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30 review for Mellonta Tauta (Tales of mystery and imagination)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Fernando

    "Mellonta Tauta" significa "en un futuro próximo". En este relato Poe anticipa el mundo del mañana, viajando en un globo de alta velocidad. Probablemente haya inspirado a Jules Verne a escribir alguna de sus novelas.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Megan Mertens

    Why do I always assume the voice of Robert Downy Jr. when I read Poe?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amy Sturgis

    There are times I hear Poe chuckling as I (re)read this, and other times I hear him sighing. Looking 1,000 years into the future, he imagines clearly how incompletely and incorrectly we may remember the past. His wry humor cannot hide the rather bleak and disturbing view.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    I like Poe's tone, this is a dry satirical story, but this story-line didn't hold my attention.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dichotomy Girl

    This was probably clever and witty in it's day, but it doesn't particularly age well.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    Now, my dear friend-now, for your sins, you are to suffer the infliction of a long gossiping letter. Those are truly terrifying words to read at the beginning of a Poe story. He's a bit long-winded at times. It is 200+ years in the future and our narrator is cruising on a super-speed hot air balloon. Her flight is frightfully dull and therefore she decides to write her friend a letter full of multitudes of pondering. I rejoice, my dear friend, that we live in an age so enlightened that no Now, my dear friend-now, for your sins, you are to suffer the infliction of a long gossiping letter. Those are truly terrifying words to read at the beginning of a Poe story. He's a bit long-winded at times. It is 200+ years in the future and our narrator is cruising on a super-speed hot air balloon. Her flight is frightfully dull and therefore she decides to write her friend a letter full of multitudes of pondering. I rejoice, my dear friend, that we live in an age so enlightened that no such a thing as an individual is supposed to exist. It is the mass for which the true Humanity cares. Nobody cares about individuals anymore. It's all for what pleases the masses. A man falls overboard and thank god nobody cares otherwise they would've had to halt their journey and retrieve him. Ancient times were odd times when people thought war and pestilence were bad. How did people not see to what great advantage it was to the mass when myriad of individuals was wiped out? I am almost devoured by ennui. (Besides being a fabulous line, it sums up how I often feel reading Poe.) Our narrator is bored with everything which leaves her time for more musings. For instance, how odd those ancient Americcans (sic.) that governed themselves! Did ever anybody hear of such an absurdity?...a republican government could never be any thing but a rascally one. (Truth.) As Poe stories go, this one gave me quite a bit to ponder on. It's a "futuristic" novel from Poe's perspective, but seems quite outdated and old-fashioned in ours. Poe's penchant for dark, absurd humor, was present but not all consuming. It was one of his more gripping short stories.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dicle Çelebi

    I thought it would be a good story for my sci-fi class at university but I gave up reading as it is a rather dry hoax. Just because a story is set in the future, it doesn't mean that story will be exciting. He used science fiction to criticise his contemporaries, or the people in history. Although it has some interesting points like reminding us how we can forget our past easily (Aries Tottle, a Turkish philosopher, really?), I don't think my students would like reading this story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nadia

    Tomfoolery. Unfortunately a bit dull.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Forked Radish

    A great work which would receive five stars, if not for much repetition of material from his previous works, especially; Eureka: A Prose Poem. However, it is very important as to its date of writing i.e. February 1848, the same month as the publication of The Communist Manifesto. To wit: "I rejoice, my dear friend, that we live in an age so enlightened that no such thing as an individual is supposed to exist, it is the mass for which true Humanity cares." Note: While it can't be ascertained that A great work which would receive five stars, if not for much repetition of material from his previous works, especially; Eureka: A Prose Poem. However, it is very important as to its date of writing i.e. February 1848, the same month as the publication of The Communist Manifesto. To wit: "I rejoice, my dear friend, that we live in an age so enlightened that no such thing as an individual is supposed to exist, it is the mass for which true Humanity cares." Note: While it can't be ascertained that Poe actually read the manifesto before writing the above passage, but he did read Marx's muse Fourier who he mockingly refers to as Furrier.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joe S.

    Not what is considered a typical "Poe" story, but it shows his dynamic ability to write. It's amazing that Poe, in using philosophy, predicted the events of today's political arena: Mellonta's April 5th journal entry details that. Sometimes Poe's stories get better with a subsequent re-read. This is one of them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    B

    Crazily clever, I DIED laughing over the sentence of the "Amriccan" church and the certain reveal at the end evoked a little Planet of the Ales reference, at least for me! Poe's more conversational narrative is probably even just as entertaining as his Gothic romantic language and no one really knows this!

  12. 5 out of 5

    M. Ashraf

    Mellonta Tauta Edgar Allan Poe Part of the collected works of Poe, I did not like it. Aries Tottle, a Turkish philosopher!!! It supposed to be funny but I think it did not age well :/ Anyways there are far better short funny stories from Poe.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    This one was pretty goofy and I enjoyed it but I think I probably missed some context that would have added some humor. It’s interesting to get another message that ends up in a bottle in the sea.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Leah Coffin

    Poe’s satirical vision of the future. As is often the case with his humorous works, aspects of this have not aged well. Still, not the worst of his works.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Ehhhh....I didn’t really get it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Hull

    19th century example of far future science fiction. Great stuff.

  17. 4 out of 5

    K. Anna Kraft

    I have arranged my takeaway thoughts into a haiku: "The dame kept her word: What history warps and scorns? 'Annoying,' indeed!"

  18. 5 out of 5

    Vatroslav Herceg

    Začetak znanstvene fantastike. Socijalističko društvo u balonima.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eric Bryant

    Not sure what to think about this story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Marko Ruostetoja

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rapaner

  22. 4 out of 5

    Francesca Beaumont

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stelios

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tero

  25. 4 out of 5

    Asya

  26. 5 out of 5

    Felipe

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nikolaos Taskos

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jithin George

  30. 4 out of 5

    Zara Zana

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