hits counter Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump's America - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump's America

Availability: Ready to download

Twenty-Three Leading Feminist Writers on Protest and Solidarity When 53 percent of white women voted for Donald Trump and 94 percent of black women voted for Hillary Clinton, how can women unite in Trump's America? Nasty Women includes inspiring essays from a diverse group of talented women writers who seek to provide a broad look at how we got here and what we need to do Twenty-Three Leading Feminist Writers on Protest and Solidarity When 53 percent of white women voted for Donald Trump and 94 percent of black women voted for Hillary Clinton, how can women unite in Trump's America? Nasty Women includes inspiring essays from a diverse group of talented women writers who seek to provide a broad look at how we got here and what we need to do to move forward. Featuring essays by REBECCA SOLNIT on Trump and his "misogyny army," CHERYL STRAYED on grappling with the aftermath of Hillary Clinton's loss, SARAH HEPOLA on resisting the urge to drink after the election, NICOLE CHUNG on family and friends who support Trump, KATHA POLLITT on the state of reproductive rights and what we do next, JILL FILIPOVIC on Trump's policies and the life of a young woman in West Africa, SAMANTHA IRBY on racism and living as a queer black woman in rural America, RANDA JARRAR on traveling across the country as a queer Muslim American, SARAH HOLLENBECK on Trump's cruelty toward the disabled, MEREDITH TALUSAN on feminism and the transgender community, and SARAH JAFFE on the labor movement and active and effective resistance, among others.


Compare

Twenty-Three Leading Feminist Writers on Protest and Solidarity When 53 percent of white women voted for Donald Trump and 94 percent of black women voted for Hillary Clinton, how can women unite in Trump's America? Nasty Women includes inspiring essays from a diverse group of talented women writers who seek to provide a broad look at how we got here and what we need to do Twenty-Three Leading Feminist Writers on Protest and Solidarity When 53 percent of white women voted for Donald Trump and 94 percent of black women voted for Hillary Clinton, how can women unite in Trump's America? Nasty Women includes inspiring essays from a diverse group of talented women writers who seek to provide a broad look at how we got here and what we need to do to move forward. Featuring essays by REBECCA SOLNIT on Trump and his "misogyny army," CHERYL STRAYED on grappling with the aftermath of Hillary Clinton's loss, SARAH HEPOLA on resisting the urge to drink after the election, NICOLE CHUNG on family and friends who support Trump, KATHA POLLITT on the state of reproductive rights and what we do next, JILL FILIPOVIC on Trump's policies and the life of a young woman in West Africa, SAMANTHA IRBY on racism and living as a queer black woman in rural America, RANDA JARRAR on traveling across the country as a queer Muslim American, SARAH HOLLENBECK on Trump's cruelty toward the disabled, MEREDITH TALUSAN on feminism and the transgender community, and SARAH JAFFE on the labor movement and active and effective resistance, among others.

30 review for Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump's America

  1. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    This collection represents the views of many women in America today. The underlying theme here is one very hard to understand fact: 53% of white women voted for Donald Trump. Women as group (including white women who did not vote for Trump), are having a really hard time absorbing this. It begs the question, is there a feminist movement when a large part of the constituency seems to be working at crossed purposes? The statistic blatantly outs a large segment of America identifying first and This collection represents the views of many women in America today. The underlying theme here is one very hard to understand fact: 53% of white women voted for Donald Trump. Women as group (including white women who did not vote for Trump), are having a really hard time absorbing this. It begs the question, is there a feminist movement when a large part of the constituency seems to be working at crossed purposes? The statistic blatantly outs a large segment of America identifying first and foremost as a white nationalist patriarchy. A fact that most people knew well before Trump was elected and well before his remarks about Haiti and African countries. The essays in this collection are from women's points-of-view of marginalized constituencies, be it people of color, people with disabilities, people of different religions, transgender, LGBT and the largest constituency of these women, white women who did not vote for Trump. The essays in some way or another represent a very specific item: there is something very wrong in this America. This book is collectively a variety of points of views of women coming to terms with this fact and adapting tactics in what is now Trumps America. (view spoiler)[  I'm a Woman, Vote for Me Somewhat mistitled this is an introduction to the book explaining why we need identity politics . Lost in the hubbub of debate on the left over identity politics was that Trump, too, ran a campaign based on identity, but it was white identity and white fears. During the election cycle, he deflected criticism of racialized language as unnecessary “political correctness”—a derisive term used to describe liberals’ attempts to express sensitivity toward minorities. Whereas the experiences of people of color are marked as nonstandard, white identity—white concerns, sensitivities, anxieties—is taken as representative of the whole; anything that deviates from that identity is “diversity” or “difference.”3.75 Stars  Are Women Persons? Interesting essay about the suffrage movement and how these women icons (Stanton, Anthony) threw blacks under the bus in pursuit of women's equality. Paraphrased: "You will let a black man vote but not a white woman? Really? WTF? " I understand the tactic but maddening. 4 Stars    She Will - Short essay by Cheryl Strayed lamenting Hillary Clintons loss and what it means to women (short term). 3.5 Stars  As Long As It's Healthy - Disabled woman talks about having a baby highlighting issues that non-disabled people take for granted. An interesting essay. 4 Stars"  We Have a Heroine Problem Essay discusses the inevitable issue with the narrative of a woman in power or seeking power. Men seeking power are characterized as heroes/saviors women are evil. In the United States, it’s fine for a woman to claim equality, as long as she cheerfully opts out of it. The problem with Hillary was never that she wasn’t a good enough candidate. The problem was always the story. And until we change the story, the revolution will not be feminized. What does a woman running for President have to do to be likable? Not run for President. Sad but true depiction of attitudes. 4.5 Stars  Advice to Grace in Ghana - essay about the damage that the global gag rule imposed by the Trump Administration hurts people especially in 3rd world countries. The US has been helping women worldwide in a myriad of ways through foreign aid. Trump is ending this in very misogynist ways. 4 Stars  Beyond the Pussy Hats A well done essay encouraging women to go beyond symbols and get active in the abortion debate. Filled with suggestions. 4.5 Stars Is There Ever a Right Time to Talk to Your Children About Fascism? - This one discusses on woman's ancestry as the grandchild of a Holocaust survivor and transposes hers and her mother's childhood with how she is trying to raise her son in the current climate. Her mother was a first generation American raised by survivors and their accompanying eccentricities.My mother repeatedly told me that when the economy tanks, scapegoating has an awful tendency to creep back, and that in fascist-run or -infested nations, citizens become complicit—and that they have to be. One of the best essays in the collection. 5 Stars  Country Crock - African American lesbian prepares to move from a liberal enclave to rural Michigan (unabashedly red state area) to live with her new wife. Discusses her apprehensions and paranoia in a tongue in cheek manner. 3.75 Stars  Refusing to Numb the Pain Another excellent essay where a recovering alcoholic notes the differences in her reaction to Obama's election (when she was drinking) and Trumps election (when she was 5 years sober). Very poignant about what she notices about society and herself. Booze only allowed me to forget things were broken. If we ever want to change the world—first we must see it. Really insightful poignant stuff. Another 5 Stars  Dispatched From a Texas Militarized Zone - very interesting essay regarding women's issues (particularly latinx, health and also safety) associated with living near the border. Texas has long proclaimed a war on women and immigration (which makes no sense for the state) with a particularly religious perspective. Latinx culture demands deference to one’s elders. The Catholic traditions that permeate Valley life add another layer of deference as well as shame. Another essay that evokes anger. These people (politicians, evangelicals, authoritarian white men) exploit so that they can dominate. Very poignant writing. Another winner 4.5 Stars  Pulling the Wool Over Their Eyes: The Blindness of White Feminists - confronting the harsh reality that given a choice between gender equality for all and white supremacy; white women always choose supremacy. Their support for feminism stops when it doesn't impact them personally.  4.5 Stars A Nation Groomed and Battered - Rebecca Solnit wrote this about the role misogyny played in the election and its obvious prominence in the American culture. 4 Stars  The Pathology of Donald Trump - Sady Doyle tells us to stop calling Trump mentally ill and call him an abuser (bully or worse) whose conduct is sane and calculated. Maybe he's just an awful person. Labeling him as ill dilutes the definition and causes folks not to look for viable solutions. It also causes us to overlook mental illnesses not being addressed like PTSD of victims (cultural). As long as we keep insisting that Donald Trump is “other” or inhuman—not like us, not healthy, not normal—then we’re blinding ourselves to the everyday evil of our neighbors, our coworkers, our family members, and all the countless anonymous men and women who think like Trump, behave like Trump, and gave Trump power as a means of giving it to themselves.Brilliant and insightful 5 Stars.  Nasty Native Women - An examination of the treatment of Native women in America makes a case that Trump is not much worse than the other 44 Presidents regarding their rights as people. Women among their people are the worst treated and most disregarded in known history. I knew little about this. Shameful. 4.5 Stars  Farewell to Meritocracy - Jamia Wilson makes a case that there is no meritocracy. Women in the workplace cannot expect meritocracy and have been coping with that for years. The election of Trump was no exception. Demonstrably the most unqualified candidate won. Not celebrity--male privilege. 4 Stars  Permission to Vote for a Monster - A look at the very frustrating, Orwellian tactics of conservatives to frame misogyny in feminist empowerment terms. Their biggest "tool" Ivanka Trump. 4 Stars  Donald Trump's War on the Working Class I confess to skimming this one. I think it's common knowledge that Trump doesn't represent the working class and that the working class is far more female and non-white than the news media likes to portray. 3.75 Stars  We've Always Been Nasty: Why the Feminist Movement Needs Trans Women and Gender Non-conforming Femmes Interesting take on how trans women are perpetually marginalized as an threat to the patriarchy. They are denied real existence. How can there be people who willingly give up their maleness? it’s not simply the assumption that women are inferior that’s to blame, but more precisely a gender essentialism that dictates how men and women are supposed to behave to be deemed good and respectable. The litany of assumptions that come with the gender binary boil down to expectations about how women are supposed to behave. Women are conditioned not to take; they ask because it is men who take.4 Stars  X Cuntry: A Muslim-American Woman's Journey - A Muslim American woman who is gay, obese and can pass for white takes a road trip across America in the wake of the Trump election. This one not at all what I expected (very little about her religion more about casual racism). I have crossed the entire country, and am nowhere near home. Another favorite. 4.5 Stars Trust Black Women - Another essay hammering home the notion that black women as a Democratic voting block show up. There is also a notion Hillary was far more supportive of black women than she is given credit. Liberals and Democrats need to wake up to their constituencies. 4 Stars."  How to Build a Movement - Short essay about how to organize around women's issues during a Trump administration. 4 Stars" All American - Another winner as an adopted Asian-American woman tries to understand and convince her Trump voting family that they are voting against people like her. The cognitive dissonance is astounding. They see her as white and their actions as rational. It's bizarre even to her. No matter where you are from, when you are adopted and nonwhite you become, to many, a symbol of the magnanimity of white Americans.5 Stars (hide spoiler)] There are many stellar essays in this collection. The volume and variety of American women perspectives is wildly unrepresented and underappreciated in mainstream visibility. There were some eye opening perspectives that I wouldn't have been exposed to had I not read this collection. In the aftermath of the election of Trump and with the first year of his Presidency almost over; there is definitely a national guilt, fatigue, apprehension, anxiety and even dread towards where we've been and where we are going and what it means for the United States both short and long term. And frankly there are a lot of books out there right now about the national hand wringing of approximately 60% of the country. Even I've become numb to the endless rehashing and diagnosing of an illness that this country has had for longer than anyone wants to admit. This collection offers more than I expected and it is an important book. There are a lot of voices here that need to be heard and understood. The quality of the essays and intelligence of the writers and editors propels this work. The collection was so good, I couldn't choose a favorite. This one should be widely read. Highly recommended. Just under 4.5 Stars Read on kindle

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nat

    Feminist collections are truly not letting me down this month. With The Little Book of Feminist Saints by Julia Pierpont and now this empowering book, Im pretty much settled for the year. Speaking of which, I began 2017 with Nasty Women by 404 Ink, and with the end in sight, I finished it with another Nasty Women. But whereas 404 Ink's Nasty Women is a call-to-action for feminists to share their experiences and accounts on what it is to be a woman in the 21st century, Samhita Feminist collections are truly not letting me down this month. With The Little Book of Feminist Saints by Julia Pierpont and now this empowering book, I’m pretty much settled for the year. Speaking of which, I began 2017 with Nasty Women by 404 Ink, and with the end in sight, I finished it with another Nasty Women. But whereas 404 Ink's Nasty Women is a call-to-action for feminists to share their experiences and accounts on what it is to be a woman in the 21st century, Samhita Mukhopadhyay's collection features discussions on feminism in Trump's America, as the title conveys. When 53 percent of white women voted for Donald Trump and 94 percent of black women voted for Hillary Clinton, how can women unite in Trump's America? Nasty Women includes inspiring essays from a diverse group of talented women writers who seek to provide a broad look at how we got here and what we need to do to move forward. “In the chapters ahead we have curated some of the strongest voices writing at the intersection of feminism, identity, and personal experience with their own identity to meditate on what we lost that fateful night in November 2016 and what lessons we can take from it. ” With over twenty essays in this collection, some were inevitably going to make the same arguments and present the same cases from the election (“telling the same story with different adjectives”). So I took more in from the personal essays that introduced the discussed topic by giving us that irreplaceable connection with an individual's experience, rather than the pieces that focused solely on conveying information about X and Y. My favorite essay by far, though, was one that came circling repeatedly into my mind over the course of the book: "As Long As It's Healthy" by Sarah Michael Hollenbeck. It even started out with a bang for me: “Nearly every thirtysomething woman I knew had a number in her head—a number she’d had since childhood—of how many kids she wanted and when—two, three, four for me! I couldn’t help thinking, Shouldn’t you wait and see how the first one goes? Even the first time I scheduled a bikini wax I only scheduled one. I wanted to monitor the repercussions before I made any long-term commitments, and I’d like to think that living children are more high-stakes than ingrown pubic hairs.” Now that's a guaranteed way to get my attention. But on a more serious note, I cherish essays that discuss how giving birth is not the only way to have children. And also that having kids is not a must. “Instead of making a new human, I feel a responsibility to be a better caretaker for the humans who are already here.” But what made this piece in particular stay with me is the fact that the author talked about being diagnosed with Moebius syndrome. “My experience of being a disabled woman is discovering in small, sharp explosions what I look like through the feedback of strangers.” ... “When I was growing up, our family never talked about Annie’s face or my own, and in the few times that I broached the topic with friends, I was told “No one notices” or “It doesn’t matter.” In my experience of disability, the people closest to me have always expressed their love by telling me that they, almost magically, cannot see it—that this thing that has both directly and indirectly shaped so much of my life doesn’t matter. Instead, it has been the callous strangers and the bullies who have been the ones to say, I notice. It matters.” I'm going be thinking about this exceptional piece of writing for months to come. Another essay that caught my attention with its opening paragraph was Kera Bolonik's “Is There Ever a Right Time to Talk to Your Children About Fascism?” It goes as following: “There's a sort of joke I used to tell my friends—a joke that’s not such an exaggeration—to succinctly describe my mother, about how she taught my younger sister and me European geography by recounting the way each country persecuted the Jews during World War II. (Austria? Birthplace of Hitler. Germany? The home of the Nazi Party, and the country he led—anti-Semitism central. Poland? Place of the extermination camps that helped to annihilate most of the Jewish population. And on.)” Her mother gets me at my core. There's more where that came from with the many outstanding feminist essays in Nasty Women. And I feel alive with power because of them. ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Publication Date: October 3rd 2017 Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying Nasty Women, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission! Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with Ko-fi.com/bookspoils

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nenia ✨️ Socially Awkward Trash Panda ✨️ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest The last presidential election made me very upset. Like many Americans, I asked myself, "How did this man get elected?" But also, "Why were so many people willing to overlook all the terrible things he said? Why did 53% of women vote for him, despite the remarks he made about women of all kinds?" And, most terrifyingly of all: "How did we become so willing to turn a blind eye to, or, worse, actively participate in or encourage acts of Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest The last presidential election made me very upset. Like many Americans, I asked myself, "How did this man get elected?" But also, "Why were so many people willing to overlook all the terrible things he said? Why did 53% of women vote for him, despite the remarks he made about women of all kinds?" And, most terrifyingly of all: "How did we become so willing to turn a blind eye to, or, worse, actively participate in or encourage acts of aggression and hate towards those who are different?" NASTY WOMEN is a collection of essays from various feminist writers about Hillary's campaign, Trump's victory, and what they believe the aftermath of the election means for women - and for Americans, more broadly. Some of the essays are filled with anger, some with sadness, some with hope. Some of the essays are written by queer women and women of color. Some of the essays are written by women who were born here, and some from women who came here as immigrants. There is a lot of diversity in these essays, which really added depth to this collection and made it complex and multi-faceted. I've included a break-down of all the essays in my status updates for this book on Goodreads (all 47 of them), but here is a collection of what I see as this book's "greatest hits." "Are Women Persons?" by Kate Harding discusses the flaws of some of the pioneering feminists, like Susan B. Anthony, who was definitely a product of her times in that she could be racist as f*ck. It cautions that historically, feminism was a white upper-class women's issue; and while these women helped paved the road for where we are now and their frustration at being held back by condescending men still resonates for many, we must not make their mistakes by throwing people of color under the bus or failing to include them when advancing feminist issues. "Trump, The Global Gag Rule, and the Terror of Misinformation" by Jill Filipovic goes into Trump's extremely cruel expansion of the gag rule, which basically penalizes foreign groups from discussing or providing abortions and birth control to foreign countries. It's heart-breaking, but powerful. "Is There Ever a Right Time to Talk to Your Children About Fascism?" by Kera Bolonik is written by the granddaughter of holocaust survivors and discusses how many of Trump's supporters and campaign tactics mirror that of fascist Germany during WWII. "Permission to Vote for a Monster: Ivanka Trump and Faux Feminism" by Jessica Valenti turned out to be one of my favorites. It's a discussion of the women conservatives champion - women who are content to play by the rules set by men and who don't want to make waves, and condemns conservative women who co-opt "feminism" to push their own agendas. It helps explain the mentality of the white women who voted for Trump. "X Cuntry: A Muslim-American Woman's Journey" by Randa Jarrar was so weird and so unlike any of the other more traditionally formatted essays in this book that it ended up being totally memorable. It's a series of dream-like diary entries written by a Palestinian immigrant discussing her encounters with racism in the toxic sociopolitical climate leading up to Trump's election. "Trust Black Women" by Zerlina Maxwell gives the reasons black women overwhelmingly (94%) voted for Hillary Clinton. It's a good essay. There were several other similar essays in this collection, but I felt like this one was the best. Maybe because it ends on a note of hope & I'm a hopeless fool. "All American" by Nicole Chung ends this book on a strong, resonant note. Chung is the adopted daughter of two white people (she's Korean-American). She talks about how the aftermath of the election has affected her, and her fear for her children because of their ethnicity and also because one of them has autism. She discusses the countless microaggressions she encounters from people who are so ignorant that they don't even realize they're being offensive, and the tense discussions with her conservative parents who voted for Trump and regard anyone different as suspicious. This really is a fantastic collection from a varied and talented group of essayists. I would honestly recommend this book to anyone who was #WithHer and is feeling angry, scared, hopeless, or sad. The editors went out of their way to include a diverse array of women with many different views when it comes to the dual but related subjects of liberalism and feminism. I heartily recommend it! Bonus pictures from the SF Women's March:    Thanks to Netgalley/the publisher for the review copy! 4 to 4.5 stars

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jenny (Reading Envy)

    A bit of preaching to the choir, but I wanted to get hyped up to vote, so this was a good read for that. Look. 53% of white women voters voted for Trump, while 94% black women voters voted for Clinton. So that comes up a bunch here from multiple perspectives. Also examined is the history of white feminism, the need for intersectionality, and the belief that feminism only works if it raises everybody up.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I'm going to start by saying that I actually read this. I can't believe I have to put that, but based on most of the star ratings, with no written reviews, on a book that isn't out until next week, it is clear that many have not. Ironic considering the point of the essays in this book. (And yes, I do believe that 5 star reviews by people who don't read the book are also an issue. I hate when people do that just because they "love" the author or topic.) This book is phenomenal. As with most essay I'm going to start by saying that I actually read this. I can't believe I have to put that, but based on most of the star ratings, with no written reviews, on a book that isn't out until next week, it is clear that many have not. Ironic considering the point of the essays in this book. (And yes, I do believe that 5 star reviews by people who don't read the book are also an issue. I hate when people do that just because they "love" the author or topic.) This book is phenomenal. As with most essay questions, some are better than others, but all will make you think. This isn't always the most comfortable book to read, even as a woman. YMMV based on where you fall along many spectrums (race, gender, sexual preference, etc.,) but it is important that we read books that make us uncomfortable. Going out of your comfort zone is often how one learns, so read hard books once in awhile. This comes out next Tuesday (Oct 3, 2017) and you should pick it up. I recommend the paper version as my Kindle version is now full of more highlights and bookmarks than anything I've read since college. I'll be picking up a paper copy for my bookshelf. Thank you to the publisher and Edelweiss for an advanced reader copy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shantala (Shanaya Tales)

    In one line - Nasty Women is a collection of essays covering a wide range of issues from racism to sexism and fascism to exclusionary liberalism in America. But honestly this book is so much more! It's an eye-opening, aggravating, necessary read which gives many diverse perspectives on the socio-cultural & political climate of the country - both past and present. Though consider this fair warning - Nasty Women is NOT an easy read. Mostly because it digs deep into many uncomfortable truths In one line - Nasty Women is a collection of essays covering a wide range of issues from racism to sexism and fascism to exclusionary liberalism in America. But honestly this book is so much more! It's an eye-opening, aggravating, necessary read which gives many diverse perspectives on the socio-cultural & political climate of the country - both past and present. Though consider this fair warning - Nasty Women is NOT an easy read. Mostly because it digs deep into many uncomfortable truths contemporary society & pop culture tend to gloss over. BUT that's exactly what makes a book like Nasty Women a MUST READ! VERDICT: CANNOT RECOMMEND IT HIGHLY ENOUGH (HENCE THE ALL CAPS!!) - Shantala @ Shanaya Tales

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    If you read one essay from this book, read Mary Kathryn Nagles Nasty Native Women - that is a history lesson and a sermon in one. And once youve read that, read the rest of the book. The contributors are diverse, the subjects and responses are diverse, and the ideas for what to do next are myriad. If you read one essay from this book, read Mary Kathryn Nagle’s “Nasty Native Women” - that is a history lesson and a sermon in one. And once you’ve read that, read the rest of the book. The contributors are diverse, the subjects and responses are diverse, and the ideas for what to do next are myriad.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Latiffany

    Samantha Irby is a contributor to Nasty Women and she is one of my favorite writers. When she promoted this book on social media I immediately purchased it. For such a short book, this was a tough read. I read this book directly after reading What Happened by Hillary Clinton and that was a terrible idea. I felt overwhelmed with information about Donald Trump, his family, his base, his reluctant allies, white women, inclusion, racism, etc. There are a lot of emotions, ideas, suggestions, and Samantha Irby is a contributor to Nasty Women and she is one of my favorite writers. When she promoted this book on social media I immediately purchased it. For such a short book, this was a tough read. I read this book directly after reading What Happened by Hillary Clinton and that was a terrible idea. I felt overwhelmed with information about Donald Trump, his family, his base, his reluctant allies, white women, inclusion, racism, etc. There are a lot of emotions, ideas, suggestions, and questions packed into these essays and if you are just as overwhelmed by the daily news about the President, you may want to take this book in small doses. The above-mentioned information has no bearing on the quality of the contributions to this book. For the most part, the essays are incredibly informative. The editor utilizes the voices of a range of women and provided a diverse view. In saying that, I mean women of different cultures and ethnicities have a voice in this book. This is not a mixture of voices based on party line. The women in the book are all on the same page when it comes to Donald Trump. There are some variations over what women should be focused on. As I mentioned the question of inclusion arises in several essays. There is the debate about uniting with white women considering 53% of them voted for Trump. There is the issue of should Black women march alongside white women knowing that these very women will not show up in large numbers at the next Black Lives Matter rally. I had to ask myself why as a Black woman did I participate in the Women's march and have never considered attending a Black Lives Matter march. As I mentioned, there is a lot to delve in and it does become overwhelming. As to be expected I didn't agree with all of the suggestions. I won't get too specific, but one author suggested that women waste their time arguing over Lena Dunham. To that, I point to my great ability to multitask. Overall, I think this is a decent read and there is nothing to be lost by reading it. There are definitely some gems and I thoroughly enjoyed Irby's contribution.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tonstant Weader

    Nasty Women is a collection of 23 essays responding to the Great Betrayal that was the 2016 election. Edited by Samhita Mukhopadhyay and Kate Harding, this collection unites the voices of women with all kinds of identities in contemplation of the world we woke up to on November 9th. For some reason, the media is far more interested in the belligerent whining of white men and white women whose feelings were hurt by black hands on the steering wheel of state and who were damn sure they didnt want Nasty Women is a collection of 23 essays responding to the Great Betrayal that was the 2016 election. Edited by Samhita Mukhopadhyay and Kate Harding, this collection unites the voices of women with all kinds of identities in contemplation of the world we woke up to on November 9th. For some reason, the media is far more interested in the belligerent whining of white men and white women whose feelings were hurt by black hands on the steering wheel of state and who were damn sure they didn’t want no woman’s hands driving next. We are supposed to have compassion for all the suffering they endure in their victory. Meanwhile, the media has no interest in what it feels like to work for and support the candidate who won the most votes, who was the most qualified, only to see a constitutional defect to protect slavery hand the country over to an ignorant, unqualified, thuggish grifter. I don’t know about you, but I think that’s a more interesting story. After all, we won the most votes and they got the White House anyway – in large part due to structural failings that should disturb us. After all, two of the last three guys handed the keys to the national car lost the popular vote. That’s no democracy. Why isn’t the media interested in what it feels like to be robbed of America’s promise again? Thankfully, the editors of Nasty Women are interested. With essays by women who are White, Black, Asian, Latino, Native American, straight, lesbian, transgender, citizens, immigrants, urban, rural, blue state and red state, this is a cross-section of Hillary voting women who have every right to be angry and who have something to say about it. These are voices we are not hearing from enough. These are the real stories of this election. Nasty Women is as good as anthology like this can be. Not every essay spoke to me and a few of them made me roll my eyes when they fell into the familiar “flawed candidate” rut that prefaced every statement of support for Hillary before the election. She’s not running for anything now, so must we still follow that script? The majority of essays though were affirming, empowering, and challenging pieces that dissected the misogyny than demands we enumerate her flaws before saying anything positive. Sarah Jaffe’s essay was particularly discordant, echoing many of the familiar denunciations of Clinton, even bringing up her very short service on the Wal-Mart board and repeating Sanders’ smears on her character. But that is just one of twenty-three and many are excellent. I was particularly moved by editor Samhita Mukhopadhyay’s defense of identity politics. It’s appalling that post-election analysis is so shoddy as to suggest abandoning the voters we have in pursuit of voters presumed more worthy because they are white and male. This is not giving up a bird in hand for two in the bush. It’s giving up a bird in hand for a myth in the bush. Rebecca Solnit’s essay was perhaps my favorite. She called out the “flawed candidate” trope in particular and took on the pathology of “progressive” men who hated Clinton. How many of us were floored during the primary by the atavistic hatred of her voiced by men we had always thought of us a liberal, smart, and feminist? Sady Doyle’s essay is important, too, in pointing out how calling Trump crazy is excusing his evil and the evil of those who voted to give him power. Carino Chocano’s essay was another that spoke to me because, to be honest, I am far more angry with those on the left who helped elect Trump by hating Clinton than with those on the right from whom I did not expect better. Rebecca Solnit’s essay was perhaps my favorite. She called out the “flawed candidate” trope in particular and took on the pathology of “progressive” men who hated Clinton. How many of us were floored during the primary by the atavistic hatred of her voiced by men we had always thought of us a liberal, smart, and feminist? Sady Doyle’s essay is important, too, in pointing out how calling Trump crazy is excusing his evil and the evil of those who voted to give him power. Carino Chocano’s essay was another that spoke to me because, to be honest, I am far more angry with those on the left who helped elect Trump by hating Clinton than with those on the right from whom I did not expect better. Though, on the other hand, Nicole Chung’s essay makes me ask if I should have challenged the Trump voters in my family more. They voted for Trump in spite of Black and Native American family members who will be hurt by Trump’s bigotry. They voted for Trump despite gay, lesbian, and trans children and siblings. What can someone say in the face of that indifference to the human cost of their votes? Their identity as white and rural was more powerful than their identity as sister or brother, mother or father. What can anyone say in the face of that and still be family? Nasty Women is not comforting unless the notion that other people are just as mad as you are is comforting. What it does is challenge us to not give in, not give up and to pick up the struggle and persist. If you were broken-hearted on November 9th, this won’t mend your heart, but it will pick up and set you in the direction of fixing what breaks us. I received an e-galley of Nasty Women from Picador through NetGalley. Nasty Women at Macmillan / Picador Samhita Mukhopadhyay author site Kate Harding author site https://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpre...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ginny Beck

    Like any essay collection, this one was a mixed bag. I actually almost put it down when the first few essays in a row were focused almost exclusively on white women processing their emotions about Hillary Clinton losing the election (with Bernie Sanders bashing thrown in? Like, why?) but as the collection went on and we got to hear from more diverse voices focused on exploring issues, critiquing the feminist movement, and offering specific calls to action, the book really strengthens. My Like any essay collection, this one was a mixed bag. I actually almost put it down when the first few essays in a row were focused almost exclusively on white women processing their emotions about Hillary Clinton losing the election (with Bernie Sanders bashing thrown in? Like, why?) but as the collection went on and we got to hear from more diverse voices focused on exploring issues, critiquing the feminist movement, and offering specific calls to action, the book really strengthens. My favorites were by Sarah Michael Hollenbeck, Samantha Irby, Sarah Hepola,Jamia Wilson, Sarah Wilson, Randa Jarrar, Aloxia Garza and Nicole Chung.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    As it turned out, nearly everything strange and disquieting about Trump his punitive response to even mile criticism, his viscerally personal insults disguised as jokes, his willingness to spread wild rumors about his targets in order to discredit or shame them, his inability to stop lashing out or degrading certain women years after theyd left his life was also a commonly reported behavior of domestic abusers. Sady Doyle, The Pathology of Donald Trump All of these essays are excellent. The ”As it turned out, nearly everything strange and disquieting about Trump – his punitive response to even mile criticism, his viscerally personal insults disguised as ‘jokes,’ his willingness to spread wild rumors about his targets in order to discredit or shame them, his inability to stop lashing out or degrading certain women years after they’d left his life – was also a commonly reported behavior of domestic abusers.” Sady Doyle, “The Pathology of Donald Trump” All of these essays are excellent. The writers all know we have entered an interesting period in American politics and many of them have great suggestions for how we move forward. The ones that struck home for me were: “We Have a Heroine Problem” by Carina Chocano “Beyond the Pussy Hats” by Kathe Pollitt “The Pathology of Donald Trump” by Sady Doyle “X Cuntry” by Randa Jarrar “Trust Black Women” by Zerlina Maxwell Please, please if you have any interest in national politics, consider reading this book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    I feel like I've been waiting for this book since the election. It is so, so cathartic to witness the rage and grief of other women over our current administration. Especially appreciated the attention paid to soliciting contributions beyond the usual roster of white, cishet, able-bodied women -- this was a truly intersectional collection with a wide range of viewpoints and suggestions for how to move forward, with the overall message that what is important is that we do, all of us, find a way I feel like I've been waiting for this book since the election. It is so, so cathartic to witness the rage and grief of other women over our current administration. Especially appreciated the attention paid to soliciting contributions beyond the usual roster of white, cishet, able-bodied women -- this was a truly intersectional collection with a wide range of viewpoints and suggestions for how to move forward, with the overall message that what is important is that we do, all of us, find a way forward.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    I read every essay from this book. I read several to my boyfriend. While each essay didn't strike a chord for me, many did. I think this is an important read for all women living in the US today. See this as your call to action. If you are conservative, see this as a book that teaches you about the other women in your life. Read it out loud to your boyfriend/girlfriend. Tweet your representatives about your opinions (I did this yesterday for the first time!). I will be purchasing a copy for my I read every essay from this book. I read several to my boyfriend. While each essay didn't strike a chord for me, many did. I think this is an important read for all women living in the US today. See this as your call to action. If you are conservative, see this as a book that teaches you about the other women in your life. Read it out loud to your boyfriend/girlfriend. Tweet your representatives about your opinions (I did this yesterday for the first time!). I will be purchasing a copy for my sister and trying to force my mom to read a few of the essays as well to start slowly teaching her my views. Thank you Picador for publishing this important work. Note: I received a free Advanced Reader's Copy (uncorrected bound manuscript) from the publisher, Picador. I requested this copy, as I was very motivated to read this title. All reviews expressed below are my own. If you would like to read more about my review and why this was an important read for me, please check out my blog www.jackiereadsbooks.blogspot.com. Synopsis: Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump's America is a collection of 23 essays in response to the 2016 United States presidential election. The essays focus along the theme of feminism and each writer focuses on what this means to them. My review: I am not the biggest fan of nonfiction. I have to read a lot of nonfiction for my job, so it often feels like work when I try to read nonfiction for leisure. But when I saw this title announced on Picador's Instagram, I knew I needed to read it. I will not go into detail about all of the essays and cannot quote them, as I have an uncorrected copy of the text, but this book was amazing. It gave me so many action items (small and large) that I can use to speak up about in our current political scene. I highly recommend this book for female readers. I recommend it for women who voted to Hillary and also women who voted for Trump. I think this is the perfect time for us to come together and to talk about our opinions, rather than segregating ourselves with others who already share our views. This is not an easy read - it took me several weeks to work my way through the essays. At times, it made me embarrassed about my limited support and activism during the election. But it left me feeling hopeful and empowered to make a change.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    this book is both infuriating and also so, so important. honestly i think this is the kind of book that will be read in 30/40/50 years time and people will ask how did they let this happen? and its also the question all of these women who contributed are asking themselves now. this book is both infuriating and also so, so important. honestly i think this is the kind of book that will be read in 30/40/50 years time and people will ask “how did they let this happen?” and it’s also the question all of these women who contributed are asking themselves now.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I picked up this anthology at the library and went into it with very specific expectations. First, I expected a spectrum of feminist thought I could glean from. Second, as a minority woman who was also deeply affected by November 6th, I was hoping this book would provide me with a sense of solidarity, catharsis, and closure. Third, I expected well-reasoned and thoughtful rationale -- one meant to address the wider audience and garner support for the movement. I'll be honest -- the initial essays I picked up this anthology at the library and went into it with very specific expectations. First, I expected a spectrum of feminist thought I could glean from. Second, as a minority woman who was also deeply affected by November 6th, I was hoping this book would provide me with a sense of solidarity, catharsis, and closure. Third, I expected well-reasoned and thoughtful rationale -- one meant to address the wider audience and garner support for the movement. I'll be honest -- the initial essays and beginning of the book (written mostly by white feminists) had none of the aforementioned qualities. With the exception of the first essay, the initial several essays made attempts at coherent rationale (particularly in favor of Hillary) to supplement their emotionally raw rants and failed. It was exceptionally frustrating to read and I almost stopped reading. It's not their positions I necessarily disagree with (though I did disagree with quite a few); it's the way they argued their positions. But maybe they needed the space to feel the confusion, rage, and hurt, which I understand. But I give this book 5 stars because eventually, the book does introduce a spectrum of opinions from women of color. You start out with the really upset, implicitly racist white feminists and hit an intersectional stride in the middle of the book. I highly appreciated the critique, diverse range of feminist commentary, and thoughtful exposition by those who had different experiences, goals, and ideas. The book was personally very challenging for me as a feminist for various reasons, but it did help me understand my own feminism as well as the sphere of feminist activism better. Intersectionality ftw.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Peggy

    This is the best book I have read so far this year. The diversity of each author's essay and perspective is thought provoking. I think this book of essays would make a perfect book club selection for discussion. It's impossible for me to pick a favorite essay but 2 that I especially loved were "As long as it's Healthy" and "All-American".

  17. 4 out of 5

    Donna Hines

    Ladies and Gents, I think this is a must read for anyone who wishes to understand the everyday injustices that happen today behind closed doors. For anyone to think that it can't happen here in these United States think twice because I for one am proof it does and is happening. Voices are being silenced for the mass who are in power and maintain control. The wealthy elite and top 1% are working to keep class division and separation. We are no longer the World Leader to be respected and admired. We Ladies and Gents, I think this is a must read for anyone who wishes to understand the everyday injustices that happen today behind closed doors. For anyone to think that it can't happen here in these United States think twice because I for one am proof it does and is happening. Voices are being silenced for the mass who are in power and maintain control. The wealthy elite and top 1% are working to keep class division and separation. We are no longer the World Leader to be respected and admired. We are a laughing stock to third world countries and are debt to China and other nations will never be repaid. Sadly we are told to speak out, to stay united, to address our concerns peacefully in marches or in writing to our local and state representatives. I've since done all that and I leave you with this second update from my own self help site in dealing with the #MeTooMovement as I think you'll understand after you read it: https://www.facebook.com/thelostself/... For those who lost their voices we will never forget. For those who continue the struggle --Never give up!-- For those who speak out and continue to do so daily may you know you're not alone and we are united. This book addressed so many areas of importance such as feminism, racism, sexism, illegal immigration, women's rights, voting rights, abortion rights, and so much more. These ladies bared it all and spoke from the heart and you could truly feel every word and the courage they endured in just re-telling their stories. Remember one thing," You are Enough." Sometimes power is scary and dominance seems to overlap intelligence. We need to create dialogue and retain open communication. The world cannot be labeled into black and white and their is many gray issues that must be addressed. To keep thinking in limited terms hampers out efforts to unite. As we all must together for the common good. I married a malignant narcissist and I can tell you narcs in general hoover and try to insight drama to appear as though they are calm as you respond to their constant degradation and criticisms. Any attention for them (even negative) is used as a source of supply. So don't feed the Narcs! As Michelle Obama said take the high road if they go low you go high. Anything else is just feeding their demand for their two year old mentality to be the one above the law and feel superior with their grandiose ego and constant desires to win. It's a bait and switch at its finest and you cannot win over the insanity. What you can do is utilize your intelligence and take your story to the platform and use it to better the broken system. In helping others and motivating each other we stay a united front. I tell those on my self help site dealing with narcissism and NPD to let the actions speak for itself. Judge a person by these actions not by their words and you will never be fooled. Know that hate never trumps love. Also remember the truth always outweighs the well dressed lie. Stay in truth and you will never go wrong. Great read and as Maya Angelou once noted, "When people show you who they are believe them." Keep working together.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Leading up to the election I was a bit nervous that people weren't taking Trump seriously enough. The main thought process was that reason will prevail overall so there was no need to worry. The thing is, having friends in the UK who told me that they and their friends felt similarly about the Brexit vote made me intensely fearful. We know what happened there. I obviously had that shred of hope as well despite my fears that reason would indeed prevail. And then of course the results came in Leading up to the election I was a bit nervous that people weren't taking Trump seriously enough. The main thought process was that reason will prevail overall so there was no need to worry. The thing is, having friends in the UK who told me that they and their friends felt similarly about the Brexit vote made me intensely fearful. We know what happened there. I obviously had that shred of hope as well despite my fears that reason would indeed prevail. And then of course the results came in slowly. The pundits kept thinking of ways that it'd all be ok because it was quite obvious they, like myself, had held on to this hope. But here we are. As of writing this, Donald Trump has been POTUS for 1 year, 140 days, 0 hours, 11 minutes and 53 seconds. This is a book of essays for people who are, to put it mildly, not thrilled with the 2016 election. These essays are full of intersectionality, not just written by or catering to one specific "type" of feminist. Some essays have slightly contradicting themes and messages and that's the beauty of it. So many of us are fearful of what's to come, but we aren't drones with a hive mind and this book reflects that beautifully. Some essays give a lot of background and historical context to what's happened, others are more about being active, while others are just reflective. This book is what you make of it. You can read it and get more depressed about everything that's going on, because it serves as a constant reminder. You can read it and get more angry about everything. You can read it and get more hopeful. There are a whole bunch of emotions that you could get while reading this, I could probably fill pages and pages. But really, I'll say to anyone who chooses to read this book, make sure you're in the right mindset. Be open and see what everyone has to say. My favorite essays were: Are Women Persons? - Kate Harding We Have a Heroine Problem - Carina Chocano Beyond the Pussy Hats - Katha Pollitt Is There Ever a Right Time to Talk to You Children About Fascism? - Kera Bolonik Dispatches From a Texas Militarized Zone - Melissa Arjona A Nation Groomed and Battered - Rebecca Solnit Trust Black Women - Zerlina Maxwell All American - Nicole Chung But every single essay is well worth a read. I can't recommend this book enough to anyone and everyone.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    This was an unfocused, uneven collection of essays, loosely organized around women sharing their experiencestheir fears, their disappointments, their sadnessesunder Trumps presidency. Some of the essays really conveyed that experience; I found these to be revelatory, thought-provoking, and often challenging. Nichole Chungs All-American was the standout essay for me, conveying the complexity of her experience and the various tensions she feels in her different roles in relation to others. How do This was an unfocused, uneven collection of essays, loosely organized around women sharing their experiences—their fears, their disappointments, their sadnesses—under Trump’s presidency. Some of the essays really conveyed that experience; I found these to be revelatory, thought-provoking, and often challenging. Nichole Chung’s “All-American” was the standout essay for me, conveying the complexity of her experience and the various tensions she feels in her different roles in relation to others. How do we speak to family members, to whom we often feel obligated, when they support this man? When we know him to be not just generally vile and dangerous, but specifically vile and dangerous to disenfranchised people to whom we are directly and intimately connected, people to whom these same relatives are directly and intimately connected? Chung was vulnerable and honest in sharing her own struggles in this vein. I also found Sady Doyle’s “The Pathology of Donald Trump” to be a thoughtful meditation on the dangers of armchair-diagnosing Trump with mental illness. Some of the essays in Nasty Women seemed to be shoehorned into the compilation, however. It is obviously a challenge to achieve consistency in a collection of essays by disparate voices. Nasty Women reflected the tension between the often less challenging and more palatable feminism of cis heterosexual White women and the feminism of other women. The essays by women I’d place in the former category suffered, for me, in trying to establish and defend their bonafides. Essays by women on the fringe, fighting to be accepted, fighting to be heard, were more powerful for me (Meredith Talusan’s “We’ve Always Been Nasty: Why the Feminist Movement Needs Trans Women and Gender Non-Conforming Femmes” being one of these). These women—feminists do not fit the cis, straight White woman package—argue both for a place at the table, or to flip the table and pave their own way. They make a really, really good case.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mindfully Evie

    A brilliant book compromising 23 leading feminist writers on protest and solidarity. This book explores what happens after 53% of white women voted for Donald Trump and 94% of black women voted for Hillary Clinton - how can women unite in Trump's America? Nasty Women includes inspiring essays from a diverse group of talented women writers who seek to provide a broad look at how we got here and what we need to do to move forward. While I am not American, this book is still deeply relevant and all A brilliant book compromising 23 leading feminist writers on protest and solidarity. This book explores what happens after 53% of white women voted for Donald Trump and 94% of black women voted for Hillary Clinton - how can women unite in Trump's America? Nasty Women includes inspiring essays from a diverse group of talented women writers who seek to provide a broad look at how we got here and what we need to do to move forward. While I am not American, this book is still deeply relevant and all the different layers of intersectional feminism and authors from all different walks of life, giving their perspective and take in this book, gives you a much better and correct idea of feminism, as well as educate you further outside of your own limited perception.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Bourke

    A great read for anyone disillusioned by the current state of American politics, specifically by who occupies the White House. The essays bring all points of the feminist movement into view, not just the needs of the white/cisgendered population, which is important as the future of our country depends on the equal inclusion of all those who have a stake in this country. The essays allow you to commiserate with like minded individuals also traumatized by the outcome of the election, but then A great read for anyone disillusioned by the current state of American politics, specifically by who occupies the White House. The essays bring all points of the feminist movement into view, not just the needs of the white/cisgendered population, which is important as the future of our country depends on the equal inclusion of all those who have a stake in this country. The essays allow you to commiserate with like minded individuals also traumatized by the outcome of the election, but then quickly encourage you to shake off your self pity and continue to fight. Intelligent, well written, and thought provoking, everything a good manifesto should be.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    What an exceptional collection of essays! They were all so captivating, SO well written (Im not surprised), so full of emotion and truth and power. I dont live in the States but even so, I connected to the dire state of affairs in that nation because Canada shares some similar problems. This is a must read, if only to prove that women/feminists have always been and will continue to be the best chance we have at a better world for everyone. What an exceptional collection of essays! They were all so captivating, SO well written (I’m not surprised), so full of emotion and truth and power. I don’t live in the States but even so, I connected to the dire state of affairs in that nation because Canada shares some similar problems. This is a must read, if only to prove that women/feminists have always been and will continue to be the best chance we have at a better world for everyone.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Miri

    I think this is the first time Ive read one of these essay collections and thought that ALL of the essays were well-written and important. Usually its much more of a mixed bag, so that was cool. That said, I dont recommend reading it all in a day like I did, since each essay is about Trump at least partially and thats exhausting. I think this is the first time I’ve read one of these essay collections and thought that ALL of the essays were well-written and important. Usually it’s much more of a mixed bag, so that was cool. That said, I don’t recommend reading it all in a day like I did, since each essay is about Trump at least partially and that’s exhausting.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    everyone I know is getting a copy of this. This makes sense of everything I've been feeling and taught me more about the state of our intersectional Feminist moment than I could have imagined. required reading.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Beachesnbooks

    This book was fantastic. I learned so much and was so inspired by the diverse voices in this collection. It discusses intersectional feminism and different womens' reactions to the 2016 election, the first few months of Trump's presidency, and how to resist. Highly, highly recommend!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Five stars, not because every essay is perfect, but because they are current, accessible, and absolutely frank, but also exhort readers to action and hope. Well worth reading.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    "There is something to be said for opening your eyes to the world as it is, and not as we want it to be." On 11/9/2016, that we're NOT living in a post-racial America was a sobering realization (for mostly white women I suspect). Most powerful were the essays in which it was pointed out -- hey, white women, you may think Trump is the worst thing that's happened to America, but we're here to tell you, it's been horrible from the minute white men decided to take what wasn't theirs. And it's been "There is something to be said for opening your eyes to the world as it is, and not as we want it to be." On 11/9/2016, that we're NOT living in a post-racial America was a sobering realization (for mostly white women I suspect). Most powerful were the essays in which it was pointed out -- hey, white women, you may think Trump is the worst thing that's happened to America, but we're here to tell you, it's been horrible from the minute white men decided to take what wasn't theirs. And it's been happening every single day since then. In other words, just because you are experiencing something for the first time doesn't mean that's the first time it's ever been or is currently being experienced by someone else or other peoples. While I appreciated this collection as a whole, some of the essays fell flat for me; namely, Strayed's "She Will." The beginning of the collection is more focused on the election and Hillary's loss, then steadily they become more broad in the frame of feminism. On my current journey to decolonizing my mind, these were my favorite essays: "Advice to Grace in Ghana"; "Beyond the Pussy Hats"; "Dispatches From A Texas Militarized Zone"; "We've Always Been Nasty" and "How to Build a Movement." 3.5 stars Table of Contents with quotes and my notes, if any. (view spoiler)[ "I'm A Woman, Vote For Me": Why We Need Identity Politics / Samhita Mukhopadhyay identity politics coalitional politics - recognizing and fighting for the diverse needs of many "That Trump's explicit appeals to white identity and resentment were considered legitimate rallying cries that supposedly united an unheard working-class base, while Clinton was called divisive, suggests that calls for 'universality' generally mean centralizing white, male experience." Are Women Persons? / Kate Harding speaks to white feminists/feminism Women are still fighting for the same thing as 100 years ago - where's the progress? "Systemic racism isn't something you can opt out of; it's only something you can consciously resist." She Will / Cheryl Strayed Personal story about how sad she was after the election As Long As It's Healthy / Sarah Michael Hollenbeck Disabled author discusses the impacts of Trump's election as well as her feelings around pregnancy and motherhood. Internal struggle with being okay with who she is and wanting to be "normal" "My experience being a disabled woman is discovering in small, sharp explosions what I look like through the feedback of strangers." We Have A Heroine Problem / Carina Chocano How "woman" is presented and marketed, her "story" Author's experience with Bernie Bros "Revolutions - it's right there in the word - tend toward circularity. As often as not, they are followed by counterrevolutions, reigns of terror, Thermidorian Reactions; or they cycle straight into totalitarian dictatorships, regimes indistinguishable from the ones they toppled. Advice To Grace In Ghana: Trump, The Global Gag Rule, And The Terror Of Misinformation / Jill Filipovic Puts a face on the global impacts of Trump's presidency Beyond The Pussy Hats / Katha Pollitt Loss of reproductive rights and women's health care needs. I just keep thinking, and people think Red Clocks is sooooo far-fetched: HA! Is There Ever A Right Time To Talk To Your Children About Fascism? / Kera Bolonik The author and partner striving to teach (and protect) their adopted Black son "...and what Meredith and I may be correcting, what we can correct: that we can pair difficult, vicious truths with action and community, and that lends a genuine sense of hope." Country Crock / Samantha Irby As per yuhz, Irby simultaneously makes me laugh and makes me think Refusing To Numb The Pain / Sarah Hepola Sobriety in the face of pain Clarity in order to prep for resistance "Part of my education has been discovering how much I have in common with people I don't like, and how much another side can teach me. These are uncomfortable truths, but discomfort can also be a sign you are growing." "There is something to be said for opening your eyes to the world as it is, and not as we want it to be." Dispatches From A Texas Militarized Zone / Melissa Arjona Dealing with checkpoints in TX; floating border walls (balloons w/ cameras!) reproductive-justice issue Pulling The Wool Over Their Eyes: The Blindness Of White Feminists / Collier Meyerson If you're white and a "feminist" read this, especially if you don't know what intersectionality is A Nation Groomed And Battered / Rebecca Solnit The Pathology Of Donald Trump / Sady Doyle Okay, so he's technically not crazy nor does he have NPD. He's just a rich white man (same thing as crazy or narcissist? lol j/k) Nasty Native Women / Mary Kathryn Nagle This election is no different for Native women than any other election. This president no different than the previous 44. "Today, Native women are more likely to be murdered, raped, and abused than any other American population*. Until all individuals - not just President Trump - are held accountable for their trivialization of Native women's identity and bodies, we will continue to be murdered and abused at rates that originated at the time of colonization. Such trivialization, in my view, isn't 'making America great again'; it is extremely polarizing." *https://www.congress.gov/congressiona... Farewell To Meritocracy / Jamia Wilson "I lost what faith I had in the system and decided to trade in my ballot-box pantsuit for the armor of a resistance warrior. Clinton's loss led me to actively reject social conditioning and internalized oppression, by focusing less on how to be included in systems with ever-moving goalposts, and more on paving insurgent ground by building new structures and more inclusive movements with my own community." Permission To Vote For A Monster: Ivanka Trump And Faux Feminism / Jessica Valenti "And that's the most important thing to understand about the trend that Ivanka represents: It's not just about any one woman who chooses to present herself as a feminist while supporting policies that oppress others. It's about the way these women and their appropriation of feminism are used to enable misogyny as tangible force in people's lives." "...to ensure that the next wave of feminist activism is so clearly defined that it will be impossible for conservative women to claim it." Donald Trump's War On The Working Class / Sarah Jaffe Marches and protests must have risks involved; they must threaten or else there's no effect on system "That solidarity does not mean we are all the same, or that we all face the same challenges or have the same levels of power. But it means that we understand our struggles as connected and understand that a winning movement must use the power and talents we all posses in order to bring about justice." We've Always Been Nasty: Why The Feminist Movement Needs Trans Women And Gender-Nonconforming Femmes / Meredith Talusan Another criticism of the Women's March not being inclusive "We cannot be truly included in the current movement if we are spoken of primarily as victims, occasionally as inspirations. To include representatives of a marginalized community only when they agree to the structures and frameworks set up by the majority is the definition of respectability and tokenist politics." "When faced with large-scale injustice, we must be prepared to rebel and disobey, to risk physical harm or imprisonment. To confront state power, we must be dangerous enough to foment actual resistance." X Cuntry: A Muslim-American Woman's Journey / Randa Jarrar Travel journal format Trust Black Women / Zerlina Maxwell Yes!! "In politics, the proximity to power is often the first step toward actual power and progress, and the Clinton campaign employed more black women than any other presidential campaign in American history." How To Build A Movement / Alicia Garza Explores how Alicia wasn't going to join the Women's March (for all the criticisms previously mentioned in this collection and other articles online), but then she re-thought her decision. What an inspiration she is! "Building a movement requires reaching out beyond the people who agree with you." All-American / Nicole Chung Really puts a face/ reality to transracial adoption from adult adoptee's POV. I was first introduced to transracial adoption in the novel, The Leavers. (hide spoiler)]

  28. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    Glad I'm not the only one who's still upset.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Johanna

    One of the best essay collections Ive ever read - powerful, insightful and brilliant. Its too hard to pick favourites, so many amazing writers. Ill definitely re-read and I rarely re-read. One of the best essay collections I’ve ever read - powerful, insightful and brilliant. It’s too hard to pick favourites, so many amazing writers. I’ll definitely re-read and I rarely re-read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I have a mixed review to give this book. Some of the authors were very simplistic in the way they analyzed Hillary Clintons loss in the 2016 election. One writer said, whenpeople said that Hillary Clinton was a flawed candidate, what they were really saying was that Hillary was woman, no they were saying she was a flawed candidate. Hillary didnt lose because she was a woman, she lost because she was problematic for a number of reasons. These feminists insistence that she lost only because she I have a mixed review to give this book. Some of the authors were very simplistic in the way they analyzed Hillary Clinton’s loss in the 2016 election. One writer said, “when…people said that Hillary Clinton was a flawed candidate, what they were really saying was that Hillary was woman”, no – they were saying she was a flawed candidate. Hillary didn’t lose because she was a woman, she lost because she was problematic for a number of reasons. These feminists’ insistence that she lost only because she is female shows that they haven’t learned anything from her defeat. Samantha Irby is so afraid of Trump supporters that she refuses to speak to anyone who she even suspects voted for him. This type of hysteria isn’t productive at all, it’s like people insisting that Trump will set up concentration camps – it discredits the speaker and makes them look paranoid. I did like Sarah Hepola’s essay about her alcoholism – I give her kudos for her honesty and her essay has a broad application. Sarah Michael Hollenbeck gives a moving contribution, but I can’t help but think that she never touches upon the fact that most people like her would be aborted. The authors in this book embrace abortion on demand, but it’s interesting that a disabled person would speak about pregnancy and disability rights and never make a connection that abortion is the worst form of ableism in that it literally obliterates disabled people from the world. Sadly, she never makes the connection. Sadie Doyle and Rebecca Solnit did a good job of capturing what horrified so many women about Trump and his campaign. The fact that he could be elected president despite bullying the disabled, belittling his opponent, and being caught on tape bragging about sexually assaulting women is appalling. Yet 53% of white women voted for him. How do you explain this? I’m a person who didn’t vote for Trump or Hillary. Voting for Trump was not an option for many reasons, but I couldn’t bring myself to vote for Hillary either. I believe Bernie would’ve won the election and I would’ve voted for him. But back to the book – I particularly liked Sadie Doyle’s explanation of why Trump is not mentally ill. She speaks for many people who do have a mental illness and yet live productive and benign lives. She is correct that calling Trump mentally ill ads to the stigma of those who legitimately suffer from mental illness. It was very important essay and a very important point, and I’m very glad it was included in the book. I learned a lot from several of the essays, including the one on Native Americans and the one on trade unions. I want to learn more about the abuse that Native American women suffer and may do some research on that later. I’m really glad my awareness has been raised on this issue. I disagree with Jessica Valenti when she attacks pro-lifers for claiming to be feminists. By her logic, Susan B Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton were not feminists, despite the fact that they dedicated their lives to get women the right to vote. Pro-life feminism has a strong history behind it and those of us who see abortion as exploitive of women can also be feminists. Valenti does not have veto power when it comes to defining feminism. Feminism does not have the right to dictate who is feminist and who is not, especially when her criteria disqualifies nearly all of the most prominent first wave feminists. I was somewhat appalled at the fact that Sarah Jaffe and Meredith Talusan both advocated violence and extremism. Talusam even says “there are times when a single instance of violence is a justifiable response to pervasive oppression by the state.” Advocating for violence does not help the feminist cause any more than it helps any other cause. If a pro-life activist had made a similar statement, feminists would be tweeting about how horrible it is and calling for the person to be blacklisted and boycotted. Overall, this book had some very good things to say, but ultimately falls short of expressing a clear way forward.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.