hits counter Exceptions to the Rule: The Politics of Filibuster Limitations in the U.S. Senate - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Exceptions to the Rule: The Politics of Filibuster Limitations in the U.S. Senate

Availability: Ready to download

Special rules enable the Senate to act despite the filibuster. Sometimes. Most people believe that, in today's partisan environment, the filibuster prevents the Senate from acting on all but the least controversial matters. But this is not exactly correct. In fact, the Senate since the 1970s has created a series of special rules—described by Molly Reynolds as “majoritarian Special rules enable the Senate to act despite the filibuster. Sometimes. Most people believe that, in today's partisan environment, the filibuster prevents the Senate from acting on all but the least controversial matters. But this is not exactly correct. In fact, the Senate since the 1970s has created a series of special rules—described by Molly Reynolds as “majoritarian exceptions”—that limit debate on a wide range of measures on the Senate floor. The details of these exemptions might sound arcane and technical, but in practice they have enabled the Senate to act even when it otherwise seemed paralyzed. Important examples include procedures used to pass the annual congressional budget resolution, enact budget reconciliation bills, review proposals to close military bases, attempt to prevent arms sales, ratify trade agreements, and reconsider regulations promulgated by the executive branch. Reynolds argues that these procedures represent a key instrument of majority party power in the Senate. They allow the majority—even if it does not have the sixty votes needed to block a filibuster—to produce policies that will improve its future electoral prospects, and thus increase the chances it remains the majority party. As a case study, Exceptions to the Rule examines the Senate's role in the budget reconciliation process, in which particular congressional committees are charged with developing procedurally protected proposals to alter certain federal programs in their jurisdictions. Created as a way of helping Congress work through tricky budget issues, the reconciliation process has become a powerful tool for the majority party to bypass the minority and adopt policy changes in hopes that it will benefit in the next election cycle.


Compare

Special rules enable the Senate to act despite the filibuster. Sometimes. Most people believe that, in today's partisan environment, the filibuster prevents the Senate from acting on all but the least controversial matters. But this is not exactly correct. In fact, the Senate since the 1970s has created a series of special rules—described by Molly Reynolds as “majoritarian Special rules enable the Senate to act despite the filibuster. Sometimes. Most people believe that, in today's partisan environment, the filibuster prevents the Senate from acting on all but the least controversial matters. But this is not exactly correct. In fact, the Senate since the 1970s has created a series of special rules—described by Molly Reynolds as “majoritarian exceptions”—that limit debate on a wide range of measures on the Senate floor. The details of these exemptions might sound arcane and technical, but in practice they have enabled the Senate to act even when it otherwise seemed paralyzed. Important examples include procedures used to pass the annual congressional budget resolution, enact budget reconciliation bills, review proposals to close military bases, attempt to prevent arms sales, ratify trade agreements, and reconsider regulations promulgated by the executive branch. Reynolds argues that these procedures represent a key instrument of majority party power in the Senate. They allow the majority—even if it does not have the sixty votes needed to block a filibuster—to produce policies that will improve its future electoral prospects, and thus increase the chances it remains the majority party. As a case study, Exceptions to the Rule examines the Senate's role in the budget reconciliation process, in which particular congressional committees are charged with developing procedurally protected proposals to alter certain federal programs in their jurisdictions. Created as a way of helping Congress work through tricky budget issues, the reconciliation process has become a powerful tool for the majority party to bypass the minority and adopt policy changes in hopes that it will benefit in the next election cycle.

34 review for Exceptions to the Rule: The Politics of Filibuster Limitations in the U.S. Senate

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chris Young

  2. 5 out of 5

    Agnes C. Moran

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jon

  4. 5 out of 5

    Renner Walker

  5. 4 out of 5

    Les Vogel

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matt Grossmann

  7. 5 out of 5

    Keith

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  10. 5 out of 5

    JoelPXP

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dusan Fischer

  12. 4 out of 5

    Colin Scala

  13. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

  14. 4 out of 5

    Avi Woontner

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amanda K

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alma

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

  20. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michael Villasenor

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

  23. 4 out of 5

    kdra

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alanna

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy

  26. 4 out of 5

    M S

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rebeka

  28. 4 out of 5

    Turner Bitton

  29. 5 out of 5

    Que Renée

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anshuman Mishra

  31. 5 out of 5

    Deryn Sousa

  32. 5 out of 5

    Zack Reagin

  33. 4 out of 5

    Institutionlzd4114

  34. 4 out of 5

    Brian Cechnicki

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...