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*Includes pictures *Includes ancient accounts of the landmarks *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents The famous conqueror from the European continent came ashore with thousands of men, ready to set up a new kingdom in England. The Britons had resisted the amphibious invasion from the moment his forces landed, but h *Includes pictures *Includes ancient accounts of the landmarks *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents The famous conqueror from the European continent came ashore with thousands of men, ready to set up a new kingdom in England. The Britons had resisted the amphibious invasion from the moment his forces landed, but he was able to push forward. In a large winter battle, the Britons’ large army attacked the invaders but was eventually routed, and the conqueror was able to set up a new kingdom. Over 1,100 years before William the Conqueror became the King of England after the Battle of Hastings, Julius Caesar came, saw, and conquered part of “Britannia,” setting up a Roman province with a puppet king in 54 B.C. In the new province, the Romans eventually constructed a military outpost overlooking a bridge across the River Thames. The new outpost was named Londinium, and it covered just over two dozen acres. Londinium was initially little more than a small military outpost near the northern boundary of the Roman province of Britannia, but its access to the River Thames and the North Sea made it a valuable location for a port. During the middle of the first century A.D., the Romans conducted another invasion of the British Isles, after which Londinium began to grow rapidly. As the Romans stationed legions there to defend against the Britons, Londinium became a thriving international port, allowing trade with Rome and other cities across the empire. By the 2nd century A.D., Londinium was a large Roman city, with tens of thousands of inhabitants using villas, palaces, a forum, temples, and baths. The Roman governor ruled from the city in a basilica that served as the seat of government. What was once a 30 acre outpost now spanned 300 acres and was home to nearly 15,000 people, including Roman soldiers, officials and foreign merchants. The Romans also built heavy defenses for the city, constructing several forts and the massive London Wall, parts of which are still scattered across the city today. Ancient Roman remains continue to dot London’s landscape today, reminding everyone that almost a millennium before it became the home of royalty, London was already a center of power. The Romans were master builders, and much of what they built has stood the test of time. Throughout their vast empire they have left grand structures, from the Forum and Pantheon in Rome to the theatres and hippodromes of North Africa and the triumphal gates in Anatolia and France. Wherever they went, the Romans built imposing structures to show their power and ability, and one of their most impressive constructions was built on the northernmost fringe of the empire. Shortly after the emperor Hadrian came to power in the early 2nd century CE, he decided to seal off Scotland from Roman Britain with an ambitious wall stretching from sea to sea. To accomplish this, the wall had to be built from the mouth of the River Tyne – where Newcastle stands today – 80 Roman miles (76 miles or 122 kilometers) west to Bowness-on-Solway. The sheer scale of the job still impresses people today, and Hadrian’s Wall has the advantage of being systematically studied and partially restored. A study of the wall and its history provide an insight not only into the political context of Rome at the time but the empire’s incredible engineering capabilities. Londinium and Hadrian’s Wall: The History of Ancient Rome’s Most Famous Landmarks in Britain analyzes the history of the influential Roman presence in England, and the ruins that remain thousands of years later. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Londinium and Hadrian’s Wall like never before.


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*Includes pictures *Includes ancient accounts of the landmarks *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents The famous conqueror from the European continent came ashore with thousands of men, ready to set up a new kingdom in England. The Britons had resisted the amphibious invasion from the moment his forces landed, but h *Includes pictures *Includes ancient accounts of the landmarks *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents The famous conqueror from the European continent came ashore with thousands of men, ready to set up a new kingdom in England. The Britons had resisted the amphibious invasion from the moment his forces landed, but he was able to push forward. In a large winter battle, the Britons’ large army attacked the invaders but was eventually routed, and the conqueror was able to set up a new kingdom. Over 1,100 years before William the Conqueror became the King of England after the Battle of Hastings, Julius Caesar came, saw, and conquered part of “Britannia,” setting up a Roman province with a puppet king in 54 B.C. In the new province, the Romans eventually constructed a military outpost overlooking a bridge across the River Thames. The new outpost was named Londinium, and it covered just over two dozen acres. Londinium was initially little more than a small military outpost near the northern boundary of the Roman province of Britannia, but its access to the River Thames and the North Sea made it a valuable location for a port. During the middle of the first century A.D., the Romans conducted another invasion of the British Isles, after which Londinium began to grow rapidly. As the Romans stationed legions there to defend against the Britons, Londinium became a thriving international port, allowing trade with Rome and other cities across the empire. By the 2nd century A.D., Londinium was a large Roman city, with tens of thousands of inhabitants using villas, palaces, a forum, temples, and baths. The Roman governor ruled from the city in a basilica that served as the seat of government. What was once a 30 acre outpost now spanned 300 acres and was home to nearly 15,000 people, including Roman soldiers, officials and foreign merchants. The Romans also built heavy defenses for the city, constructing several forts and the massive London Wall, parts of which are still scattered across the city today. Ancient Roman remains continue to dot London’s landscape today, reminding everyone that almost a millennium before it became the home of royalty, London was already a center of power. The Romans were master builders, and much of what they built has stood the test of time. Throughout their vast empire they have left grand structures, from the Forum and Pantheon in Rome to the theatres and hippodromes of North Africa and the triumphal gates in Anatolia and France. Wherever they went, the Romans built imposing structures to show their power and ability, and one of their most impressive constructions was built on the northernmost fringe of the empire. Shortly after the emperor Hadrian came to power in the early 2nd century CE, he decided to seal off Scotland from Roman Britain with an ambitious wall stretching from sea to sea. To accomplish this, the wall had to be built from the mouth of the River Tyne – where Newcastle stands today – 80 Roman miles (76 miles or 122 kilometers) west to Bowness-on-Solway. The sheer scale of the job still impresses people today, and Hadrian’s Wall has the advantage of being systematically studied and partially restored. A study of the wall and its history provide an insight not only into the political context of Rome at the time but the empire’s incredible engineering capabilities. Londinium and Hadrian’s Wall: The History of Ancient Rome’s Most Famous Landmarks in Britain analyzes the history of the influential Roman presence in England, and the ruins that remain thousands of years later. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Londinium and Hadrian’s Wall like never before.

33 review for Londinium and Hadrian’s Wall: The History of Ancient Rome’s Most Famous Landmarks in Britain

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    I learned much about Roman Britain, the city of London in those days, and why and how Hadrian's Wall was built as well as how it was defended. I learned much about Roman Britain, the city of London in those days, and why and how Hadrian's Wall was built as well as how it was defended.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brett

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Flowers

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mr.C.G.Ray

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael A. Simmons, Sr.

  6. 4 out of 5

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  8. 5 out of 5

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  9. 4 out of 5

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  10. 4 out of 5

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  11. 5 out of 5

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  12. 4 out of 5

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  13. 5 out of 5

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  14. 4 out of 5

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  16. 5 out of 5

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  17. 5 out of 5

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  18. 4 out of 5

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  20. 5 out of 5

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  21. 4 out of 5

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  22. 5 out of 5

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  23. 4 out of 5

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  24. 4 out of 5

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  25. 4 out of 5

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  26. 5 out of 5

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  27. 4 out of 5

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  32. 4 out of 5

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  33. 5 out of 5

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