hits counter The Music of Life: Bartolomeo Cristofori & The Invention of the Piano - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Music of Life: Bartolomeo Cristofori & The Invention of the Piano

Availability: Ready to download

Award-winning biographer Elizabeth Rusch and two-time Caldecott Honor–recipient Marjorie Priceman team up to tell the inspiring story of the invention of the world’s most popular instrument: the piano. Bartolomeo Cristofori coaxes just the right sounds from the musical instruments he makes. Some of his keyboards can play piano, light and soft; others make forte notes ring o Award-winning biographer Elizabeth Rusch and two-time Caldecott Honor–recipient Marjorie Priceman team up to tell the inspiring story of the invention of the world’s most popular instrument: the piano. Bartolomeo Cristofori coaxes just the right sounds from the musical instruments he makes. Some of his keyboards can play piano, light and soft; others make forte notes ring out, strong and loud, but Cristofori longs to create an instrument that can be played both soft and loud. His talent has caught the attention of Prince Ferdinando de Medici, who wants his court to become the musical center of Italy. The prince brings Cristofori to the noisy city of Florence, where the goldsmiths’ tiny hammers whisper tink, tink and the blacksmiths’ big sledgehammers shout BANG, BANG! Could hammers be the key to the new instrument? At last Cristofori gets his creation just right. It is called the pianoforte, for what it can do. All around the world, people young and old can play the most intricate music of their lives, thanks to Bartolomeo Cristofori’s marvelous creation: the piano.


Compare

Award-winning biographer Elizabeth Rusch and two-time Caldecott Honor–recipient Marjorie Priceman team up to tell the inspiring story of the invention of the world’s most popular instrument: the piano. Bartolomeo Cristofori coaxes just the right sounds from the musical instruments he makes. Some of his keyboards can play piano, light and soft; others make forte notes ring o Award-winning biographer Elizabeth Rusch and two-time Caldecott Honor–recipient Marjorie Priceman team up to tell the inspiring story of the invention of the world’s most popular instrument: the piano. Bartolomeo Cristofori coaxes just the right sounds from the musical instruments he makes. Some of his keyboards can play piano, light and soft; others make forte notes ring out, strong and loud, but Cristofori longs to create an instrument that can be played both soft and loud. His talent has caught the attention of Prince Ferdinando de Medici, who wants his court to become the musical center of Italy. The prince brings Cristofori to the noisy city of Florence, where the goldsmiths’ tiny hammers whisper tink, tink and the blacksmiths’ big sledgehammers shout BANG, BANG! Could hammers be the key to the new instrument? At last Cristofori gets his creation just right. It is called the pianoforte, for what it can do. All around the world, people young and old can play the most intricate music of their lives, thanks to Bartolomeo Cristofori’s marvelous creation: the piano.

30 review for The Music of Life: Bartolomeo Cristofori & The Invention of the Piano

  1. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    Bartolomeo Cristofori invented the Piano. This book is a history text told as story. It is very steeped in history and they do a very good job of making this a story and not a history. The Art is very colorful and kinetic. Vibrant. Art as a dance. The author did their research and listed quotes at the bottom of the page from texts and records from the time. This is historically accurate. Honestly, I did not know this history very well and I did learn quite a bit from this book. It's a quick way t Bartolomeo Cristofori invented the Piano. This book is a history text told as story. It is very steeped in history and they do a very good job of making this a story and not a history. The Art is very colorful and kinetic. Vibrant. Art as a dance. The author did their research and listed quotes at the bottom of the page from texts and records from the time. This is historically accurate. Honestly, I did not know this history very well and I did learn quite a bit from this book. It's a quick way to get the basic facts. So I enjoyed the story myself. My niece was interested in this and marveled that there was a time when people didn't have pianos. Then she wanted to know what a harpsicord sounded like. I call that a win.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Krista the Krazy Kataloguer

    I've loved pianist David Lanz's beautiful "Cristofori's Dream" since I first heard it years ago, but never knew who Cristofori was. Now, thanks to this book, I know that he invented the first piano. Rusch offers a lot in this picture book biography. Not only does she tell the story of his life, but at the end she includes three pages of notes as to how she researched it. She had to deduce a lot based on very little! She also lists the characteristics of Cristofori's pianos and how today's pianos I've loved pianist David Lanz's beautiful "Cristofori's Dream" since I first heard it years ago, but never knew who Cristofori was. Now, thanks to this book, I know that he invented the first piano. Rusch offers a lot in this picture book biography. Not only does she tell the story of his life, but at the end she includes three pages of notes as to how she researched it. She had to deduce a lot based on very little! She also lists the characteristics of Cristofori's pianos and how today's pianos are different. Best of all, she includes information on the three surviving Cristofori pianos (only one of which is still playable), and links to web sites (mostly YouTube) where you can hear what clavichord, harpsichord, and original, restored, and replica Cristofori pianos sound like, plus a list of classical and modern piano music demonstrating the range of what the instrument can do, all of which can be heard from links on her web page. I had a ball listening to it! I hope young readers won't skip over all this wonderful extra material at the end of the book. What I really want to know about Cristofori, however, wasn't answered in any of those notes: did he really have a cat? There's a large orange tabby in almost every picture of him at home (and a gray one after he dies). Is this just illustrator Priceman's fancy or did he love cats? Maybe I'll never know. In any case, I enthusiastically recommend this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jillian Heise

    I appreciate the message, design and depth of detail in this book, though I'm not sure how kids would respond, and I think it's too lengthy for a read aloud. Appreciate the back matter, especially the author's detailing of how she used primary and secondary source materials for the information on each spread in the whole book. Good mentor for research. I also liked the musical deduction terms used to evoke mood on each spread. I appreciate the message, design and depth of detail in this book, though I'm not sure how kids would respond, and I think it's too lengthy for a read aloud. Appreciate the back matter, especially the author's detailing of how she used primary and secondary source materials for the information on each spread in the whole book. Good mentor for research. I also liked the musical deduction terms used to evoke mood on each spread.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    One of my earliest memories is that of having a piano in our house. My sister's short-lived piano lessons meant that it sat unplayed for many years. But I was fascinated with this unusual piece of furniture in our living room that made noise when I plunked my fingers down on it. It wasn't until I was nine years old that I finally began taking piano lessons, but I can remember as early as three or four begging my parents to learn how to play it. So it is no surprise that this book both spoke to me One of my earliest memories is that of having a piano in our house. My sister's short-lived piano lessons meant that it sat unplayed for many years. But I was fascinated with this unusual piece of furniture in our living room that made noise when I plunked my fingers down on it. It wasn't until I was nine years old that I finally began taking piano lessons, but I can remember as early as three or four begging my parents to learn how to play it. So it is no surprise that this book both spoke to me and fascinated me. As someone who actually spent time during a trip to Vienna touring a piano workshop, it's safe to say that I am the perfect audience for this book. In fact, I couldn't even finish this book before I had to stop in the middle because I immediately felt compelled to go and play my own piano. Not only does The Music of Life tell the story of how the first pianoforte (later shortened to piano) was created, but it also has a lot of great backmatter that includes links that will take you to sound clips of the original Cristofori pianos, which sound much different than they do today. I highly recommend this book for the budding pianist or musician in your life... or just someone who likes to know how things work. Read my entire review on my blog.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    Very well done history of Cristofori, inventor of the piano, with lots of vibrant pictures in bold oranges, pinks and yellows. His story can be read straight through, but then read again for the volume markings and direct quotes from primary sources. The end includes a timeline, a list of the 3 surviving Cristofori pianofortes, differences between them and modern pianos, a list of a wide variety of piano music from Classical to Modern, and a section on how the author reconstructed Cristofori's l Very well done history of Cristofori, inventor of the piano, with lots of vibrant pictures in bold oranges, pinks and yellows. His story can be read straight through, but then read again for the volume markings and direct quotes from primary sources. The end includes a timeline, a list of the 3 surviving Cristofori pianofortes, differences between them and modern pianos, a list of a wide variety of piano music from Classical to Modern, and a section on how the author reconstructed Cristofori's life from her sources. I learned a lot, and I have quite a history with music!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Stunning use of primary source research with quotes from the research added enjoyed the way musical directions made the headings for pages and sections, really solid and well thought out information and the illustrations are fun too.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    This is a very interesting book about the inventor of the piano. Loved at the top of the page when the author would put forte, piano, crescendo and it's meaning. For a non-piano player I learned a lot!....krb 8/2/17 This is a very interesting book about the inventor of the piano. Loved at the top of the page when the author would put forte, piano, crescendo and it's meaning. For a non-piano player I learned a lot!....krb 8/2/17

  8. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Powell

    Beautifully illustrated and student-friendly biography of the creator of the pianoforte, now known simply as the piano.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kara Garcia

    This book is about Bartolomeo Cristofori and how he invented the piano. He began as a clavichord and harpsichord maker and restorer in Italy, but soon the Prince of Tuscany, Ferdinando de Medici, hired him to restore and create musical instruments for him and his court. Cristofori moved to Florence, and while there, began developing a new instrument. The clavichord was always quiet and difficult to hear, while the harpsichord always played loud. There was no way to control the volume of each no This book is about Bartolomeo Cristofori and how he invented the piano. He began as a clavichord and harpsichord maker and restorer in Italy, but soon the Prince of Tuscany, Ferdinando de Medici, hired him to restore and create musical instruments for him and his court. Cristofori moved to Florence, and while there, began developing a new instrument. The clavichord was always quiet and difficult to hear, while the harpsichord always played loud. There was no way to control the volume of each note or key, so Cristofori’s dream was to create an instrument that could play both quiet and loud to show different emotions, like the human voice. He worked with many different materials and made many different models to test his ideas before he developed the piano, and then continued to try to make his invention better. The fiction twin text that I paired with this was The Piano by Marika Maijala and Juha Virta. This book follows a girl named Filippa. In the middle of the night, a piano falls out of a truck and lands in her front yard. Some of her friends (Andre the Donkey and Snoozy the Cat) both take the piano and use it for non-musical things, while Filippa gets frustrated that she still hasn’t been allowed to play with it. Meanwhile, the musician who owns the piano goes looking for it because he can’t play in his band without it, and instead finds Filippa playing a harmonica. He tells her about his lost piano, and Filippa thinks she knows where it might be. Then they all get together – Filippa, her friends, and the band – and play music together. The connection between these two texts is music and piano. Sometimes, I think students don’t always have the appreciation for music that they do for some other subjects. They love to listen to music, but sometimes learning to play music takes a lot longer. I also think that many students don’t ever think about how musical instruments came to be, or how they were developed. I took piano lessons for 9 years and never once thought about how a piano was invented! I think looking into the history of the piano and connecting it with a fun story about a piano and playing music would encourage students’ interest. The interactive strategy that I would use to go with these texts would be a web or concept web. There’s quite a bit from both texts that you could use to discuss about music and sound, as well as how pianos are made and how they work. For example, students could put the word “piano” in the middle of the web, and then as they read, they could fill in words phrases that describe how a piano works or sounds from both books. They could also discuss how knowing how the piano works and was made from The Music of Life helps them understand some of what happens in the The Piano, and vice versa. The content area crossover could be music, history, or science. The music crossover is pretty obvious – both books talk about pianos and music, and so they could connect to a music or music appreciation lesson. The Music of Life specifically talks about history and the invention or creation of the piano, and puts it into context in Italian history, with historical figures that contributed to its creation. This book also has a sort of timeline – on many pages, there is a year and connected quote from the actual time that the piano invention took place. The final content area crossover that would be possible would be in science. These books could be a way to introduce music and sound or sound waves. In the book The Piano, there’s even a part where the conductor of the band’s sock is in the piano and prevents it from playing, so that could be another connection to talking about how sound and sound waves work, as well as how they can be stopped or dampened. Maijala, M. & Virta, J. (2015). The piano. Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith. Rusch, E. (2017). The music of life: Bartolomeo Cristofori and the invention of the piano. New York, NY: Atheneum Books for Young Readers.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laura Giessler

    This biography makes clear that the motivation behind inventing the "pianoforte," now commonly called the piano, was to find an instrument that could play a range of sounds, from very soft to very loud. Previous instruments like the harpsichord (always loud) and the clavichord (always soft) were limited in the sounds they could produce, and thus, limited musicians and composers in what they were able to express. I loved reading about how this new instrument "lights [Hayden's] imagination on fire This biography makes clear that the motivation behind inventing the "pianoforte," now commonly called the piano, was to find an instrument that could play a range of sounds, from very soft to very loud. Previous instruments like the harpsichord (always loud) and the clavichord (always soft) were limited in the sounds they could produce, and thus, limited musicians and composers in what they were able to express. I loved reading about how this new instrument "lights [Hayden's] imagination on fire", how Mozart dazzled an audience with the new expressive possibilities of this instrument, changing the course of keyboard music forever, how Cristofori's invention "becomes a powerful tool in the hands of brilliant composers everywhere." Very well-researched with notes at the end on surviving Cristofori pianos, how to listen to a pianoforte and a clavichord online, how the author used primary sources to write the book, and suggestions for piano music to listen to that capture various emotions. I want to work my way through this suggested listening list!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael Fitzgerald

    Did not really like the book - not a fan of the illustration style, and the story is told in a perpetual present tense. The back matter (11 pp!) was quite good, with bibliography and footnotes! This book perpetuates the myth/misconception that harpsichords can only play loud. At the very least, changing registration (how many/which strings) was possible on larger instruments, but there has also been research into how subtleties of touch can produce perceivable differences. Not sure why the term f Did not really like the book - not a fan of the illustration style, and the story is told in a perpetual present tense. The back matter (11 pp!) was quite good, with bibliography and footnotes! This book perpetuates the myth/misconception that harpsichords can only play loud. At the very least, changing registration (how many/which strings) was possible on larger instruments, but there has also been research into how subtleties of touch can produce perceivable differences. Not sure why the term fortepiano was not used (or at least mentioned), but maybe this would have required too much explanation. The suggested listening rubbed me the wrong way, with flavor-of-the-month pop artists that will soon be obscure placed side by side with others who have stood the test of time.

  12. 4 out of 5

    N

    Another amazing children's biography. This one of the inventor of the piano. It includes music terms and quotes that show the research that went into it. It has beautiful, fun illustrations. It shows the hard work and many revisions his ideas went through. Another awesome Genius Hour, STEM, STEAM, and inventing book. Another amazing children's biography. This one of the inventor of the piano. It includes music terms and quotes that show the research that went into it. It has beautiful, fun illustrations. It shows the hard work and many revisions his ideas went through. Another awesome Genius Hour, STEM, STEAM, and inventing book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Mcavoy

    I wish this had a stronger beginning, but once it gets going the information on the creation of the piano is fascinating.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    Wonderfully lively history of Cristofori and his invention of the piano. I especially enjoyed the use of musical terms and the energetic and colorful illustrations. The back matter is superb - especially the extensive section on the use of primary and secondary sources to reconstruct Chrisofori's life. Fascinating stuff! Wonderfully lively history of Cristofori and his invention of the piano. I especially enjoyed the use of musical terms and the energetic and colorful illustrations. The back matter is superb - especially the extensive section on the use of primary and secondary sources to reconstruct Chrisofori's life. Fascinating stuff!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tara Choate

    Note: I am an adult. I was waiting for something and saw this book. The cover intrigued me so I read it. I really liked it. A great story with nice artwork, and the more "adult" essays at the end were interesting too. My only criticism is that I wasn't enough of a music buff to understand the sounds a harpsicord or chavicord made. Also, I would have like a more exact drawing of the hammer because I had trouble understanding that part. If I had a child who like to play music, I would BUY this book f Note: I am an adult. I was waiting for something and saw this book. The cover intrigued me so I read it. I really liked it. A great story with nice artwork, and the more "adult" essays at the end were interesting too. My only criticism is that I wasn't enough of a music buff to understand the sounds a harpsicord or chavicord made. Also, I would have like a more exact drawing of the hammer because I had trouble understanding that part. If I had a child who like to play music, I would BUY this book for them.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    A picture book biography of Bartholomew Cristofori, inventor of the piano. Much to get from this book: throughout are bolder musical terms such as FORTE (loud) and MORENDO (dying away), the persistence of Cristofori in figuring out how to transform the engineering of the harpsichord and clavichord to make an instrument capable of playing both loudly and softly. Author includes a timeline of Cristofori's life, links to listen to one of Cristofori's existing pianofortes, and information about toda A picture book biography of Bartholomew Cristofori, inventor of the piano. Much to get from this book: throughout are bolder musical terms such as FORTE (loud) and MORENDO (dying away), the persistence of Cristofori in figuring out how to transform the engineering of the harpsichord and clavichord to make an instrument capable of playing both loudly and softly. Author includes a timeline of Cristofori's life, links to listen to one of Cristofori's existing pianofortes, and information about today's pianos. Also, VERY interesting, author includes notes on how she reconstructed Cristofori's life from primary and secondary sources. Rates 5 stars because of both the story and the notes in the back.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    Pros: Exuberant artwork, meticulous research, vibrant language, use of dynamics terminology to describe the action. Cons: I thought the beginning was starting after he had already done his inventing. I think that for kids who have never heard of a clavichord (and inattentive adults), it would have been helpful to move the information on pages 14 and 15 to the start. And I'm still not clear on the hammer explanation on p. 25. Pros: Exuberant artwork, meticulous research, vibrant language, use of dynamics terminology to describe the action. Cons: I thought the beginning was starting after he had already done his inventing. I think that for kids who have never heard of a clavichord (and inattentive adults), it would have been helpful to move the information on pages 14 and 15 to the start. And I'm still not clear on the hammer explanation on p. 25.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    A longer nonfiction picture book about the invention of the piano. I like that the text also addresses how the inventor improved his instrument. Recommended for 4th and 5th grade. I would only purchase this for a collection with students having strong interest in the piano or musical instruments in general.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    Bartolomeo Cristofori wants to be able to play both piano and forte on one instrument, so he invents his own. The pianoforte is built and improved through years of experimentation by Cristofori, and goes on to capture the world. Not a favorite of mine, but music lovers and piano players would appreciate the text.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This is a visually exciting book to read about the making/ history of the piano. It talks about Bartolomeo Cristofori, who invented it. Throughout the book there is different ways, sounds, the piano makes, their definition and them used in a sentence.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Loved this book! It is the story of how Bartolomeo Cristofori created the piano and how this innovative instrument can be both loud and soft. I loved the notes at the end- especially the list of piano music that included Chopin and Coldplay, Elton John and Brahms.

  22. 5 out of 5

    MaryLibrarianOH

    A look at the inventor of the modern piano. Great mix of fact and illustration to share music history. Lots of additional information in the back matter.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    The story itself is cool and there's lots of creativity put into this, but it was pretty dense to share with kids. Lots and lots of text! But visually very cool! The story itself is cool and there's lots of creativity put into this, but it was pretty dense to share with kids. Lots and lots of text! But visually very cool!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    Read for Librarian Book Group Here's a story of how the piano came to be. It's full of interesting details and those slightly messy, brightly colored illustrations that I enjoy. Read for Librarian Book Group Here's a story of how the piano came to be. It's full of interesting details and those slightly messy, brightly colored illustrations that I enjoy.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    Rusch, Elizabeth The Music of Life: Bartolomeo Cristofori and the Invention of the Piano Illustrated by Marjorie Priceman PICTURE BOOK Atheneum Books, 2017. $17.99 Content: G. Cristofori is a talented instrument maker. Prince Ferdinando of Medici hires Cristofori and pays him well to provide instruments for his Italian court. Cristofori wanted to make an instrument that the musician could control the volume of the notes being played. The harpsichord was too loud and the clavichord was too soft, Rusch, Elizabeth The Music of Life: Bartolomeo Cristofori and the Invention of the Piano Illustrated by Marjorie Priceman PICTURE BOOK Atheneum Books, 2017. $17.99 Content: G. Cristofori is a talented instrument maker. Prince Ferdinando of Medici hires Cristofori and pays him well to provide instruments for his Italian court. Cristofori wanted to make an instrument that the musician could control the volume of the notes being played. The harpsichord was too loud and the clavichord was too soft, so he invented the pianoforte. The pianoforte is the instrument many famous classical musicians used to write their music. This book is an interesting and in depth look at how the piano was invented. There isn’t a lot about Cristofori as a person, but the story is more about his invention and the way it impacted the world. The illustrations are bright and well done and on most of the pages there are different terms for the sounds: crescendo, fortissimo, etc. Although this book is very well done, I’m not sure there is a big audience for this topic, except maybe in music class. EL (K-3),EL, MS – OPTIONAL. Reviewer, C. Peterson. https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2017...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lois

    Like another reviewer, I love pianist David Lanz's beautiful "Christofori's Dream," and I wondered who Crhistofori was. Thanks to Elizabeth Rush, I now know from reading her forty-eight page biography of the pianoforte inventor, Bartolomeo Cristofori, who tunes and restores instruments in Italy in 1709. Wonderful illustrations by illustrator Marjorie Priceman. The author adds above the text a layer of musical words and their meanings across the tops of the spreads. Below the text, she placed dat Like another reviewer, I love pianist David Lanz's beautiful "Christofori's Dream," and I wondered who Crhistofori was. Thanks to Elizabeth Rush, I now know from reading her forty-eight page biography of the pianoforte inventor, Bartolomeo Cristofori, who tunes and restores instruments in Italy in 1709. Wonderful illustrations by illustrator Marjorie Priceman. The author adds above the text a layer of musical words and their meanings across the tops of the spreads. Below the text, she placed dated quotes relating to the text. The excellent writing and back matter (a Timeline of Cristofori and the piano, the three surviving Cristofori pianos, a comparison between the pianoforte and today's piano, classical and modern musical recommendations, the use of primary and secondary sources, a bibliography, quotation sources, and acknowledgments) reveals the author's extensive research. The publisher's recommended age range of the reader is four to eight, but an older child interested in music would also enjoy this book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Luisa Knight

    What a wonderful book! This is definitely one you'll want to pull out for a brief history lesson or simply for the inquiring child, asking you how the piano was invented. Colorful illustrations, musical definitions and a steady-flowing story line make this an enjoyable read! Ages: 4 - 8 **Like my reviews? I also have hundreds of detailed reports that I offer too. These reports give a complete break-down of everything in the book, so you'll know just how clean it is or isn't. I also have Clean Guid What a wonderful book! This is definitely one you'll want to pull out for a brief history lesson or simply for the inquiring child, asking you how the piano was invented. Colorful illustrations, musical definitions and a steady-flowing story line make this an enjoyable read! Ages: 4 - 8 **Like my reviews? I also have hundreds of detailed reports that I offer too. These reports give a complete break-down of everything in the book, so you'll know just how clean it is or isn't. I also have Clean Guides (downloadable PDFs) which enable you to clean up your book before reading it! Visit my website: The Book Radar.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Madison Roark

    The book is about Bartolomeo Cristofori in which it teaches you how the piano was invented, the vocabulary that goes along with the instrument, a timeline of Cristofori’s life, the three surviving Cristofori pianos, and what todays pianos look like. This is a good book to read to the kids before they go to music or in a music class because most classrooms have a piano in them and the kids can learn the history of the piano as well as the vocabulary that they might hear when talking about the pia The book is about Bartolomeo Cristofori in which it teaches you how the piano was invented, the vocabulary that goes along with the instrument, a timeline of Cristofori’s life, the three surviving Cristofori pianos, and what todays pianos look like. This is a good book to read to the kids before they go to music or in a music class because most classrooms have a piano in them and the kids can learn the history of the piano as well as the vocabulary that they might hear when talking about the piano. An activity that could go along with the book for 1st graders is the students could draw their own piano and in two sentences write why their piano is special.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Marx

    I enjoyed this book and learned a lot about Bartolomeo and his invention of the piano. Prior to reading this book, I did not know who created the piano or who Bartolomeo was. As an early childhood educator, I believe this book would be great in a music class. The children can gain insight on Cristofori's life and his works. I also appreciated the primary sources in the book. I found them to be useful in giving background information. I enjoyed this book and learned a lot about Bartolomeo and his invention of the piano. Prior to reading this book, I did not know who created the piano or who Bartolomeo was. As an early childhood educator, I believe this book would be great in a music class. The children can gain insight on Cristofori's life and his works. I also appreciated the primary sources in the book. I found them to be useful in giving background information.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karen Johnson

    Interesting. Good musical terminology throughout. Solving a problem because there is a need - good theme (prior to piano, couldn't play with dynamics - similar to how some popular singers have but one volume that never changes, and it's usually loud--ugh). Good history. Has a time line of composers. All around good book for young musicians. Interesting. Good musical terminology throughout. Solving a problem because there is a need - good theme (prior to piano, couldn't play with dynamics - similar to how some popular singers have but one volume that never changes, and it's usually loud--ugh). Good history. Has a time line of composers. All around good book for young musicians.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.