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Are you thinking about writing fiction? Writing a novel? Trying to improve a manuscript? Then you need to know all about scenes and sequels. Scenes and sequels are the one-two punch of a story that make it page-turning fiction. If you don't know what they are and how they work, how can your tale reach its potential? Writing fiction isn't easy, but trying to write a novel w Are you thinking about writing fiction? Writing a novel? Trying to improve a manuscript? Then you need to know all about scenes and sequels. Scenes and sequels are the one-two punch of a story that make it page-turning fiction. If you don't know what they are and how they work, how can your tale reach its potential? Writing fiction isn't easy, but trying to write a novel without a solid understanding of scenes and sequels will fall flat. You can learn about scenes and sequels in three ways: (1) just start writing and hope you figure it out over time, (2) read lots of books and attend a bunch of seminars, or (3) study a book devoted entirely to the subject. Mike Klaassen has already read the books and attended the seminars. Combining his copious notes with his own writing experience, he's clarified and expanded the concepts of scenes and sequels. Save yourself a ton of time, money, and frustration with one comprehensive, concise book. Inside "Scenes and Sequels," you'll discover: practical definitions of scenes and sequels, the components of scenes and sequels, how scenes and sequels compare to other passages of writing, the nuances of using each, practical examples of how to use scenes and sequels, prototype scenes and sequels, how to control the pace of your fiction, how to troubleshoot a manuscript with scene-and-sequel analysis, and much, much more. Why spend countless hours doing your own research? "Scenes and Sequels: How to Write Page-Turning Fiction" is a treasure of straightforward, practical information that you can use immediately. Unlock your full writing potential with "Scenes and Sequels" today!


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Are you thinking about writing fiction? Writing a novel? Trying to improve a manuscript? Then you need to know all about scenes and sequels. Scenes and sequels are the one-two punch of a story that make it page-turning fiction. If you don't know what they are and how they work, how can your tale reach its potential? Writing fiction isn't easy, but trying to write a novel w Are you thinking about writing fiction? Writing a novel? Trying to improve a manuscript? Then you need to know all about scenes and sequels. Scenes and sequels are the one-two punch of a story that make it page-turning fiction. If you don't know what they are and how they work, how can your tale reach its potential? Writing fiction isn't easy, but trying to write a novel without a solid understanding of scenes and sequels will fall flat. You can learn about scenes and sequels in three ways: (1) just start writing and hope you figure it out over time, (2) read lots of books and attend a bunch of seminars, or (3) study a book devoted entirely to the subject. Mike Klaassen has already read the books and attended the seminars. Combining his copious notes with his own writing experience, he's clarified and expanded the concepts of scenes and sequels. Save yourself a ton of time, money, and frustration with one comprehensive, concise book. Inside "Scenes and Sequels," you'll discover: practical definitions of scenes and sequels, the components of scenes and sequels, how scenes and sequels compare to other passages of writing, the nuances of using each, practical examples of how to use scenes and sequels, prototype scenes and sequels, how to control the pace of your fiction, how to troubleshoot a manuscript with scene-and-sequel analysis, and much, much more. Why spend countless hours doing your own research? "Scenes and Sequels: How to Write Page-Turning Fiction" is a treasure of straightforward, practical information that you can use immediately. Unlock your full writing potential with "Scenes and Sequels" today!

30 review for Scenes and Sequels: How to Write Page-Turning Fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    This is a great tool for writers especially beginning writers. Even as I say that, I was able to grasp several techniques and ideas that I had been lacking in my own writing. I will keep this as a reference because it has simple tools needed in my writer's arsenal. There are worksheets that will assist in getting the formula correct for the right amount of tension and challenges for the characters to face. This is a great tool for writers especially beginning writers. Even as I say that, I was able to grasp several techniques and ideas that I had been lacking in my own writing. I will keep this as a reference because it has simple tools needed in my writer's arsenal. There are worksheets that will assist in getting the formula correct for the right amount of tension and challenges for the characters to face.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    It is surprisingly difficult to find good information on creating scenes and sequels. The author does a good job of culling the useful information from some decades-old references, filling the gaps, and providing modern examples to study. He gives solid information on not just the construction of scenes and sequels but their structural and story functions as well as how to modify them to fit a story. This stuff might be old hat to some students of writing but for me it supplied information that I It is surprisingly difficult to find good information on creating scenes and sequels. The author does a good job of culling the useful information from some decades-old references, filling the gaps, and providing modern examples to study. He gives solid information on not just the construction of scenes and sequels but their structural and story functions as well as how to modify them to fit a story. This stuff might be old hat to some students of writing but for me it supplied information that I have found nowhere else. (And I've been looking, trust me.) A suitable companion to The fantasy fiction formula

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jon Stonecash

    The problem is the blank page. You have worked out your story. You have defined some interesting characters to populate that story. You have identified your setting, perhaps even done some world building. Perhaps you have defined an outline, in greater or lesser detail. The problem is still that blank page. What are you actually going to write as your first word? Your first sentence? Your first paragraph? One approach, of course, is simply to write something, step back to admire it, and bring out The problem is the blank page. You have worked out your story. You have defined some interesting characters to populate that story. You have identified your setting, perhaps even done some world building. Perhaps you have defined an outline, in greater or lesser detail. The problem is still that blank page. What are you actually going to write as your first word? Your first sentence? Your first paragraph? One approach, of course, is simply to write something, step back to admire it, and bring out the chainsaw to edit out all of the stuff that doesn’t work. This book is a very good attempt to help you handle that blank page. There are a lot of books out there, and I read quite a number of them in my attempt to learn how to write novels, that will address various aspects of writing. This book has a very narrow focus: writing scenes and sequels. A “scene” is where characters attempt to make things happen. Klaassen defines the elements of a scene as: Character, Setting, Situation, Crucible, Goal, Stakes, Motivation, Attempt, Resistance, Conflict, Uncertainty, Tension, Time, Suspense, Climax, and Resolution. He gives reasonable definitions and examples of each of these elements, shows how they interact with each other, and how they are likely to be ordered within a scene. This gives the author, would-be or published, a checklist of things to consider. Who are the characters in the scene? What aspects of the setting are pertinent to the action within the scene? What is the situation that the characters find themselves in? What external forces impose themselves on the characters such that they must deal with the situation? And so on and so on. A “sequel” is where the protagonist (or the point of view character if that’s different) reflects upon what happened in the scene. Klaassen defines a checklist for this as well. More things to consider. The creative writer might be concerned that this book proposes formulistic writing. The nice thing about this book is that Klaassen describes the “standard” setup, he describes many variations that deviate from that standard. The thing that I found the most useful about this book was the very detailed analysis of the elements that make up the scene and sequel structure. Rather than having to figure out how to write a novel, or even write a chapter, the book guides you to think about how to write a paragraph or two about the setting, or two sentences about how the conflict plays out, or a phrase about what the motivation of the characters might be. There is still work to be done, but it is something that even an inexperienced and beginning writer can grapple with successfully. It is a place to start filling in that blank page. I have no doubt that this is a book which I will refer back to again and again.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Venky Iyer

    This is a review of the book Scenes and Sequels: How to Write Page-Turning Fiction by Mike Klaassen. I did not purchase this book; I received a review copy from Story Cartel. Apart from my understanding with Story Cartel that they would like me to read and review the book in exchange for getting it free, I have no other understanding of any nature whatsoever with Story Cartel, the author, the publisher or any other individual or organization connected to the book. This is the second book by t This is a review of the book Scenes and Sequels: How to Write Page-Turning Fiction by Mike Klaassen. I did not purchase this book; I received a review copy from Story Cartel. Apart from my understanding with Story Cartel that they would like me to read and review the book in exchange for getting it free, I have no other understanding of any nature whatsoever with Story Cartel, the author, the publisher or any other individual or organization connected to the book. This is the second book by this author I have read and reviewed this year, and that very fact should tell readers of this review that I found value in the first book, which led me to take up this second book. This book did not disappoint, either. As the title suggests, the book is about writing fiction books in logical sequences of scenes and sequels to ensure the finished book’s grip on readers stays tight throughout. Scenes are passages in the book that describe action and sequels describe post-scene introspection, when the protagonist ruminates over what was, what is and what can be made to be. These very brief definitions are deliberately simplistic; they do not touch upon the nuances of the matter. As an author, I suspect that somewhere in me I had a rudimentary grasp of the concept of writing in scenes and sequels, because a quick check of my own work in progress showed me that I had been reasonably faithful to this concept, though I was not consciously aware of it. The book clarified my thoughts, not only in terms of scenes and sequels, but also in terms of not feeling guilty about passages in my books that may be neither or a mix of both. I learned that every permutation is fine, as long as it works to move the book along and keep the reader guessing. I do have a gripe, though. The book is short on examples. Examples consisting of extracts from existing books would have been of great help to readers in learning the lessons taught better. And that’s it. To get the full picture, you will have to read the book. And should you read the book? I would say yes, unless you are not writing anything at the moment and don’t plan to for the foreseeable future. Make a note somewhere reliable, anyway, for the day you change your mind.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Carla

    Reviewed by Carla Trueheart for Readers' Favorite This is the second book I have read by author Mike Klaassen, and I like each one more and more. Scenes and Sequels teaches the writer how to focus on their writing using a closer structure—the method of scenes and sequels. The book explains the process and how to incorporate it into your own fiction writing for a stronger, more action-packed story overall. Scenes are goals, while sequels are responses, and all of these formulas are written out in Reviewed by Carla Trueheart for Readers' Favorite This is the second book I have read by author Mike Klaassen, and I like each one more and more. Scenes and Sequels teaches the writer how to focus on their writing using a closer structure—the method of scenes and sequels. The book explains the process and how to incorporate it into your own fiction writing for a stronger, more action-packed story overall. Scenes are goals, while sequels are responses, and all of these formulas are written out in the book for ease of conceptualization for the writer. Also included are passages that explain troubleshooting, how to read a piece of your writing and find the problem if you’re struggling with a scene, and when to put away the writing when you just can’t come up with a proper sequel. The book also explains how to apply the scene and sequel technique and how to examine if what you’re writing is a scene or a sequel, which is helpful. Basically, this is a different way to write that will give your writing project the extra action and emotion that it needs and requires for the best possible publication outcome. In Scenes and Sequels, I enjoyed the Goldilocks example and found that the story breakdown was exactly what was needed to explore the concept of scene and sequel. There are also worksheets to help with your analysis of a specific passage of writing, and I found myself taking notes outside of the book so I could reference them later while writing. In addition, Mike Klaassen provides fiction writing terms at the end of the book that should prove helpful to the new writer or even someone who has been in the field and needs a refresher. I would recommend this book to all writers, new and not-so-new.

  6. 4 out of 5

    C.B. Calsing

    Mike Klaassen has written a book, Scenes and Sequels, that is fairly easy to understand and pretty useful for an aspiring writer. In it, he explains how to use scene and sequel to help craft a better novel. This information could be utilized before drafting or as an analysis tool once a first draft is complete. In addition to the exploration of the concepts of scene and sequel, Mr. Klaassen provides several concrete examples from novels with which most readers will be familiar. He also uses a fai Mike Klaassen has written a book, Scenes and Sequels, that is fairly easy to understand and pretty useful for an aspiring writer. In it, he explains how to use scene and sequel to help craft a better novel. This information could be utilized before drafting or as an analysis tool once a first draft is complete. In addition to the exploration of the concepts of scene and sequel, Mr. Klaassen provides several concrete examples from novels with which most readers will be familiar. He also uses a fairy tale and passages from his own writing. These help effectively illustrate the structures he is discussing. As a writer myself, I can't over stress the need for writers to first be avid readers, and his analysis helps drive home that point. While reading this book, I was also reading Raymond Chandler’s The High Window. I found myself thinking of the novel's structure in terms of scene and sequel, and being able to see the structure in action gave me some insight into my own writing. A lot of the work here can be found elsewhere, so if a reader has already explored this topic, he or she may not find anything new, other than the specific examples. My biggest problem with Scenes and Sequels is the use of filler to increase word count. The author repeats a great deal of information, summarizes chapters at both the beginnings and endings, and includes a large glossary of literary terms, many of which are not applicable to the text. I would definitely feel more comfortable buying this book if the cover price were lower. All in all, I would recommend this to an author who has yet to put pen to paper, someone who feels as if he or she has a novel inside but does not yet know how to go about organizing it. I think this book could help a writer like that hit the ground running and end up less frustrated in the long run.

  7. 5 out of 5

    E.

    3.5 stars “Scenes and Sequels: How to Write Page-Turning Fiction” by Mike Klaassen is a non-fiction book that analyzes the elements of a chapter and what makes a story move along and keep a reader’s interest. The author breaks down what makes a scene and uses examples from various well-known fiction stories to explain how to give the character a goal and follow his or her attempts to achieve that goal, with the obstacles that prevent success. Balancing this with the exposition he terms sequels is 3.5 stars “Scenes and Sequels: How to Write Page-Turning Fiction” by Mike Klaassen is a non-fiction book that analyzes the elements of a chapter and what makes a story move along and keep a reader’s interest. The author breaks down what makes a scene and uses examples from various well-known fiction stories to explain how to give the character a goal and follow his or her attempts to achieve that goal, with the obstacles that prevent success. Balancing this with the exposition he terms sequels is what distinguishes a particular work. There are conventions and tweaking of those conventions that characterize a particular writer’s style. The material presented is a bit dry and ponderous to read, but the basic premises are informative and will undoubtedly give a writer a guide to use when analyzing a manuscript. There are multiple citations and advice to delve more deeply into the concepts by reading guides that have become standards in the field but I was somewhat disconcerted by the amount of repetition of concepts and the way things are restated. It was entertaining to follow the analysis of a popular fairy tale that is retold and made more exciting, albeit ending very differently than the traditional tale. I think this book will give a framework for a writer to start with and provide the tools to identify problem areas and the impetus to consult other more in-depth books. A copy of this title was provided to me for review

  8. 5 out of 5

    Erica (The Literary Apothecary)

    The concept of scenes and sequels was originally introduced by Dwight V. Swain and Jack M. Bickham, where they discuss the concepts of scenes and sequels. But, these definitions lie on the surface, as each term possesses a more profound meaning.The author seeks to answer his own question - are fiction writers “making making optimal use of scenes and sequels” in their own work. A skilled wordsmith, Klaassen examines bestselling novels and provides keen insight into the successful formulas used to The concept of scenes and sequels was originally introduced by Dwight V. Swain and Jack M. Bickham, where they discuss the concepts of scenes and sequels. But, these definitions lie on the surface, as each term possesses a more profound meaning.The author seeks to answer his own question - are fiction writers “making making optimal use of scenes and sequels” in their own work. A skilled wordsmith, Klaassen examines bestselling novels and provides keen insight into the successful formulas used to produce them. In Scenes and Sequels, he explains how authors like Janet Evanovich, Stephanie Meyer, Nelson DeMille, and Dan Brown use variations of the techniques he describes to craft intriguing works of fiction. (full review on my blog)

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Szalasny

    I received a copy through Goodreads. For a how-to book, it was average. For me, there were no "A-HA" moments, but it could be that this was not written for the newbie writer. The structure (or non-structure) of scene - sequel writing was looked at in various combinations, but there seemed to be too many chapters devoted to nearly same material. The reading suffered somewhat from the use of several popular (but not univerally read) novels for examples. If the author used his expanded Goldilocks ex I received a copy through Goodreads. For a how-to book, it was average. For me, there were no "A-HA" moments, but it could be that this was not written for the newbie writer. The structure (or non-structure) of scene - sequel writing was looked at in various combinations, but there seemed to be too many chapters devoted to nearly same material. The reading suffered somewhat from the use of several popular (but not univerally read) novels for examples. If the author used his expanded Goldilocks example from the end chapters throughout the book (based on a univerally known story), the reader would not need to infer or investigate the styles of authors he refers to as examples.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ronda Bowen

    Overall, Klaassen gives a good, albeit very formulaic, overview of how to write compelling fiction. He discusses the idea that every scene has a sequel, even if we skip it when writing. It’s a handy guide for thinking about the way plots are strung together. It’s also a good way to think about how a book has been structured – passages, scenes, and sequels – when going back to revise (In particular, I’m thinking about the stream-of-conscious style I used for my NaNoWriMo project). This book is gr Overall, Klaassen gives a good, albeit very formulaic, overview of how to write compelling fiction. He discusses the idea that every scene has a sequel, even if we skip it when writing. It’s a handy guide for thinking about the way plots are strung together. It’s also a good way to think about how a book has been structured – passages, scenes, and sequels – when going back to revise (In particular, I’m thinking about the stream-of-conscious style I used for my NaNoWriMo project). This book is great for writers of all levels for helping them to see their work’s structure in a different way.

  11. 4 out of 5

    TSD

    Resourceful tool for both beginning writers and seasoned writers. I would definitely recommend for self-taught authors, self published authors, any author without a mentor or group to learn scene structure from. I went back and rewrote my scenes and it flows much better. Great job!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Anne

    The author presents a thorough rundown of scenes and sequels. He defines them, and gives prototypes and variations. The book, however, is very dry.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michele Cacano

    Stays focused, thoroughly explores the titular concepts, and has plenty of examples.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    A through exposition of the techniques scenes and sequels. Dives deep into technical details of scene and sequel structure (scenes show the story's action, while sequels show the characters' reactions, emotions, and decisions resulting from the action). Discusses variations on scene and sequel structure, such as omitting sequels for some scenes, and explains when might be a good time to do it. Writers should note that this is not meant to be a comprehensive book on how to write a novel--it doesn' A through exposition of the techniques scenes and sequels. Dives deep into technical details of scene and sequel structure (scenes show the story's action, while sequels show the characters' reactions, emotions, and decisions resulting from the action). Discusses variations on scene and sequel structure, such as omitting sequels for some scenes, and explains when might be a good time to do it. Writers should note that this is not meant to be a comprehensive book on how to write a novel--it doesn't discuss big-picture plotting, characterization, dialogue, or setting. However, it thoroughly covers scene and sequel structure. Overall, the book is clear and useful, although a few passages got bogged down in technical details. There are a few instances of bad language. Some examples are drawn from novels that I've heard aren't well-written, such as the Twilight series (maybe these books do use scene and sequel structure well). Full disclosure: I received a free copy of the book in exchange for this review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Review originally posted at Thoughts Stained With Ink: This is one of the first craft books I’ve read in a while. It’s something I need to work more on and read more of (I even own a couple!), as I’d love to continue to elevate the craft aspect of my novels, while still continuing to challenge and expanding my own narrative storytelling. This novel was recommended to me by my editor and I found it to be okay. I really liked the premise of it and the idea of breaking down your novel into main scen Review originally posted at Thoughts Stained With Ink: This is one of the first craft books I’ve read in a while. It’s something I need to work more on and read more of (I even own a couple!), as I’d love to continue to elevate the craft aspect of my novels, while still continuing to challenge and expanding my own narrative storytelling. This novel was recommended to me by my editor and I found it to be okay. I really liked the premise of it and the idea of breaking down your novel into main scenes and then sequel scenes, but I found the tone to be a bit condescending and the actual implementation not exactly what I was looking for (actually, just talking through these ideas with my editor made ten times more sense and was more helpful than this novel, so….). All in all, not a bad read, but not exactly my favorite, either.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rubina

    A good book on the art of writing. I especially liked the way in which techniques are listed with examples

  17. 5 out of 5

    Charissa Wilkinson

    I received this book as part of the Goodreads First Reads Program for the purpose of a fair review. Overview: Can you think of the last book you’ve really enjoyed? More likely you can remember the action scenes easily. What makes a memorable book? Mr. Klaassen thinks he can impart some wisdom that will make your book reach new heights. Likes: This book is well written and easily understandable for those who are just starting on their writing journeys. Conclusion: This is a book that is vital in my I received this book as part of the Goodreads First Reads Program for the purpose of a fair review. Overview: Can you think of the last book you’ve really enjoyed? More likely you can remember the action scenes easily. What makes a memorable book? Mr. Klaassen thinks he can impart some wisdom that will make your book reach new heights. Likes: This book is well written and easily understandable for those who are just starting on their writing journeys. Conclusion: This is a book that is vital in my opinion for the author’s toolbox. Just a bit of a warning, don’t use it for your first draft, you need something written before you can trouble-shoot it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sussu Leclerc

    In my opinion, this book would really fit well in a university curriculum. It defines a scene very well and very clearly. As a writer, I found it less useful because I was expected more advanced techniques. but that should not deter anyone from reading this book because it is a very good base to the craft.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michael Dickson

    One of the best in defining scenes and sequels I've read several dozen books on writing over the years. I've also taken several online courses. This book ranks near the top for scenes and sequels and matched with K.M. Weiland's workbook on structure, it's all you need for a great start to your novel. One of the best in defining scenes and sequels I've read several dozen books on writing over the years. I've also taken several online courses. This book ranks near the top for scenes and sequels and matched with K.M. Weiland's workbook on structure, it's all you need for a great start to your novel.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Sterling

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Grantham

  22. 5 out of 5

    Benita

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jc

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lee

  25. 4 out of 5

    Norm Jenson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kat Turner

  27. 4 out of 5

    DeAndrae

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kim

  29. 4 out of 5

    Donald Standeford

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Cahhal

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