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A brave teen recounts her debilitating struggle with obsessive-compulsive disorder—and brings readers through every painful step as she finds her way to the other side—in this powerful and inspiring memoir. Until sophomore year of high school, fifteen-year-old Allison Britz lived a comfortable life in an idyllic town. She was a dedicated student with tons of extracurricular A brave teen recounts her debilitating struggle with obsessive-compulsive disorder—and brings readers through every painful step as she finds her way to the other side—in this powerful and inspiring memoir. Until sophomore year of high school, fifteen-year-old Allison Britz lived a comfortable life in an idyllic town. She was a dedicated student with tons of extracurricular activities, friends, and loving parents at home. But after awakening from a vivid nightmare in which she was diagnosed with brain cancer, she was convinced the dream had been a warning. Allison believed that she must do something to stop the cancer in her dream from becoming a reality. It started with avoiding sidewalk cracks and quickly grew to counting steps as loudly as possible. Over the following weeks, her brain listed more dangers and fixes. She had to avoid hair dryers, calculators, cell phones, computers, anything green, bananas, oatmeal, and most of her own clothing. Unable to act “normal,” the once-popular Allison became an outcast. Her parents questioned her behavior, leading to explosive fights. When notebook paper, pencils, and most schoolbooks were declared dangerous to her health, her GPA imploded, along with her plans for the future. Finally, she allowed herself to ask for help and was diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder. This brave memoir tracks Allison’s descent and ultimately hopeful climb out of the depths.


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A brave teen recounts her debilitating struggle with obsessive-compulsive disorder—and brings readers through every painful step as she finds her way to the other side—in this powerful and inspiring memoir. Until sophomore year of high school, fifteen-year-old Allison Britz lived a comfortable life in an idyllic town. She was a dedicated student with tons of extracurricular A brave teen recounts her debilitating struggle with obsessive-compulsive disorder—and brings readers through every painful step as she finds her way to the other side—in this powerful and inspiring memoir. Until sophomore year of high school, fifteen-year-old Allison Britz lived a comfortable life in an idyllic town. She was a dedicated student with tons of extracurricular activities, friends, and loving parents at home. But after awakening from a vivid nightmare in which she was diagnosed with brain cancer, she was convinced the dream had been a warning. Allison believed that she must do something to stop the cancer in her dream from becoming a reality. It started with avoiding sidewalk cracks and quickly grew to counting steps as loudly as possible. Over the following weeks, her brain listed more dangers and fixes. She had to avoid hair dryers, calculators, cell phones, computers, anything green, bananas, oatmeal, and most of her own clothing. Unable to act “normal,” the once-popular Allison became an outcast. Her parents questioned her behavior, leading to explosive fights. When notebook paper, pencils, and most schoolbooks were declared dangerous to her health, her GPA imploded, along with her plans for the future. Finally, she allowed herself to ask for help and was diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder. This brave memoir tracks Allison’s descent and ultimately hopeful climb out of the depths.

30 review for Obsessed: A Memoir of My Life with OCD

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gwendolyn Kensinger

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. As the title suggests this is the author’s memoir of her life with OCD, specifically during her sophomore year of high school. It does not, despite the title read like a typical, often dry memoir. It’s eye opening and quite the page turner. Before I dive into how much I enjoyed Obsessed: a memoir of my life with OCD by Allison Britz I should warn you that if you will be triggered in anyway by OCD, persistent, unwanted thoughts or urges, incessant or repetitive actions, or food restriction tread As the title suggests this is the author’s memoir of her life with OCD, specifically during her sophomore year of high school. It does not, despite the title read like a typical, often dry memoir. It’s eye opening and quite the page turner. Before I dive into how much I enjoyed Obsessed: a memoir of my life with OCD by Allison Britz I should warn you that if you will be triggered in anyway by OCD, persistent, unwanted thoughts or urges, incessant or repetitive actions, or food restriction tread lightly. As promised I was completely changed after reading about Allison’s inspiring journey in this nonfiction debut memoir. She brings us through every painful step as she finds her way to the other side of her debilitating struggle with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Obsessed begins with a prologue that allows the readers a glimpse into what they should soon expect. Chapter 1 however thrusts the reader for a very short time into the before. Before Allison had dream of having terminal brain cancer (page 15). Allison is navigating her way through the typical teenage world of high school, boys, football games, homework, and prom. Then one night she vividly dreams that she has brain cancer. When she wakes up to her alarm playing “it’s all in your head” she is sure that the dream was a message/warning that she has brain cancer. After the dream she starts avoiding cracks. If she steps on a crack, she can cancel that out by reaching a destination under a certain number of steps. She believes if she avoids the things that cause cancer she can cure herself. She finds new ways to barter with herself including food restrictions. She continually barters and trades one thing for another including standing on one leg for hours on end, and holding her breathe. She continues to believe there is a monster/savior sending her secrets messages to avoid objects. These objects included: clothes, furniture, pencils, notebook paper, calculators, anything the color green, her toothbrush, her hair dryer, etc. As she begins her driver’s ed class her instructor, a very religious man changes the way she sees the debilitating messages. She no longer believes they are from a monster. She begins to believe God is using her as a vessel and they are direct messages from God to her. Now, God will be mad if she doesn’t listen to these messages. Obviously, her behaviors had devastating consequences on her social, academic, and home life. Once she had friends, had a good relationship with her parents. Now she has pushed all her friends away and is shouting at her parents to leave her alone. She continues to believe that God is telling her the secret codes to cancer so she follows these thoughts deeper and deeper into the rabbit hole. Midway through Obsessed, somehow Allison is able to reach out to her mom. After a visit to her primary care physician where her mom reveals she knew something was wrong, the doctor refers Allison to a psychiatrist. After just a couple visits and secretly reading some pamphlets Allison believes she has OCD. After terrifyingly talking to the psychiatrist about it, the psychiatrist agrees. Since Allison does not want to take any medication she is again referred to another doctor who specializes in childhood and adolescent OCD and anxiety. Initially the OCD makes it difficult for her to want help, but deep down she does want it. She begins ERP (exposure response prevention) and slowly she begins making improvements. I feel extremely sad for Allison because it seemed like the people around her knew something was wrong, but did nothing about it. I do not have OCD nor am a friend nor a parent of someone that has OCD but I would like to think it is my job to not have the answers but to realize there is a problem and to seek out someone with the answers. Allison went from 115 lbs. to 95 lbs. Everyone noticed she was skin and bones. They saw her tiptoeing, heard her counting, avoiding things. Why did no one do anything? She dropped out of her extracurricular activities, her grades started suffering and no one said anything. Even after she is in therapy and slowing regaining the ability to use things previously deemed cancerous one of her teachers nastily remarks about her weight loss. This brought me to tears. As a teacher myself I couldn’t imagine seeing Allison at such a low point and saying such a thing. Obsessed widened the definition of OCD for me and I highly recommend it. I will be seeking #ownvoices reviews come September when this memoir releases. I WANT TO SEND OUT A HUGE THANK YOU TO SIMON & SCHUSTER CHILDREN’S PUBLISHING DIVISION FOR SENDING ME AN EARLY COPY OF THIS BOOK. WITHOUT YOU I WOULD NOT BE ABLE TO SHOUT FROM THE ROOFTOPS HOW AMAZING THIS #OWNVOICES DEBUT IS. ALSO TO ALLISON BRITZ, THE INCREDIBLE AUTHOR, YOU ARE BRAVE BEYOND WORDS. THANK YOU FOR SHARING YOUR STORY.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I thought this book was well written. It is a little slow in my opinion. The majority of the book is Allison having new items that are fears and are off limits. I wanted to see more progress being made faster, but I guess thats the frustrating part about it (that you can’t fix it immediately). There are definitely points in this book that I wanted to jump into her mind and strangle her thoughts and fears she was having that were keeping her from having a normal life. I did think that it was insp I thought this book was well written. It is a little slow in my opinion. The majority of the book is Allison having new items that are fears and are off limits. I wanted to see more progress being made faster, but I guess thats the frustrating part about it (that you can’t fix it immediately). There are definitely points in this book that I wanted to jump into her mind and strangle her thoughts and fears she was having that were keeping her from having a normal life. I did think that it was inspirational and that I would overall recommend the book to someone who is interested in how the mind works with these disorders. This may be triggering for someone with OCD because she talks so in depth, but I couldn’t be sure on that. Give it a try if you like these sort of topics because you may find it inspirational just as I did!

  3. 5 out of 5

    N

    Obsessed is a wonderful memoir of the author, Allison Britz’ life. Allison deals with extreme OCD after a nightmare. She starts avoiding cracks, and counting her steps. Allison struggles as she keeps it a secret, but she can’t keep it to herself for long. A lovely, sad story that completely got me on the edge of my seat.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    a pretty interesting and insightful read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Scottsdale Public Library

    Obsessed: A Memoir of My Life with OCD comes across as a traditional young adult fiction novel about a 15-year-old girl’s journey to find a mental health diagnosis and learn to live with that diagnosis, but Allison’s story is made all the more impactful because it is true. Allison, a sophomore in high school who focuses on her academic achievements and living up to her social expectations, lives what some might consider an ideal life. That all changes when a vivid nightmare where she develops an Obsessed: A Memoir of My Life with OCD comes across as a traditional young adult fiction novel about a 15-year-old girl’s journey to find a mental health diagnosis and learn to live with that diagnosis, but Allison’s story is made all the more impactful because it is true. Allison, a sophomore in high school who focuses on her academic achievements and living up to her social expectations, lives what some might consider an ideal life. That all changes when a vivid nightmare where she develops and dies from brain cancer triggers the abrupt onset of her OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder). Allison’s obsessions and compulsions escalate quickly with devastating consequences to her academics, relationships, and well-being. Not only is Allison convinced that her delusions are true, but others make excuses for the peculiar changes in her behavior resulting in postponed diagnosis and treatment. Allison’s fascinating memoir goes a long way in educating readers about mental health, OCD, and available mental health resources. – Christina B.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Oh my goodness! I sat down with this book, intending to read a few chapters before bed and ended up reading the entire book in one sitting. I found myself completely absorbed in the world of Allison Britz - after all, it is a memoir about her life with OCD. In reading other reviews or comments, so many people were irritated by the pacing of the book, or how it wasn't 'what they thought it would be', but I found it to be a wonderful book for those exact reasons. (view spoiler)[ As someone with no form Oh my goodness! I sat down with this book, intending to read a few chapters before bed and ended up reading the entire book in one sitting. I found myself completely absorbed in the world of Allison Britz - after all, it is a memoir about her life with OCD. In reading other reviews or comments, so many people were irritated by the pacing of the book, or how it wasn't 'what they thought it would be', but I found it to be a wonderful book for those exact reasons. (view spoiler)[ As someone with no formal diagnosed mental health problems, but dealing with anxiety and OCPD tendencies, I work daily to see my world through the lens of reality rather than through the skewed perspective my brain likes to push on me sometimes. After a year and a half of therapy, I am able to do this on my own, with strategies and certain routines. So I fully appreciated and empathized with Allison on how hard it was to fight on her own, and how hard it was to get back to a 'normal' state once she was receiving help. I found the writing to be engaging and the pacing actually kept my attention because I kept seeing myself in her in small ways. I definitely understood the 'buzzing' in the head when something wasn't right, as I also have this symptom when my anxiety is trying to rear its ugly head. (hide spoiler)] Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed the book. I do think it is worth a read for anyone who works with young adults and those with OCD or other mental health issues, as it is a unique and vivid depiction of one person's fight to learn how to do life with a new 'normal'.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sam McNeely

    This book was very, very good. It portrays the very real life of people who suffer from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and how fast the symptoms can come on. It was well written and really makes the reader consider the effects that mental health issues can have on a person. At different points in the book, I would stop and think 'this is ridiculous!', not because it was poorly written, but some of the different things in the mind of the main character, Allison, were so far out there, it makes yo This book was very, very good. It portrays the very real life of people who suffer from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and how fast the symptoms can come on. It was well written and really makes the reader consider the effects that mental health issues can have on a person. At different points in the book, I would stop and think 'this is ridiculous!', not because it was poorly written, but some of the different things in the mind of the main character, Allison, were so far out there, it makes you really think about OCD and the struggles those who have it go through on a daily basis. This is the author's first book and I would recommend it to anyone who likes a good read. I hope the author decides to write a sequel, I would definitely read it!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Liz Herrington

    This book definitely taught me about OCD. It was sort of a disturbing read because it emphasizes what a stronghold mental illness can have on your life and the lives of people around you. I did find it repetitive and frustrating at times. Like the author spent too much time setting the stage when I was ready to move on to the solution.

  9. 5 out of 5

    ConfusedKyra

    I thought the journey of this book was absolutely AMAZING. I loved the way that the character was struggling and was upset about her OCD and was having trouble being happy. By the end, she was still trying to find a way to cope with it, but she was so much more positive. Super inspiring.

  10. 4 out of 5

    fyn

    * I am reviewing this as someone who has been professionally diagnosed with OCD * This was a tough one to rate. I feel the author did such a good job at showing how all consuming living with OCD can be, the constant battle and knowing so many of the thoughts and actions make no sense at all but still having to go through them anyway. I especially loved the way it was so open about things like going to therapy and wasn’t all about getting the character heavily medicated and how that’ll solve every * I am reviewing this as someone who has been professionally diagnosed with OCD * This was a tough one to rate. I feel the author did such a good job at showing how all consuming living with OCD can be, the constant battle and knowing so many of the thoughts and actions make no sense at all but still having to go through them anyway. I especially loved the way it was so open about things like going to therapy and wasn’t all about getting the character heavily medicated and how that’ll solve everything. And the way it discussed progress and not being able to feel proud about it because there are still so many obstacles to face. This book also didn’t make everything into a cookie cutter perfect ending where everyone is cured and happy, because that’s not realistic when it comes to mental illnesses. I felt that representation was super honest and real. But on the other hand I really really didn’t like the writing, it just wasn’t all that good. Also didn’t like anything secondary to the OCD rep, like none of the characters or other things going on outside of that. Also this is just my personal opinion, but when the whole religious aspect came into play I was so annoyed, but I understand that was a huge part of the author/main character’s experience with OCD. Anyway I’m giving this a three stars for now.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Crizzle

    I would put a warning label on this book for others who deal with OCD; I could see it triggering “incessant, unwanted thoughts”. Conversely, it may help some objectively see how illogical these thought patterns are. I checked this out from the library because it was listed in my 5th grade daughter’s Scholastic book order, but I told her not to read it (at least not yet). I think it would scare her and maybe even cause some OCD thoughts in my girl who already leans on the anxious side. I began thi I would put a warning label on this book for others who deal with OCD; I could see it triggering “incessant, unwanted thoughts”. Conversely, it may help some objectively see how illogical these thought patterns are. I checked this out from the library because it was listed in my 5th grade daughter’s Scholastic book order, but I told her not to read it (at least not yet). I think it would scare her and maybe even cause some OCD thoughts in my girl who already leans on the anxious side. I began this book at bedtime and could not put it down... I read til 2am! The first half of the book is nightmarish. After I finished, I went to Allison’s tumblr (listed on the back cover) and I see that even married with a son, she still fights these thoughts. She never clarified in her Note to Readers, but I really hope she did begin taking meds. This is a great read for those who don’t suffer OCD and helps us catch a glimpse into the scary world of one who’s being debilitated by it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Scott

    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... My other half has a touch of OCD. Until I read this memoir and got punched right in the heart I didn’t realise how mild her obsessions are. They’re nothing compared to the author’s. I feel I understand my partner a bit better now. This is not an easy book to read. I was in tears a lot while reading the first half before the author’s diagnosis and her obsessions and anxiety’s becoming increasingly worse. I can only imagine the hell she must have gone throug https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... My other half has a touch of OCD. Until I read this memoir and got punched right in the heart I didn’t realise how mild her obsessions are. They’re nothing compared to the author’s. I feel I understand my partner a bit better now. This is not an easy book to read. I was in tears a lot while reading the first half before the author’s diagnosis and her obsessions and anxiety’s becoming increasingly worse. I can only imagine the hell she must have gone through at school. I remember school and it was shit at times. It must have been hell trying to mask her illness. The memoir gets even better when the author is diagnosed. She gradually gets her OCD under control and picks up the shreds her illness made of her life. I cried like a big baby several times.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kasey.9220

    I loved this book! I liked how the author gave us insight on her life prior to her experience with OCD and her whole experience through it. Knowing there is an author that put her own story out there about a very difficult, life changing, time in her life gives readers, and possibly future writers the courage to put their own stories out there. This book keeps you very on your toes, and makes you want to know what happens next, so you just keep reading to find out. I loved when she finally got u I loved this book! I liked how the author gave us insight on her life prior to her experience with OCD and her whole experience through it. Knowing there is an author that put her own story out there about a very difficult, life changing, time in her life gives readers, and possibly future writers the courage to put their own stories out there. This book keeps you very on your toes, and makes you want to know what happens next, so you just keep reading to find out. I loved when she finally got up her courage to speak up and get help. I recommend this book a 10/10.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Annie Li

    this book overall was pretty good as i got to learn more about people who have to deal with OCD and other mental illness. What I didn't like was how boring it was during the beginning. It took awhile for it to reach the climax, but other than that I think this book should be more noticed by people so they could understand people with mental illnesses felt.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Elijah Howell

    Very moving and in depth.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Safara

    I read this in English. Thanks to rivetedlit.com for May free books! Allison Britz was a straight A-student in Samuel High School. She was also a cross-country runner. The symptoms started when she felt cracks causes cancer. From that point, everything was fall behind. She couldn't eat as a trade from stepping in cracks, she couldn't do her homework because pencil caused cancer, and she even couldn't brush because comb caused cancer. I always thought OCD related to obsessive about something, but r I read this in English. Thanks to rivetedlit.com for May free books! Allison Britz was a straight A-student in Samuel High School. She was also a cross-country runner. The symptoms started when she felt cracks causes cancer. From that point, everything was fall behind. She couldn't eat as a trade from stepping in cracks, she couldn't do her homework because pencil caused cancer, and she even couldn't brush because comb caused cancer. I always thought OCD related to obsessive about something, but related to neatness. It turns out, OCD has many spectrums. In Allison's case, she felt that obsession 24/7 before she got the proper treatment. This was definitely not fast-reading phase book. In the first half, the book told us all her feelings, what were the causes and the consequences if she didn't do as her "brain" told her. I think it is an accurate representation for her mental conditions. I got really frustrated because I feel it was not logical for me, I can't help but kept reading it one by one and tried to not skimming it. I literally cried when I read she finally got help. What I like about this book 1. Well-written and easy to understand 2. Covers major aspect for high school student life 3. Normalize about getting help either to physiatrist or psychologist What I don't like about this book 1. The slow-pace in the first 15 chapters Conclusion: This is worth reading before deep dive into the non-fiction book. But if you don't feel at your best condition, you might wanna read it later.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nele

    Read for free through Riveted DNF @35% because 1/ it didn't hold my interest and 2/ IT blocked the website at work (but I wasn't motivated to finish this at home) Don't get me wrong, I think OCD is a very serious condition and people with this disorder do have my sympathy. However, I got really annoyed with the way of thinking. If I would think that every little ache in my body is cancer, I would be in serious trouble. I know that the thought pattern of OCD is illogical, but everything (absolutely Read for free through Riveted DNF @35% because 1/ it didn't hold my interest and 2/ IT blocked the website at work (but I wasn't motivated to finish this at home) Don't get me wrong, I think OCD is a very serious condition and people with this disorder do have my sympathy. However, I got really annoyed with the way of thinking. If I would think that every little ache in my body is cancer, I would be in serious trouble. I know that the thought pattern of OCD is illogical, but everything (absolutely everything!) is a trigger. Like a blue pen... Euhm... That said, I got annoyed even more that she didn't take any action. If you think you might have cancer, or in her case, you're completely convinced, seek help. Take action. If you are in pain, go see a professional. I don't know anybody with OCD. And yes, it's a serious condition. I do have a few tendencies myself. The story is insightful, because we do put TOO much pressure on people, and in this book, on teens who have to perform. I blame our society. Let people live their lives. Let them be lazy once in a while. Let them take a vacation. Let them show their emotions and weaknesses. It's all a part of human life. But no, we have to perform. We have to make money to fill the pockets of others who don't care about us at all! So yeah, I did not enjoy this book that much. But it is a wake-up call to enjoy your life and pay attention to the things and people you love. Instead of wasting away in (school)work.

  18. 5 out of 5

    vanessa

    Honestly a really surprising, educational, and thoughtful read. I have never read a first-hand account about living with OCD, so that's already a plus. Britz, though, is a talented writer; it's very easy to sympathize and understand her daily struggles. This is a memoir that shows you how untreated mental illness progresses: from the first invasive thoughts to how they grow and ravage... as well as how Britz got help. Thanks to Libro FM for the ALC.

  19. 5 out of 5

    April

    4.5 stars I really liked this book. Told in present tense first person, it felt more like a novel than a memoir. Being inside the head of a teen as OCD develops (with non-stereotypical manifestations) really pushed me to develop a lot of empathy for what seemed like behaviors that would she should be able to control. The descent from normalcy to complete disfunction was both gradual and precipitous, making it very compelling and important. Well worth reading for all age groups.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    Thank you to author Allison Britz for sharing her story. This allowed me to get perspective around what life must be like for my son, since he has a hard time articulating his struggles. This book helps clear the misconception that OCD is only about germs and order. A memoir that serves to educate.

  21. 5 out of 5

    MissHancock

    This book. I have no words. Wow. I couldn’t get my nose out of this book!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shemayah

    I have to say, I only really started to enjoy this book when I got to page 200. The content is great, and I learnt a lot about OCD, however the writing for the majority of the book was bland and repetitive, and I ended up starting a new book and reading a few pages (if any) of this one on the side because it couldn't hold my attention. After page 200, we learn more about her recovery and how she mentally dealt with her OCD, and this is when I learnt the most and was interested in the story.

  23. 4 out of 5

    The Book Girl

    I really enjoyed this book. I don't know anyone in my real life that deals with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Which means that Obsessed: A Memoir of My Life with OCD was such a cool read and it was extremely eye-opening. I always associated the disorder with just excessive cleaning and organization. Unfortunately, that is pretty wrong and often not the case. This isn't the case with Allison's experience. While this is a memoir, it is kinda more like a novel, the author Britz is actually writing I really enjoyed this book. I don't know anyone in my real life that deals with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Which means that Obsessed: A Memoir of My Life with OCD was such a cool read and it was extremely eye-opening. I always associated the disorder with just excessive cleaning and organization. Unfortunately, that is pretty wrong and often not the case. This isn't the case with Allison's experience. While this is a memoir, it is kinda more like a novel, the author Britz is actually writing about her experiences with OCD in high school. Her going from a so-called normal straight A student, who is also a cross-country runner. To a girl that can't step on cracks because she believes it will cause cancer to her or someone she loves. She then begins to almost instantly obsessively avoid cracks in the pavement, tile, flooring, or anything her feet touch. In the end, if she steps on a crack then she needs to do something to cancel it out like not eat the next meal or only use a certain number of steps to get somewhere. The self-punishments get more severe as her symptoms progress. As her symptoms get more severe she believes that various objects will cause cancer; the color green, the toothbrush, certain clothing, and so on. Of course, this begins to really cause havoc in her life. The consequences of these behaviors are devastating to her personal, social, home, and academic life. She begins to isolate and really push away people that she loves dearly. What was really hard to watch was that she was doing this because she loved these people, yet she was left alone. I was really happy to see that her parents saw these changes and that Allison herself-sought out help. It was a really powerful part of the story. The only thing I really disliked about this book was the pacing. It was sort of rapid, then slow, then rapid, then fast, then slow, and then fast again. It wasn't a seamless transition from the first half of the book which describes Allison's changing behaviors, to the last half when the family took her in to see if there was help for what she was struggling with. All in All, I have to say that I really enjoyed this novel. It had its downsides but they were far and few. I did get hooked right away. I learned a lot about Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and it was nice to read it from an own voices perspective. I am really glad I picked this book up from the library.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    This book was so frightening to read as I read about how this young girl’s life started to spriral out of control just overnight. Never realized how terrifying OCD could be

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joyce Yattoni

    I am so glad I picked up this book from the Scholastic Book Fair. My limited knowledge of OCD prior to reading this novel could fit in a thimble. I was aware that people who have OCD have an aversion to germs and wash their hands a lot. Or, they worry that they have not turned off appliances. OCD manifests itself in so many ways brought on by acute anxiety. What surprised me was that she was able to hide it from her parents and teachers for so long, especially given the seriousness of the author I am so glad I picked up this book from the Scholastic Book Fair. My limited knowledge of OCD prior to reading this novel could fit in a thimble. I was aware that people who have OCD have an aversion to germs and wash their hands a lot. Or, they worry that they have not turned off appliances. OCD manifests itself in so many ways brought on by acute anxiety. What surprised me was that she was able to hide it from her parents and teachers for so long, especially given the seriousness of the author’s symptoms. I learned that sometimes the “monster” would appear in the brain with a feeling of a lot of bees flying around inside your brain. Another symptom might be to walk on tiptoes to avoid cracks that would cause cancer. Fascinating memoir. I hope I never see these symptoms in students, but if I do I know to seek help for them.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Wells

    Obsession is about Allison and her struggle with OCD. It all started after a nightmare, in which she had brain cancer. This sprouted a fear of sidewalk cracks. Quickly, more and more fears and obsessions became part of her daily life. Allison slowly stopped taking care of herself and pushed people away from her. In the depths of her despair and struggle, she calls for help. It was the first step in her recovery progress. The next step was getting help. She learns how to battle her OCD and how to Obsession is about Allison and her struggle with OCD. It all started after a nightmare, in which she had brain cancer. This sprouted a fear of sidewalk cracks. Quickly, more and more fears and obsessions became part of her daily life. Allison slowly stopped taking care of herself and pushed people away from her. In the depths of her despair and struggle, she calls for help. It was the first step in her recovery progress. The next step was getting help. She learns how to battle her OCD and how to live life as someone who has this mental illness. This book could be used during a unit on memoirs. Have the students read the book first and then write a memoir themselves.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    This was a riveting, eye-opener into a subject I thought I knew a lot about but I really only ever knew superficial information. I liked how the author told her story with brutal honesty but with an excellent voice and great narration. It read like a YA novel. The information was there but it was part of the story, the story was amazing. It was also empowering, this was overall one of the best memoirs I've read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Malia Desta

    The book Obsessed by Allison Britz was one of the best books I've read this year. Its a great book to read if you wanna learn something new about how others may struggle in life, and their differences. Also it's a good way to learn about mental disorders in the real world, and how it really affects people. I give this book a solid 5 stars. if you enjoy books that have to do with mental disorders I 100% think Obsessed is the best choice.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Name

    One aspect of this book that I enjoyed was how the book was written in present tense like a novel. I though the inclusion of so many characters was confusing at times, but it reflected that this book is an autobiography. I felt like the book could have included more about the author's recovery from OCD, since the book seemed a bit unbalanced. Overall, I thought this book was best autobiographies that I've read, but I don't usually read autobiographies.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hailey Woessner

    I loved all the little details in this book. It really opened my eyes to what O.C.D. can be like. I now know that it's not about being neat and a germ freak. This book was very emotional, especially when the mental illness took over Allison's daily life. I love this memoir and how it was written, I just wished that there was more to the ending and more with her movement to living an almost normal life. I was so proud of the author by the end of the book.

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