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A captivating biography of the man who became a legend at the Battle of the Little Bighorn As a brilliant leader of a desperate cause and one of the most perennially fascinating figures of the American West, Crazy Horse crushed Custer's 7th Cavalry and brought the United States Army to its knees. Now, with the help of celebrated historian Joseph Marshall, we finally have th A captivating biography of the man who became a legend at the Battle of the Little Bighorn As a brilliant leader of a desperate cause and one of the most perennially fascinating figures of the American West, Crazy Horse crushed Custer's 7th Cavalry and brought the United States Army to its knees. Now, with the help of celebrated historian Joseph Marshall, we finally have the opportunity to know Crazy Horse as his fellow Lakota Indians knew him. Drawing on extensive research and a rich oral tradition that it rarely shared outside Native American circles, Marshall - himself a descendent of the Lakota community that raised Crazy Horse - creates a vibrant portrait of the man, his times, and his legacy. From the powerful vision that spurred him into battle to the woman he loved but lost to duty and circumstance, this is a compelling celebration of a culture, an enduring way of life, and the unforgettable hero who remains a legend among legends. Marshall's gloriously poetic and sweeping chronicle ushers in a new genre of American history...A tour de force. - Peter Nabakov, author of Native American Testimony A remarkable portrait of a remarkable man. - Colin G. Calloway, professor of history and Samson Occom Professor of Native American Studies, Dartmouth College


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A captivating biography of the man who became a legend at the Battle of the Little Bighorn As a brilliant leader of a desperate cause and one of the most perennially fascinating figures of the American West, Crazy Horse crushed Custer's 7th Cavalry and brought the United States Army to its knees. Now, with the help of celebrated historian Joseph Marshall, we finally have th A captivating biography of the man who became a legend at the Battle of the Little Bighorn As a brilliant leader of a desperate cause and one of the most perennially fascinating figures of the American West, Crazy Horse crushed Custer's 7th Cavalry and brought the United States Army to its knees. Now, with the help of celebrated historian Joseph Marshall, we finally have the opportunity to know Crazy Horse as his fellow Lakota Indians knew him. Drawing on extensive research and a rich oral tradition that it rarely shared outside Native American circles, Marshall - himself a descendent of the Lakota community that raised Crazy Horse - creates a vibrant portrait of the man, his times, and his legacy. From the powerful vision that spurred him into battle to the woman he loved but lost to duty and circumstance, this is a compelling celebration of a culture, an enduring way of life, and the unforgettable hero who remains a legend among legends. Marshall's gloriously poetic and sweeping chronicle ushers in a new genre of American history...A tour de force. - Peter Nabakov, author of Native American Testimony A remarkable portrait of a remarkable man. - Colin G. Calloway, professor of history and Samson Occom Professor of Native American Studies, Dartmouth College

30 review for The Journey of Crazy Horse: A Lakota History

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    You read or hear about Gen. George Custer and think, "oh I know all about Little Big Horn, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse" but upon reflection you realize you do not know a damn thing about the Native American side of things...and then you go and do something about that. Joseph M. Marshall III The name doesn't sound very "Native American," but Marshall is about as close as you'll get these days. According to his Wiki page he speaks Lakota and "can craft a Lakota bow in the traditional style. He was You read or hear about Gen. George Custer and think, "oh I know all about Little Big Horn, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse" but upon reflection you realize you do not know a damn thing about the Native American side of things...and then you go and do something about that. Joseph M. Marshall III The name doesn't sound very "Native American," but Marshall is about as close as you'll get these days. According to his Wiki page he speaks Lakota and "can craft a Lakota bow in the traditional style. He was on the founding board of the tribal college, Sinte Gleska University, on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. Joseph is an enrolled member of the Sicangu Lakota of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Joseph grew up in Horse Creek Community near White River (Maka Izita Wakpa, Smoking Earth River) on the Rosebud Indian Reservation in South Dakota." He is Lakota. He studies and teaches the Lakota ways and history. What better person to tell you about one of the Lakota's greatest heroic figures of all time? Marshall's The Journey of Crazy Horse gives the reader more of an insight into the true daily life of this northern plains tribe than most depictions of Native Americans often receive. How do we know this is true? Granted, much of this is taken from oral history, since written accounts of Crazy Horse have mainly been from whites, soldiers, boastful victors and the sour defeated (funny how the US Army named their loses as "massacres" back then, isn't it? Makes it sound like they were blind-sided in a unfair fight). I'm on the side of Native Americans and their gripes about the Europeans that took their lands. If there's anyone in America with the right to complain about illegal aliens it's these guys. However, I'm not a fan of whiny losers. You fought, you lost, the victor gets your shit. That's the way war works. Were the Americans underhanded in their dealings with the Native Americans? Hell yes. Did the Romans treat the Celts kindly or did they hunt down their leaders and holy men and stamp out their culture? Did one tribe wipe out another? When they had the chance. It's the way of conquerors. Much of human history is about war. Just think about what gets recorded and retaught, the battles or the times when blood-shed was avoided? History bluffs are more apt to read/write about the strategies at Waterloo rather than poring over the notes and lab hours of Louis Pasteur. To this point, we've been a war-like people. Expect it. Don't be surprised and shocked by its disgusting ways when it shows up upon your doorstep. My point is, I have a low threshold for listening to or reading "woe is us" laments from the losing side. Genocide of a peaceful people is one thing. They can righteously complain all they want and have my heart and ear the whole way through. But a people that pride themselves upon their fighting prowess, and the Lakota certainly did, get a little less sympathy from me. So, with that rather long harangue in mind, I'm happy to say Marshall's The Journey of Crazy Horse does not go overboard with the laments. Yes, there is sorrow for the tribe and hatred for the whites, which I suppose some with a lower threshold for complaints might balk at, but I didn't have a problem with it. I've seen worse. (From a '70s anti-pollution campaign. Which bothers me, because the Native Americans were some of the worst polluters. Look into the heaping midden piles they left behind. Again, I'm on their side. I'm glad there are anti-pollution campaigns, but let's have some perspective...and less misguided melodrama, please.) As far as biographies go, this sets a good tone and pace, and it's the perfect length. I sensed that creeping feeling of boredom I get with a book that's pushing it's interest-limits coming along just as it ended. It's a tough subject to tackle. It's so much easier to research written histories from a people long-versed in writing things down. The Lakota were not that kind of people. However, they did have a long and rich oral history from which Marshall has crafted a fine biography upon a figure that would be intriguing no matter what people Crazy Horse came from.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    An excellent biography. Joseph M. Marshall III’s 2005 history of Crazy Horse was a mesmerizing, sometimes heartbreaking account of the enigmatic Lakota leader. The Crazy Horse that we meet in Marshall’s chronicle is a quiet man who loved solitude but who was gifted with an exceptional, almost supernatural fighting ability. A somewhat reluctant leader, Crazy Horse was first a fighting man, a warrior who led others because of his ability rather than any ambition to lead. Marshall punctuates his narra An excellent biography. Joseph M. Marshall III’s 2005 history of Crazy Horse was a mesmerizing, sometimes heartbreaking account of the enigmatic Lakota leader. The Crazy Horse that we meet in Marshall’s chronicle is a quiet man who loved solitude but who was gifted with an exceptional, almost supernatural fighting ability. A somewhat reluctant leader, Crazy Horse was first a fighting man, a warrior who led others because of his ability rather than any ambition to lead. Marshall punctuates his narrative with editorial asides that adds depth and understanding. Born about a hundred years after his subject, Marshall was nonetheless raised to appreciate the Lakota ways and so he has a unique perspective to offer a sympathetic rendering of the man whose leadership is still studied today. Leadership as a theme is one in which Marshall spends much time and a subject that adds value and detail to Crazy Horse’s biography. In a time of transition when many other Lakota chose to live within the parameters of agency with the encroaching whites, Crazy Horse was a steadfast defender of the older ways but also a thoughtful steward of the trust in which his people held him. Marshall describes Crazy Horse’s interactions with other Native American leaders such as Red Cloud and Sitting Bull and provides illuminating depictions of several important events, including the Battle of Little Big Horn, known to the Lakota as the Battle of the Greasy Grass. Most histories are written from the standpoint of the US soldiers, but Marshall’s view from the side of the Lakota was noteworthy and thought provoking. Marshall does not cast his subject in a false but heroic light (as many depictions of Custer do) but provides an accurate portrayal of a man who was an often-violent defender of his people. Crazy Horse was a warrior and killer, but Marshall reveals that this bellicosity was out of a sincere love of his land and people and out of a desperate defense of what he valued. Ultimately, out of a love for his people and a desire that they be treated fairly, Crazy Horse surrendered to US General Crook and was murdered only a few months later in disputed circumstances. Crazy Horse had accepted that he could fight to the death, but his selfless concern for those left after him led him to attempt to lead his people to a more secure future. Marshall has given us a glimpse into a warrior, leader and a great man.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Clif Hostetler

    Crazy Horse’s life is by necessity based largely on Native American oral traditions since his actions didn’t produce direct documentation. The author grew up on the Rosebud Sioux Reservation and first learned about the legendary Lakota warrior from the stories told by older men of the tribe. This biography is told from the viewpoint of the Lakota much in the storyteller style the author first heard it. The narration doesn’t shift to the world of the whites to explain motivations and plans being Crazy Horse’s life is by necessity based largely on Native American oral traditions since his actions didn’t produce direct documentation. The author grew up on the Rosebud Sioux Reservation and first learned about the legendary Lakota warrior from the stories told by older men of the tribe. This biography is told from the viewpoint of the Lakota much in the storyteller style the author first heard it. The narration doesn’t shift to the world of the whites to explain motivations and plans being made in Washington DC or the U.S. Army on the plains. Rather, any news is learned in the same way those living in the Lakota world learned about it. (view spoiler)[For example, when gold is discovered in the Black Hills the book tells us the Indians noticed unusual numbers of white men going to the Black Hills, and then learned later that it was in response to gold being discovered. (hide spoiler)] The author avoids dramatic combat scenes but instead emphasizes the larger picture of the struggle of the Sioux tribes between 1840s and the 1880s to defy the settlers and miners coming onto their portion of the Great Plains. One example of book's avoidance of blood-and-guts is how the Battle of Greasy Grass (Little Bighorn) was portrayed. From my prior knowledge of history I knew the battle was about to occur, but the book was giving no hint of a pending battle. Then it’s mentioned that a scout came over a ridge shouting that soldiers were coming. The narrative suddenly skips to the next day when the warriors are trying to decide whether to kill off the remaining stranded soldiers. At first I thought some pages had been skipped. Where was the battle? As the narrative continues we’re told that Crazy Horse later learned of happenings as told by people from various parts encampment. No attempt is made to describe Crazy Horse’s actions during the battle, probably because there is no way to know that kind of detail. The author emphasizes the importance of the Battle of the Rosebud that occurred eight days prior to Little Bighorn. He describes it as an outstanding example of the fighting abilities of the Indians under Crazy Horse's leadership. It is a battle that is often overlooked by many history buffs. Crazy Horse is described as a loyal son, spurned lover, instinctive warrior, doting father, compassionate hunter and natural leader, one who “reluctantly answered the call to serve” and “had no desire to talk about his exploits.” It is the enigmatic nature of this man that makes him so interesting. I as a pacifist have mixed feelings about the warrior life as personified by Crazy Horse and described in this book. I appreciate the sense of service and responsibility shown for his people. It is also easy to feel sympathy for the impossible situation his people were in. I acknowledge that Crazy Horse did finally have the wisdom to capitulate and surrender. Doing so saved the lives of his wife and others in his group. But his inner defiant spirit led to actions that resulted in his death at the hands of another Lakota who was in the pay of the U.S. Army as a guard. His untimely death contributes to his legend and mystery.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Like Crazy Horse the author, Joseph M. Marshall is a Lakota himself and in his introduction tells us how the legendary Lakota leader was his boyhood hero thanks to the stories told to him by his elders. He says these were merely stories to his boyhood sensibility but that as he grew older he realised they were also essential historical and cultural insights into his people. He finally tells us this biographic narrative is an attempt to unfold the life of Crazy Horse as a storyteller would and th Like Crazy Horse the author, Joseph M. Marshall is a Lakota himself and in his introduction tells us how the legendary Lakota leader was his boyhood hero thanks to the stories told to him by his elders. He says these were merely stories to his boyhood sensibility but that as he grew older he realised they were also essential historical and cultural insights into his people. He finally tells us this biographic narrative is an attempt to unfold the life of Crazy Horse as a storyteller would and this is the great triumph of this biography – it possesses all the vitality and detailed cultural fabric of a well written novel. Crazy Horse’s biography would be any novelist’s dream – he has to overcome outsider status, there’s a tragic love story, there’s betrayal from his own kin, there’s a spiritual quest, alienation, persecution and ultimately the fight to the death to protect his family and friends and withhold the values he cherished above even his own life. Another facet of this book that makes it so compelling is the author’s intimate insight into the detail and rituals of life as a Lakota in the 19th century. Of course it’s a culture that never was going to survive into the 20th century without massive compromises and time and time again, because of the author’s detailed insight into and account of a culture that had much that was poetic, beautiful and deeply spiritual I was made to feel the tragedy of this loss. You could say Crazy Horse was the prototype or inspiration for the likes of Luke Skywalker and every other Hollywood hero or heroine who fights for his homeland against oppressive intruders - except the accepted notion of him is still essentially as an outlaw, a wild savage. Okay, he was never going to win the Nobel Peace Prize but surely it’s time Crazy Horse was honoured as a noble and courageous man who did everything in his power to preserve a culture that still has so much wisdom to offer the world. We don’t have to demonise his oppressors to do that. We all know they were essentially unwitting agents of history. The author has done a great job of changing popular perception in this book. I just wish Hollywood would make it into a film. Thank you to Joseph Marshall for this beautiful and profoundly moving book. And here’s a beautiful Sioux song - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n--U_...

  5. 4 out of 5

    R.K. Gold

    I love learning more about Crazy Horse, there were a lot of interesting stories in this book, the pacing halted me a few times. The very end of the book wrapped it up nicely to the point where it explained the entire meaning but still the pacing is why I struggle to go higher than 3 stars.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Angela Holland

    I enjoyed this book and learned more about Crazy Horse as I read. Of course the more I read the the more I angry I got. Growing up around Native American Reservations I have a respect for them. I know they were treated badly but I did not realize exactly what they did to him and his family. I liked that this was told from their point of view which I feel should have been done a long time ago. I enjoyed the story at the end as well as who the author got his information from. There is a lot of inf I enjoyed this book and learned more about Crazy Horse as I read. Of course the more I read the the more I angry I got. Growing up around Native American Reservations I have a respect for them. I know they were treated badly but I did not realize exactly what they did to him and his family. I liked that this was told from their point of view which I feel should have been done a long time ago. I enjoyed the story at the end as well as who the author got his information from. There is a lot of information packed in this book but not so much that it is overwhelming. The way the author wrote it makes you want to continue reading to learn more about Crazy Horse and his people. I recommend this book to anyone who is wanting to learn a little more about our history from the way it happened and not the way the history books want you to think it all happened.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    The story of Crazy Horse is tragic on so many levels. This book gives a fair and balanced portrait of a true American hero.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jen_Ken a.k.a....Jenny from the block

    This edition on the story of Crazy Horse left me with a deep sense of profound admiration, respect and honor of a legitimate war hero. If anyone ever thinks their a true leader then read this and let me know if you are or not. I would say leading anything in life is a lot of hard work and dedication. It's easy to say follow me but it's entirely a different story if anyone follows your direction or not. What happened to the different tribes of the Native American Nations is a travesty and true sa This edition on the story of Crazy Horse left me with a deep sense of profound admiration, respect and honor of a legitimate war hero. If anyone ever thinks their a true leader then read this and let me know if you are or not. I would say leading anything in life is a lot of hard work and dedication. It's easy to say follow me but it's entirely a different story if anyone follows your direction or not. What happened to the different tribes of the Native American Nations is a travesty and true sadness in my inner essence. My heart burns there too and can't even think what that must feel like. I do know the feeling of what IT feels to be discriminated against but being driven from your home is definitely a horse of a different story.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brian Glass

    Hau kola! Interesting take on a biography of Crazy Horse. Marshall skillfully avoids the "look-how-many-Lakota-words-I-know" trap of most native writers and gives a not-always-flattering portrayal of the Oglala leader. The tales come alive, and in so much more clarity and strength than any other portrayal of Crazy Horse I've encountered (I'm talking to you, Son of the Morning Star author). Both the author and I are Sicangu, and members of the same tribe, so there's a certain kinship I feel that Hau kola! Interesting take on a biography of Crazy Horse. Marshall skillfully avoids the "look-how-many-Lakota-words-I-know" trap of most native writers and gives a not-always-flattering portrayal of the Oglala leader. The tales come alive, and in so much more clarity and strength than any other portrayal of Crazy Horse I've encountered (I'm talking to you, Son of the Morning Star author). Both the author and I are Sicangu, and members of the same tribe, so there's a certain kinship I feel that I suspect might not translate. I was also, again, given to wonder if there had been a greater resistance at the outset, had the Lakota adopted the whites method of warfare earlier, what would the outcome of the Great Sioux War have been? The Lakota were limited by two key factors: 1) an initial unwillingness to engage in outright warfare, and 2) divided attention between being warriors and providers for their families. The Long Knives certainly proved their willingness to massacre the elderly, women, and children and the warriors had little choice but to divide their attentions between defense and repulsion. I hope my non-Indian friends give this one a try. I promise we only look mad in all those pictures. But, yes, we would like the Black Hills back, please.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Feisty Harriet

    Waffling between 3 and 4 stars (honestly, it's probably a 3.5 star book). This isn't exactly a biography, although Marshall has done extensive research into the life and times of Crazy Horse, Lakota warrior in the 1860s and 1870s in what is now the Dakotas, Montana, and Wyoming. Most notoriously (to white Americans) is his defeat of Custer at the Battle of Little Bighorn, however Crazy Horse led the Lakota people in battle for years, fighting for their independence from white annuity payments an Waffling between 3 and 4 stars (honestly, it's probably a 3.5 star book). This isn't exactly a biography, although Marshall has done extensive research into the life and times of Crazy Horse, Lakota warrior in the 1860s and 1870s in what is now the Dakotas, Montana, and Wyoming. Most notoriously (to white Americans) is his defeat of Custer at the Battle of Little Bighorn, however Crazy Horse led the Lakota people in battle for years, fighting for their independence from white annuity payments and "peace papers." Ok, I learned a lot about the Lakota, Crazy Horse, and their history. The first 180 pages of this book tell the mostly chronological story of Crazy Horse's life. The voice took some getting used to, the tale is told as--I believe--it would have been told in an oral history from the ancient ones. Time and place are all Lakota, as they should be, but without a footnote or parenthetical translation of what month or in what geographical space we were talking about, I got lost easily. There is a map at the beginning, but it wasn't all that great for me. An example: Crazy Horse's mentor was an older man named High Back Bone, which I interpreted as Hunchback (he is called Hump sometimes too), as a description of his physical form. It wasn't until almost 200 pages in that Marshall explains that High Back Bone/Hump meant like that of a buffalo, which makes WAY MORE SENSE than what I had been imagining. So, again, this is my fault for not fully understanding, but I also felt like if I'm reading this book specifically to learn about the Lakota some footnotes or other explanations would have been helpful. "Moon of the Popping Trees" is a mystery for me, but a quick (December-ish) parenthetical would have helped immensely. General Custer was referred to as Long Hair, which is what the Dakota called him, but as I am unfamiliar with all the details surrounding Little Bighorn that battle was over completely before I realized that I'd just read about Crazy Horse and his band of warriors most famous (to white Americans) deed. The few chapters at the end use English/American dates and names, and were much easier to follow. I am not asking Marshall to change his storytelling voice for the Lakota legend, NOT AT ALL, but a few footnotes or explanations to help me connect the dots would have been really helpful.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jerome

    Like I said previously, the book suffers greatly from the author’s relentless interjection of his life into that of Crazy Horse's journey. I also find it interesting that he has exact details of experiences Crazy Horse had when he was alone. It’s hard for me to believe because he paints Crazy Horse to be a man of solitude who did not speak about himself. So, how did some of these elaborate details make it to the surface when the only person that was present would most likely not speak of these d Like I said previously, the book suffers greatly from the author’s relentless interjection of his life into that of Crazy Horse's journey. I also find it interesting that he has exact details of experiences Crazy Horse had when he was alone. It’s hard for me to believe because he paints Crazy Horse to be a man of solitude who did not speak about himself. So, how did some of these elaborate details make it to the surface when the only person that was present would most likely not speak of these details? On a positive note, there is plenty of great information resulting from the oral accounts. If the oral accounts were presented untainted and each piece of information was credited to the appropriate individual, this project would have had a greater voice. Instead, the knowledge of numerous individuals is mashed together and presented as one flawless, highly detailed story. My suggestion would be to give credit to the storytellers within the body of the text. Unfortunately, the storytellers are listed at the end text...almost as if it was an afterthought.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alene

    I grew up in Montana and remember studying some key battles and some key Native American figures, but this was really the inside story it felt like. It was both truly heartbreaking and truly inspiring about how leaders should serve their communities, being first an example above all other things. It has made me want to learn so much more of the Lakota history and of course reminded me how much I want to teach my children about having character.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    This book about Crazy Horse is an eye-opening experience because of the perspective of its Lakota author. I listened to it on Audiobook, where it was beautifully read by the author. Living in Nebraska, very close to the region where Crazy Horse lived and led his Lakota people, made the story especially meaningful. Understanding history requires our attention to the narratives of the different groups of people who played a part in that history. Marshall is an excellent voice for the "Lakota narra This book about Crazy Horse is an eye-opening experience because of the perspective of its Lakota author. I listened to it on Audiobook, where it was beautifully read by the author. Living in Nebraska, very close to the region where Crazy Horse lived and led his Lakota people, made the story especially meaningful. Understanding history requires our attention to the narratives of the different groups of people who played a part in that history. Marshall is an excellent voice for the "Lakota narrative." One of his goals is to teach the reader to separate the myth of Crazy Horse from the man, and to appreciate the complexities of the pressures that influenced him. While many Lakota found it expedient to cast their lot with the "agencies" of the US government, and receive the benefits of food, shelter, clothing, and safety that they afforded, Crazy Horse chose to defend the Lakota way of life and resist the enticements of the white man. Eventually, knowing he was outnumbered and outgunned, he, too, submitted, and ended up being captured and murdered by his guards. But this book is an excellent way to "feel" the encroachment of the Euro-American immigrants into Lakota territory from the Lakota point of view and to develop an appreciation for the values and traditions that Crazy Horse was trying to protect.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ctgt

    An interesting hybrid of traditional and oral history. The author is a Lakota who was born and raised on Rosebud Indian Reservation and grew up surrounded by the stories and legends of Crazy Horse. The author makes a point early on about the shift from the oral tradition of history and he argues that too often those types of "history" are ignored or neglected. As a result there are moments throughout the book where the author takes some liberties with dialogue or actions and makes assumptions on An interesting hybrid of traditional and oral history. The author is a Lakota who was born and raised on Rosebud Indian Reservation and grew up surrounded by the stories and legends of Crazy Horse. The author makes a point early on about the shift from the oral tradition of history and he argues that too often those types of "history" are ignored or neglected. As a result there are moments throughout the book where the author takes some liberties with dialogue or actions and makes assumptions on what might have been going through the head of Crazy Horse and others. I have read some criticism of the book for this method of writing but I think that is missing the point of what the author is attempting to achieve with this blending of sourced and oral history. It is also interesting to read a book from the "other" side of the history. Structurally the book suffers a bit from jumping out of a linear chronological mode and repeating some moments throughout the timeline but overall there is a decent flow. I listened to the audio narrated by the author and would recommend this format. 8/10

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

    Main flaw for me: I'm looking for accurate information. I felt I was reading historical fiction because some of the scenes could not possibly be known. But no one can do Crazy Horse accurately. Excellent reading by the author on the cd. Main flaw for me: I'm looking for accurate information. I felt I was reading historical fiction because some of the scenes could not possibly be known. But no one can do Crazy Horse accurately. Excellent reading by the author on the cd.

  16. 4 out of 5

    CindySlowReader#GimmeDatVac!

    All the battles just ran together in a river of sad.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dził Ba Hadadolgháásh

    Joseph Marshall creates a personalized story of the life of Crazy Horse by webbing together Lakota traditional stories and knowledge of the man with European settler historical information. He does a good job showing the true side of the story between the confrontation of the settlers and Lakota people, which is mainly the struggle of the Lakota people to keep living their way of life and practice the beliefs and teachings of their ancestors. One thing that stood out for me was the comparison of Joseph Marshall creates a personalized story of the life of Crazy Horse by webbing together Lakota traditional stories and knowledge of the man with European settler historical information. He does a good job showing the true side of the story between the confrontation of the settlers and Lakota people, which is mainly the struggle of the Lakota people to keep living their way of life and practice the beliefs and teachings of their ancestors. One thing that stood out for me was the comparison of waging war or battle by the two different cultures. For the Lakota they connected battles or war with gaining courage, strengthening the people, making boys into men, or sometimes to get even for wrongs done to them. They did not just do it to kill of an enemy or exterminate them, this may be why counting coup was thought of as being more courageous than killing or mortally wounding a foe. This differs greatly with the European settlers though, who fought to either take out Indigenous nations completing, whether it be by war, colonization, forced secularization, or oppressive education. A favorite read for me, and a great story put together to show the Crazy Horse as how he was known to be by the Lakota, which makes for a more authentic account, although Joseph should of gave credit to the people with this traditional historical knowledge in the very body of the text. If his life was made into a movie it would be epic, but even he would not want this, how much more humble can one get. Shirt wearer for life.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Larissacherpeski

    I think because I was just recently at the Crazy Horse Monument by Rushmore and because I have some really good Lakota friends this book really affected me. It was a beautifully written Lakota perspective, and I feel like I got more insight into the Lakota culture as well as Crazy Horse himself. It's hard to read at times, because you know how it's going to end. I think because I was just recently at the Crazy Horse Monument by Rushmore and because I have some really good Lakota friends this book really affected me. It was a beautifully written Lakota perspective, and I feel like I got more insight into the Lakota culture as well as Crazy Horse himself. It's hard to read at times, because you know how it's going to end.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Scot

    I've long respected the great Oglala warrior of the Lakota people, Crazy Horse, probably best known for his great victory in the defeat of General Custer at Little Big Horn, but there is so much more about this man to admire, as one learns by reading this sensitive and intelligent biography, written by a Lakota historian who draws upon the oral histories passed down by many of his relatives and revered community elders. As a historian, Marshall employs traditional scholarly research too, but his I've long respected the great Oglala warrior of the Lakota people, Crazy Horse, probably best known for his great victory in the defeat of General Custer at Little Big Horn, but there is so much more about this man to admire, as one learns by reading this sensitive and intelligent biography, written by a Lakota historian who draws upon the oral histories passed down by many of his relatives and revered community elders. As a historian, Marshall employs traditional scholarly research too, but his greatest sources of information are those who lived and knew the Lakota culture one generation removed from Crazy Horse--they never knew the man themselves, but they heard the accounts, tales, and Lakota history accounts from many who had. What emerges is the story of a true hero as seen from within his own cultural system and on their own terms, celebrated not only for his military genius and fighting ability, but even more so for what he would suffer or endure as an individual for the good of his community. Crazy Horse put strong emphasis on the traditions, practices, rituals, and the form of community governance of his people, and he received a powerful calling early on to protect their way of life--embedded in that vision was the dark realization that his own people would bring him down someday. Despite that prophetic awareness, what stands out most starkly in this biography is how Crazy Horse always put the good of the "we" before the good of the "me" when it came to traditional Lakota culture and the lands they cherished.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Randy Daugherty

    Marshall tells the story of Crazy Horse not only from research but from the oral tradtion of his grandfathers and offers an insight into Crazy Horse not only as a leader and warrior but more importantly as a man. A man who though not asking or seeking it assumed the mantle of leader for his people, also explained is the deep feeling Crazy Horse had for his people and their culture and why he was willing to die fighting for it and more importantly why he was willing to take his people to live ... Marshall tells the story of Crazy Horse not only from research but from the oral tradtion of his grandfathers and offers an insight into Crazy Horse not only as a leader and warrior but more importantly as a man. A man who though not asking or seeking it assumed the mantle of leader for his people, also explained is the deep feeling Crazy Horse had for his people and their culture and why he was willing to die fighting for it and more importantly why he was willing to take his people to live ... (show more) Marshall tells the story of Crazy Horse not only from research but from the oral tradtion of his grandfathers and offers an insight into Crazy Horse not only as a leader and warrior but more importantly as a man. A man who though not asking or seeking it assumed the mantle of leader for his people, also explained is the deep feeling Crazy Horse had for his people and their culture and why he was willing to die fighting for it and more importantly why he was willing to take his people to live on the agency and give up what he held dearest so that his people could live, survive and that their culture would continue.This book is a must for anyone intersted in Native American history and culture, the History of the American West and as a guide for leadership. We all know Crazy Horse the Warrior, the Great Military leader and now we learn of Crazy Horse the Son, Father , Husband, a man with doubts, fears, hopes and dreams.May he always be remembered as such.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tony Taylor

    A very, very interesting book written by a Lakota Indian about Crazy Horse without the Hollywood hype. Recommend it for anyone interested in American history. Crazy Horse was probably one of the greatest leaders of his generation, American Indian or Euro-American. This non-ficton is written using the names of people and places as those used by the Lakota at that time. As an example, the Battle of LIttle Bighorn is referred to as the Greasy Grass Fight of 1876 (Greasy Grass was the Indian name fo A very, very interesting book written by a Lakota Indian about Crazy Horse without the Hollywood hype. Recommend it for anyone interested in American history. Crazy Horse was probably one of the greatest leaders of his generation, American Indian or Euro-American. This non-ficton is written using the names of people and places as those used by the Lakota at that time. As an example, the Battle of LIttle Bighorn is referred to as the Greasy Grass Fight of 1876 (Greasy Grass was the Indian name for the Little Bighorn River.) Custer is only mentioned in passing as "Long Hair." It is an interesting personal note that in the course of reading this book, we were returning from a five week drive across the U.S., and while passing through Montana we made a last minute stop at the LIttle Bighorn Battlefield National Monument which is marked by a sign directing us to a Dakota trading post... a very memorable experience.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    This is the story of Crazy Horse from the Lakota oral histories as told by the author, himself a Lakota that grew up on the reservations, who learned of the histories from his elders. This is the type of history that does not contain some of the fantastic stories of made up fantasy and embellishment that has come out in the past. Such as the battle at Greasy Grass better known as Little Big Horn and the defeat of Custer. Here it is told as a battle that took place over several days and covered s This is the story of Crazy Horse from the Lakota oral histories as told by the author, himself a Lakota that grew up on the reservations, who learned of the histories from his elders. This is the type of history that does not contain some of the fantastic stories of made up fantasy and embellishment that has come out in the past. Such as the battle at Greasy Grass better known as Little Big Horn and the defeat of Custer. Here it is told as a battle that took place over several days and covered several areas. Most stories that are heard are that all of the U.S. troops were wiped out in one single decisive battle. Historically this is not accurate. More interesting than the war stories are the histories of Crazy Horse as a child growing into the warrior and hunter that he was. A different look at his life and one that I feel is more accurate than what you would find in any history book in any classroom today.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    A biography of Crazy Horse is more interesting when the story is told in a oral history. Joseph Marshall III a Lakota Indian tells this story which was pass down to him by his Lakota ancestry. To me this is the best history one can get on a subject by ancestors who have lived it. He details Crazy Horse's struggles, his incredible intuition and foresight. His acts of valor and genius in battle and his leadership by example are explored by Marshall were inspiring. I'm glad I read this book that gi A biography of Crazy Horse is more interesting when the story is told in a oral history. Joseph Marshall III a Lakota Indian tells this story which was pass down to him by his Lakota ancestry. To me this is the best history one can get on a subject by ancestors who have lived it. He details Crazy Horse's struggles, his incredible intuition and foresight. His acts of valor and genius in battle and his leadership by example are explored by Marshall were inspiring. I'm glad I read this book that gives the Native American Indian's perspective on this person. I learned a lot about the Indian culture as well about the man himself. Marshall writes on a culture that we should respect and mourn for something that can never be replaced.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Colby

    This book is outstanding! The author, Joseph Marshall III, provided an alternate perspective about the life of the great Oglala Lakota warrior Crazy Horse with which many people are unfamiliar. Although many people are familiar with Crazy Horse's exploits on the battlefield, they may not be aware of his humble character and personality. The author does a sensational job of highlighting these aspects of Crazy Horse, as well as some of the personal challenges and heartaches that this great warrior This book is outstanding! The author, Joseph Marshall III, provided an alternate perspective about the life of the great Oglala Lakota warrior Crazy Horse with which many people are unfamiliar. Although many people are familiar with Crazy Horse's exploits on the battlefield, they may not be aware of his humble character and personality. The author does a sensational job of highlighting these aspects of Crazy Horse, as well as some of the personal challenges and heartaches that this great warrior faced during his lifetime.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rachael Lind

    This book is amazing, especially for a required history text. It told the story of Crazy Horse in a novel form, rather than reading about it in a textbook. This caused personal feelings to develop for characters and the tribe. Even when I knew the outcome of the story would not be in the Lakota's favor, I couldn't help root for them the whole while. Definitely a recommended read, whatever your interests. This book is amazing, especially for a required history text. It told the story of Crazy Horse in a novel form, rather than reading about it in a textbook. This caused personal feelings to develop for characters and the tribe. Even when I knew the outcome of the story would not be in the Lakota's favor, I couldn't help root for them the whole while. Definitely a recommended read, whatever your interests.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Maddy Barone

    This book is excellent. Rather than focusing on dates and white American interpretations of events, the author tells of Crazy Horse's life as the man lived it, bringing to the froe the people and events that were important to Crazy Horse. Dates are occasionally listed, but only rarely. If a reader would like to know what Crazy Horse's life was like and what mattered to him, this is the book to read. This book is excellent. Rather than focusing on dates and white American interpretations of events, the author tells of Crazy Horse's life as the man lived it, bringing to the froe the people and events that were important to Crazy Horse. Dates are occasionally listed, but only rarely. If a reader would like to know what Crazy Horse's life was like and what mattered to him, this is the book to read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Richard Lamont

    I thought that this was a phenomenal piece. Joseph M. Marshall III did an amazing job writing about one of the most famous Lakota people out there in Crazy Horse. If I ever had a favorite book, this would definitely be the one that I would remember most. It was truly a excellent piece of history of how one man led a tribe to take down the United States 7th Calvary and how was able to break their will.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Robert Smith

    This is a great biography and history of the Oglala Lakota. It was a great read as it was written in the oral tradition. It gave tremendous insight into the life of Crazy Horse that has been plagued with so much legend and hearsay. It helped to clear up some of the misconceptions and myths surrounding Crazy Horse. It also gave great insight into the life and world of the Lakota.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Hebert

    I mostly just know about the soldiers in the forts and Indians through TV and movies. So reading this provided new insight, new thinking, and a new version of a man who was a leader, sacrificing any personal glory for what was good for his people. Another terrible chapter in American history as. Manifest Destiny clashes with the lives and culture of the people here before.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Gore

    Thankfully a Native American story told by a Native American A book that tell the story of Crazy Horse the way it was handed down from the people who were there. Engrossing and informative and a must read!

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