hits counter Malala: Activist for Girls' Education - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Malala: Activist for Girls' Education

Availability: Ready to download

Malala Yousafzai est pakistanaise et musulmane. Depuis l’âge de onze ans, elle dénonce les intégristes musulmans qui considèrent que l’école, ce n’est pas pour les filles. Pour tenter de la faire taire, ils ont même tiré sur elle. Par bonheur, Malala est toujours debout. Aujourd’hui récompensée par le prix Nobel de la paix, elle poursuit son combat avec plus de force encor Malala Yousafzai est pakistanaise et musulmane. Depuis l’âge de onze ans, elle dénonce les intégristes musulmans qui considèrent que l’école, ce n’est pas pour les filles. Pour tenter de la faire taire, ils ont même tiré sur elle. Par bonheur, Malala est toujours debout. Aujourd’hui récompensée par le prix Nobel de la paix, elle poursuit son combat avec plus de force encore afin que tous les enfants aient le droit d’aller à l’école, qu’ils soient fille ou garçon, pauvre ou riche.


Compare

Malala Yousafzai est pakistanaise et musulmane. Depuis l’âge de onze ans, elle dénonce les intégristes musulmans qui considèrent que l’école, ce n’est pas pour les filles. Pour tenter de la faire taire, ils ont même tiré sur elle. Par bonheur, Malala est toujours debout. Aujourd’hui récompensée par le prix Nobel de la paix, elle poursuit son combat avec plus de force encor Malala Yousafzai est pakistanaise et musulmane. Depuis l’âge de onze ans, elle dénonce les intégristes musulmans qui considèrent que l’école, ce n’est pas pour les filles. Pour tenter de la faire taire, ils ont même tiré sur elle. Par bonheur, Malala est toujours debout. Aujourd’hui récompensée par le prix Nobel de la paix, elle poursuit son combat avec plus de force encore afin que tous les enfants aient le droit d’aller à l’école, qu’ils soient fille ou garçon, pauvre ou riche.

30 review for Malala: Activist for Girls' Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nat

    “One child, one teacher, one book, one pen can change the world.” ― Malala Yousafzai Malala is a beautifully illustrated biography telling the story of Malala Yousafzai, who stood up to the Taliban and fought for the right for all girls to receive an education. It features illustrations that really manage to capture Malala Yousafzai's strength and endurance. I mean, they're detailed in just the right places: Though the illustrations were stunning, I felt like most of the major ev “One child, one teacher, one book, one pen can change the world.” ― Malala Yousafzai Malala is a beautifully illustrated biography telling the story of Malala Yousafzai, who stood up to the Taliban and fought for the right for all girls to receive an education. It features illustrations that really manage to capture Malala Yousafzai's strength and endurance. I mean, they're detailed in just the right places: Though the illustrations were stunning, I felt like most of the major events in Malala's life were a bit skipped over and rushed, so I was left wanting more. As a result, this made me want to pick up her biography (I Am Malala) and explore more of her world, which I'm planning on doing next. *Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying Malala, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission!* Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with Ko-fi.com/bookspoils

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hilda

    One child, one teacher, one pen, and one book can change the world. This is one of those books every school should have. It's a biography and talks about the day Malala Yousafzai was shot. It does it so simply and truthfully, it's kid friendly without dumbing it down. The illustrations are beautiful and the story is beyond inspiring. Malala dreams of books and notebooks instead of war in her beloved valley. In Malala's dreams she wishes airplanes dropped pens, notebooks, and books instead of bom One child, one teacher, one pen, and one book can change the world. This is one of those books every school should have. It's a biography and talks about the day Malala Yousafzai was shot. It does it so simply and truthfully, it's kid friendly without dumbing it down. The illustrations are beautiful and the story is beyond inspiring. Malala dreams of books and notebooks instead of war in her beloved valley. In Malala's dreams she wishes airplanes dropped pens, notebooks, and books instead of bombs. And what a beautiful world this would be if it was true.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    When I saw this on *Netgalley I had to request it. I remember watching Malala on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. To say that this girl (now a woman) is an inspiration does not even begin to express it. The book goes into details about Malala's life and her activism for girls and her fight against the Taliban. It doesn't hold back and even tells of her being shot 3 times. I enjoyed this book. It is not for younger children as it is information heavy and some may find parts too upsetting. But this When I saw this on *Netgalley I had to request it. I remember watching Malala on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. To say that this girl (now a woman) is an inspiration does not even begin to express it. The book goes into details about Malala's life and her activism for girls and her fight against the Taliban. It doesn't hold back and even tells of her being shot 3 times. I enjoyed this book. It is not for younger children as it is information heavy and some may find parts too upsetting. But this is perfect for older children. It is a great introduction to Malala's life. The illustrations in this are incredible. Like stare at each page for several minutes incredible. I also love that at the end of the book the author included real photographs of Malala. I loved the ones showing her with her family as the love is obvious in her family. This is one that I will read again. 4 out of 5 stars. * I recieved a free copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bookish Devil

    Calling Malala as a 'Braveheart' would be a mere understatement, for she is the most boldest girl the world has ever seen. This particular book is best suited for young kids who wants to learn or get to know about who Malala is and also about the hardships,pain that she underwent. The illustrations would surely pique a kid's interest to read more about her story. It gives a clear, crisp account of the events and happenings that took place in Malala's life and how it shaped her character and atti Calling Malala as a 'Braveheart' would be a mere understatement, for she is the most boldest girl the world has ever seen. This particular book is best suited for young kids who wants to learn or get to know about who Malala is and also about the hardships,pain that she underwent. The illustrations would surely pique a kid's interest to read more about her story. It gives a clear, crisp account of the events and happenings that took place in Malala's life and how it shaped her character and attitude towards the world around her, in a simple language. It's a book that i would definitely encourage young readers of today to read. :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    This review was originally posted on As Told By TinaBefore reading this, I had a basic idea of who Malala is and I would say that this book is definitely a good introduction to her. The story gives a good platform into who Malala is and what she has done for girls’ education and why she began her activism. This would be the perfect book to read in a classroom because it would teach about activism and also help expand the children’s classroom. This story was not written for adults and is explaine This review was originally posted on As Told By TinaBefore reading this, I had a basic idea of who Malala is and I would say that this book is definitely a good introduction to her. The story gives a good platform into who Malala is and what she has done for girls’ education and why she began her activism. This would be the perfect book to read in a classroom because it would teach about activism and also help expand the children’s classroom. This story was not written for adults and is explained in a way that kids could understand everything Malala has achieved. At the end of the story it also includes a time, a website and videos so you can learn more about Malala. Like I said this would be the perfect book to have in a classroom and center a lesson around. The illustrations weren’t that great because I read the eARC on my iPad but I would definitely recommend buying the hardcover because the illustrations looked before and I’m sure in person they would be amazing. My littles are ages 5, 3, and 2 so they did not fully appreciate this story as much as I did. I would say that this should be geared towards an audience who is a bit older. Overall, I would definitely recommend this to anyone who would love to learn more about Malala.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    From page 42 " Malala was named after Malalai, the greatest Afghan heroine." Malala truly lived up to her name. This is a beautiful and inspiring story of a girl who stood up for what she believed in. There is a lot of information here and some beautiful folk art inspired illustrations. I enjoyed learning about Malala, and look forward to reading the book that inspired this story for children. This book does not sugar coat the events that occurred. It tells us about Malalas family, religious prac From page 42 " Malala was named after Malalai, the greatest Afghan heroine." Malala truly lived up to her name. This is a beautiful and inspiring story of a girl who stood up for what she believed in. There is a lot of information here and some beautiful folk art inspired illustrations. I enjoyed learning about Malala, and look forward to reading the book that inspired this story for children. This book does not sugar coat the events that occurred. It tells us about Malalas family, religious practices of Islam, war and violence, and simple details of the attempted assassination of Malala Yousafzai. It is appropriate for older children, and would be an excellent choice for a book report. The book includes a timeline,map, actual photos of events and award ceremonies Malala attended, and links to websites and other references to learn more about this topic. I chose NOT to read this story to my daughters, ages 5 and 7, because I felt that they would be too sensitive to the way the information is presented. There are a lot of scary words here: assassination, shot in the head, bombings of her village, just too many themes that I want to shelter my girls from for a little while longer. Fortunately for them, I can. As this book shows, little girls in other countries don't have that luxury. I received an ARC form Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This is a most excellent picture book about a topic that most kids might not know they want to know about, that of the Taliban and education for girls. The book explains, in very simple language about Malala's life, and what lead up to her assassination attempt by the Taliban, for wanting education for girls. I knew the basic story, but didn't know about her online blog, which made her famous before she was shot. Beautifully illustrated, with bright colors, sure to appeal to children. There is ev This is a most excellent picture book about a topic that most kids might not know they want to know about, that of the Taliban and education for girls. The book explains, in very simple language about Malala's life, and what lead up to her assassination attempt by the Taliban, for wanting education for girls. I knew the basic story, but didn't know about her online blog, which made her famous before she was shot. Beautifully illustrated, with bright colors, sure to appeal to children. There is even more information at the back of the book that gives more details about her life up to and including the Nobel Peach Prize. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ari

    Received from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This is a perfect book for children to learn who Malala is and the amazing things that she has accomplished at such a young age. The message is uplifting and beautiful, with gorgeous and bright illustrations to match. Highly recommended for everyone.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Burkhart

    A beautifully written and wonderfully illustrated picture book about a young woman who has made an impact all over the world in her struggles for women's rights. She doesn't stop there, but also addresses rights for all humans. Every child should hear this story. A beautifully written and wonderfully illustrated picture book about a young woman who has made an impact all over the world in her struggles for women's rights. She doesn't stop there, but also addresses rights for all humans. Every child should hear this story.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Apparently we're entering a new trend where books about Malala just make me cry. But I'll go with it. Apparently we're entering a new trend where books about Malala just make me cry. But I'll go with it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    SenoraG

    This was a nice little book that introduces children to Malala, who she is, what she stands for and what her life is about. Malala is very brave and her story empowers young girls to stand up for their rights and what they believe in even when it is not easy. Very nicely illustrated, written in simple terms that will appeal to children and help teach them about things that are not easy to talk about. This book is also a reminder to our children that the things they may take for granted are not av This was a nice little book that introduces children to Malala, who she is, what she stands for and what her life is about. Malala is very brave and her story empowers young girls to stand up for their rights and what they believe in even when it is not easy. Very nicely illustrated, written in simple terms that will appeal to children and help teach them about things that are not easy to talk about. This book is also a reminder to our children that the things they may take for granted are not available to other children in the world. It can open up discussions on many levels about many world issues. Highly recommended for all children, especially little girls. **Received free from Netgalley for an honest review**

  12. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I found this title because it was on the honor list for the Batchelder Award in 2018. Malala: Activist for Girls' Education was written by Raphaële Frier in French and translated to English by Julie Cormier. I found this book on Epic!, which is an app I use often with my students. Epic! does not read aloud this book, so I was unable to have that as an option. This book is an excellent biography on Malala's life. It begins with her as a baby and gives details of her family. As she grows older, she I found this title because it was on the honor list for the Batchelder Award in 2018. Malala: Activist for Girls' Education was written by Raphaële Frier in French and translated to English by Julie Cormier. I found this book on Epic!, which is an app I use often with my students. Epic! does not read aloud this book, so I was unable to have that as an option. This book is an excellent biography on Malala's life. It begins with her as a baby and gives details of her family. As she grows older, she becomes more aware of the Taliban's violence and control on her country and its people. In 2009, the Taliban bans girls from school and Malala uses her voice to stand up for this injustice. She begins by writing blogs and soon enough she is invited to speak at events to aid in the campaign for girls to have equal access to education. The Taliban threatened Malala and even shot her multiple times, yet she does not get discouraged. She continues to fight for girl's education all around the world. Malala is the youngest person to ever win the Nobel Peace Prize, which she received at the age of 17. Malala's strength and dedication to this cause is very obvious in this book and is very inspirational for all readers. This book is written in third person, as the narrator is informing the readers about Malala's life. The author's voice is very prominent in this book. He understands the challenges Malala has in her life growing up, and is very impressed with Malala's actions. I think the illustrator did an excellent job with adding details to the story. For example, when Malala is getting shot by the Taliban on the bus, Malala is the only girl with her headscarf off and has a large yellow bubble around her. This emphasizes the author's text on this page. On the last page, the illustrator draws girls from different countries all connected by a rope. I love this image because it shows the main theme of how we need to come together in order to accomplish a common goal, which in this case is to have equal education all around the world. I chose this book because when I saw it on the list, I instantly thought of how my fourth grade class completes biographies and Malala is always an option for students to choose from. We only have one book about Malala at school, so I would love to have another option for my students who complete a biography on her. I will definitely use this book during the biography unit this year! My one concern is the level, though. I feel this book would be best for students in junior high due to the vocabulary and context. With this in mind though, I will use the teaching point suggested in Chapter 5 of "Children's Books in Children's Hands: A Brief Introduction to Their Literature". I will first have the student who is studying Malala read the book that we have at school for the third/fourth grade level. This will allow them to have more background on her life, so they will better understand when they read this higher level text. Another caution I have for anyone that uses this book with their students is to preview the Pakistani culture and explain the Taliban. This will allow students to have a better understanding of the book. For example, in the beginning it is explained that her father "is not sorry that his child is a girl" (Frier, 2018, p.6). Most students will not understand this and may get the impression that she is from a "mean" family for even thinking this. Reviewing some instances such as this will help students best understand and enjoy the book!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    Malala Yousafzai is a remarkable young lady, whose story has touched the hearts of many. As a result there are a number of books available about her, which is great, the world needs to know about people like Malala, who risk so much to fight for what they believe in. This picture book biography gives a brief introduction to this young Noble Peace Prize winner. The text works well for younger children (1st and 2nd grade) but also has enough information to intrigue older children as well. The illu Malala Yousafzai is a remarkable young lady, whose story has touched the hearts of many. As a result there are a number of books available about her, which is great, the world needs to know about people like Malala, who risk so much to fight for what they believe in. This picture book biography gives a brief introduction to this young Noble Peace Prize winner. The text works well for younger children (1st and 2nd grade) but also has enough information to intrigue older children as well. The illustrator clearly thought through what to put in her illustrations that is truthful and yet child appropriate and I believe she succeeded. Even the scene where Malala gets shot isn't too graphic, but it is a part of the story. I appreciated how clearly and succinctly the text explains Malala's experiences and beliefs. I absolutely loved the back matter which is full of photographs, quotes, a map of Pakistan, a timeline, and information about the work that Malala continues to dedicate herself to. This is a fabulous picture book biography about a brave young woman and her cause. One quote that I particularly loved was as follows: "With guns you can kill terrorists; with education you can kill terrorism." What profoundly powerful words! Would that the world would listen to this!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    Malala Yousafzai is a remarkable young lady, whose story has touched the hearts of many. As a result there are a number of books available about her, which is great, the world needs to know about people like Malala, who risk so much to fight for what they believe in. This picture book biography gives a brief introduction to this young Noble Peace Prize winner. The text works well for younger children (1st and 2nd grade) but also has enough information to intrigue older children as well. The illu Malala Yousafzai is a remarkable young lady, whose story has touched the hearts of many. As a result there are a number of books available about her, which is great, the world needs to know about people like Malala, who risk so much to fight for what they believe in. This picture book biography gives a brief introduction to this young Noble Peace Prize winner. The text works well for younger children (1st and 2nd grade) but also has enough information to intrigue older children as well. The illustrator clearly thought through what to put in her illustrations that is truthful and yet child appropriate and I believe she succeeded. Even the scene where Malala gets shot isn't too graphic, but it is a part of the story. I appreciated how clearly and succinctly the text explains Malala's experiences and beliefs. I absolutely loved the back matter which is full of photographs, quotes, a map of Pakistan, a timeline, and information about the work that Malala continues to dedicate herself to. This is a fabulous picture book biography about a brave young woman and her cause. One quote that I particularly loved was as follows: "With guns you can kill terrorists; with education you can kill terrorism." What profoundly powerful words! Would that the world would listen to this!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Karen Schmidt

    This book represents the strength and ability that all possess and few use. Malala: Activist for Girl's Education is a biography of Malala, her contributions and fight for the right to an education. Living in America where many take advantage of the basic right to an education, Raphaele Frier tells of Malala's unending fight. The illustrations by Aurelia Fronty accent the Middle Eastern setting. The illustrations are vibrant, strong, and tell a story on their own. Included in the book are pictur This book represents the strength and ability that all possess and few use. Malala: Activist for Girl's Education is a biography of Malala, her contributions and fight for the right to an education. Living in America where many take advantage of the basic right to an education, Raphaele Frier tells of Malala's unending fight. The illustrations by Aurelia Fronty accent the Middle Eastern setting. The illustrations are vibrant, strong, and tell a story on their own. Included in the book are pictures of Malala, a map of Pakistan, and short biographies of men whom have inspired her; Gandhi, Mandela, and Martin Luther King Jr. Also included are resources for further learning such as the speech by Malala to the United Nations, Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech, and more. Although a picture book, the information, vocabulary and content are for older readers.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alana Young

    This book outlines Malala's life from childhood up until early adulthood. It explains the culture in which Malala grew up in, the adversity she faced, and how she overcame and fought for what she believed in. The illustrations were beautiful and the text told the story truthfully and accessibily for young learners. This book would be great for middle to late elementary schoolers. Because Malala is a current activist fighting for education and women's rights, this book could be a great tool for d This book outlines Malala's life from childhood up until early adulthood. It explains the culture in which Malala grew up in, the adversity she faced, and how she overcame and fought for what she believed in. The illustrations were beautiful and the text told the story truthfully and accessibily for young learners. This book would be great for middle to late elementary schoolers. Because Malala is a current activist fighting for education and women's rights, this book could be a great tool for discussion of current world events and equality efforts.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Sanders

    This is a biography of Malala Yousafzai. Her story is fascinating and the author does a great job of helping a child that does not live in a country where educating girls/women is scorned understand what Malala and millions like her have to endure. The illustrations are well done and go perfectly with the story and its setting. There is additional information at the end to help explain the story and website urls for more information.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    I read this book today with my son. I had never heard of this amazing young woman. There is some really tough parts in the book about how she and her family are mistreated by the Taliban. So even though it is a children's book I would suggest you preview it before reading it to your children. I would love to read more about this young woman. Recommend! I read this book today with my son. I had never heard of this amazing young woman. There is some really tough parts in the book about how she and her family are mistreated by the Taliban. So even though it is a children's book I would suggest you preview it before reading it to your children. I would love to read more about this young woman. Recommend!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Aliza Werner

    Extraordinary end notes containing photographs, speech excepts, a timeline, and highlights those who inspired her. I really appreciate how the focus is on her activism and work for equality and education instead of on the incident that nearly took her life.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    A gorgeously illustrated picture book biography about Malala and the causes she fights for, translated from French.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    Text-to-self: I connected with Malala in this story because, I have always loved school. Although I may not have always seen the deep importance of it when I was younger, like Malala did early on, school is something I have always been passionate about, even now, as an adult learner. I can’t imagine if that right was ever taken away from me. Text-to-text: When it came out, I read Malala’s book I am Malala and it was really neat to connect this story in picture book form to the book she wrote for Text-to-self: I connected with Malala in this story because, I have always loved school. Although I may not have always seen the deep importance of it when I was younger, like Malala did early on, school is something I have always been passionate about, even now, as an adult learner. I can’t imagine if that right was ever taken away from me. Text-to-text: When it came out, I read Malala’s book I am Malala and it was really neat to connect this story in picture book form to the book she wrote for young adults. I am Malala has much more detail of course, but the underlying message in both is the same: education is everyone’s right. Text-to-world: This book emphasizes the value of education and not just education for some, but education for all. It is something to be fought for, no matter what. Frier, R. (2017). Malala Activist for Girls' Education. Watertown, MA: Charlesbridge Publishing. Yousafzai, M., & Lamb, C. (2013). I am Malala: The girl who stood up for education and was shot by the Taliban (First edition.). New York: Little, Brown and Company.

  22. 4 out of 5

    LavaLadee2000

    this book made my heart fall. so deep. loved it soooo much. it was sad. I never thought I'd like history. but this took me away so far. girls should have education to. this book made my heart fall. so deep. loved it soooo much. it was sad. I never thought I'd like history. but this took me away so far. girls should have education to.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sci-Fi & Scary

    Malala: Activist for Girls' Education is the second children's book I have read about Malala Yousafzai. It is, for the most part, beautifully illustrated. The artist has a great eye for colors and patterns that draw the eye and help hold young children's (and flighty adults) attention to the page. They are clear enough that even if a child cannot read well, the pictures may be able to help them understand what is going on. The story of Malala is one that most people know at this point. A brave yo Malala: Activist for Girls' Education is the second children's book I have read about Malala Yousafzai. It is, for the most part, beautifully illustrated. The artist has a great eye for colors and patterns that draw the eye and help hold young children's (and flighty adults) attention to the page. They are clear enough that even if a child cannot read well, the pictures may be able to help them understand what is going on. The story of Malala is one that most people know at this point. A brave young girl and her father dared to take a stand against the restrictions imposed by traditions and religion. As a result, Malala ends up getting shot in the head. Luckily, she survived, and her ordeal not only drew worldwide attention, but helped to propel her and her activism even further into the public eye. Malala is a gorgeous young woman who is driven to help disadvantaged young girls and women across the world. She knows what is important, and she’s doing everything that she can to change it. She’s also a gifted speaker that can put things very clearly into terms that anyone can understand. The author did a solid job of telling the story of Malala, too. He clearly lays out her brief history, highlighting all the important points without going into too much detail. At the back of the book, after all the illustrations and the story is over, he has included more information about the young activist in a way that will appeal to older readers. This is perhaps a perfect addendum for adults who have read the simple story to their children and want to know more. This includes a timeline, information about Pakistan, the Pashtun People, etc. He educates readers about the status of girls and their ability to go to school, Malala’s take on religion, her influences, and ends with some of her best known quotes. Overall, this is a good book that clearly communicates the information about Malala Yousafzai for both younger and older readers. The combination of illustrations in the beginning and the mostly black and white photos in the back provide a range of visual stimulation. It is well-written, enjoyable, and educational. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher free in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    A realistic, inspiring biography of the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, originally published in France. Beautifully illustrated by Aurélia Fronty.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I found the book Malala: Activist for Girls Education written by Raphaële Frier and illustrated by Aurélia Fronty on the Mildred L. Batchelder Award website. This book is originally written in French and then was translated to English. I was able to read the book on Epic!. Malala: Activist for Girls Education is a true story about Malala Yousafzai, her life growing up in Pakistan, and her journey being an advocate for girl’s education. Malala was born in 1997 and while growing up in Mingora, Pak I found the book Malala: Activist for Girls Education written by Raphaële Frier and illustrated by Aurélia Fronty on the Mildred L. Batchelder Award website. This book is originally written in French and then was translated to English. I was able to read the book on Epic!. Malala: Activist for Girls Education is a true story about Malala Yousafzai, her life growing up in Pakistan, and her journey being an advocate for girl’s education. Malala was born in 1997 and while growing up in Mingora, Pakistan, the Taliban began to take control over the region. Malala’s father, Ziauddin, founded a school for girls which Malala attended. When the Taliban initially gain control, certain enjoyable things such as listening to music and watching movies are banned. Things continue to get worse for the people and men are no longer allowed to shave their beards and women are required to wear burqas amongst other things, eventually resulting in people jailed or killed for breaking any rules. Ziauddin worries that school will be banned for females and on January 15, 2009, girls were no longer allowed to go to school. Although the people are afraid, Malala begins a blog and fights for a girl’s right to education. She wins the first ever National Youth Peace Prize and starts an educational foundation. This brings attention to the Taliban who catch her going to school in 2012 and shoot her. Luckily, Malala survives and is treated at a hospital in England. Today, Malala continues to advocate for women’s rights and a girl’s right to education and is the youngest person to ever receive a Nobel Peace Prize at the age of 17. I found this book to be very informative and inspiring. Malala is a true hero and despite all of the obstacles against her, she never gave up. The book does a nice job of intertwining descriptions of the political events and history with Malala’s personal story. Although the book is translated into English, you cannot tell that it was originally written in French. As mentioned above, I found this book on Epic!, which showed the book like a movie. The illustrations in the story move and there is music playing in the background. I thought that this made the story more interesting and real for the reader. For example, there is a part in the book that discussed the busyness of life in Mingora and the chatter in the city and in the background of the story being read there was a voiceover of people chattering. The music also contributes to setting the mood of the book being read. For instance, when something sad is happening, the music becomes slow and mellow. The illustrations in the story are also beautiful with bright colors, making the story even more interesting. While Epic! recommends the book for students ages 8 to 11, I would suggest using the book with students in fourth or fifth grade or older, since the vocabulary is complex and the ideas and content may be difficult to understand for younger students. It would be great to use this book in a unit encouraging students to advocate for what they believe in or a unit about influential people in history. Overall, I highly recommend this story and it is a great overview of the events taking place in Pakistan and Malala’s life story.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Goos

    Malala Activist for Girls' Education is a biographical children's book written by Raphaele Frier and illustrated by Aurelia Fronty. It tells the story of Malala Yousafzai, her life growing up in rural northern Pakistan, and how she fought against the Taliban through education. Malala was born in the city of Mingora, a city in the northern part of Pakistan. She comes from a sub-community in Pakistani known as Pashtun, and spoke the language of Pashto. Growing up her father and mother treated her Malala Activist for Girls' Education is a biographical children's book written by Raphaele Frier and illustrated by Aurelia Fronty. It tells the story of Malala Yousafzai, her life growing up in rural northern Pakistan, and how she fought against the Taliban through education. Malala was born in the city of Mingora, a city in the northern part of Pakistan. She comes from a sub-community in Pakistani known as Pashtun, and spoke the language of Pashto. Growing up her father and mother treated her know differently than boys they felt that their child despite the fact that she was a girl was still just important to them after male children were. This was already extremely progressive thinking for their community. Malala's father ran a school for girls, one of the few in the city. And he actively encouraged Malala to learn and get an education. Throughout the years the Taliban terrorist organization used fear tactics and misinterpretation of the Islamic religion to convince the inhabitants of the city that among other things that giving girls and education is a sin, and would burn down schools. Malala created a blog under a pseudonym and wrote down her experiences of living in a city occupied by the Taliban. Eventually word to spread to the Taliban that Malala and her father were actively against the rules enforced by them. They attempted to murder Malala to silence her activism. She not only survived being shot three times in the head, but now Malala had become the youngest winner of the Nobel Peace Prize and has flown to various countries in the world including visiting Syrian refugees in Lebanon to promote female education. This story is extremely important to me because I actively and vividly remember learning on the news about Malala's attacks caused by the Taliban. And praying that she would survive but she inspired countless people to understand the importance of education and how many Americans especially of my generation take for granted the education they receive because it's mandatory and they feel that they want to do it while you have someone like Malala who was shot and had been almost killed by terrorist organizations because she wanted to get an education. This book very accurately and respectively portrays the entire situation that led up to Molala's assassination attempt and every moment after. This book is going to be extremely important for the future and I think especially for young children who sometimes I don't early age may not realize how important their education is to them I remember in high school and earlier how many kids did not want to go to school because they did not feel it was important but with stories like Molala to read to these young children and even older children you can read instill that passion Drive these students to realize how important their education is and they should take full advantage of it. I could think of to classroom activities what would be a cultural x-ray of Malala and her father, or something else that could be done is perhaps the students could all write letters to Molala explaining what they admire about her or rather what do they inspire her to do.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gary Anderson

    Consider the challenge of conveying Malala Yousafzai’s story in a way that is appropriate for children: Malala’s courage and convictions arose from a context of political and personal violence. Malala: Activist for Girls’ Education masterfully navigates this territory. Author Raphaële Frier does not shy away from the Taliban’s brutality, including the shooting of Malala on a school bus, but she first establishes Malala’s passion for education, beliefs in the rights of girls, and her family’s rol Consider the challenge of conveying Malala Yousafzai’s story in a way that is appropriate for children: Malala’s courage and convictions arose from a context of political and personal violence. Malala: Activist for Girls’ Education masterfully navigates this territory. Author Raphaële Frier does not shy away from the Taliban’s brutality, including the shooting of Malala on a school bus, but she first establishes Malala’s passion for education, beliefs in the rights of girls, and her family’s role in providing schooling for Pakistani children. The illustrations from Aurélia Fronty present Malala and other individuals in a more expressionistic manner, reminiscent of muralists. The bright artwork is not gruesome or graphic on the pages conveying violent episodes, although it is dramatic. Young readers will come away from the main text with an understanding of how one person can make a difference, as well as the obstacles to freedom faced by some children, especially girls, in other cultures. The back matter presents photographs of Malala, numerous quotes from her, and background material relevant to understanding her life, work, and culture.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    I found Malala Activist for Girls’ Education by Raphaële Frier on the American Library Association website and the past winners of the Mildred L. Batchelder Award page. The book is a winner of the Mildred L. Batchelder Honor in 2018. This picture book tells the story of a young girl growing up in Pakistan named Malala. The Taliban took over the village where her family lived, and her father oversaw an all-girls school. Malala and her father were targeted by the Taliban when Malala created a blog I found Malala Activist for Girls’ Education by Raphaële Frier on the American Library Association website and the past winners of the Mildred L. Batchelder Award page. The book is a winner of the Mildred L. Batchelder Honor in 2018. This picture book tells the story of a young girl growing up in Pakistan named Malala. The Taliban took over the village where her family lived, and her father oversaw an all-girls school. Malala and her father were targeted by the Taliban when Malala created a blog to speak out against the group. The Taliban attempted an assassinated on her school bus. She survived the attack and went on to speak about girls’ education throughout the world. She became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. This story is inspirational and demonstrates the importance of determination. The story would be great for grades 1 through 4 but includes some violence. It is a great resource for Women’s History month, which would be helpful with learning about nonfiction text, or a way to help students write an opinion piece. Students can also compare and contrast Malala with other historical figures.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    This beautifully illustrated biographical picture book of the young educational rights activist was the recipient of the distinguished Mildred L. Batchelder Award in 2018 as noted by the American Library Association. The text was translated from French by Julie Cormier. From the time she was born in Pakistan in 1997, Malala was surrounded by family who openly discussed current politics and social injustices of the mountain village near their home where only men could be seen and women were to m This beautifully illustrated biographical picture book of the young educational rights activist was the recipient of the distinguished Mildred L. Batchelder Award in 2018 as noted by the American Library Association. The text was translated from French by Julie Cormier. From the time she was born in Pakistan in 1997, Malala was surrounded by family who openly discussed current politics and social injustices of the mountain village near their home where only men could be seen and women were to marry young, obey their husbands, and stay home to take care of the children. Malala was considered fortunate to be able to attend her father’s Khushal School near her home where she and other girls were educated. Then the Taliban began destroying schools and banned girls from learning to read and write. At just eleven years old, Malala begins blogging about the injustices imposed by the Taliban. Not long after, she is chosen to speak at an assembly advocating for children’s rights. While revered by the public and her own government, Malala’s efforts do not go unnoticed by the Taliban, who attempts to assassinate her on the bus ride home from school one day in 2012. Malala recovers in England, where she continues her own education and speaking out against the oppression of girls and women. In 2014, Malala becomes the youngest person to ever receive the Nobel Peace Prize at age seventeen. Frier’s narrative of Malala’s courageous journey comes to life through Aurélia Fronty’s colorfully rich illustrations. I very much enjoyed reading about this inspirational young woman’s determination to enrich the lives of young people advocating for freedom that so many of us here in the United States take for granted: the right to learn. Malala’s own words emphasize the power of education: “One child, one teacher, one pen, and one book can change the world.” Mulala: Activist for Girls' Education would be appropriate for children ages 8 to 11 years old.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marsha

    I located the book, Malala: Activist for Girls’ Education by searching on the American Library Association website for Batchelder Award winners. This book written by Raphaele Frier won the Batchelder award in 2018. It was originally published in French and then later published in the United States. I was able to access the digital version of this book on Hoopla through my local library. Malala: Activist for Girls’ Education is a true story about Malala. The book starts out with Malala Yousafzai I located the book, Malala: Activist for Girls’ Education by searching on the American Library Association website for Batchelder Award winners. This book written by Raphaele Frier won the Batchelder award in 2018. It was originally published in French and then later published in the United States. I was able to access the digital version of this book on Hoopla through my local library. Malala: Activist for Girls’ Education is a true story about Malala. The book starts out with Malala Yousafzai being a very young girl living in Pakistan. The book quickly introduces the conflict between the citizens of Pakistan and the Taliban. She remembers that “people stop dancing, beauty parlors close, men stop shaving, women’s bodies and faces are now having to be covered.” In 2008, the Taliban had announced: “girls no longer have the right to go to school.” Malala and her family later travel to a different village where her grandparents live by abandoning their current home. Later, Malala is given a leadership role by speaking for the rights of children and women. Unfortunately, the Taliban comes to destroy the new buildings that the community has built. Through the outpouring themes of diversity, strength, and education, Malala deals with several more horrible events in her life before she is able to stand up to the Taliban and eventually wins the Nobel Peace Prize. The illustrations are painted with vibrant colors. With each page, there are mountains, the people are wearing bright clothes that are painted with texture. This story is a non-fiction piece of literature that is told from the third-person point of view. This would be a wonderful international literature piece of text to any classroom library. It can be a “mirror” for any girl of Muslim or Pakistani faith. If a teacher was to choose to have this in their library or use it as part of their curriculum, the teacher would need to teach or give some pre-context knowledge about the Taliban.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.