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A leading Christian intellectual explores the newest strain of atheism, its foremost thinkers, the cultural conditions that have bred it, and how Christians should respond. Something has changed in American culture. What for years was a little-regarded belief system-atheism-has now gained a large, and increasing, national hearing through the writings of "new atheists" such A leading Christian intellectual explores the newest strain of atheism, its foremost thinkers, the cultural conditions that have bred it, and how Christians should respond. Something has changed in American culture. What for years was a little-regarded belief system-atheism-has now gained a large, and increasing, national hearing through the writings of "new atheists" such as Dawkins, Dennett, Harris, and Hitchens. Wanting to both inform and equip serious-minded Christians regarding this cultural shift, R. Albert Mohler Jr. explores the environment that has bred the "new atheism" while also introducing readers to the movement's four leading thinkers and the contours of their arguments. Mohler-deemed "the reigning intellectual of the evangelical movement in the US" by Time magazine-then uses this foundation to pinpoint eight major distinctives that make the new atheism new, and to discuss the future of Christianity in relationship to it. At school and in the community, Christians are sure to encounter people who have been shaped by this strain of atheism. Here is keen insight that any believer can use to understand and challenge the new atheists.


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A leading Christian intellectual explores the newest strain of atheism, its foremost thinkers, the cultural conditions that have bred it, and how Christians should respond. Something has changed in American culture. What for years was a little-regarded belief system-atheism-has now gained a large, and increasing, national hearing through the writings of "new atheists" such A leading Christian intellectual explores the newest strain of atheism, its foremost thinkers, the cultural conditions that have bred it, and how Christians should respond. Something has changed in American culture. What for years was a little-regarded belief system-atheism-has now gained a large, and increasing, national hearing through the writings of "new atheists" such as Dawkins, Dennett, Harris, and Hitchens. Wanting to both inform and equip serious-minded Christians regarding this cultural shift, R. Albert Mohler Jr. explores the environment that has bred the "new atheism" while also introducing readers to the movement's four leading thinkers and the contours of their arguments. Mohler-deemed "the reigning intellectual of the evangelical movement in the US" by Time magazine-then uses this foundation to pinpoint eight major distinctives that make the new atheism new, and to discuss the future of Christianity in relationship to it. At school and in the community, Christians are sure to encounter people who have been shaped by this strain of atheism. Here is keen insight that any believer can use to understand and challenge the new atheists.

30 review for Atheism Remix: A Christian Confronts the New Atheists

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    This short book (108 pages) is an informative guide to the challenge of the New Atheists and their challenge to Christian theism. Mohler targets the "four horsemen of the New Atheism" - Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennet, Sam Harris, and Christopher Hitchens. Chapter one briefly surveys the history of atheism and situates the new atheism within secularism. Chapter two is the most helpful chapter of the book; it discusses New Atheism's assault on Theism by giving thumbnail sketches of the "four horseme This short book (108 pages) is an informative guide to the challenge of the New Atheists and their challenge to Christian theism. Mohler targets the "four horsemen of the New Atheism" - Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennet, Sam Harris, and Christopher Hitchens. Chapter one briefly surveys the history of atheism and situates the new atheism within secularism. Chapter two is the most helpful chapter of the book; it discusses New Atheism's assault on Theism by giving thumbnail sketches of the "four horsemen,"then pointing out eight common features of their assault on theism: (1) The New Atheism is marked by an unprecedented new boldness; (2) There is a clear and specific rejection of the Christian God of the Bible; (3) The New Atheists explicitly reject Jesus Christ; (4) The New Atheism is specifically grounded in scientific argument; (5) The New Atheism is new in its refusal to tolerate moderate and liberal forms of belief; (6) The New Atheism attacks toleration; (7) The New Atheists have begun to question the right of parents to inculcate belief in their own children; and (8) The New Atheists argue that religion itself must be eliminated to preserve human freedom. Chapters three and four discuss the defense of theism poised against by the New Atheists by various theologians and philosophers, including Alistair McGrath, Alvin Plantiga, Tina Beattie, and John F. Haught. While agreeing with some points of their arguments (especially McGrath and Plantiga), Mohler's primary criticism is that these responses represent various levels of accomodation. In contrast, Mohler argues that "Evangelical Christians simply cannot surrender biblical authority, propositional revelation, and biblical theism in order to meet the various challenges presented to us in the twenty-first century" (102). There are only two alternatives, atheism or biblical, Christian theism. Unfortunately, this book does not itself present an argument for biblical theism. The book doesn't deliver on its subtitle, "a Christian confronts the New Atheists," for there isn't much confrontation with, and no detailed argumentation against, the New Atheists. That was disappointing. Readers who want thoughtful engagement with the New Atheists will have go elsewhere. (I'd suggest Timothy Keller's The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism.)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Cassada

    The books was pretty dry, but it contains information that all Christians need to be aware of. We are in a battle and being attack from without and within. Many prominent atheists have large platforms and wide readership that has helped them gain much influence, especially within their college classrooms (many are professors). But also let us not forget the wolves in sheep’s clothing, self proclaimed “Christians” that sounds not believe in the literal interpretation of the Bible and would encour The books was pretty dry, but it contains information that all Christians need to be aware of. We are in a battle and being attack from without and within. Many prominent atheists have large platforms and wide readership that has helped them gain much influence, especially within their college classrooms (many are professors). But also let us not forget the wolves in sheep’s clothing, self proclaimed “Christians” that sounds not believe in the literal interpretation of the Bible and would encourage a push to usher in a “new theology “ that is compatible with feminism and evolution. This book borrows a lot from other sources, but there is nothing new under the sun. It helps the reader to know who our opponents are and what they believe.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Adam Smith

    Analysis This book captures the W.H. Griffith Thomas Lectures Albert Mohler delivered in 2008 at Dallas Theological Seminary. There are four lectures recorded in this volume: 1. The New Atheism and the Endgame of Secularism 2. The New Atheism and the Assault on Theism 3. The New Atheism and the Defense of Theism 4. The New Atheism and the Future of Christianity In the first lecture, Mohler takes stock of the modern scene. He summarizes the current cultural influence of the New Atheists; he then compar Analysis This book captures the W.H. Griffith Thomas Lectures Albert Mohler delivered in 2008 at Dallas Theological Seminary. There are four lectures recorded in this volume: 1. The New Atheism and the Endgame of Secularism 2. The New Atheism and the Assault on Theism 3. The New Atheism and the Defense of Theism 4. The New Atheism and the Future of Christianity In the first lecture, Mohler takes stock of the modern scene. He summarizes the current cultural influence of the New Atheists; he then compares the New Atheists to the atheists of old (Nietzsche, Marx, Darwin and Freud among others). He provides a broad historical sweep of thinkers and cultural movements such as the so-called "Victorian Loss of Faith" and the Communist Revolution. Finally he addresses the phenomenon of secularization, discussing the Theory of Secularization at length. He concludes by stating, "These are the conditions of belief under which we now live". This cultural milieu has helped the New Atheists to gain traction. Lecture 2 he discusses the influence of Richard Dawkins, especially his book "The God Delusion". He notes the connection between his belief in evolutionary theory (Charles Darwin) and his atheism. He moves on to Daniel Dennett and his book "Darwin's Dangerous Idea". Dennett feels Darwinism is a kind of "universal acid" that will one day eat away the beliefs in the supernatural in the world. Next is Sam Harris and his book, "The End of Faith". This book can be described as a broadside attach on theism. Finally he discusses Christopher Hitchens and his book, "God is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything". This book presents objections to the Chrisrtian faith. Basically the book encourages non-believers to be more vocal in their unbelief. Mohler summarizes the points of the New Atheists and concludes that they represent a revolution of sorts. Lecture 3 he writes that the New Atheism demands a cogent and forceful response. He describes responses to the New Atheists such as we see from Alister McGrath and his books The Twilight of Atheism: The Rise and Fall of Disbelief in the Modern World (2004), The Dawkins Delusion?: Atheist Fundamentalism and the Denial of the Divine (2007) and Dawkins' God: Genes, Memes, and the Meaning of Life (2007). He moves on to discuss Alvin Plantinga and his review of The God Delusion (presented in February 2007 in the periodical Books and Culture). Mohler concludes that while critiques such as those offered by McGrath and Plantinga are useful (based on scientific theory and philosophy), they fall short of the needed basis of Scripture because of its authority. Finally in lecture 4 he evaluates more closely the cultural impact of the New Atheists. He discusses the responses by liberal theologians John F. Haught, Tina Beattie and Paul Tillich. They would argue that not all Christians take a narrow fundamentalist view of the Bible; therefore the New Atheists go too far in their rejection of Christian theism. Mohler makes the case that their responses are inadequate. Mohler writes: The Christian church must respond to the challenge of the New Atheism with the full measure of conviction. We are reminded that the church has faced a constellation of theological challenges throughout its history. Then, as now, the task is to articulate, communicate, and defend the Christian faith with intellectual integrity and evangelistic urgency. We should not assume that the task will be easy, and we must also refuse to withdraw from public debate and private conversation in light of the challenge. Recommendation This book provides excellent advice for Christians in dealing with atheists, and specifically the New Atheist movement. I enjoyed the organization of the book and the points that Dr. Mohler makes. He is very well versed in the arguments of the New Atheists and knows how to effectively counter them. He shows how half-hearted Christianity will not do in our defense of the truth. We must have a a strong commitment to the inerrant truth of God's Word. I would strongly recommend this book on that basis.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ashkan

    while I'm pleased with absence of vulgarity - which I don't mind it's presence really as I like polemics- but much of this book was commentary and analysis of the new atheists; this can be good for someone who's not really familiar with new atheists but not for someone like me. I was eager to read a good criticism. there is as always false associations in these kinds of books like communism and Atheism ... anyway Plantinga and Mcgrath are like acids on my last nerves. They assume waaaaaaaaaaay t while I'm pleased with absence of vulgarity - which I don't mind it's presence really as I like polemics- but much of this book was commentary and analysis of the new atheists; this can be good for someone who's not really familiar with new atheists but not for someone like me. I was eager to read a good criticism. there is as always false associations in these kinds of books like communism and Atheism ... anyway Plantinga and Mcgrath are like acids on my last nerves. They assume waaaaaaaaaaay toooooooo much and of course their main tools are theology which I'm not a fan of. I wish there could be a different approach in this book as this was my first time reading an account of theistic view on the new atheists ,I'm not regretting my decision to read this books as much as I'm disappointed but I guess for the first time theistic account of a general subject, you can't expect much. I'll be searching for a better case against them.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    Misrepresented as Armor of God I purchased this book because it was pitched as a work that would introduce who the New Atheists were, what they "preach," and how Christians could combat them. It does an excellent job of identifying who the four Atheists are: Dawkins, Dennett, Harris, and Hitchens. It even continues this excellence in identifying their key works and what each work and Atheist espouses as undeniable fact. Rather than giving step-by-step instructions, counter arguments, or even Scrip Misrepresented as Armor of God I purchased this book because it was pitched as a work that would introduce who the New Atheists were, what they "preach," and how Christians could combat them. It does an excellent job of identifying who the four Atheists are: Dawkins, Dennett, Harris, and Hitchens. It even continues this excellence in identifying their key works and what each work and Atheist espouses as undeniable fact. Rather than giving step-by-step instructions, counter arguments, or even Scripture verses to address these atheists and their ensuing arguments; the book instead analyzes counter arguments from the Christian side that had already been leveled at the atheists. These counter arguments are represented first in the pro category and then again in the con-category. The book really chastises all arguments; both atheist and the Christian counter arguments alike. For a book written by a theologian, it is surprisingly sparse in biblical verses. There were about three verses in the total 114 pages of this book. This brings Mohler's other works into question, given the "finesse" with which this one was written. Are they as lacking in Scripture? Are they pitched as one thing but then delivered as another? Do they present the issue in great detail but neglect any manner of solution? Even the writing was questionable; I cannot figure out if it is Mohler's lack of technique with the written word or if it is a gross formatting issue with the ebook format. Every italicized word is squished into the succeeding word with no space in between, making it very hard to read. Some words seem to have absorbed those spaces where there should be none, while apostrophes of possession and several commas were misused and out of place respectively. Ebook format or not, these issues should have been edited out for a work that is not free of charge. If you're looking for a book that lists the works of the "Four Horsemen of the Atheist Apocalypse" then this is the volume for you! If you are like me however, and were looking for a book to help arm your Christian faith with the means necessary to even approach atheists, you will be sorely disappointed. It is neither well-written nor equipped enough to serve as an aid for anyone. This book is nothing more than a glorified bibliography for Dawkins, Dennett, Harris, and Hitchens. If I could, I wouldn't even give it a star rating and I wish I could get my money back; it was like buying a movie ticket for Conan the Barbarian only to watch Popeye the Sailor Man instead.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Louis Lapides

    This book is based upon the W. H. Griffith Thomas lectures given by R. Albert Mohler’s at Dallas Theological Seminary in 2008. The style is the spoken word which makes for engaging reading. If one picks up Mohler’s book to learn about the New Atheism, he or she will be exposed to this naturalistic, non-theistic way of viewing the universe. However, Mohler in no way intended for this book to provide an extensive expose on the New Atheists. This is more of a flyover look at these modern atheists as This book is based upon the W. H. Griffith Thomas lectures given by R. Albert Mohler’s at Dallas Theological Seminary in 2008. The style is the spoken word which makes for engaging reading. If one picks up Mohler’s book to learn about the New Atheism, he or she will be exposed to this naturalistic, non-theistic way of viewing the universe. However, Mohler in no way intended for this book to provide an extensive expose on the New Atheists. This is more of a flyover look at these modern atheists as well as some liberal Christian theologians who tried to refute them. My biggest criticism of the book is that apart from Mohler as a conservative theologian, he cited no other thinker who was conservative enough to challenge the loose thinking of the New Atheists. But if you want a birds eye view of the New Atheists, Atheism Remix will not disappoint m.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Excellent read! The contents of this work is the W. H. Griffith Thomas Lectures given at Dallas Theological Seminary by R. Albert Mohler, Jr. Mohler provides a historic overview of Atheism, then covers in detail the thoughts and arguments of today's leading proponents of atheism. Those thoughts and arguments are critically examined under the light of Christian thought. Mohler's scholarship is impeccable and his thoughts clear and sustainable. At only 108 pages, Mohler's presentation packs a powe Excellent read! The contents of this work is the W. H. Griffith Thomas Lectures given at Dallas Theological Seminary by R. Albert Mohler, Jr. Mohler provides a historic overview of Atheism, then covers in detail the thoughts and arguments of today's leading proponents of atheism. Those thoughts and arguments are critically examined under the light of Christian thought. Mohler's scholarship is impeccable and his thoughts clear and sustainable. At only 108 pages, Mohler's presentation packs a power punch. I highly recommend this text to anyone struggling with Atheism, or who is searching for a solid beginning point for understanding just what the "New Atheists" are thinking and attempting to "evangelize" within today's culture.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Philip Brown

    Good only as an introduction to the conversation. From the perspective of someone who's read a decent amount of Christopher Hitchens (on the atheist side) and K. Scott Oliphint (on the Christian theist side), I didn't find a whole lot of new ideas here. It was an enjoyable enough read, though, and I would definitely recommend it to someone completely new to these ideas. Good only as an introduction to the conversation. From the perspective of someone who's read a decent amount of Christopher Hitchens (on the atheist side) and K. Scott Oliphint (on the Christian theist side), I didn't find a whole lot of new ideas here. It was an enjoyable enough read, though, and I would definitely recommend it to someone completely new to these ideas.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    Informative, yet leaves one to desire more in the way of substantive refutation and guidance for Christians in replying to arguments made by these New Atheists. Perhaps the books' intention was not to offer comprehensive/practical strategies for refutation, however, and the reviewer has false/misguided expectations. Informative, yet leaves one to desire more in the way of substantive refutation and guidance for Christians in replying to arguments made by these New Atheists. Perhaps the books' intention was not to offer comprehensive/practical strategies for refutation, however, and the reviewer has false/misguided expectations.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    “He [mcgarth] compares the human need for God to the powerful desire represented by thirst - and as thirst corresponds to the reality of water, so faith corresponds to the reality of God.” Of 74

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Holton

    Atheism has been around for centuries, but there is a new atheism that has been emerging within the past decade and it is becoming more and more prevalent in these Post Modern days. Mohler writes in his newest book Atheism Remix, “Atheists have represented only a small minority of Americans. Surveys estimate that atheists represent 2 percent of the population.” He continues, “The New Atheism is not just a reassertion of atheism. It is a movement that represents a far greater public challenge to Atheism has been around for centuries, but there is a new atheism that has been emerging within the past decade and it is becoming more and more prevalent in these Post Modern days. Mohler writes in his newest book Atheism Remix, “Atheists have represented only a small minority of Americans. Surveys estimate that atheists represent 2 percent of the population.” He continues, “The New Atheism is not just a reassertion of atheism. It is a movement that represents a far greater public challenge to Christianity than that posed by the atheistic movement of previous times.” Albert Mohler is referring to a band of atheists that have emerged in the past few decades namely, Richard Dawkins, Christopher Hitchins, Sam Harris, and Daniel Dennett. These men have taken atheism to a new level. Mohler notes in his book that atheism throughout history has been fairly non-threatening to the mass public. However with the release of national best sellers from Dawkins, Hitchens and Harris they have ushered in this New Atheism that is making atheism a much more common and acceptable philosophy. As this New Atheism is becoming more and more popular and acceptable to the general public R. Albert Mohler Jr. has attempted to take on these voices who are shouting from the rooftops their theories and beliefs and are ruthless in doing so. The book is basically broken down into four parts (or chapters). The first part deals with an introduction to atheism and how this New Atheist movement came to be. The second part deals with open war that New Atheism is waging on Theism and spends a good deal of time combing through the teachings of Dawkins, Harris, Hitchins and Dennett. Part three finds Mohler defending the position of Theism and spends a great deal of time with the works of Allister McGrath and Alvin Plantinga who have taken on the writings of these Atheists with scholarly and scientific articulacy. The final chapter looks at the future of Christianity and atheism and looks primarily at the writings of Tina Beattie, a feminist and Catholic theologian and John F. Haught senior fellow and in science and religion at Woodstock Theological Center at Georgetown University both opponents of atheism, yet have flawed theology at best. Atheism Remix is a very easy read and is a great introduction to New Atheism from a Christian perspective. Mohler does have many references from specific author’s books, so there is no implying of what was said from various atheists. He has well documented footnotes so there should be no room for error of what was said and implied. Overall this 108 page book is good for informational purposes, however I wouldn’t suggest it if you are looking for a deep look at the New Atheist movement. Mohler merely scratches the surface on this issue, yet does a great and concise job at exposing the possible threats this movement can pose on Christianity in the future if it continues to go unfettered in the years to come. Reviewed by Jeff Holton

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

    For those who have been reading much of the New Atheist's work or have been keeping abreast with Christian apologetics (defense of the faith), this work will offer nothing new. However, this work by Southern Seminary President Al Mohler is a good introduction to what the New Atheists are about. Mohler argues that what makes New Atheism different than atheists of old is that they generally have a sense of celebration when it comes to God's nonexistence whereas old school atheists typically experi For those who have been reading much of the New Atheist's work or have been keeping abreast with Christian apologetics (defense of the faith), this work will offer nothing new. However, this work by Southern Seminary President Al Mohler is a good introduction to what the New Atheists are about. Mohler argues that what makes New Atheism different than atheists of old is that they generally have a sense of celebration when it comes to God's nonexistence whereas old school atheists typically experienced a sense of loss (54). Mohler also felt that the New is more against Christianity specifically than more against an abstract philosophical concept of God such as the atheists before them (55-57) . This is disputed, I think what's new is not really with the new atheists (one can think of Dan Barker, George Smith, Robert Ignersoll, etc) but the cultural acceptance of this current wave of atheists. In other words, new atheism speaks more of our culture than the atheists themselves, and if there is any differences between the old and the new it's a matter of degrees rather than clear cut separation between the new and the old. As with other works by Mohler, I know he is a very capable bright man, and an intellectual giant but his written works tend to address a popular general reading audience. The book is not a refutation of New Atheism per se and more of a survey of the movement's strategy, and readers will enjoy the background information of the "Four Horsemen." Mohler is well-read (just look at his book review on his website) and the book reflects his knowledge of ongoing interaction in print, such as his summary of the new Atheist's work, and the responses by Alvin Plantinga and Alister McGrath. The last chapter also focuses on the liberal and mainline response of those who are outside the pale of Evangelical orthodoxy, and his observation of their response and inadequacies since they deny Evangelical doctrines such as the propositional nature of the Word of God and the truth of the Gospel. Overall, as an introduction I think it was a good book. I enjoy the discussion of improbability by McGraft (71-72)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ben Adkison

    I picked up a used copy of Atheism Remix for $5 at McKay's Used Books, CD's, Movies, and More in Nashville. If you've never been to McKay's, you're missing out. There is an incredible amount of good media at McKay's, and inventory changes often. Anyway, I'd been eyeing Atheism Remix for a while now in Lifeway, so when I saw I cheap used copy, I jumped on it. This is a brief (108 pages), but effective book about the "New Atheism" movement. New Atheism is different from older forms of atheism in it I picked up a used copy of Atheism Remix for $5 at McKay's Used Books, CD's, Movies, and More in Nashville. If you've never been to McKay's, you're missing out. There is an incredible amount of good media at McKay's, and inventory changes often. Anyway, I'd been eyeing Atheism Remix for a while now in Lifeway, so when I saw I cheap used copy, I jumped on it. This is a brief (108 pages), but effective book about the "New Atheism" movement. New Atheism is different from older forms of atheism in its boldness, its specific animosity towards Christians and the God of the Bible (rather than just the conception of God in general), and in its cultural reach. According to Mohler, New Atheism is "not just a reassertion of atheism, it is a movement that represents a far greater public challenge to Christianity than that posed by the atheistic movements of previous times" (12). New Atheism is advocated most prominently by Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennet, Sam Harris, and Christopher Hitchens. In just four chapters, Mohler spells out a description of New Atheism, its adherents, and how it is being challenged both effectively and ineffectively. This book is culturally relevant and should be read widely. The books of Dawkins and others are too popular for Christians to be completely unaware of the bombs being lobbed at Christianity by the adherents of New Atheism. You should read this book. If the effects of New Atheism don't seem to be effecting you, they will effect your kids and the people you're surrounded by. I think believers everywhere should read Atheism Remix, especially because its brevity makes it so approachable. If I have any qualms about this book, it is that Mohler offers little in the way of "What now?" I don't want to misrepresent Mohler as a deconstructionist, but I did personally long for a little more construction at the end of the book. I suspect that he would argue that this was not his purpose in writing, which is perfectly acceptable, it just left me wanting a little more. None-the-less, I learned a ton in the brief pages of this book and will encourage many to read it for themselves.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Zack Migioia

    I found Atheism Remix extremely helpful and informative in understanding the new face of atheism in the world today. Mohler gives a historical understanding and overview of atheism and talks extensively about four prominent, new faces of what he calls the "New Atheism." The book is very interesting and covers the challenges that atheism presents to Christianity. Mohler introduces and evaluates all four of the four horseman of the "New Atheism." The four atheist that are reviewed and introduced a I found Atheism Remix extremely helpful and informative in understanding the new face of atheism in the world today. Mohler gives a historical understanding and overview of atheism and talks extensively about four prominent, new faces of what he calls the "New Atheism." The book is very interesting and covers the challenges that atheism presents to Christianity. Mohler introduces and evaluates all four of the four horseman of the "New Atheism." The four atheist that are reviewed and introduced are Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, and Christopher Hitchens. In the second chapter of the book, Mohler gives a brief history of each man and the main points of concern they have with the Christian faith. As the book transitions, Mohler then takes a look at the works of Allister McGrath and Alvin Plantaga, in trying to help the reader see a proper defense against these new atheists. Mohler finally concludes the book by wrapping everything up and drawing the reader back to the God of the Bible, the God who we trust and hope in. He challenges the reader to the task at hand: "The task is to articulate, communicate, and defend the Christian faith with intellectual integrity and evangelistic urgency. We should not assume that this task will be easy, and we must also refuse to withdraw from public debate and private conversation in light of this challenge." (Mohler 107). Finally, Mohler suggests that, "the New Atheism presents the Christian church with a great moment of clarification." (Mohler 107). I agree wholeheartedly and hope that by reading this book, along with others, you might be able to help clarify and present the message of the gospel to our atheist friends and properly defend the faith that was delivered to the saints, once and for all.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Libby

    While this book doesn't go in depth with New Atheism from a Christian perspective, I think it's a rather good introduction for readers who may not be too familiar with the arguments and beliefs of prominent NAs and Christian theologians mentioned in the book. It has actually encouraged me to become more informed on the works of these figures (and others who weren't named) as well as our society's shifting attitude towards religion, namely Christianity. While this book doesn't go in depth with New Atheism from a Christian perspective, I think it's a rather good introduction for readers who may not be too familiar with the arguments and beliefs of prominent NAs and Christian theologians mentioned in the book. It has actually encouraged me to become more informed on the works of these figures (and others who weren't named) as well as our society's shifting attitude towards religion, namely Christianity.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michael Locklear

    As many (if not, all) of Dr. Mohler's book, this small book - based upon the W. H. Griffith Thomas Lectures delivered at Dallas Theological Seminary in 2008 - is an informative and worthwhile read. He presents the New Atheism movement and our response as believers in Christ. Dr. Mohler concludes with these remarks: In the end, evangelical Christians must remember that the burden of our concern is not merely to refute atheism or to argue for the intellectual credibility of theism in any generic As many (if not, all) of Dr. Mohler's book, this small book - based upon the W. H. Griffith Thomas Lectures delivered at Dallas Theological Seminary in 2008 - is an informative and worthwhile read. He presents the New Atheism movement and our response as believers in Christ. Dr. Mohler concludes with these remarks: In the end, evangelical Christians must remember that the burden of our concern is not merely to refute atheism or to argue for the intellectual credibility of theism in any generic or minimal form. Instead, our task is to present, to teach, to explain, and to defend Christian theism. On this point, the defense of biblical theism reveals the great divide in intellectual though to be not merely over the existence of God but over the question of whether he has spoken. The materialism and naturalism that are so central to New Atheism simply reject the category of revelation out of hand. This, in the end, is the real impasse. The issue is not merely metaphysics, but epistemology. The credibility of Christian theology is thus essentially tied to the credibility of biblical revelation. The refutation of the New Atheism and the critiques offered on the basis of scientific theory and philosophy are helpful. But in the end, the self-authenticating character of divine revelation is the only ground upon which a distinctively Christian theism can be established (pp84, 85).

  17. 4 out of 5

    Todd Wilhelm

    "In the course of studying the relative levels of religious belief in the world's countries, sociologists determined that the least religious nation in the world was Sweden, while the most religious was India. Berger, speaking of the United States, said that what we have in America is a nation of Indians ruled over by an elite of Swedes. As Berger has explained, the secularized global intelligentsia is in all nations a minority of the population, "but a very influential one."" -Page 35 "The credib "In the course of studying the relative levels of religious belief in the world's countries, sociologists determined that the least religious nation in the world was Sweden, while the most religious was India. Berger, speaking of the United States, said that what we have in America is a nation of Indians ruled over by an elite of Swedes. As Berger has explained, the secularized global intelligentsia is in all nations a minority of the population, "but a very influential one."" -Page 35 "The credibility of Christian theology is thus essentially tied to the credibility of biblical revelation. The refutation of the New Atheism and the critiques offered on the basis of scientific theory and philosophy are helpful, But in the end, the self-authenticating character of divine revelation is the only ground upon which a distinctively Christian theism can be established." -Page 85 "All this brings to mind my favorite quotation from the late historian Eugene D. Genovese, himself an atheist, who wrote, "I intend no offense, but it takes one to know one. And when I read much Protestant theology and religious history today, I have the warm feeling that I am in the company of fellow nonbelievers."" -Page 105

  18. 5 out of 5

    Peter Coleman

    Definitely a solid intro into the new atheism. This books provides a jumping off point into the subject and will likely act to me as a complex annotated bibliography. If I needed to asses a particular topic, then I will likely turn to this book for his assessment and then use the information within to find where to go for further study. What is also helpful is not just that he lays out which thinker thinks what, but also looks into the cultural conditions out of which the thinker arrived at his s Definitely a solid intro into the new atheism. This books provides a jumping off point into the subject and will likely act to me as a complex annotated bibliography. If I needed to asses a particular topic, then I will likely turn to this book for his assessment and then use the information within to find where to go for further study. What is also helpful is not just that he lays out which thinker thinks what, but also looks into the cultural conditions out of which the thinker arrived at his standpoint and the conditions in the world that cultivated the wider acceptance of these viewpoints. Particularly helpful is the progression that he quotes of the reversal of how once it was impossible to be an atheist, and now it is nearly impossible to be a theist within certain circles (scientific, intellectual, etc...) So for a broad overview and introduction to the subject, even for someone wanting an atheistic view (they can ignore the arguments Mohler makes and defends), this would be an excellent book to turn to.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David Smith

    Al Mohler is probably my favorite Christian thinker of this age. I am extremely impressed with his ability to distinguish and discern what is right and what is wrong with any information with which he is presented. This is a short book, taken from a lecture series he gave at Dallas Theological Seminary in 2008, but it is packed with a great deal of information and thought-provoking propositions. If I had one criticism it might be that the reader would be enlightened a little more by his work if Al Mohler is probably my favorite Christian thinker of this age. I am extremely impressed with his ability to distinguish and discern what is right and what is wrong with any information with which he is presented. This is a short book, taken from a lecture series he gave at Dallas Theological Seminary in 2008, but it is packed with a great deal of information and thought-provoking propositions. If I had one criticism it might be that the reader would be enlightened a little more by his work if he/she had a cursory knowledge of philosophy and modern philosophers and theologians, both conservative and liberal. He spends a great deal of time critiquing and citing critiques of Richard Dawkins (and rightfully so), addressing not only the particulars of his argument against the existence of God, but also the polemic and almost "evangelistic" nature of those arguments. It's a great book...even though it's short, take your time with it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Thomas

    Some good overview and analysis, but Mohler doesn't actually engage anyone, which was a major shortcoming of the book, especially given the subtitle and related calls within the book for bold formulations if biblical theism. Mohler does have good content throughout, and it woukd have served as a good introduction to a larger work. One major irritation I had was that he analyzes new atheist authors, their critics, and then critiques each of them, pointing out their short comings, but does not off Some good overview and analysis, but Mohler doesn't actually engage anyone, which was a major shortcoming of the book, especially given the subtitle and related calls within the book for bold formulations if biblical theism. Mohler does have good content throughout, and it woukd have served as a good introduction to a larger work. One major irritation I had was that he analyzes new atheist authors, their critics, and then critiques each of them, pointing out their short comings, but does not offer his own solution or discuss any of the evangelical authors who hold the biblical theistic convictions similar to his own and who have responded to the new atheism, whether directly or indirectly. For example and without trying to be exhaustive, Ravi Zacharias' The End of Reason or Christ Among Other Gods, William Lane Craig's Reasonable Faith, or Timothy Keller's The Reason for Good, to main but a few.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chase Austin

    Has our society or more specifically culture been transformed by a changed condition of belief in which for intellectuals it is now impossible to believe in God or any monotheistic religion? Dr. Mohler believes so and in this response to the "Four Horsemen of the New Atheist Apocalypse" -as Dawkins, Dennett, Harris and Hitchens have been christened, he counters their arguments through book publications and debates by critiquing what other theologians have said about these men and probably more Has our society or more specifically culture been transformed by a changed condition of belief in which for intellectuals it is now impossible to believe in God or any monotheistic religion? Dr. Mohler believes so and in this response to the "Four Horsemen of the New Atheist Apocalypse" -as Dawkins, Dennett, Harris and Hitchens have been christened, he counters their arguments through book publications and debates by critiquing what other theologians have said about these men and probably more importantly what has not been said in defense of the bible. Dr. Mohler is a skilled writer and one of the leading evangelical intellectuals of our time, this book meets the objectives laid out by Dr. Mohler even if it is hard to grasp some of the philosophical ideals or logical conclusions of world views such as secularism and postmodernism.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Bertolet

    This is a short book with a helpful overview of the new proponents of atheism. It includes brief surveys of Richard Dawkins, Chistopher Hitchens, Sam Harris, and Daniel Dennett. It summarizes their work and discusses eight characteristics of the new atheism. It also summarizes some recent responses to Dawkins by Alistair McGrath and Alvin Plantinga. Finally, it shows the peril of comprimising our Christianity to try to appease the new athiests. This is a survey at is helpful at points. If you ar This is a short book with a helpful overview of the new proponents of atheism. It includes brief surveys of Richard Dawkins, Chistopher Hitchens, Sam Harris, and Daniel Dennett. It summarizes their work and discusses eight characteristics of the new atheism. It also summarizes some recent responses to Dawkins by Alistair McGrath and Alvin Plantinga. Finally, it shows the peril of comprimising our Christianity to try to appease the new athiests. This is a survey at is helpful at points. If you are looking for an indepth treatment or full orbed rebuttal, this book is not for you. If you are looking for a brief introduction this book is helpful and even quite insightful at points.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    This book offers a clear and concise overview of the argument between the modern atheist (New Atheists) and Christian (Intelligent Design) beliefs about the origins of this world and its inhabitants. Mohler writes a book that offers the main points of the New Atheists and refutes these points using the leading Intelligent Design counterpoints to give the reader a peak into the discussion. However, Mohler makes clear that he does not always agree with some of the leaders points within the Intelli This book offers a clear and concise overview of the argument between the modern atheist (New Atheists) and Christian (Intelligent Design) beliefs about the origins of this world and its inhabitants. Mohler writes a book that offers the main points of the New Atheists and refutes these points using the leading Intelligent Design counterpoints to give the reader a peak into the discussion. However, Mohler makes clear that he does not always agree with some of the leaders points within the Intelligent Design camp. A good read to get a grasp of current discussion about creation.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    This book did a great job demonstrating what the New Atheism movement is, but it failed to really connect how this new movement relates to Christians. It went on several tangents about fairly specific people and topics to demonstrate a larger point. I understand that this book is essentially a lecture, but I think it could have been a quarter of the length and still give an effective survey of New Atheism. Overall, it is a very short read. If you have the time, go for it. If not, well, you really This book did a great job demonstrating what the New Atheism movement is, but it failed to really connect how this new movement relates to Christians. It went on several tangents about fairly specific people and topics to demonstrate a larger point. I understand that this book is essentially a lecture, but I think it could have been a quarter of the length and still give an effective survey of New Atheism. Overall, it is a very short read. If you have the time, go for it. If not, well, you really aren't missing out too much.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Glaser

    Good, short read from Dr. Mohler. Book is pretty much what you expect from anything Dr. Mohler writes, pithy, to the point, and well-sourced. I really liked the part where Dr. Mohler shows that Protestant Liberalism is just atheism in different clothes, using the words of the New Atheists to prove his point. This book is a good intro to the "New Atheism", but I really wish there was a "for further reading" section in this book since it is so short and other than a few sentences here and there do Good, short read from Dr. Mohler. Book is pretty much what you expect from anything Dr. Mohler writes, pithy, to the point, and well-sourced. I really liked the part where Dr. Mohler shows that Protestant Liberalism is just atheism in different clothes, using the words of the New Atheists to prove his point. This book is a good intro to the "New Atheism", but I really wish there was a "for further reading" section in this book since it is so short and other than a few sentences here and there does not make a strong positive case for Christian Theism.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Garrett

    I had little to no expectations for this book, and so it was that my expectations were rewarded. This was not an "atheism remix," or even a categorical refutation of atheist thinking from a Christian perspective. This was really just 100 pages of talking points for fundamentalist Christians who think that engaging those atheists who slavishly devote themselves to everything Richard Dawkins says is still a good idea. It's eight years out of date and leans heavily on the crutches of semantics and I had little to no expectations for this book, and so it was that my expectations were rewarded. This was not an "atheism remix," or even a categorical refutation of atheist thinking from a Christian perspective. This was really just 100 pages of talking points for fundamentalist Christians who think that engaging those atheists who slavishly devote themselves to everything Richard Dawkins says is still a good idea. It's eight years out of date and leans heavily on the crutches of semantics and groundless assumptions and is essentially a waste of time, but not much of one, as it's so short.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    A great overview of the build-up and existence of New Atheism, as well as a summary of some current Christian responses. Mohler dislikes the response of McGrath and Plantinga because it is too sympathic of evolution. And he rejects the accommodating theology of liberal Christian. He desires a response from 'biblical Christianity' (as defined by him, namely seven day creationism), but he doesn't present the case. A great overview of the build-up and existence of New Atheism, as well as a summary of some current Christian responses. Mohler dislikes the response of McGrath and Plantinga because it is too sympathic of evolution. And he rejects the accommodating theology of liberal Christian. He desires a response from 'biblical Christianity' (as defined by him, namely seven day creationism), but he doesn't present the case.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Alvers

    Great short book on explaining the attempts of new atheists. My only problem is that this book could have been long and more specific. However, that would mean less people read it. Its probably better that more people read this book then to bog it down with all the mechanics I would have enjoyed. If you want to examine what is going on with the atheist movement in a short period of time, this is the book for you.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mark A Powell

    Unlike in previous generations, atheism has become quite marketable in this postmodern age. A slew of atheistic books have permeated bestseller lists, and Mohler has written this book to investigate and illuminate the claims of the “New Atheists.” Mohler adroitly summarizes the premises of modern-day atheists and also details varying responses to their claims, and while I would have preferred more of his own insight (and some additional pages), his work is typically skillful and helpful.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    A short, pithy introduction to the New Atheists, and some of the adequate and inadequate critiques of them. The first of Mohler's take home points is that the New Atheism, while not representative of the whole population, does wield an influence which is significant. Therefore it is worth combatting. His second take home point is that liberal Christian, and vaguely theistic rebuttals will not cut it. It is a battle between biblical theism, or atheism. A short, pithy introduction to the New Atheists, and some of the adequate and inadequate critiques of them. The first of Mohler's take home points is that the New Atheism, while not representative of the whole population, does wield an influence which is significant. Therefore it is worth combatting. His second take home point is that liberal Christian, and vaguely theistic rebuttals will not cut it. It is a battle between biblical theism, or atheism.

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