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The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living

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A beautifully packaged daily devotional of Stoic wisdom, featuring new translations of the most celebrated Stoics with historical context and practical tips from bestselling author Ryan Holiday. Stoic philosophy has long been the secret weapon of history’s greatest and wisest leaders--from emperors to artists, activists to fighter pilots. Today, people of all stripes are se A beautifully packaged daily devotional of Stoic wisdom, featuring new translations of the most celebrated Stoics with historical context and practical tips from bestselling author Ryan Holiday. Stoic philosophy has long been the secret weapon of history’s greatest and wisest leaders--from emperors to artists, activists to fighter pilots. Today, people of all stripes are seeking out Stoicism’s unique blend of practicality and wisdom as they look for answers to the great questions of daily life. Where should they start? Epictetus? Marcus Aurelius? Seneca? Which edition? Which translator? Presented in a page-per-day format, this daily resource combines all new translations done by Stephen Hanselman of the greatest passages from the great Stoics (including several lesser known philosophers like Zeno, Cleanthes and Musonius Rufus) with helpful commentary. Building on the organizational structure in Ryan Holiday’s cult classic The Obstacle is the Way, this guide also features twelve monthly themes (and helpful glossary) for clarifying perception, improving action, and unlocking the power of will. Aimed at the high-octane, action-oriented doers of our wired world, this book brings new daily rituals and new perspectives to produce balanced action, insight, effectiveness, and serenity. From the Hardcover edition.


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A beautifully packaged daily devotional of Stoic wisdom, featuring new translations of the most celebrated Stoics with historical context and practical tips from bestselling author Ryan Holiday. Stoic philosophy has long been the secret weapon of history’s greatest and wisest leaders--from emperors to artists, activists to fighter pilots. Today, people of all stripes are se A beautifully packaged daily devotional of Stoic wisdom, featuring new translations of the most celebrated Stoics with historical context and practical tips from bestselling author Ryan Holiday. Stoic philosophy has long been the secret weapon of history’s greatest and wisest leaders--from emperors to artists, activists to fighter pilots. Today, people of all stripes are seeking out Stoicism’s unique blend of practicality and wisdom as they look for answers to the great questions of daily life. Where should they start? Epictetus? Marcus Aurelius? Seneca? Which edition? Which translator? Presented in a page-per-day format, this daily resource combines all new translations done by Stephen Hanselman of the greatest passages from the great Stoics (including several lesser known philosophers like Zeno, Cleanthes and Musonius Rufus) with helpful commentary. Building on the organizational structure in Ryan Holiday’s cult classic The Obstacle is the Way, this guide also features twelve monthly themes (and helpful glossary) for clarifying perception, improving action, and unlocking the power of will. Aimed at the high-octane, action-oriented doers of our wired world, this book brings new daily rituals and new perspectives to produce balanced action, insight, effectiveness, and serenity. From the Hardcover edition.

30 review for The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paula Terrado

    I’ve read this book already but i still read it everyday. It serves as a book vitamin to me. ❦ It helps me have a positive attitude when i’m feeling down. ❦ It gives me a whole a new perspective. ❦ It helps open my mind and help me understand things. ❦ It helps me find something positive in a negative situation. ❦ It just lifts me. It may be short but i believe it still served its purpose. These are just some of the things that this book did to me. I do hope it has the same effect on you. And aside fr I’ve read this book already but i still read it everyday. It serves as a book vitamin to me. ❦ It helps me have a positive attitude when i’m feeling down. ❦ It gives me a whole a new perspective. ❦ It helps open my mind and help me understand things. ❦ It helps me find something positive in a negative situation. ❦ It just lifts me. It may be short but i believe it still served its purpose. These are just some of the things that this book did to me. I do hope it has the same effect on you. And aside from this book, prayers will definitely work wonders, no doubt about it (other religions, please don’t take offense in this - i apologize if i’ve offended anyone with this, that’s not my intention). Happy reading!!! :)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sean Goh

    Read it in just under 6 weeks, rather than a year. Some days are repetitive, but then again so is life, since lessons tend to be repeated until learnt. But as the conclusion says, theory is easy, practice is hard (and never-ending). ___ Stoicism in a nutshell: Virtue (four cardinal virtues of self-control, courage, justice and wisdom) is happiness, and it is our perception of things - rather than the things themsleves - that cause most of our trouble. The three most essential parts of Stoic philoso Read it in just under 6 weeks, rather than a year. Some days are repetitive, but then again so is life, since lessons tend to be repeated until learnt. But as the conclusion says, theory is easy, practice is hard (and never-ending). ___ Stoicism in a nutshell: Virtue (four cardinal virtues of self-control, courage, justice and wisdom) is happiness, and it is our perception of things - rather than the things themsleves - that cause most of our trouble. The three most essential parts of Stoic philosophy: Control your perceptions. Direct your actions properly. Willingly accept what's outside your control. When your efforts are not directed towards a cause or purpose, how will you know what to say no to and what to say yes to? How will you know when you have had enough, when you've reached your goal, when you've gotten off track, if you've never defined what those things are? Serenity and stability are results of your choices and judgment, not your environment. If you seek to avoid all disruptions to tranquility, you will never be successful. Your problems will follow you wherever you run and hide. External things can't fix internal issues. Money only marginally changes life. It doesn't solve the problems that people without it seem to think it will. When I see an anxious person, I ask: What do they want? For if a person wasn't wanting something outside their control, why would they be stricken by anxiety? The next time you find yourself in the middle of a freakout or breakout, stop a moment and ask yourself: Is this helping me feel better? It is important to connect the so-called temptation with its actual effects. Once you understand that indulging might actually be worse than resisting, the urge begins to lose its appeal. It is the privilege of the gods to want nothing, and of godlike men to want little. To want nothing makes you invincible, because nothing lies outside of your control. The more things we desire and the more we have to do to earn or attain these achievements, the less we actually enjoy our lives - and the less free we are. It's not about avoidance or shunning, but rather not giving any possible outcome more power or preference than is appropriate. This is not easy to do, certainly, but if you could manage, how much more relaxed would you be? Curb your desire - don't set your heart on so many things and you will get what you need. Train your mind to ask: "Do I need this thing? What will happen if I do not get it? Can I make do without it?" "The cause of my irritation is not in this person but in me." Our labels, our expectations. There are two ways to be wealthy, to get everything you want or to want everything you have. People put a great deal of effort into ensuring that money is real, whereas we accept potentially life-changing thoughts or assumptions without so much as a question. One ironic assumption along these lines: That having a lot of money makes you wealthy. Or that because a lot of people believe something, that it must be true. At the end of your time on this planet, what expertise is going to be more valuable, your understanding of matters of living and dying, or your knowledge of celebrity lives / intricacies of plot points of your favourite TV series / insert random vice or obsession here? Everything we do has a toll attached to it. Waiting around is a tax on travelling. Rumours and gossip are the tax that come from acquiring a public persona. Disagreements and occasional frustration are taxes placed on even the happiest of relationships. There are many forms of taxes in life. You can argue with them, you can go to great - but ultimately futile - lengths to evade them, or you can simply pay them and enjoy the fruits of what you get to keep. "If you don't take the money, they can't tell you what to do." Wanting makes you a servant. Make character your loudest statement. Do, don't just say. God laid down this law, saying: if you want some good, get it from yourself. - Epictetus. Reflect then, that your ancestors set up these trophies, not that you may gaze at them in wonder, but that you may also imitate the virtues of the men who set them up. Take pleasure in taking the right actions, rather than the results that come from them. Focus on what you can control. Joy for human beings lies in proper human work. And proper human work consists in: acts of kindness to other human beings, disdain for the stirring of the senses, identifying trustworthy impressions, and contemplating the natural order and all that happens in keeping with it. The first two things before acting: Don't get upset. And do the right thing. Succumbing to the self-pity and "woe is me" narrative accomplishes nothing - nothing except sapping you of the energy and motivation you need to do something about your problem. A trained mind is better than any script. And and far better booster of confidence. Don't think of how you HAVE to do something, but rather how you GET TO do it. Receive and respond to the will in the world. Appeal to self-interest, rather than moralise. SHOW how something is bad, rather than just say it is bad. Remember then, if you deem what is by nature slavish to be free, and what is not your own to be yours, you will be shackled and miserable, blaming both gods and other people. But if you deem as your own only what is yours, and what belongs to others as truly not yours, then no one will ever be able to coerce or to stop you, you will find no one to blame or accuse, you will do nothing against your will, you will have no enemy, no one will harm you, because no harm can affect you. Anyone who truly wants to be free, won't desire something that is actually in someone else's control, unless they want to be a slave. Take days off from work, not learning. Better to trip with the feet than the tongue. Words can't be unsaid. A virtuous person is generous with assumptions: that something was an accident, that someone didn't know, that it won't happen again. This makes life easier to bear and makes us more tolerant. Meanwhile - assuming malice - the most hasty of judgments - makes everything harder to bear. Cease to hope and you will cease to fear. The primary cause of both these ills is that instead of adapting ourselves to present circumstances we send out thoughts too far ahead. Fortune falls heavily on those for whom she's unexpected. The one always on the lookout easily endures. "I would choose being sick over living in luxury, for being sick only harms the body, whereas luxury destroys both the body and the soul, causing weakness and incapacity in the body, and lack of control and cowardice in the soul. What's more, luxury breeds injustice because it also breeds greediness." No person hands out money to passersby, but to how many do each of us hand out our lives! We're tight-fisted with property and money, yet think too little of wasting time, the one thing about which we should all be the toughest misers.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ying Ying

    The meditations are so short that they cannot satisfy my daily thirst. However, because the texts are not tightly connected, "reading" quickly on one-go feels like drinking too many different beverages at the same time; soon you lose your feeling. What this book did do is to re-awaken my interest in stoicism and my desire to go back to the actual texts, which are much more thoughtful and profound, and hence significantly more delightful. The meditations are so short that they cannot satisfy my daily thirst. However, because the texts are not tightly connected, "reading" quickly on one-go feels like drinking too many different beverages at the same time; soon you lose your feeling. What this book did do is to re-awaken my interest in stoicism and my desire to go back to the actual texts, which are much more thoughtful and profound, and hence significantly more delightful.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Kemp

    It's perfect for it's purpose, a daily dip into stoic wisdom. Those who rated it one star are judging against a standard it's not attempting to meet. The author does not claim to give the best translations, only accessible ones. I'm probably going to end up buying this and reading it daily for years. For those looking for deep dives rather than a daily dip, read Long's translation of Meditations (or Hays for a version that's like having the author put his hand on his shoulder and advise you, whil It's perfect for it's purpose, a daily dip into stoic wisdom. Those who rated it one star are judging against a standard it's not attempting to meet. The author does not claim to give the best translations, only accessible ones. I'm probably going to end up buying this and reading it daily for years. For those looking for deep dives rather than a daily dip, read Long's translation of Meditations (or Hays for a version that's like having the author put his hand on his shoulder and advise you, while standing in a muddy field). There are a lot of translations, look until you find one you like!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    I am a fan of some of Marcus Aurelius' writing so I bought this book looking forward to discovering other ancient Stoic writers. Instead, I found mostly the interpretations of the editor with just small snippets from the Stoic greats. Sometimes it's hard to find the Stoic quotes amidst the simplistic and shallow commentary of the editor. I am a fan of some of Marcus Aurelius' writing so I bought this book looking forward to discovering other ancient Stoic writers. Instead, I found mostly the interpretations of the editor with just small snippets from the Stoic greats. Sometimes it's hard to find the Stoic quotes amidst the simplistic and shallow commentary of the editor.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Raymond

    This was a really good collection of quotes from Stoic philosophers such as Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, and Epictetus and daily meditations from the authors Ryan Holiday and Stephen Hanselman. I read two meditations a day from December 2016 to July 2017. I enjoyed learning from the wisdom of these philosophers who lived around 2,000 years ago and it amazes me that their words stand the test of time. Big takeaways from the book: Be good, accept the things you can control, realize that the outcome of This was a really good collection of quotes from Stoic philosophers such as Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, and Epictetus and daily meditations from the authors Ryan Holiday and Stephen Hanselman. I read two meditations a day from December 2016 to July 2017. I enjoyed learning from the wisdom of these philosophers who lived around 2,000 years ago and it amazes me that their words stand the test of time. Big takeaways from the book: Be good, accept the things you can control, realize that the outcome of things is controlled by someone or something bigger than yourself, and finally practice what you preach by living out the wisdom and teachings that you read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adam McNamara

    Stoicism is an ancient philosophy. It asserts that virtue (meaning self-control, courage, justice, and wisdom) is happiness. To achieve virtue, and thus live happily, one must master the three Stoic disciplines: perceptions (how you see and understand the world), actions (how you act based on what you see), and will (how you feel when events are outside your control). The Daily Stoic is an exercise guide, not a history of Stoicism. Its goal is to help you understand the three disciplines - percep Stoicism is an ancient philosophy. It asserts that virtue (meaning self-control, courage, justice, and wisdom) is happiness. To achieve virtue, and thus live happily, one must master the three Stoic disciplines: perceptions (how you see and understand the world), actions (how you act based on what you see), and will (how you feel when events are outside your control). The Daily Stoic is an exercise guide, not a history of Stoicism. Its goal is to help you understand the three disciplines - perception, action, and will - and apply lessons from each to your life. Each day, you’re presented with a Stoic lesson, explained in modern language, with advice about how to apply it in everyday life. When studying Stoicism in the past, I’ve encountered two problems. The original sources can difficult to read. Simply put, we spoke differently 2,000 years ago. Stoicism is full of important lessons, but they can be lost when struggling with the language in Meditations by Marcus Aurelius and Letters from a Stoic by Seneca. Books like The Obstacle is the Way and a Guide to the Good Life help by interpreting and summarizing the lessons for a modern audience. But Stoicism contains hundreds lessons about how to live well, and modern summaries can be difficult to remember and apply them all. This is where The Daily Stoic shines. Not only does it make Stoic lessons easy to understand and apply, it focuses you on just one lesson per day. I find this format - a daily practice guide - the most effective way of reading, understanding, and applying Stoicism.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amy Landino

    Life changing. Reading it over. Every day. Every year.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Valentina

    This book is seriously life changing. I couldn't imagine my life without it. I'm on my second, going on a third (surely not the last one) loop. This book is seriously life changing. I couldn't imagine my life without it. I'm on my second, going on a third (surely not the last one) loop.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Adrianna O.

    I have to admit I wasn't reading this every day, I also started it in April, so I have missed a couple of months, I also skipped some days by just completely forgetting about this book, sometimes even weeks. However, some of the quotes and analysis of them were quite relatable, sometimes even on the days I would read them. It's rather a flexible and open-minded approach, it is often fitting to your current situation, or one you once found yourself in, your experiences, etc. Lots of them helped me I have to admit I wasn't reading this every day, I also started it in April, so I have missed a couple of months, I also skipped some days by just completely forgetting about this book, sometimes even weeks. However, some of the quotes and analysis of them were quite relatable, sometimes even on the days I would read them. It's rather a flexible and open-minded approach, it is often fitting to your current situation, or one you once found yourself in, your experiences, etc. Lots of them helped me get through the days, encouraged me to analyse how I felt, what went well and wrong, and how to make that particular day better and not make the same mistakes again. Overall, I really enjoyed it, but as lazy as I am, I will probably not stick to the goal of reading it every day in 2018.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    In one pithy word: rudimentary. What an affront to the great thinkers of ancient times. Each "daily meditation" is but a tiny drop of water splashing itself into the vast blue sea; nary an impact, nary a difference. Would not recommend. In one pithy word: rudimentary. What an affront to the great thinkers of ancient times. Each "daily meditation" is but a tiny drop of water splashing itself into the vast blue sea; nary an impact, nary a difference. Would not recommend.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sheila Jungco

    Been reading this precious for a year now and maybe i have read this twice. This indeed gave me perspective to silence the anxiety of the uncertainty especially during the pandemic. I am grateful instead of a lot of things that i can accomplish even just to wake up, clean, read and prepare something to eat. I still read this book daily for this year. You cannot really become by just reading a book once.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Phill

    I bought this book in hopes to get a modern take of stoic philosophy. The book is intended to start on January 1st which is slightly distracting but that's neither here nor there. Each passage has a snippet of a classic stoic philosopher and a few paragraphs on how that particular snippet can be implemented in modern life. I personally don't particularly see eye to eye with how the authors choose to implement the philosophy. Without getting to political, there is a typical "American" / neolibera I bought this book in hopes to get a modern take of stoic philosophy. The book is intended to start on January 1st which is slightly distracting but that's neither here nor there. Each passage has a snippet of a classic stoic philosopher and a few paragraphs on how that particular snippet can be implemented in modern life. I personally don't particularly see eye to eye with how the authors choose to implement the philosophy. Without getting to political, there is a typical "American" / neoliberal vibe with the modern implementations which I find ever so slightly grating. That being said, it's not too distracting albeit probably noticeable for those who might not be so fond of said vibe. I'd recommend the book to those who might want to get a feel of stoicism or at least get a good idea of who the stoics were. I'd also recommend it for people who might be pressed for time but still have the desire to read something introspective daily (notably atheists / non-theists).

  14. 4 out of 5

    JD Welch

    Gave up pretty quickly on this as the commentaries attached to each quotation are clearly geared to "high-octane, action-oriented" douchebros. Skip this and just read to the actual sources. To be fair, I should have looked up this Ryan Holiday asshole beforehand, and I wouldn't have bothered. Gave up pretty quickly on this as the commentaries attached to each quotation are clearly geared to "high-octane, action-oriented" douchebros. Skip this and just read to the actual sources. To be fair, I should have looked up this Ryan Holiday asshole beforehand, and I wouldn't have bothered.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Richard Mulholland

    A life changing book that I read a page a day. I'm now on my second loop. A life changing book that I read a page a day. I'm now on my second loop.

  16. 5 out of 5

    CaptainWolfsborg

    I have read this book more or less with regard to the date as author originally intended – one piece of stoic wisdom per day. As one of the great stoic, Seneca, recommends – "Of all people only those are at leisure who make time for philosophy, only they truly live.", I tried to fill my days this year with some leisureliness by following the wisdom of Seneca, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, Musonius Rufus, and some other fellows from swollen times. It is a very good idea by Ryan Holiday – a daily sm I have read this book more or less with regard to the date as author originally intended – one piece of stoic wisdom per day. As one of the great stoic, Seneca, recommends – "Of all people only those are at leisure who make time for philosophy, only they truly live.", I tried to fill my days this year with some leisureliness by following the wisdom of Seneca, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, Musonius Rufus, and some other fellows from swollen times. It is a very good idea by Ryan Holiday – a daily small dose of philosophy. In the book, each month has a theme, starting with Clarity in January and finishing with Meditation on Mortality in December, and then other important questions in other months. The format of the book is simple. Each page has a citation by one of the philosophers, and there's a comment and interpretation by the author. A nice way to approach philosophy, it feels like you're having in a small discussion among three of us. Many comments by Ryan Holiday on stoic wisdom is even better than the original message, but some are just filling the page with words. Stoic insights are profound and at the same time very useful and practical. This book does a really great job in promoting it. It almost felt like a self-help book, but what can be a better shaper and advisor to our internal struggles than a good piece of philosophy?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Taylor

    Make your life worth living, face your fear of death! Pop culture likes to lead you to believe that if you set your mind to anything, you can achieve it. But you don't need to live too long to realise you don't have complete control over circumstances. You may have prospered yesterday and yet experience a reversal today. So what is the one thing that's completely in your control? Your mind. And because you control your mind, you control your choices. Even so, the consequences of those choices are ou Make your life worth living, face your fear of death! Pop culture likes to lead you to believe that if you set your mind to anything, you can achieve it. But you don't need to live too long to realise you don't have complete control over circumstances. You may have prospered yesterday and yet experience a reversal today. So what is the one thing that's completely in your control? Your mind. And because you control your mind, you control your choices. Even so, the consequences of those choices are outside your control. Practice Stoicism and start a lifelong journey of self-mastery.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alex Chavez

    Great book to reflect on important topics of life. This is great to walk your way through the stoic philosophy and practice its teaching every day with a new reflection, if you practice doing the exercise and start really questioning your life and the world around you can benefit in ALL AREAS of your life focusing on the really important stuff and get rid of superficiality.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Owlseyes

    "The greater the difficulty, the more glory in surmounting it. Skilful pilots gain their reputation from storms and tempests.” Epictetus (What about those who drown ...and sink?). Well, well,...keep serene. And keep a diary. https://www.google.it/amp/s/amp.thegu... (Be careful using BoJo's Stoic technique of negative visualisation) We are all Stoics now... maybe: https://asiatimes.com/2020/03/we-are-... (And Taoists too??) "We are waves of the same sea, leaves of the same tree, flowers of the same garde "The greater the difficulty, the more glory in surmounting it. Skilful pilots gain their reputation from storms and tempests.” Epictetus (What about those who drown ...and sink?). Well, well,...keep serene. And keep a diary. https://www.google.it/amp/s/amp.thegu... (Be careful using BoJo's Stoic technique of negative visualisation) We are all Stoics now... maybe: https://asiatimes.com/2020/03/we-are-... (And Taoists too??) "We are waves of the same sea, leaves of the same tree, flowers of the same garden" Seneca Can the coronavirus pandemic change the way we think? One philosopher in Italy wonders: https://theconversation.com/philosoph... https://medium.com/stoicism-philosoph...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jerrie (redwritinghood)

    I have been reading a passage from this book each day (more or less) all year long. Each month’s worth of reading focuses on one aspect of Stoic philosophy, and each daily reading gives thoughts on that topic. Quotes from well-known Stoic philosophers start each passage for the day and then some text below that gives you something to think about and develop as you go through your day. It was an interesting year-long journey.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vasyl Pasternak

    While I don't like the book format - I rarely read one page per day, the idea, cites, topic organization, and motivation are the great. The book contain easy to share phrases and short paragraphs of very concentrated examples of the idea behind. I recommend it to everyone. While I don't like the book format - I rarely read one page per day, the idea, cites, topic organization, and motivation are the great. The book contain easy to share phrases and short paragraphs of very concentrated examples of the idea behind. I recommend it to everyone.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Samy

    This book is meant to be read one day at a time, but I couldn’t help but go through it over the course of a couple of weeks. Emotional stability is something that’s of the utmost importance if you want to make the best decisions in your life. I find that the stoic philosophy lends itself well to distancing yourself from other people’s behavior so that you truly focus on what’s in your own control. For people who are very future-oriented like me, I think you’ll find that letting go of some of you This book is meant to be read one day at a time, but I couldn’t help but go through it over the course of a couple of weeks. Emotional stability is something that’s of the utmost importance if you want to make the best decisions in your life. I find that the stoic philosophy lends itself well to distancing yourself from other people’s behavior so that you truly focus on what’s in your own control. For people who are very future-oriented like me, I think you’ll find that letting go of some of your desire to create certain outcomes, to ironically, be helpful for creating the outcomes you seek. Here are some of the quotes that particularly resonated with me. I've organized them by People, Choices, Doubt, Desire, and Wealth. People People are depending on you. Your purpose is to help us render this great work together. And we’re waiting and excited for you to show up. ========== You must choose whether to be loved by these friends and remain the same person or to become a better person at the cost of those friends … if you try to have it both ways you will neither make progress nor keep what you once had.” ========== “If a person gave away your body to some passer-by, you’d be furious. Yet you hand over your mind to anyone who comes along, so they may abuse you, leaving it disturbed and troubled—have you no shame in that?” Someone can’t frustrate you, work can’t overwhelm you—these are external objects, and they have no access to your mind. Those emotions you feel, as real as they are, come from the inside, not the outside. Someone says something rude—it’s your sensitivity that interpreted their remark this way. ========== “Appeal to People’s Self-Interest Never to Their Mercy or Gratitude.” ========== “If you wish to improve, be content to appear clueless or stupid in extraneous matters—don’t wish to seem knowledgeable. “In public avoid talking often and excessively about your accomplishments and dangers, for however much you enjoy recounting your dangers, it’s not so pleasant for others to hear about your affairs.” ========== Listen and connect with people, don’t perform for them. ========== What if you could “love your enemies, do good to those who hate you”? What kind of effect do you think that would have? The Bible says that when you can do something nice and caring to a hateful enemy, it is like “heaping burning coals on his head.” ========== Most rudeness, meanness, and cruelty are a mask for deep-seated weakness. Kindness in these situations is only possible for people of great strength. You have that strength. Use it. ========== If an actor focuses on the public reception to a project—whether critics like it or whether it’s a hit, they will be constantly disappointed and hurt. But if they love their performance—and put everything they have into making it the best that they’re capable of—they will always find satisfaction in their job. ========== Choices You become the sum of your actions, and as you do, what flows from that—your impulses—reflect the actions you’ve taken. Choose wisely. ========== How you handle today is how you’ll handle every day. How you handle this minute is how you’ll handle every minute. ========== Freedom? That’s easy. It’s in your choices. Happiness? That’s easy. It’s in your choices. Respect of your peers? That too is in the choices you make. And all of that is right in front of you. No need to take the long way. Right now we might be laid low with struggles, whereas just a few years ago we might have lived high on the hog, and in just a few days we might be doing so well that success is actually a burden. One thing will stay constant: our freedom of choice—both in the big picture and small picture. ========== You’ve got just one thing to manage: your choices, your will, your mind. So mind it. “In the afternoon, remind yourself that aside from the choices you make, your fate is not entirely up to you. The world is spinning and we spin along with it—whichever direction, good or bad. “ Doubt Greek word euthymia, which he defines as “believing in yourself and trusting that you are on the right path, and not being in doubt by following the myriad footpaths of those wandering in every direction.” ========== Tranquillity and peace are found in identifying our path and in sticking to it: staying the course—making adjustments here and there, naturally—but ignoring the distracting sirens who beckon us to turn toward the rocks. ========== Connection There is clarity (and joy) in seeing what others can’t see, in finding grace and harmony in places others overlook. Isn’t that far better than seeing the world as some dark place? ========== “I will keep constant watch over myself and—most usefully—will put each day up for review. For this is what makes us evil—that none of us looks back upon our own lives. We reflect upon only that which we are about to do. And yet our plans for the future descend from the past.” ========== Desire The more things we desire and the more we have to do to earn or attain those achievements, the less we actually enjoy our lives—and the less free we are. ========== Locate that yearning for more, better, someday and see it for what it is: the enemy of your contentment. Choose it or your happiness. As Epictetus says, the two are not compatible. ========== For nowhere can you find a more peaceful and less busy retreat than in your own soul—especially if on close inspection it is filled with ease, which I say is nothing more than being well-ordered. Treat yourself often to this retreat and be renewed.” ========== A mind that isn’t in control of itself, that doesn’t understand its power to regulate itself, will be jerked ========== “There is something of a civil war going on within all of our lives,” a war inside each individual between the good parts of their soul and the bad. ========== This is why we must fight our biases and preconceptions: because they are a liability. Ask yourself: What haven’t I considered? Why is this thing the way it is? Am I part of the problem here or the solution? Could I be wrong here? ========== “From the very beginning, make it your practice to say to every harsh impression, ‘you are an impression and not at all what you appear to be.’ ========== “It isn’t events themselves that disturb people, but only their judgments about them.” ========== Thyestes is ultimately tempted and persuaded to accept “fortune’s gifts,” … which turned out to be a ruse hiding devastating tragedy. ========== We can get very good at what we’re paid to do, or adept at a hobby we wish we could be paid to do. Yet our own lives, habits, and tendencies might be a mystery to us. ========== By seeing each day and each situation as a kind of training exercise, the stakes suddenly become a lot lower. ========== Here is how to guarantee you have a good day: do good things. ========== Instead of seeing philosophy as an end to which one aspires, see it as something one applies. Not occasionally, but over the course of a life—making incremental progress along the way. Sustained execution, not shapeless epiphanies. ========== It’s fun to think about the future. It’s easy to ruminate on the past. It’s harder to put that energy into what’s in front of us right at this moment—especially if it’s something we don’t want to do. ========== “We like to say that we don’t get to choose our parents, that they were given by chance—yet we can truly choose whose children we’d like to be.” ========== Wealth “A man’s wealth must be determined by the relation of his desires and expenditures to his income. If he feels rich on $10 and has everything he desires, he really is rich.” Remember: taking the money, wanting the money—proverbially or literally—makes you a servant to the people who have it. Indifference to it, as Seneca put it, turns the highest power into no power, at least as far as your life is concerned.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Josh McVay

    Couldn’t recommend this enough. This is one New Years resolution that I’ll be forever thankful I picked up. Over the course of the last year these daily devotionals have managed to change the way I look at the world ever so slightly and have opened my mind to a new life philosophy. I have a long way to go in my study of Stoicism (a philosophy based around never making it to the destination) but this served as a perfect primer, opening a door to other great works that I plan on tackling this year Couldn’t recommend this enough. This is one New Years resolution that I’ll be forever thankful I picked up. Over the course of the last year these daily devotionals have managed to change the way I look at the world ever so slightly and have opened my mind to a new life philosophy. I have a long way to go in my study of Stoicism (a philosophy based around never making it to the destination) but this served as a perfect primer, opening a door to other great works that I plan on tackling this year.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Szymon

    One of the most important books in my life. I've just finished the last lesson and tomorrow Im going to start the book all over again. Plain, simple and powerful. I cannot relate to each lesson equally but I guess thats a personal thing, also it might change in time for any individual. I've also bought another copy of this book which I lend to my friends and family to try it out. Highly recommended. One of the most important books in my life. I've just finished the last lesson and tomorrow Im going to start the book all over again. Plain, simple and powerful. I cannot relate to each lesson equally but I guess thats a personal thing, also it might change in time for any individual. I've also bought another copy of this book which I lend to my friends and family to try it out. Highly recommended.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Started reading this with the new year and stopped today. It was frustratingly repetitive, with only 2 or 3 ideas said over and over again in different ways by different people.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Carr

    This was the first book I began in 2018, and the last I finished. The one I read the most consistently, yet took all year to finish. The Daily Stoic is a collection of 365 entries, each with a long quotation from a Stoic philosopher and 1-2 paragraphs of explanation and analysis. This is the first ‘daily wisdom’ book I have read. From 1 January to 31 December, I read each day’s entry. At times I fell 2 or 3 days behind, but almost never more than that. The habit held. While I’m sceptical about th This was the first book I began in 2018, and the last I finished. The one I read the most consistently, yet took all year to finish. The Daily Stoic is a collection of 365 entries, each with a long quotation from a Stoic philosopher and 1-2 paragraphs of explanation and analysis. This is the first ‘daily wisdom’ book I have read. From 1 January to 31 December, I read each day’s entry. At times I fell 2 or 3 days behind, but almost never more than that. The habit held. While I’m sceptical about these types of books (originally a religious genre that now overflows with random collections of banal inspirational quotes), I found real satisfaction in the practice of reading one page every day. Sure, most days I promptly forgot what I had read, but sometimes I would catch myself thinking of it. Or seeing reflections of its themes in the events I faced that day. As the year went on, this tendency to recall and consider increased. I’ve yet to find a replacement for 2019 (though I have Leo Tolstoy’s A Calendar of Wisdom on order) and I’m not sure about re-starting The Daily Stoic again next year (well, tomorrow). But I really appreciated what I learned, and the effort and thought that went into pulling this book together. The essays are often well written and actively contribute, instead of just rephrasing the quote. Ryan Holiday has a capacity to say afresh well known ideas, and often avoid the easy cliché or formulation. Most of all, this book was a reminder that philosophy is not an idle leisure pursuit (something I have come to treat it as, dipping in during quite months or occasional bursts mid-year) but should be a regular practice and habit. And philosophy may be on the abstract and obtuse, but it also has great value on helping us think, act and live in our own lives.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    An excellent, practical series of meditations drawing on Stoic philosophy that guide everyday living in the modern world. Surprisingly relevant. Occasionally, the application of Stoic philosophy seemed to be drawing a long bow but, overall, beneficial advice. Much better than some of the saccharine advice given in some books of daily readings.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    I bought this book because I wanted a page-a-day morning meditation. Instead, I got this: flaccid, trite, ignorant, self-important "advice" with little comprehension of the classical philosophers. Feb 8 actually suggests that if someone is upset, you should taunt them sarcastically. Absolutely lacking in empathy and wisdom. Nothing of value here. I bought this book because I wanted a page-a-day morning meditation. Instead, I got this: flaccid, trite, ignorant, self-important "advice" with little comprehension of the classical philosophers. Feb 8 actually suggests that if someone is upset, you should taunt them sarcastically. Absolutely lacking in empathy and wisdom. Nothing of value here.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Maxine Schmidt

    Loved this book! I completed the journal alongside and will re-read and journal again next year! Reflection is my key to inner peace and remaining true to what's important to me in life! So pleased that I completed both book and journal! Loved this book! I completed the journal alongside and will re-read and journal again next year! Reflection is my key to inner peace and remaining true to what's important to me in life! So pleased that I completed both book and journal!

  30. 4 out of 5

    The Artisan Geek

    6/5/19 I said last year, I'd become a self help gal, but didn't read any of the self help books that I bought. So in an effort to not leave these books to a lonely fate of not being read, I'll have a go at this one first. You can find me on Youtube | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Website 6/5/19 I said last year, I'd become a self help gal, but didn't read any of the self help books that I bought. So in an effort to not leave these books to a lonely fate of not being read, I'll have a go at this one first. You can find me on Youtube | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Website

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