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Just when the children thought the magic in the old well was all played out (that is, if it was magic!) and had sworn an oath in blood not to make any more wishes until the well gave them a sign, Gordy—in a reckless moment—told it to get going with its magic, or else! Something certainly did begin to happen then, whether it was magic or not, for a strange, witchlike old wo Just when the children thought the magic in the old well was all played out (that is, if it was magic!) and had sworn an oath in blood not to make any more wishes until the well gave them a sign, Gordy—in a reckless moment—told it to get going with its magic, or else! Something certainly did begin to happen then, whether it was magic or not, for a strange, witchlike old woman came to the children's secret house in the wood soon after and led Gordy away. The most unexpected things kept on happening all through that eventful autumn, just the sort of things an unpredictable wishing well might involve them in, from reforming a nearly delinquent juvenile at school, keeping apple trees and romance in bloom, and rescuing a damsel in distress, to helping a new family settle in the community.


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Just when the children thought the magic in the old well was all played out (that is, if it was magic!) and had sworn an oath in blood not to make any more wishes until the well gave them a sign, Gordy—in a reckless moment—told it to get going with its magic, or else! Something certainly did begin to happen then, whether it was magic or not, for a strange, witchlike old wo Just when the children thought the magic in the old well was all played out (that is, if it was magic!) and had sworn an oath in blood not to make any more wishes until the well gave them a sign, Gordy—in a reckless moment—told it to get going with its magic, or else! Something certainly did begin to happen then, whether it was magic or not, for a strange, witchlike old woman came to the children's secret house in the wood soon after and led Gordy away. The most unexpected things kept on happening all through that eventful autumn, just the sort of things an unpredictable wishing well might involve them in, from reforming a nearly delinquent juvenile at school, keeping apple trees and romance in bloom, and rescuing a damsel in distress, to helping a new family settle in the community.

30 review for The Well-Wishers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rick Stuckwisch

    Another great book in the Edward Eager collection. This one is a bit different from the others, even somewhat different than the preceding one, though it features the same group of children. It is written as though from the perspective of each of the children, which gives it a nice character. And the focus is on growing up and doing good for neighbors. Well written, as ever, and a delight to read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elfear

    Awesome, as usual. This and Magic or Not? are probably my favourite in the series. There's that chill you get when the coincidences stack up and you debate with yourself whether there was magic or not? Plus the old world charm is, well, perfectly charming. Unfortunately, James, Kip and Laura were hardly in the this book. However, I enjoyed Gordy and Dicky's growing-up, and love Lydia to bits, so it was alright. Surprisingly, there was no mention of Deborah's strange low voice, and she seems alm Awesome, as usual. This and Magic or Not? are probably my favourite in the series. There's that chill you get when the coincidences stack up and you debate with yourself whether there was magic or not? Plus the old world charm is, well, perfectly charming. Unfortunately, James, Kip and Laura were hardly in the this book. However, I enjoyed Gordy and Dicky's growing-up, and love Lydia to bits, so it was alright. Surprisingly, there was no mention of Deborah's strange low voice, and she seems almost normal in this book except for a few instances where she starts talking about squirrels or something. I liked how weird she was. Weird baby. Anyway, the different voices Eager wrote in were pretty cool, but it kind of excluded the rest when the 'I' was used. Especially since they seemed to have an adventure each of their own here. It's sad that they're all growing up. (view spoiler)[ reminds me of Narnia, when Peter's the first to doubt its existence. (hide spoiler)] But it has to be done! The only constant is change.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Okay, maybe I needed to read this book before ranting on about Magic or Not, because this book makes up for the terrible ending of the last book. While, yes, I did like the book because it is the reality of life: magic may exist, or it may not. This book seems like Edward Eager tried to fit the magic back in and continue the last book, but, no, it still doesn’t capture the magic charm of the series. I feel like this should be a different series because it doesn’t fit in a series called Tales of Okay, maybe I needed to read this book before ranting on about Magic or Not, because this book makes up for the terrible ending of the last book. While, yes, I did like the book because it is the reality of life: magic may exist, or it may not. This book seems like Edward Eager tried to fit the magic back in and continue the last book, but, no, it still doesn’t capture the magic charm of the series. I feel like this should be a different series because it doesn’t fit in a series called Tales of Magic and I said this once already. Overall, it feels off for some reason, making it not fit in the Tales of Magic series, but if you consider nothing else, it was decent.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chrisanne

    Awww... I appreciated Eager's adding in the gradual maturation of the characters more now. I find it interesting the way values have flipped, particularly with one character. But it was just a lovely book and I found a beautiful wisdom in his dealing with differences. Awww... I appreciated Eager's adding in the gradual maturation of the characters more now. I find it interesting the way values have flipped, particularly with one character. But it was just a lovely book and I found a beautiful wisdom in his dealing with differences.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Janelle

    I love the way the author writes this beautiful fantasy story while overall maintaining a plausible plot. The fantasy isn’t overdone. The main characters are all so lovable. I loved seeing the different view points and writing styles of the various characters and seeing them grow.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kailey (Luminous Libro)

    The five children are back for more magic from their wishing well. But this time the magic is including all sorts of unsuitable people in their adventures, and the children aren't sure if they can accept these new people encroaching on their magic business. Can the school bully really be reformed by the magic, or does he deserve to be punished for his previous schoolyard crimes? Will the children try to help an extremely annoying opera diva, or will they avoid her like the plague? And what about The five children are back for more magic from their wishing well. But this time the magic is including all sorts of unsuitable people in their adventures, and the children aren't sure if they can accept these new people encroaching on their magic business. Can the school bully really be reformed by the magic, or does he deserve to be punished for his previous schoolyard crimes? Will the children try to help an extremely annoying opera diva, or will they avoid her like the plague? And what about the crazy witch-lady from the local insane asylum? Surely, the magic wouldn't expect them to make friends with a dangerous witch! But somehow the magic pulls through, the children find the courage and resourcefulness to overcome every obstacle, and they spread some good magic around their neighborhood while still having fun! They learn that anyone can become a friend if only you show them acceptance and kindness. The only thing that I didn't like about this book was the changing POV. Each chapter is written by a different member of the Wishing-Well group, and while I thought it was interesting to see how they each had their own voice and unique perspective, changing POVs is one of my pet peeves. It IS well done in this book, but no matter how well-written, it still grates on my nerves. That's just me. Otherwise, this is a 5-star book! The characters grow and make mistakes and have break-through ideas. The plot turns around in unexpected ways, and the writing is funny and bright. Even rereading this for the 2nd time, I was engaged and entertained and loving it!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dolly

    This is the sixth book in the Tales of Magic series by Edward Eager. interesting quotes: "Physical violence never solved anything in the world, we all realize." (p. 3) "Sticks and stones may break your bones, but names and plain truths and meanness can go much deeper and cut you to the quick." (pp. 18-19) "The books tell all about knights and musketeers rescuing beautiful damsels. But they never put in what Lancelot said to Elaine on the ride home. Or D'Artagnan to Milady de Winter, either." (p. 190 This is the sixth book in the Tales of Magic series by Edward Eager. interesting quotes: "Physical violence never solved anything in the world, we all realize." (p. 3) "Sticks and stones may break your bones, but names and plain truths and meanness can go much deeper and cut you to the quick." (pp. 18-19) "The books tell all about knights and musketeers rescuing beautiful damsels. But they never put in what Lancelot said to Elaine on the ride home. Or D'Artagnan to Milady de Winter, either." (p. 190) "It's the way they look at things, as if anything could happen the next minute. And generally something does. If you want to call it believing in magic, okay, call it that." (pp. 214-215) new word: doughty

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tory

    This is one of Edward Eager's cheesiest books. I know it's meant to be a deeper read (not as magic, more good deeds and such), but that makes it not as much fun. The problems throughout the book are all solved much too quickly, with very little plot arc. This is one of Edward Eager's cheesiest books. I know it's meant to be a deeper read (not as magic, more good deeds and such), but that makes it not as much fun. The problems throughout the book are all solved much too quickly, with very little plot arc.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kate H

    Edward Eager's books were stories I loved as a child and having re-read them as an adult I still quite enjoy them. The stories and characters hold up to the test of time. These books are clever and intriguing and the characters are very endearing. Edward Eager's books were stories I loved as a child and having re-read them as an adult I still quite enjoy them. The stories and characters hold up to the test of time. These books are clever and intriguing and the characters are very endearing.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hamster

    Besides the first in the series, this one has been my favorite.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    This is the first Edgar Eager book I did not love! The unfolding of the characters true natures through the eyes of their friends and themselves was actually fantastic. It propelled the story forward. It was the only thing that kept me reading. I took particular issue with how one of the stories was handled. SPOILERS About midway through the book there is a great deal of hoopla in this little Connecticut town because an African American family is moving in. A cohort of townspeople want to make it c This is the first Edgar Eager book I did not love! The unfolding of the characters true natures through the eyes of their friends and themselves was actually fantastic. It propelled the story forward. It was the only thing that kept me reading. I took particular issue with how one of the stories was handled. SPOILERS About midway through the book there is a great deal of hoopla in this little Connecticut town because an African American family is moving in. A cohort of townspeople want to make it clear to the family that they are not welcome. The kids telling the story want to create another and bigger group of people to welcome the family. This would have made a reasonable story and a possibility for further discussion with my children. However, Eager didn't come out and say the family was African American. He spends an entire chapter discussing this mysterious family that "the Smugs," as Eager names them, don't want in their town. He gives the reader no explanation of why! I had my suspicions, but these were not confirmed until the end of the next chapter when the youngest child *sees* the father of the new family and proclaims, "Oh! Is that all it was?" Puhleeeease. If you're going to write about race, even in the 1960s, you've got to be a little more obvious about it. Being embarrassed or coy or smug (which is the feeling I got) does not help matters in the least. We had before this book read Because of Winn-Dixie and Kate DiCamillo handles death, war, neglect, and sorrow and she looks 'em straight in the face, and, honestly, I could still read the book to a six year old. The Well-Wishers was a sorry follow up.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kylie

    I have such mixed emotions about the books with James and Laura and friends. My favorite thing about the first few books in this series is there is actual 100% magic. The ones with James and Laura have the reader decide if it's the wishes on the well, or if it's just basically coincidence. And while I really love the fact that the kids are kind of "looking" for good turns to do whether it be the well's magic or not, I really miss the 100% for sure magic aspect. The adventures and wishes each kid I have such mixed emotions about the books with James and Laura and friends. My favorite thing about the first few books in this series is there is actual 100% magic. The ones with James and Laura have the reader decide if it's the wishes on the well, or if it's just basically coincidence. And while I really love the fact that the kids are kind of "looking" for good turns to do whether it be the well's magic or not, I really miss the 100% for sure magic aspect. The adventures and wishes each kid gets in this book are really heartwarming. Well, mostly. Gordy gets to help a little girl whose parents have recently died kind of step out of her depression. Laura helps a man find a new place for his apple orchard, Kip gets to speak out against the "smugs" who don't want a particular family to move into their neighborhood due to the color of their skin and help make them feel welcome. Lydia however, tries to out-bully the bullies which turns out to be a pretty funny wish. One of the biggest wishes in this book (Kip's) is about certain groups of people not being accepting of other groups of people and even though this book was written in 1960, the same issues arise in the present times. Which is super unfortunate, but the kids are so adamant about making these people feel at home and being inclusive. The lesson is great. Definitely a solid book in the series even though it doesn't have proven magic.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn Shea

    I have long loved Edward Eager's tales of magic and was delighted to find this first edition from the UK which in its former life was part of a library in Glasgow. It's been a while since I've read this one, enough to make it seem entirely new. I think in the past, I might'nt have liked it as much as the others because this one had very practical, everyday sorts of events that had nicely unexpected results. It had a theme of being grateful for what one has and helping others, no matter how hopel I have long loved Edward Eager's tales of magic and was delighted to find this first edition from the UK which in its former life was part of a library in Glasgow. It's been a while since I've read this one, enough to make it seem entirely new. I think in the past, I might'nt have liked it as much as the others because this one had very practical, everyday sorts of events that had nicely unexpected results. It had a theme of being grateful for what one has and helping others, no matter how hopeless the cause. You know, the magic in things around us. It was comforting to me right now when I am wondering about what impact my life has had, if any, on those around me. Maybe I can think I've done some little magic somehow in my relationships with people at work, the students I've gotten to know and my family. I love them all and wish them all well. That makes me a Well-Wisher, I suppose.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Maria Antonia

    This is the sequel to Magic or Not? In this one, the magic wishing well is up to its old tricks. The children make wishes, but they're not sure if it's really the well. This book, oddly enough, is written in first person, from multiple perspectives of the children. My favourite one was the "Anonymous" chapter that gives several clues as to the identity of the character. Of course, it's easy to figure out who the character is! The "magic" in these two books are not as prominent. I do love the stor This is the sequel to Magic or Not? In this one, the magic wishing well is up to its old tricks. The children make wishes, but they're not sure if it's really the well. This book, oddly enough, is written in first person, from multiple perspectives of the children. My favourite one was the "Anonymous" chapter that gives several clues as to the identity of the character. Of course, it's easy to figure out who the character is! The "magic" in these two books are not as prominent. I do love the story about the new family moving in which caused within the community. Eager doesn't ever say exactly what the "problem" is, but it becomes clear (at least to an adult) that this is a black family moving in. (The book was written in the 1960s.) I love how little Deborah puts it when she first meets the family: "Oh, that's what the fuss is all about." And I love the friendship that develops between her and the little boy, Hannibal. [3.5 Stars]

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    This book was really slow moving and boring to read. I took a long break from it and then the past few days I have been trying to finish it so I can move on to the last Edward Eager book. I remember looking at the Edward Eager books on the shelf of the library when I was little and I thought they looked interesting. I think I just really liked the pictures and the titles with the word magic intrigued me. But I wasn't much of a reader then and I thought the books looked too advanced for me to rea This book was really slow moving and boring to read. I took a long break from it and then the past few days I have been trying to finish it so I can move on to the last Edward Eager book. I remember looking at the Edward Eager books on the shelf of the library when I was little and I thought they looked interesting. I think I just really liked the pictures and the titles with the word magic intrigued me. But I wasn't much of a reader then and I thought the books looked too advanced for me to read so I never checked them out. I set it as a goal to read the books now that I'm older. I don't think I would have liked this book as a kid. So far I like the Half Magic book the best. I'll see what I think about Seven Day Magic. I'm hoping it's better than this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Fraser Sherman

    Surprisingly this sequel to Magic or Not, Eager's weakest book, is a very fun story. The surprising part is that it has the same premise — the kids do good deeds, hoping that the maybe-magic wishing well in their yard will help — but here it works. Part of the appeal is that it's written in a series of first person narrations. Eager has a good kid-voice, where everything sounds a little bit more melodramatic than it really is, and it pays off. It also gives us good insight into some of the charac Surprisingly this sequel to Magic or Not, Eager's weakest book, is a very fun story. The surprising part is that it has the same premise — the kids do good deeds, hoping that the maybe-magic wishing well in their yard will help — but here it works. Part of the appeal is that it's written in a series of first person narrations. Eager has a good kid-voice, where everything sounds a little bit more melodramatic than it really is, and it pays off. It also gives us good insight into some of the characters. A major plot point is a black family moving into the neighborhood despite protests. It's striking that Eager doesn't come out and say this explicitly, leaving everyone to infer it. Was he working around editors? Upset parents? It feels weird but that aside I think he handles it decently.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gable Roth

    I really like how this book and that last book use a subtle form of magic. It really makes you wonder if it is magic or not. But not only that but this book also tackles the moral issue of accepting others which was a big issue when this book was written... and sadly it is still a big issue. You would think that we would have been able to put that behind us now and move on but we still struggle. Some people may not think this is appropriate to put in a children's book. But Eager does it in such I really like how this book and that last book use a subtle form of magic. It really makes you wonder if it is magic or not. But not only that but this book also tackles the moral issue of accepting others which was a big issue when this book was written... and sadly it is still a big issue. You would think that we would have been able to put that behind us now and move on but we still struggle. Some people may not think this is appropriate to put in a children's book. But Eager does it in such a way that it is not in your face and it fits well with the story. Definitely a good read for all children!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    This is the one that broke me. I was okay with the previous one, with the magic not really being real, being the product of the children's good deeds, but this one was too disjointed for me. I don't know if it was the transition into an "I" book from each of the character's perspectives or something else. Anyway, while still delightful this one lost a bit of the magic for me. This is the one that broke me. I was okay with the previous one, with the magic not really being real, being the product of the children's good deeds, but this one was too disjointed for me. I don't know if it was the transition into an "I" book from each of the character's perspectives or something else. Anyway, while still delightful this one lost a bit of the magic for me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Filipa

    I just adore this series by Edward Eager and I will never forget that it was thanks to Alice Hoffman’s books that I even got to know them. I’m stupidly grateful that I came across these wonderful tales of magic. They are super entertaining, endearing and funny to read. Perfect summer readings, full of magic. These books warm my heart.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Johnny Bennett

    This one is sort of fun as the perspective cycles through the group and near the end the book starts to comment on how childish the stories are. The handling of the family moving to town is perhaps my favorite, though the Dicky story was also good. Just the fact that the reader fills in what should be ostracizing this family, the story never says.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    This was my favorite book as a child. I was happy to find it on eBay and am reliving a more innocent time. It's reminded me of a more idealistic me, when I believed in magic and the good in the world. This was my favorite book as a child. I was happy to find it on eBay and am reliving a more innocent time. It's reminded me of a more idealistic me, when I believed in magic and the good in the world.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    Notable Content: Some judgmental thoughts about someone's weight. Bullying. A** meaning donkey. Someone's called a boob. A crush, glimpses of dating; nothing more serious than hand holding and whispering. Notable Content: Some judgmental thoughts about someone's weight. Bullying. A** meaning donkey. Someone's called a boob. A crush, glimpses of dating; nothing more serious than hand holding and whispering.

  23. 5 out of 5

    LobsterQuadrille

    The Well-Wishers had a much more focused plot than Magic or Not?, and there were more memorable characters. But otherwise my thoughts on it are much the same as they were for its predecessor.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eugenia

    "Because I don't want things to change, or people either. I want them to stay exactly the way they are. That was how I felt yesterday." This book makes me long for days of the past when kids rode on the handlebars of bicycles. "Because I don't want things to change, or people either. I want them to stay exactly the way they are. That was how I felt yesterday." This book makes me long for days of the past when kids rode on the handlebars of bicycles.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Skm

    The important thing to realize about The Well-Wishers is that it's an homage to Nesbit's Bastable children books, instead of Nesbit's Phoenix/Psammead/other straight-up-unequivocally-magical books like the earlier Eager books are. The ambiguity of the kid's adventures, the conceit of the kids writing the book themselves, the focus on good deeds / improving the community, the "grown-up author winking at grown-up reader over the kids' heads" (eg the two chapters about redlining that never explicit The important thing to realize about The Well-Wishers is that it's an homage to Nesbit's Bastable children books, instead of Nesbit's Phoenix/Psammead/other straight-up-unequivocally-magical books like the earlier Eager books are. The ambiguity of the kid's adventures, the conceit of the kids writing the book themselves, the focus on good deeds / improving the community, the "grown-up author winking at grown-up reader over the kids' heads" (eg the two chapters about redlining that never explicitly discuss why people want to keep the black family out of town) are all very reminiscent of the Bastable books.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn Erb Bognar

    I read this aloud to my 9 year old. She gives it 3.5 stars and I give it 4. It was a nice addition to the series. Some parts were slower than others. It was a fun book overall.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    http://readfantasybooks.wordpress.com The Well-Wishers is the second part of the previous Tales of Magic book, Magic or Not?, which includes the same children we have come to adore! James, Kip, Laura, Lydia, and Gordy are back with new adventures! I thought it was interesting how this book was written. It reminds me a lot of the first book in which each child has their own chapter in the book and explains all about their adventure. I really like that it was in first-person because I feel like that http://readfantasybooks.wordpress.com The Well-Wishers is the second part of the previous Tales of Magic book, Magic or Not?, which includes the same children we have come to adore! James, Kip, Laura, Lydia, and Gordy are back with new adventures! I thought it was interesting how this book was written. It reminds me a lot of the first book in which each child has their own chapter in the book and explains all about their adventure. I really like that it was in first-person because I feel like that gives a more personal feel to the novel. You really get to know more about the characters and I felt like part of their group. There is so much more to learn about each of the characters in this book. They are much more developed and we begin to see signs of them starting to "grow-up" and wanting to leave magic behind. So sad! I don't feel like I should tell you more about them because you should discover that for yourself, but it is important to know that they are growing as characters. It is sad to spend two books with them and learn to love them so much only to see them go. I don't believe they are around in the final Tales of Magic book. Anyway, the characters are great! I like the plot , but it is closely related to the previous book, but with different adventures. The children want to help people in the neighborhood and use the wishing well as a means to do so; however, they are never certain whether it really is magic or just a bunch of coincidences. I actually found the first adventure with Gordy to be the most interesting, but they were all entertaining. I also like how there are several lessons to be learned in this novel that are important for children to know. The one thing I wasn't too sure about was right at the end in about the last chapter when we see James start to mature a little and find an interest in girls. There wasn't anything too inappropriate about it, which was good, but if you are a parent and don't like anything like that then this book can be easily skipped. So, I really like this book, but just like the previous one, it is not my favorite just because nothing really magical actually happens to make it... well more magical. I did like that it was a little different though, especially in a series with as many books as this one it helps to change it up a little. I would recommend this book to anyone who loves this series or adores fantasy books. It is also a great book for children!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    So I am beginning this story, and after that each one will tell what happened to him or her, as the case may be, and each one will tell it in his own way. Only we have made one rule, which is not to tell about the days when nothing happened, because who would want to read about them? And another rule is not to put in things that don't mean anything and are just there to try to make it more exciting. Like saying, "There I stood, my heart beating." Naturally your heart would be beating. Otherwise So I am beginning this story, and after that each one will tell what happened to him or her, as the case may be, and each one will tell it in his own way. Only we have made one rule, which is not to tell about the days when nothing happened, because who would want to read about them? And another rule is not to put in things that don't mean anything and are just there to try to make it more exciting. Like saying, "There I stood, my heart beating." Naturally your heart would be beating. Otherwise you wouldn't be standing there; you'd be lying down dead. There's a lot of charm, a lot of sly literary commentary, even in an average Edward Eager book. This is one of his mediocre works, though, because most of the stories are formulaic. Still well-told, and always witty, with that thread of satire running beneath every character pronouncement, but less fresh overall, less memorable. The on chapter that struck me most this time was the way Eager treated Deborah's story of the first black family to move to town. Interestingly, he never describes the family's appearance, just the town's split reaction, letting readers draw their own conclusions. Eager's only true acknowledgement that the opposition to the new family was race-based comes from Deborah's "Oh, is that all?" reaction when she first catches sight of the new family. Which felt a bit - condescending. Though that's perhaps balanced by Hannibal's insight that the families were so welcoming to make themselves feel good, which is a moment of uncomfortable insight that I'd imagine was fairly daring for a book first published in 1960.

  29. 4 out of 5

    CatholicBibliophagist

    (This is the same as my review of Magic or Not) Edward Eager was one of my favorite authors when I was a child. However, I only read Magic or Not and its sequel, The Well Wishers once or twice. (The others I read countless times!) What I liked about Eager's other books was that magical adventures befell ordinary children living in ordinary neighborhoods in the United States. But in Magic or Not the very existence of magic is very ambiguous. In fact, the characters themselves aren't sure whether th (This is the same as my review of Magic or Not) Edward Eager was one of my favorite authors when I was a child. However, I only read Magic or Not and its sequel, The Well Wishers once or twice. (The others I read countless times!) What I liked about Eager's other books was that magical adventures befell ordinary children living in ordinary neighborhoods in the United States. But in Magic or Not the very existence of magic is very ambiguous. In fact, the characters themselves aren't sure whether the wishing well is granting their wishes or if each successful outcome is the result of coincidence. And that's not what I was hoping for when I read these books as a child. Having now reread both books as an adult, I'm revising my original opinion of them upwards -- but by only a little. I can appreciate the author's attempt to do something different from the rest of his canon, and from my adult point of view, I definitely see a supernatural touch in both books. And most of the elements I've always loved in Eager's books are still there. But for me they still lack the exuberance of his previous works. And I am glad that the author went back to form in his last book, Seven Day Magic.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    It was pretty good. It taught about believing in something even when you don't believe in yourself. It taught about sticking together and finding a positive solution in each negative situation. It taught that something as simple as a water well could represent a creative sign to send magical wishes that could teach a powerful lesson.Sometimes it just takes a little team work and ideas from your heart to make something special happen. Sometimes you need to not judge a book by it's cover and give a It was pretty good. It taught about believing in something even when you don't believe in yourself. It taught about sticking together and finding a positive solution in each negative situation. It taught that something as simple as a water well could represent a creative sign to send magical wishes that could teach a powerful lesson.Sometimes it just takes a little team work and ideas from your heart to make something special happen. Sometimes you need to not judge a book by it's cover and give a person a chance.When a challenging or interesting situation presents itself don't walk away from it because you just might learn something that you'll also learn to be thankful for. Learning that it wasn't really a wishing well that brought all the magic. That it was really something they felt in their hearts that helped them feel driven to look at things with compassion.Even though they didn't want to believe it was as simple as that. All in all it taught follow your dreams and don't be selfish. It's better to give first then recieve later.

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