth of misery is hopelessness, the dire feeling that there is no way to rise above whatever struggle someone is experiencing – poverty, sex trafficking, hunger, loss of a child, etc. If there is no light, no reason for moving forward, that is utter hopelessness and deep misery. As for the word I most identify with, it changed 5 times as I read this book. I've settled on "silver-lining." My sister tells me that I always try to find the silver-lining. I guess that's true. It's an effort I make in order to feel positive and grateful. Despite some of the observations that I have written about today, I rarely dwell in the negative. Enjoy this book. It is enlightening and a journey.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tay Reads

    200 women. 200 stories. Wow. Wow. Wow. Every women has her own story. Every women has her own "life rule" she lives by and follows. This book opened my mind up to the things these women experienced. And perhaps, how there are many silent voices who did not and CAN NOT speak - perhaps these 200 women spoke up FOR them. There are definitely, and I will be honest, some ideas and values mentioned that I do not "support" BUT it opened my mind up to them. 200 women. 200 stories. 200 unique stories. An 200 women. 200 stories. Wow. Wow. Wow. Every women has her own story. Every women has her own "life rule" she lives by and follows. This book opened my mind up to the things these women experienced. And perhaps, how there are many silent voices who did not and CAN NOT speak - perhaps these 200 women spoke up FOR them. There are definitely, and I will be honest, some ideas and values mentioned that I do not "support" BUT it opened my mind up to them. 200 women. 200 stories. 200 unique stories. And this is "just" 200 stories. The world is filled with ~8 BILLION people. ~8 BILLION stories. Wow. This book opened my eyes up to the way I look at people. And the stories that they carry. For no story is "just" light and no story is "just" heavy. If I was to summarize what I took home from this book, I will say it in 4 words: BE KIND TO EVERYONE (p.s this is an audiobook review.)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Noeline

    The sort of book you pick up to read a few pages of and put back down again. Stunning book with inspiring woman answering similar questions. Includes all types of people ranging from famous talented woman to leaders and then everyday people that are not well known. Great section in the back which tells you the bio of each person. Love this book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Book Buying With Katie

    An outstanding collection. Loved the emphasis on BIPOC women and the inclusion of trans-women. I also loved the emphasis on the charities or causes they work with--I learned about a lot of really cool initiatives that I never would have been exposed to otherwise.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This was a really powerful book. After asking 200 women the same few questions, the author collects their answers and presents them in this collection. Inspiring, emotional, beautiful, tragic. A really beautiful way to present the voices of influential women across the globe.

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