hits counter The Care and Feeding of an Independent Bookstore: Three Instructive Essays - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Care and Feeding of an Independent Bookstore: Three Instructive Essays

Availability: Ready to download

Published for Independent Bookstore Day 2016, this pamphlet contains The Bookstore Strikes Back, originally published in Atlantic Monthly.


Compare

Published for Independent Bookstore Day 2016, this pamphlet contains The Bookstore Strikes Back, originally published in Atlantic Monthly.

30 review for The Care and Feeding of an Independent Bookstore: Three Instructive Essays

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

    Patchett's preaching to the choir, of course, seeing as I read this book on the train ride between two independent bookstores on Independent Bookstore Day 2016, but delightful and hilarious foibles that put Nashville's Parnassus Books on the map for me to visit someday. Patchett's preaching to the choir, of course, seeing as I read this book on the train ride between two independent bookstores on Independent Bookstore Day 2016, but delightful and hilarious foibles that put Nashville's Parnassus Books on the map for me to visit someday.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Arnett

    Thought about deducting a star for her advocating having bookstores dogs. Bookstore cats, Ann. Dogs are bunk.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Whit

    All this did was feed the fire of my desire to own my own bookstore. And added dogs to the list of mandatory features.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chris Wolak

    I purchased this pamphlet back in 2016 at the Northshire Bookstore in Manchester, VT and read it before bed last night. It’s a beautiful nonfiction bedtime story for adult bookworms that’ll give you sweet dreams. 😉 Update: wrote a blog post about it https://wildmoobooks.com/2018/10/14/t... I purchased this pamphlet back in 2016 at the Northshire Bookstore in Manchester, VT and read it before bed last night. It’s a beautiful nonfiction bedtime story for adult bookworms that’ll give you sweet dreams. 😉 Update: wrote a blog post about it https://wildmoobooks.com/2018/10/14/t...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    A staple-bound pamphlet about how Patchett got involved in creating and rearing an independent bookstore (Parnassus Books in Nashville, TN.) A sweet, heartwarming aside for anyone who loves books and book culture. Also, Patchett reassures us that indie bookstores are not dead, and that they're not even unprofitable. (Possibly this is less easy to ensure if you're not already a nationally-famed and -acclaimed author/owner?) I've never been to Nashville and I'm unlikely to go, but if I do, I know A staple-bound pamphlet about how Patchett got involved in creating and rearing an independent bookstore (Parnassus Books in Nashville, TN.) A sweet, heartwarming aside for anyone who loves books and book culture. Also, Patchett reassures us that indie bookstores are not dead, and that they're not even unprofitable. (Possibly this is less easy to ensure if you're not already a nationally-famed and -acclaimed author/owner?) I've never been to Nashville and I'm unlikely to go, but if I do, I know where I'm going to spend my time and dollars.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Meli

    Makes me miss my bookstore days.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katrina

    I find myself wanting to pace around and argue about this book (more of a pamphlet, really), which may mean it was successful. Ann Patchett is an excellent writer whose fiction I've been meaning to read for years, and I don't think reading these essays has changed my desire to do so. It came close, though, in the initial essay's sheer self-aggrandizement. Ann Patchett considers herself "the spokesperson for independent bookstores," which is a worthy role, and one I applaud. However, she also see I find myself wanting to pace around and argue about this book (more of a pamphlet, really), which may mean it was successful. Ann Patchett is an excellent writer whose fiction I've been meaning to read for years, and I don't think reading these essays has changed my desire to do so. It came close, though, in the initial essay's sheer self-aggrandizement. Ann Patchett considers herself "the spokesperson for independent bookstores," which is a worthy role, and one I applaud. However, she also seems to think she single-handedly saved the independent bookstore industry by promoting the opening of her new Nashville bookstore. Perhaps she did play a key role in bringing independent bookstores back into the public eye. Perhaps I've been utterly spoiled by living in cities where the bookstores have always played an intrinsic role in the community. (Although that's also been a conscious choice on my part: how could I stay for long in a place that didn't share my love of books?) Something about her tone in that initial essay (originally published in The Atlantic Monthly in 2012) rubs me the wrong way, though, and I can't seem to shake it. The second essay, presumably written years later, once the bookstore was firmly established and had become a thriving community center and tourist destination, offers a more generous window into the world of independent bookselling. I'm particularly fond of the employees' dedication to making their dogs part of the experience; there are far too many bookstore cats in the world, and I would travel to this bookstore just to sit on the floor and pet the dogs. That's where I have to hand it to Patchett - she's clearly a shrewd businesswoman who has a powerful ability to sell herself and her products (her books, her store, her friends' novels). It's an admirable trait, and it's possible it grates against me because it's one I lack. The third "essay" is simply a list of 52 of Patchett's favorite books. I'd be more intrigued by this list if it didn't hold three that I absolutely despised reading - that taints my impression of the overall quality - but I'm a sufficiently passionate reader to want to work my way through the rest of the recommendations. That's the beauty of literature; each of us responds to different works and different authors, and we can spend our lives discovering the ones that best fit us. I agree with Patchett on the following: "There are so many things I would have missed were I not in the presence of actual physical books, which is often the reason our customers come in. Instead of knowing what they're going to read next, they come in to see what book demands their attention." This is one of the primary reasons I frequent bookstores. There's something crucial about browsing through the shelves, flipping open the covers, sniffing the pages (I'm glad she noted this as a common action, as it's something I've had bookstore owners frown at me for doing), and stumbling across books that I would've never found online. I realize this is a thoroughly biased response, and I do find it interesting that something so short could ruffle my feathers so much. I think it's a testament to the passion books can inspire, as well as the stores that house them. "There is the very real sense that every independent bookstore belongs to its customers," Patchett writes, and I couldn't agree with a statement more. I purchased this book on Independent Bookstore Day 2016, in one of my favorite bookstores, and proceeded to visit eight more during the course of the day, doing my part to show my appreciation for each of the stores I'll always cherish. The bookstore where I picked this up, by the way, was a used bookstore (that sells some new books), a category Patchett brushes aside at the beginning of her first essay, as a type of store that doesn't really "count." Perhaps that's why I slid so quickly into defensive mode while reading: every bookstore that our communities support has its place and its value. Used bookstores are their own treasure troves, and have done their part in shaping my endless love for literature. They, I daresay, have done as much to pull independent bookstores back from the brink of destruction as Patchett's book tours and press releases, simply by anchoring themselves into communities and building local, loyal followings. In short: this is a skillfully written love letter to independent bookstores, but its focus on Patchett's store provides only a limited glimpse into a wider, more diverse and wonderful world.

  8. 4 out of 5

    BrittainX

    While not exactly a step-by-step manual for opening a bookshop, the author reminisces about her time opening and working in the bookstore. It's a lovely little booklet for readers, but the 6-figure costs of opening one is somewhat discouraging for someone who dreamt about a bookshop on and off and has been in poverty completely on. While not exactly a step-by-step manual for opening a bookshop, the author reminisces about her time opening and working in the bookstore. It's a lovely little booklet for readers, but the 6-figure costs of opening one is somewhat discouraging for someone who dreamt about a bookshop on and off and has been in poverty completely on.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joseph McGarry

    I picked this book up at Scout & Morgan Books in Cambridge, MN, as part of Independent Bookstore Day. It's a short book but a good one. In this age of Amazon and Barnes & Noble, independent bookstores still thrive. Why is that? The author, Ann Pratchett, owns Parnassus Books in Nashville. It consists of three essays about her experience. When the last independent bookstore, as well as Borders, in Nashville closed, she was approached about starting a new one. She was originally cool to the idea, I picked this book up at Scout & Morgan Books in Cambridge, MN, as part of Independent Bookstore Day. It's a short book but a good one. In this age of Amazon and Barnes & Noble, independent bookstores still thrive. Why is that? The author, Ann Pratchett, owns Parnassus Books in Nashville. It consists of three essays about her experience. When the last independent bookstore, as well as Borders, in Nashville closed, she was approached about starting a new one. She was originally cool to the idea, but eventually she decided to go for it. As one person described her, she was like a chef who wanted to open a new restaurant. Mount Parnassus in Greek mythology is the home for poetry, music, and learning. In some traditions, it was also the home of the Muses. An appropriate name for a bookstore. The bookstore went well, and is still going today. It got a big boost when the author was on The Colbert Report talking about her book. She describes her experiences with the bookstore, like employees, and dogs. She doesn't have a café, because she allows dogs to come into the store. (So does Scout & Morgan. They have two dogs on their logo.) There is also a list at the end of books she recommends. She encourages anyone who wants to open a bookstore to do so, provided you can get the money. I like both types of bookstores. I will admit to getting books from Amazon that I can't get anywhere else. I also get a lot of Amazon gift cards. I will also admit to spending lots of time in Barnes & Noble. My first experience with Barnes & Noble was at Country Club Plaza in Kansas City. Three floors of books, all available for me, provided I had the money. I was in heaven. And yet, I do like the independent bookstores like Scout & Morgan. It's easier to talk to people, especially the owners. It feels more relaxing. I can sit an enjoy a potential new purchase. There's a café next door, so it's easy to get a drink and relax. The other night, our local bookstore sponsored Fredrik Backman, author of A Man Called Ove, in Cambridge, MN. He came from Sweden to be with us. That took a lot of work, and was a good event. I will have a separate post on my blog later about that. I also like the different attitudes on book signings. I've gone to Mall of America book signings. There, you stand in line with your book, which is usually a celebrity autobiography. You get your book signed, a picture with the celebrity, and then you go on. It's like an assembly line. At Scout & Morgan, and at the event last night, the author interacts with the audience, and gets to know them. As an author myself Operation Mermaid: The Project Kraken Incident(Operation Mermaid: The Project Kraken Incident, available on Amazon), I like the second type better, although I wouldn't mind being in the Rotunda of Mall of America with a huge line to sign books. All in all, this is a good little book. It was just for independent booksellers, and just for the one day. It does make me appreciate them more. While I'm mentioning independent bookstores, I'd like to give a shoutout to some other independent bookstores I've been to over the years. Paperbacks & Pieces and Book Shelf in Winona, MN, and Book People in Sioux City, IA. www.scoutandmorganbooks.com www.bookpeoplesc.com www.bookshelfwinona.com www.paperbacksandpieces.com www.parnassusbooks.net

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    "All things happen in a cycle, I explained--the little bookstore had succeeded and grown into a bigger bookstore. Seeing the potential for profit, the superstore chains rose up and crushed the independents, then Amazon rose up and crushed the superstore chains. Now that we could order any book at any hour without having to leave the screen in front of us, we realized what we had lost: the community center, the human interaction, the recommendation of a smart reader rather than a computer algorit "All things happen in a cycle, I explained--the little bookstore had succeeded and grown into a bigger bookstore. Seeing the potential for profit, the superstore chains rose up and crushed the independents, then Amazon rose up and crushed the superstore chains. Now that we could order any book at any hour without having to leave the screen in front of us, we realized what we had lost: the community center, the human interaction, the recommendation of a smart reader rather than a computer algorithm telling us what other shoppers had purchased." I am rolling in a wave of nostalgia now for my childhood independent. Sadly, my current town does not have an indie bookstore (hi, B&N). I feel for my daughter, and when I finally leave this place, I will move somewhere with a fantastic bookstore for the two of us. And if not, maybe I will make one. All I need, apparently, is $300k to start...sigh.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Allan

    What a delightful read, and for $6 , my copy from Cellar Door in Riverside . It's very short most will likely read it in a afternoon . But what an enjoyable and awesome celebration of books and bookstore and book selling . I found one point curious , the store that was bought by the Ohio book chain and moved to a mall is lamented , and so is the Borders that was in a mall (presuming ). But the other mall stores in Nashville B&N and Books A Million are characterized as those ' evil mall chain sto What a delightful read, and for $6 , my copy from Cellar Door in Riverside . It's very short most will likely read it in a afternoon . But what an enjoyable and awesome celebration of books and bookstore and book selling . I found one point curious , the store that was bought by the Ohio book chain and moved to a mall is lamented , and so is the Borders that was in a mall (presuming ). But the other mall stores in Nashville B&N and Books A Million are characterized as those ' evil mall chain stores ' , and somehow made to be equivalent to Target . YMMV Seems non-consistent to me . Of her point is there needed to be an independent bookstore in Nashville , the sense is the mall stores are more suburban .

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Adding this "book" to goodreads is basically cheating since it's only 2 essays (and I'm pretty sure I read one of them before) and a list of books Ann recommends. Plus it's like 30 something pages. I don't care. Ann Patchett's my fave and I work at an independent bookstore. Also, I'm from Nashville and worked at the Borders she mentions in the first essay. So obviously this lil' pamphlet book was made for me. Love you, Ann Patchett. Come hang out in SF. Adding this "book" to goodreads is basically cheating since it's only 2 essays (and I'm pretty sure I read one of them before) and a list of books Ann recommends. Plus it's like 30 something pages. I don't care. Ann Patchett's my fave and I work at an independent bookstore. Also, I'm from Nashville and worked at the Borders she mentions in the first essay. So obviously this lil' pamphlet book was made for me. Love you, Ann Patchett. Come hang out in SF.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Was this tiny book really worth $6? It depends. It's very short, and one "essay" is just a list of recommended books. But it's really the heart and spirit of Independent bookstores that counts. This book is heartwarming on a book nerd/community level. We love independent bookstores and they love us just as much! Super short but fun and funny. Over 50 books just got added to my TBR... Was this tiny book really worth $6? It depends. It's very short, and one "essay" is just a list of recommended books. But it's really the heart and spirit of Independent bookstores that counts. This book is heartwarming on a book nerd/community level. We love independent bookstores and they love us just as much! Super short but fun and funny. Over 50 books just got added to my TBR...

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Edmonds

    Three of Ann Patchett's previously published essays on how she became a bookstore owner and what she learned in the process of opening an independent bookstore. The first of an annual series of $6 Stories Pamphlets to be published in celebration of Independent Bookstore Day. Three of Ann Patchett's previously published essays on how she became a bookstore owner and what she learned in the process of opening an independent bookstore. The first of an annual series of $6 Stories Pamphlets to be published in celebration of Independent Bookstore Day.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Earl

    As a bookseller, I've been mildly obsessed with Ann Patchett recently. I love her writer turned bookstore owner/ bookseller story and everything she's been doing to promote not only her store but all independent bookstores. This was an exclusive release for Independent Bookstore Day. As a bookseller, I've been mildly obsessed with Ann Patchett recently. I love her writer turned bookstore owner/ bookseller story and everything she's been doing to promote not only her store but all independent bookstores. This was an exclusive release for Independent Bookstore Day.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Arianna

    I want to open a bookstore. Or work in one. Or co-own one. Or work in and co-own one.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

    I agree.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    This little book only made me fall deeper in love with the idea of opening a bookstore one day. And with dogs! I am so glad I went back inside Horton's to buy it before we left Carrollton, GA. This little book only made me fall deeper in love with the idea of opening a bookstore one day. And with dogs! I am so glad I went back inside Horton's to buy it before we left Carrollton, GA.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Drew

    deeeeelightful. and now I want to own a bookstore. More tk

  20. 5 out of 5

    Trish Bachman

    These short essays are an enjoyable glimpse into Ann Patchett's experience as the owner of an independent book store. Love her style of writing! These short essays are an enjoyable glimpse into Ann Patchett's experience as the owner of an independent book store. Love her style of writing!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Enjoyed this book. You can tell Patchett is very passionate about bookstores.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rae

    Two essays tell how and why Patchett got into the independent bookstore business. Includes a list of recommended titles. Delightful. And short.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Autumn

    I want one even more now.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jade Walker

    I've always dreamed of owning a bookstore. This little book -- purchased on Independent Bookstore Day -- gives me hope. I've always dreamed of owning a bookstore. This little book -- purchased on Independent Bookstore Day -- gives me hope.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tomissa

  26. 4 out of 5

    Abby

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  28. 5 out of 5

    Liz Bartek

  29. 4 out of 5

    Diane

  30. 5 out of 5

    Erin

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...