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Lord Baltimore 05. L'Apotre Et La Sorciere

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Lord Baltimore poursuit sa traque du Roi Rouge, le demon aux pouvoirs quasi-divins a l'origine du reveil des vampires. Apres avoir sauve une jeune femme des griffes de son mari mort-vivant, Lord Baltimore et ceux qui osent encore l'accompagner, sont confrontes au fils d'une sorciere, et decouvrent la verite au sujet du Juge Inquisiteur Duvic, devenu un loup-garou assoiffe Lord Baltimore poursuit sa traque du Roi Rouge, le demon aux pouvoirs quasi-divins a l'origine du reveil des vampires. Apres avoir sauve une jeune femme des griffes de son mari mort-vivant, Lord Baltimore et ceux qui osent encore l'accompagner, sont confrontes au fils d'une sorciere, et decouvrent la verite au sujet du Juge Inquisiteur Duvic, devenu un loup-garou assoiffe de sang !


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Lord Baltimore poursuit sa traque du Roi Rouge, le demon aux pouvoirs quasi-divins a l'origine du reveil des vampires. Apres avoir sauve une jeune femme des griffes de son mari mort-vivant, Lord Baltimore et ceux qui osent encore l'accompagner, sont confrontes au fils d'une sorciere, et decouvrent la verite au sujet du Juge Inquisiteur Duvic, devenu un loup-garou assoiffe Lord Baltimore poursuit sa traque du Roi Rouge, le demon aux pouvoirs quasi-divins a l'origine du reveil des vampires. Apres avoir sauve une jeune femme des griffes de son mari mort-vivant, Lord Baltimore et ceux qui osent encore l'accompagner, sont confrontes au fils d'une sorciere, et decouvrent la verite au sujet du Juge Inquisiteur Duvic, devenu un loup-garou assoiffe de sang !

30 review for Lord Baltimore 05. L'Apotre Et La Sorciere

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    A new story begins with Lord Baltimore travelling with other monster hunters to fight the minions of the Red King. A witch has cursed a village and raising the dead. This witch is badass. The second story features a tale of one of the members of the Inquisition as they try to hunt down Judge Duvic who is now a werewolf. Horror fans should dig both these stories.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    I wonder whether this book would be published if a no-name writer wrote this? The fifth Baltimore volume contains two short arcs, The Witch of Harju and The Wolf and the Apostle. In the Witch, Baltimore and his crew find a witch in a village and kill her. In the Wolf, a different crew find a werewolf in a castle and kill it. Seriously: if it weren’t for Mike Mignola’s involvement and his readership, NOBODY would read this crap (assuming it'd even be made available)! It could not be any less insp I wonder whether this book would be published if a no-name writer wrote this? The fifth Baltimore volume contains two short arcs, The Witch of Harju and The Wolf and the Apostle. In the Witch, Baltimore and his crew find a witch in a village and kill her. In the Wolf, a different crew find a werewolf in a castle and kill it. Seriously: if it weren’t for Mike Mignola’s involvement and his readership, NOBODY would read this crap (assuming it'd even be made available)! It could not be any less inspired. The summary above sounds like I’m skimming details, but I’m really not - that’s all there is to this one! There’s a black cat with red eyes and later a crow and I was thinking, maybe they’re MacGuffins - maybe the innocent girl villager turns out to be the witch and the animal/shapeshifter is trying to save the village? But no, the witch was the black cat/crow. There’s not even a hint of ambiguity in the werewolf story: some characters you’ve never heard of rock up to a stereotypically gothic castle on a crumbling mountainside and kill a werewolf. And?! I enjoyed Peter Bergting’s art on the witch story and Ben Stenbeck’s on the werewolf one, and Dave Stewart’s colours always improves a comic, but holy shit is there nothing to this Baltimore book! This is a book of lazy, immensely boring, generic horror comics - Mike Mignola and Christopher Golden are firmly on autopilot throughout.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    Lord Baltimore is growing on me. It doesn't hurt that the quality of the story has been excellent. In this volume we have two really good stories. The first is the Witch of Harju- an excellent tale about a powerful witch and her undead minion. Lord Baltimore and his friends are in Estonia and have found a great evil lurking in a small village. There is a powerful witch that has a grudge against the town. What follows is a really dark, but good, story about undead, witches and Lord Baltimore hims Lord Baltimore is growing on me. It doesn't hurt that the quality of the story has been excellent. In this volume we have two really good stories. The first is the Witch of Harju- an excellent tale about a powerful witch and her undead minion. Lord Baltimore and his friends are in Estonia and have found a great evil lurking in a small village. There is a powerful witch that has a grudge against the town. What follows is a really dark, but good, story about undead, witches and Lord Baltimore himself. The group reminds me a little of League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (though no super powers). The plot is a good one and the overall setting is very grim and dark. Quite enjoyable. The second story- The Apostle is even better. Judge Duvic, the homicidal Inquistor, has become a werewolf. Lord Baltimore is in the Crimea hunting him down. What follows is a superb werewolf tale. The fallen Inquisitor is a great villain. In fact I can say that this was one of the finest werewolf stories I've read. The art for both stories is quite well done (if you like the Mignola style of artwork). It fits the dark grim tale, yet offers up bright colors when it calls for it (bloody, violent scenes). The Inquisotr's carving a path through his former brothers was a great scene. All in all -this is a really good Lord Baltimore collection. I have enjoyed the Lord Baltimore comics so far. Good plot, great action, solid prose and quality art all combine to make a great horror comic. I am really becoming a Lord Baltimore fan.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    Another two great sharp stories of Lord Baltimore and his growing band of fearless-monster-killers. The Witch of Harju was awesome and The Apostle a sick gore-fest, maybe the most brutal episode in the saga. Really love these series! Another two great sharp stories of Lord Baltimore and his growing band of fearless-monster-killers. The Witch of Harju was awesome and The Apostle a sick gore-fest, maybe the most brutal episode in the saga. Really love these series!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    2.5. A new status quo that starts rather choppily. World: The art has been solid for this series but I will say I did not really enjoy the art in the Witch of Harju story, I felt the art and the tone didn’t really combine well, yes the art is still very violent but I think it’s the brightness of the world that is jarring. The world building is choppy also. With the last book we let off with Baltimore I’m a new mission and without a heart, plus then werewolf. Here we see them again but Baltimore 2.5. A new status quo that starts rather choppily. World: The art has been solid for this series but I will say I did not really enjoy the art in the Witch of Harju story, I felt the art and the tone didn’t really combine well, yes the art is still very violent but I think it’s the brightness of the world that is jarring. The world building is choppy also. With the last book we let off with Baltimore I’m a new mission and without a heart, plus then werewolf. Here we see them again but Baltimore has friends now and his personality is a bit different, we didn’t get any introduction and the change is sudden making for a little sense of disorientation at the start of the read. The ideas behind the world are interesting but just when the rules were established we get more questions about the rules of the world which irk. Story: Two solid stories. The first one is a bit choppy and coming off the last arc was disorienting with the changes and the new team. It’s not really Baltimore’s thing and it is out of character which irks me. The second story is better, a classic Mignola monster tale and the tragic mission is just what I needed. Th pacing for that issue was good and the story acting as an origin is great. Characters: Baltimore is different, he’s much more sociable and he actually has a team and isn’t a complete jerk. I don’t mind that, the team is interesting but I need to know why this happened. The character change is inconsistent to his character and I find that to be lazy writing and not like Mignola at all. The new characters are alright, they fill in archetypes for teams so we will see where this goes. It was a bit choppy but once it gets in it’s groove this new status quo is good. Onward to the next book!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Václav

    Two really spooky stories in one book. The first one jumped right into Baltimore & "friends", hunting witch and her spawns. This book is carnage of "good" character, too much for my taste. The witch story got me on very end (first two issues were kind of weird and different for me), but the second - werewolf story - is raw, dark and exciting side line (with very unexpected ending). And it is very refreshing to move to another monsters than vampires. Two really spooky stories in one book. The first one jumped right into Baltimore & "friends", hunting witch and her spawns. This book is carnage of "good" character, too much for my taste. The witch story got me on very end (first two issues were kind of weird and different for me), but the second - werewolf story - is raw, dark and exciting side line (with very unexpected ending). And it is very refreshing to move to another monsters than vampires.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Wants to Read More)

    This volume has a super high creep factor. Anything with secret/demonic cults I find very disturbing. We meet an order of Christian knights who are trying to do what Baltimore does, but they are quite in over their heads. We also learn the fate of one of Baltimore's greatest adversaries (not the Vampire he hunts, mind you). There's some werewolf thrown in and not a little bit of blood and gore. Definitely one of the darkest volumes in a series that ain't exactly light reading. It was very good, This volume has a super high creep factor. Anything with secret/demonic cults I find very disturbing. We meet an order of Christian knights who are trying to do what Baltimore does, but they are quite in over their heads. We also learn the fate of one of Baltimore's greatest adversaries (not the Vampire he hunts, mind you). There's some werewolf thrown in and not a little bit of blood and gore. Definitely one of the darkest volumes in a series that ain't exactly light reading. It was very good, despite all that. I hope Mignola keeps writing about Baltimore.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    I was very close to rating this 5 stars, but I didn't like the second story quite as much as the first. Mignola is a master at Horror & Macabre. I really enjoyed this volume and this series as a whole. I was very close to rating this 5 stars, but I didn't like the second story quite as much as the first. Mignola is a master at Horror & Macabre. I really enjoyed this volume and this series as a whole.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Zedsdead

    Haigus at long last vanquished, Baltimore assembles a brotherhood of determined and capable men to move against the Red King, the ancient godlike being responsible for the creation of vampires. This league of extraordinary gentlemen travels around Europe ridding villages of monsters and recruiting new members. To my surprise, I'm enjoying the episodic nature of the series. Baltimore may be untouchable but the rest of the cast can die, or be maimed, or simply not be dragged directly into Baltimore Haigus at long last vanquished, Baltimore assembles a brotherhood of determined and capable men to move against the Red King, the ancient godlike being responsible for the creation of vampires. This league of extraordinary gentlemen travels around Europe ridding villages of monsters and recruiting new members. To my surprise, I'm enjoying the episodic nature of the series. Baltimore may be untouchable but the rest of the cast can die, or be maimed, or simply not be dragged directly into Baltimore's wake. So there are actual stakes. The chapters: (view spoiler)[ The Witch of Harju Estonia, 1920. Baltimore and company stumble across a woman fleeing the corpse of her husband. The zombie takes a lot of punishment before escaping into the woods. Soon the group is entangled with a shapeshifting witch and her monster children. The company's membership suffers some turnover. The Wolf and the Apostle Crimea, 1920. Baltimore grills a badly mauled priest of the Inquisition about his nemesis Duvic, restored to life as a clergy-slaughtering lycanthrope. The Inquisition sent an elite squad to eliminate its former operative (and the magnificent werewolf stalking and slaughtering them through the ruins of an abandoned castle is a thing of beauty.) Baltimore's interrogatee is the only survivor. Having repented of his Inquisitorial butchery, he seeks redemption by joining Baltimore in his crusade against the Red King. (hide spoiler)]

  10. 5 out of 5

    Orrin Grey

    In a volume that feels very much like it's building toward something after the climax of Chapel of Bones, we see Lord Baltimore assembling a group that will, presumably, ultimately go up against the Red King and his agents. For now we have a couple of stories, one about a town besieged by witchcraft, the other about the fate of the Inquisitor Duvic. The first story features illustrations by new Baltimore artists Peter Bergting, whose work is fun and evocative, though I can't help missing previous In a volume that feels very much like it's building toward something after the climax of Chapel of Bones, we see Lord Baltimore assembling a group that will, presumably, ultimately go up against the Red King and his agents. For now we have a couple of stories, one about a town besieged by witchcraft, the other about the fate of the Inquisitor Duvic. The first story features illustrations by new Baltimore artists Peter Bergting, whose work is fun and evocative, though I can't help missing previous series artist Ben Stenbeck, who remains my favorite non-Mignola artist to work on a Mignola book (tall praise indeed). I guess I'll just have to take solace in the fact that he's moved on to Frankenstein Underground. The second story was my favorite in this volume by a margin. Stenbeck's art is as good as ever, the werewolf is portrayed beautifully, and the scenes in the castle at the end had a wonderful Castlevania vibe to them that few other things can capture.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Baal Of

    Now that the initial story arc is complete, and the initial objective has been met, the story continues with a new objective, but first a couple side-quests, and the addition of an adventuring party. Both stories are, at their core, straightforward hunt down the monster and kill it missions. I have mixed feelings about the addition of a crew, instead of maintaining Baltimore as a lone wolf, but I suppose Mignola might be setting this up as a necessity for the ultimate confrontation of the Red Ki Now that the initial story arc is complete, and the initial objective has been met, the story continues with a new objective, but first a couple side-quests, and the addition of an adventuring party. Both stories are, at their core, straightforward hunt down the monster and kill it missions. I have mixed feelings about the addition of a crew, instead of maintaining Baltimore as a lone wolf, but I suppose Mignola might be setting this up as a necessity for the ultimate confrontation of the Red King. Still fun stuff, with some pretty good gruesome bits.

  12. 4 out of 5

    annie k

    There are few feelings that rival the thrill of finding a *new!* addition to a series that wasn't clearly supposed to be continuing...sitting down to "read a couple chapters" before bed and devouring those chapters along with the rest of the book in an hour, or so, certainly comes closest. I'm not sure I can review this without spoilers so I'll just say, Damn, I've really enjoyed this series...and hope to see another surprise on the library shelves in the (near) future! There are few feelings that rival the thrill of finding a *new!* addition to a series that wasn't clearly supposed to be continuing...sitting down to "read a couple chapters" before bed and devouring those chapters along with the rest of the book in an hour, or so, certainly comes closest. I'm not sure I can review this without spoilers so I'll just say, Damn, I've really enjoyed this series...and hope to see another surprise on the library shelves in the (near) future!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Fraser Sherman

    Very good, old-school horror as Baltimore and his allies confront a malevolent witch (unusually for Mignola we actually get a good witch in the story) and an inquisitor turned werewolf. Highpoints include the witch's creepy shapeshifting (good illustrated work there!) and the sequence where the werewolf picks off its prey in an abandoned castle. Very good, old-school horror as Baltimore and his allies confront a malevolent witch (unusually for Mignola we actually get a good witch in the story) and an inquisitor turned werewolf. Highpoints include the witch's creepy shapeshifting (good illustrated work there!) and the sequence where the werewolf picks off its prey in an abandoned castle.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sonic

    Thought Mignola said there would be no more Baltimore in Vol. 4, so I was thrilled to see this on the shelf at my library, and yes, it did not disappoint!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Col

    Remainder of the series review: Here the series started to lose its way. Bergting isn't a terrible artist, but he can't compare to Stenbeck, and the writing started to fall apart. Haigus and the other vampires were defeated in the previous volume, so the narrative attempts to shift gears to preventing the Red King from manifesting in the world by investigating witches worshipping him. I found the witches far less interesting than the previous grab-bag of antagonists, especially in comparison to t Remainder of the series review: Here the series started to lose its way. Bergting isn't a terrible artist, but he can't compare to Stenbeck, and the writing started to fall apart. Haigus and the other vampires were defeated in the previous volume, so the narrative attempts to shift gears to preventing the Red King from manifesting in the world by investigating witches worshipping him. I found the witches far less interesting than the previous grab-bag of antagonists, especially in comparison to the witches of Hellboy. The only ones that compared in design were the death-masked Red King worshippers, but they gave the impression of LARPers more than anything. Baltimore's formerly personal and solo quest becomes nebulous and team-oriented. But Baltimore is an inherently antisocial character, so it gives the sense of hangers-on rather than real teamwork. I understand that some of the initial members were given more characterization in the original novel which I haven't read yet, but none of them were particularly interesting. More problematic is the strange disconnections between each volume. Where the hell did this Quigley guy come from and who the hell is he? Why would a young woman like Sofia join Baltimore (and when?). When the Romanian girl from earlier tried to join Baltimore, it felt natural because we actually saw a connection build between them. Here teammates seem to join and drop at random. Worse, the art threw me several times. Rigo's hair changes from red to black to grey over the course of the series, and Bergting seemingly couldn't keep straight whether his scars were deep or shallow, and whether his eye was crushed to nothing or bloodshot or blank. Lemuel Rose was seemingly drawn without his artificial fingers in the last volume. Harish apparently fell in love with Sofia at some point, but that development is never shown. (view spoiler)[The final volume gives the impression of a rushjob. There's a several year timeskip from the Red King's resurrection to his almost having conquered Europe, and at some point Lemuel Rose became some kind of avatar of sickness, which is never explained. The Red King himself is disappointing, going from a cosmic horror to an Antichrist zombie. Baltimore's final confrontation with him is anticlimactic in the extreme. Hellboy managed this much better with the Nimue/Hellboy duel, which was appropriately apocalyptic. Could these problems have been fixed? Maybe. I think Blavatsky as the final villain would have helped keep the Red King's mystique better, and given Baltimore more of a personal grudge against her. But the overall pacing of the second half of Baltimore would still be all over the place and with general lack of evocative foes compared to the first half. (hide spoiler)] The one thing I really want to laud this series for was its alternate early 20th century setting, where an apocalyptic plague stops WWI in its tracks. In our world, that plague came after the war was over, but it's interesting to consider what would have happened had it struck earlier. The story also has a more varied cast than Hellboy, which is almost entirely American aside from Johann. Here we've got a mix of English, Greek, Estonian, Indian, Senegalese, with some attempts to mix in local folk-lore relevant to them, in the main cast. It really sells the Europe-trotting nature of the series, compared to Hellboy where the local contacts tend to be almost non-existent, or drop out of the story quickly. Overall, the early parts of Baltimore stand up with Hellboy, whereas these latter parts run more to the mignolaverse spinoff end of the scale.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mike Booth

    Another two brilliant stories, showing Baltimore building his team to fight the Red King. We are dropped in on the protagonist and his companions mid-scene, almost, which has been the case for each of the stories since the first, as far as I remember. I think it's interesting that we join them almost mid-plot, with no real explanation as to why the group is there. It implies that each of the related tales is only one of many, and that this is only a snapshot of their path. I suppose it means the Another two brilliant stories, showing Baltimore building his team to fight the Red King. We are dropped in on the protagonist and his companions mid-scene, almost, which has been the case for each of the stories since the first, as far as I remember. I think it's interesting that we join them almost mid-plot, with no real explanation as to why the group is there. It implies that each of the related tales is only one of many, and that this is only a snapshot of their path. I suppose it means the authors could have gone on for a long time, but obviously they chose not to, which is a bit of a shame, seen as how good these comics are. Neither of the stories featured vampires, which I found interesting. It highlights the shift away from Haigus and onto the Red King, who is causing such a plethora of evil to awaken. The first story, the Witch of Haiju, is one these minions and has been causing terror in a small Eastern European town. I really loved the design of the witch, as well as how the story built from one chance encounter into something much more. The monsters were great, again, and I think the art style must be growing on me because I'm loving it now. The second story, catching up with the werewolf Inquisitor, was also wonderful. Baltimore and his fellow monster hunters barely featured in this one, merely as an audience to a story told by a fellow Inquisitor. I liked the change of pace, where it felt more like Predator - a group of soldiers (well, practically) going up against a monster and getting more than they bargained for. I loved the unique designs of the priests; that they all had their own styles and looks made it much more interesting visually. It was a good story, too, and makes me interested to see how effective religion and religious items will continue to be. It's great to see a series you love have yet another brilliant entry. I can't wait to read the next.

  17. 4 out of 5

    jedioffsidetrap

    Baltimore and his posse roll into Estonia and find a young woman chased by a zombie. The village is haunted by a witch that raises the dead. Baltimore & Co. learn the history of the village & fight for it—B. doesn’t seem as heartlessly (ha ha) driven as he used to be. Monsters burst out of the corpses bodies & B. pursues the witch alone to confront her & end the reanimations for good. Apparently she’s an apostle of the Red King. She’s freaked out by B., retreating and crying, “what are you?” The Baltimore and his posse roll into Estonia and find a young woman chased by a zombie. The village is haunted by a witch that raises the dead. Baltimore & Co. learn the history of the village & fight for it—B. doesn’t seem as heartlessly (ha ha) driven as he used to be. Monsters burst out of the corpses bodies & B. pursues the witch alone to confront her & end the reanimations for good. Apparently she’s an apostle of the Red King. She’s freaked out by B., retreating and crying, “what are you?” Then calls him “hollow man.” He ends her, but loses one of his own. In the end, the woman Sofia joins up. The second story, The Wolf & the Apostle, is the tale of an Inquisitor who survived a battle with Duvic, who is a werewolf now—dominated by his dark side. Duvic slaughters a company of inquisitors as they try to subdue him in his castle lair. After hearing the tale & how the inquisitor Rigo fought Duvic & recanted his old ways, B. offers him a spot on the team. More awesome sound effects: SPLRKK! SPLUTCHH! SHHLUK! SPLTCH!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bill Coffin

    After Baltimore kills his nemesis, the vampire Haigus, he learns of a far greater threat—a primordial evil god known as the Red King—and goes to war against that. But first, he must contend with the Inquisitor Duvic, who he thought dead and who has become a literal monster instead of just a figurative one. This is an entertaining volume, but we begin to see the shortcomings with the larger series here. Baltimore works best when it is a tale of personal obsession, and the triangle of Baltmore > H After Baltimore kills his nemesis, the vampire Haigus, he learns of a far greater threat—a primordial evil god known as the Red King—and goes to war against that. But first, he must contend with the Inquisitor Duvic, who he thought dead and who has become a literal monster instead of just a figurative one. This is an entertaining volume, but we begin to see the shortcomings with the larger series here. Baltimore works best when it is a tale of personal obsession, and the triangle of Baltmore > Haigus > Duvic was shaping up to be extremely interesting. Too bad they resolved all that so neatly and so quickly without giving that very rich source material more room to develop. What he have from this point on is diminishing returns from what had been a very promising first arc.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    Baltimore continues to be an excellent horror book. The art by Peter Bergting and Ben Stenbeck was fantastic. They both created such a creepy atmosphere. This world that Mignola and Golden have created continues to grow and amaze. Its pretty great. I felt the book moved too quickly, again, and I would have liked more Lord Baltimore in the second arc but that's a minor complaint. Great read. Baltimore continues to be an excellent horror book. The art by Peter Bergting and Ben Stenbeck was fantastic. They both created such a creepy atmosphere. This world that Mignola and Golden have created continues to grow and amaze. Its pretty great. I felt the book moved too quickly, again, and I would have liked more Lord Baltimore in the second arc but that's a minor complaint. Great read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brannigan

    I love the Mignolaverse. It scratches an itch no other comic universe does. This is the second Baltimore book I’ve read and I enjoy it but because it seems to be in its own world or timeline I think I’m going to set it aside until some time in the future or possibly never. It’s good but not better than HB, LJ or BPRD and I can only keep up with so much. That said I do enjoy it more than AS.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    This volume has enjoyable pacing and solid stories. It is interesting to see the creation of Lord Baltimore's team including many characters introduced previously. I assume we haven't seen the last of Duvic's inquisitor/werewolf character. Looking forward to it. This volume has enjoyable pacing and solid stories. It is interesting to see the creation of Lord Baltimore's team including many characters introduced previously. I assume we haven't seen the last of Duvic's inquisitor/werewolf character. Looking forward to it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I really love this series! Tasty little horror stories with illustrations that just ramp up the creepy. This book (much like the rest of the series) is atmospheric without feeling juvenile or over the top. Fantastic!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brian Dickerson

    BCDER: 43

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Lynn Kramer

    I feel like I missed something with the sudden inclusion of some new characters and a few of the panels are a little hard to make out but overall this was another enjoyable issue.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    The mini-stories are too short to really get into.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tim Shepard

    An okay continuation of the Lord Baltimore series. It helps to build more of a storyline and creates a new path and new characters.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matt Maielli

    look I'm just glad they gave Baltimore some monster hunting friends look I'm just glad they gave Baltimore some monster hunting friends

  28. 4 out of 5

    CB

    Not quite as good as the earlier books, but enjoyable nonetheless.

  29. 5 out of 5

    John

    The last of the great Baltimore stories. From here to its conclusion it never attains these heights. Great storytelling and excellent artwork.

  30. 4 out of 5

    James

    More World War I-era horror from Hellboy creator Mike Mignola and co-writer Christopher Golden. This series isn't part of the Hellboy universe; instead, it focuses on its namesake lead, Lord Baltimore, whose encounter with a vampire in the trenches of World War I led to the death of his family and an unwavering quest for revenge. That quest was fulfilled in the last volume, though, which lets the series shift slightly to a new status quo. Instead of being a reluctant hero, a kind of drifter who g More World War I-era horror from Hellboy creator Mike Mignola and co-writer Christopher Golden. This series isn't part of the Hellboy universe; instead, it focuses on its namesake lead, Lord Baltimore, whose encounter with a vampire in the trenches of World War I led to the death of his family and an unwavering quest for revenge. That quest was fulfilled in the last volume, though, which lets the series shift slightly to a new status quo. Instead of being a reluctant hero, a kind of drifter who gets entangled in local troubles before returning to his own quest, Baltimore in this volume is building a team to try to stop the vampire threat once and for all. The two stories in this volume serve as a kind of recruitment, highlighting how two new members join the effort. I preferred the first, "The Witch of Harju," which is a spooky-style tale of animated dead and perverted altars. It's a nice horror tale set in Eastern Europe, the likes of which Mignola has explored in Hellboy before; while it's nothing groundbreaking, it is well paced and well crafted. "The Apostle" sees a team of Inquisitors go after a former member of their ranks who has turned into a murderous werewolf. Frankly, I'm a little tired of the villain here, a cruel man prone to torture who I thought met his deserved fate a volume back. Here he seems overpowered and a bit cliched, and I would rather the story explore new possibilities rather than refocus on him. The art by Ben Stenbeck and his successor on the series, Peter Bergting, is excellent throughout. There's plenty of dark, expressive terrors as well as some animalistic monster work. I like how the illustrators distinguish the large casts for each storyline, and I look forward to seeing what new horrors they can evoke.

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