hits counter Strangers Tend to Tell Me Things: A Memoir of Love, Loss, and Coming Home - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Strangers Tend to Tell Me Things: A Memoir of Love, Loss, and Coming Home

Availability: Ready to download

By peeling back the curtain of her syndicated advice column, Amy Dickinson reveals much of the inspiration and motivation that has fueled her calling. Through a series of linked essays, this narrative picks up where her earlier memoir left off. Exploring central themes of romance, death, parenting, self-care, and spiritual awakening.


Compare

By peeling back the curtain of her syndicated advice column, Amy Dickinson reveals much of the inspiration and motivation that has fueled her calling. Through a series of linked essays, this narrative picks up where her earlier memoir left off. Exploring central themes of romance, death, parenting, self-care, and spiritual awakening.

30 review for Strangers Tend to Tell Me Things: A Memoir of Love, Loss, and Coming Home

  1. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    This book surprised me with its intensity. For a book with a bright yellow cover and two large sheep, I wasn't expecting the second half to reveal what it's like to manage grief. So many of my friends have gone through the death of a parent or two over the past few years. I listen and learn from their experiences so I will know how to handle mine. I met Amy Dickinson in person at the Hachette Bookclub Brunch in New York City and I was looking forward to reading this book. I held off reading it This book surprised me with its intensity. For a book with a bright yellow cover and two large sheep, I wasn't expecting the second half to reveal what it's like to manage grief. So many of my friends have gone through the death of a parent or two over the past few years. I listen and learn from their experiences so I will know how to handle mine. I met Amy Dickinson in person at the Hachette Bookclub Brunch in New York City and I was looking forward to reading this book. I held off reading it because it's not being published until March so I don't like to get too far ahead of myself but I was intrigued and I'm happy that I took the time to read this memoir. I do love a good memoir and this was no exception!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kasa Cotugno

    Amy Dickinson has seemingly done it all. She's lived in big cities, has an enviable career with her advice column and also her appearances as a panelist on Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me (one of my favorite NPR shows), has raised her daughter virtually single-handed. But here she shares her inner life, beginning with the small town she was raised in, has returned to, and now inhabits with many of her relatives. Well, actually she lives in the next town over with her husband and his enormous family, Amy Dickinson has seemingly done it all. She's lived in big cities, has an enviable career with her advice column and also her appearances as a panelist on Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me (one of my favorite NPR shows), has raised her daughter virtually single-handed. But here she shares her inner life, beginning with the small town she was raised in, has returned to, and now inhabits with many of her relatives. Well, actually she lives in the next town over with her husband and his enormous family, and this book addresses the challenges and rewards of being absorbed into a household that is completely different from yours. There is so much wisdom here, not to mention humor. She does her writing in the house her mother lived in after her father's departure, a bequest from a neighbor, and the events surrounding her mother's final years and the subsequent emptying of that house were, for me, the best part of the book. Reminiscent of They Left Us Everything by Plum Johnson, the book tells how she is able to clear the house of her mother's prized belongings and still honor the woman she loved and misses so much. It is evident to see where she gets the empathy necessary to succeed in writing her column.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This was a book group pick, and I read it eagerly because I like the author's "Ask Amy" column and enjoy her appearances on "Wait Wait Don't Tell Me." And the book is reasonably well-written and readable. The problem is that it doesn't tell a compelling or particularly sympathetic story, and I ended up liking the author far less after reading it. Her story recounts her parents' divorce when she was young, an early failed marriage, a difficult relationship with her father, a second marriage that This was a book group pick, and I read it eagerly because I like the author's "Ask Amy" column and enjoy her appearances on "Wait Wait Don't Tell Me." And the book is reasonably well-written and readable. The problem is that it doesn't tell a compelling or particularly sympathetic story, and I ended up liking the author far less after reading it. Her story recounts her parents' divorce when she was young, an early failed marriage, a difficult relationship with her father, a second marriage that created a blended family, and the death of her beloved, long-suffering single mother. These are the things of which life is made, and while the author recounts all the events in more or less entertaining detail, her tale is hardly unique. It lacks the power and the life lessons I was hoping for. And she has a mean streak that comes out in the unwarranted disparaging comments that pepper the narrative. She calls Ithaca College, where her mother taught writing for her entire career, a "lesser-known, local school." As a parent of an IC student, I'm vaguely insulted. IC is not Cornell, as the author points out, but it's a well-known school with excellent academics and draws a student body from around the globe (and did so even when the author's mother was teaching there). Similarly, she says the problem with the Ithaca, New York farmers' market is not the market itself, but the "adjunct professors" who frequent it, all of whom are allegedly insufferable and spoiled. I'm an adjunct professor myself. You can see why I found this problematic. I just don't identify with her snarky asides. "I can lay down a line of snark when it's warranted," the author says, interestingly, toward the end of the book, "but that's not who I want to be." Finally, toward the end of the book, she complains that random strangers tend to approach her in public with their "petty problems" and she wishes she could tell them to "shut up." (This is the idea underlying the title of the book.) But when you're an advice columnist, that's going to happen. Ask any doctor or lawyer whether someone has ever approached them with their personal problems in a nonprofessional setting. It goes with the occupational territory. As for people feeling sorry for her kids because of the pressure they must feel to be perfect, that complaint just didn't resonate with this preacher's kid. People make assumptions. It isn't unique or compelling to complain about them. When I read a memoir, I want to learn something, to hear a tale of an interesting or unusual life, and to take some nugget of hard-earned wisdom away from it. I was entertained by this book, but not compelled by it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Madison

    Definitely a story of the author's life and not about her life as an advice columnist. I still enjoyed it because I like hearing people's life stories but the title was a bit misleading.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    I recently went to a talk given by the author whose advice column I read everyday. She was funny, insightful, and a bit all over the place. I bought her book and she signed it. I probably would never have bought it on my own but I loved reading it. The book was funny, insightful, and a bit all over the place. She talked about moving back home (very close to where I currently live). She explained her experience of falling in love and marrying in middle adulthood (an experience we share) and the I recently went to a talk given by the author whose advice column I read everyday. She was funny, insightful, and a bit all over the place. I bought her book and she signed it. I probably would never have bought it on my own but I loved reading it. The book was funny, insightful, and a bit all over the place. She talked about moving back home (very close to where I currently live). She explained her experience of falling in love and marrying in middle adulthood (an experience we share) and the loss of a beloved parent that I too have recently suffered. I enjoyed her humor, emotion, introspection, and story telling. I am glad I went to see her.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kirsti

    "It turns out that grief isn't something that can be hurried. You can't move through it faster than it moves through you." Honestly, I didn't have high hopes for this one because I had already read Amy Dickinson's previous memoir, and it's hard for even the most eventful life to provide enough material for two memoirs. But I got completely drawn in. This is a beautifully written, sharp-eyed look at families (troubled, happy, or a little of both) and at being able to accept oneself at midlife and "It turns out that grief isn't something that can be hurried. You can't move through it faster than it moves through you." Honestly, I didn't have high hopes for this one because I had already read Amy Dickinson's previous memoir, and it's hard for even the most eventful life to provide enough material for two memoirs. But I got completely drawn in. This is a beautifully written, sharp-eyed look at families (troubled, happy, or a little of both) and at being able to accept oneself at midlife and beyond. Her description of her romance with her second husband and their blended family is charming and funny and heartwarming. But the parts I enjoyed most were the ones that most closely resembled my recent life--trying to accept one's personality flaws in middle age (ding) and caring for elderly parents (ding ding) and being shocked at how much grief is left over after burying a parent, even after having plenty of time to prepare for the sad event (ding ding ding ding ding). Amy Dickinson is a terrific advice columnist, guest panelist, and author, and I hope she will continue to be all these things for a long time to come.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Temple Dog

    Amy Dickerson's Strangers Tend to Tell Me Things was a guilty pleasure. I read it not for book club or because it would provide any symbolism of intellectual stimulus, but merely because I am a shameless fan of NPRs Wait, Wait, Dont Tell Me, of which Amy is a regular and because it sounded fun. Fun would not be how I would describe it, it was more of a catharsis, not for me, but for Amy. She narrates her chaotic childhood, her unfortunate first marriage, the subsequent idyllic romance of her Amy Dickerson's Strangers Tend to Tell Me Things was a guilty pleasure. I read it not for book club or because it would provide any symbolism of intellectual stimulus, but merely because I am a shameless fan of NPR’s Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me, of which Amy is a regular and because it sounded fun. Fun would not be how I would describe it, it was more of a catharsis, not for me, but for Amy. She narrates her chaotic childhood, her unfortunate first marriage, the subsequent idyllic romance of her second marriage and the many tragedies in her life. It’s not that it was a bad book, there are some modestly cute moments, it’s just not a great book. In referring to how she decides to eliminate clutter she asks “does it spark joy?” This book did not spark joy, but it did occasionally bring a smile to my face. TD is neutral on this one.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ann Douglas

    I was shocked to discover that Amy Dickinson has 20 million readers. All this time, I thought I was the only one! Of course, I'm kidding, but that's how much I connect with the warmth and humour of Amy's writing. I always feel like she's speaking (okay writing) directly to me. This memoir is written in that same wonderfully down-to-earth style. She showcases her glorious imperfection. She's honest about her missteps. And she puts the spotlight on what really matters: the people and places who I was shocked to discover that Amy Dickinson has 20 million readers. All this time, I thought I was the only one! Of course, I'm kidding, but that's how much I connect with the warmth and humour of Amy's writing. I always feel like she's speaking (okay writing) directly to me. This memoir is written in that same wonderfully down-to-earth style. She showcases her glorious imperfection. She's honest about her missteps. And she puts the spotlight on what really matters: the people and places who make you feel at home. I loved this book. Thank you, Amy, both for writing it and for being you.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    "It turns out that grief isn't something that can be hurried. You can't move through it faster than it moves through you." So goes one of the lessons Amy Dickinson, known for her syndicated "Ask Amy" advice column, shares with us in her memoir. We all move through grief in our life, often related to loss. The loss of a marriage, the loss of our children to their own adult lives, the loss of a parent, child, or other loved one to death. Dickinson lets us into her inner monologue around grief - and "It turns out that grief isn't something that can be hurried. You can't move through it faster than it moves through you." So goes one of the lessons Amy Dickinson, known for her syndicated "Ask Amy" advice column, shares with us in her memoir. We all move through grief in our life, often related to loss. The loss of a marriage, the loss of our children to their own adult lives, the loss of a parent, child, or other loved one to death. Dickinson lets us into her inner monologue around grief - and also the hope, love, and life-living that coexist with grief. In late middle-life the coexistence of hope for the future can pair awkwardly with grief. We have seen death, smelled it, held its hand and sat with it. We recognize our draw to the warmth of hope, but are often conditioned to the coolness of reality. Similarly, the middle-aged longing for love can clash with the painful anticipation of another potential heartbreak. On one level we recognize that familial and romantic love enrich our lives, but it is likely we have been betrayed by one or both. If you retain "emotional muscle memory of betrayal", then trusting in love, regardless of its source, is difficult. What resonated most with me was her reminiscences of her mother's end of life: "I thought that through the years of accelerated care-taking and leave-taking that we had granted our mother a good and gentle death. I thought that because I had been so present with her and had accepted the reality of it, I had somehow pre-grieved my mother's passing. But as it turned out, I was wrong." She normalizes that even if we have no regrets, even if our parental relationships were sound and good, even if they had a long and full life, the grief we feel upon losing them is significant. I was led to ponder that, theoretically, there may be a good death for a individual passing on, but from the perspective of those still living, there is likely no such thing. All of these themes weave through Dickinson's book, where she writes in a way that both carries you away to her small-town life and sharply turns your focus in to your own world. I could not put this one down.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    A memoir written by a columnist as she nears the end of her career. What could be more in my wheel house? Very little, and yet, I still often found this book grating to read. Why? My first theory is that the author does not seem very genuine to me. I'm not saying she's lying -- I don't think she is -- but her voice is somehow automatic. The jokes come easily, at measured intervals, and from predictable angles designed not to irritate anyone (except me, I suppose). It may also be that Dickinson's A memoir written by a columnist as she nears the end of her career. What could be more in my wheel house? Very little, and yet, I still often found this book grating to read. Why? My first theory is that the author does not seem very genuine to me. I'm not saying she's lying -- I don't think she is -- but her voice is somehow automatic. The jokes come easily, at measured intervals, and from predictable angles designed not to irritate anyone (except me, I suppose). It may also be that Dickinson's primary form is newspaper columns and that this style is less charming over the course of a book. Although I did not know she was an advice columnist when this book showed up in a library search, this is not the first time I've found that a columnist's voice wears when encountered for longer than five minutes. I'm reluctant to generalize, but it's possible that the problem lies in paragraph construction as much as voice. Newspapers (and online newspapers) cherish short paragraphs that begin with strong declarative sentences followed by qualifications, and they too often rely on cute zingers as they conclude. Much of this review has flirted with labeling the book cliche. It is in its voice and its aspirations, but in other ways it offers what strikes me as an under told story: A woman who has a fairly unique profession returns from the city to her rural hometown and marries well into middle age. She becomes a step mother while also helping her mother during the latter's final years. It might not be the nuclear family the Golden Generation might have imagined, but this is mostly a story about how family is the foundational unit of American culture. It would not surprise me at all to learn that Dickinson's story is reassuring or inspiring for many readers.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Leigh Kramer

    About fourteen years ago, a few weeks after starting my second year of graduate school, I sent a question to Ask Amy. I had started my social work fieldwork placement in hospice and wanted to know how I could help my patients look past my youthful appearance as they frequently commented on it and I didn't want this to interfere with my ability to help them. (I still look much younger than I am, to my chagrin.) To my surprise, it appeared in the Chicago Tribune a few weeks later. Then a couple About fourteen years ago, a few weeks after starting my second year of graduate school, I sent a question to Ask Amy. I had started my social work fieldwork placement in hospice and wanted to know how I could help my patients look past my youthful appearance as they frequently commented on it and I didn't want this to interfere with my ability to help them. (I still look much younger than I am, to my chagrin.) To my surprise, it appeared in the Chicago Tribune a few weeks later. Then a couple months after that, Amy ran her first-ever reader response column, as apparently many people had advice on how I could counter (or embrace!) my young face. Needless to say, I have had a special place in my heart for Amy Dickinson ever since. I thoroughly enjoyed this memoir and plan on reading its predecessor soon. Dickinson is a great writer- no surprise there- and I appreciated how openly she discussed the end of her first marriage, her years of singleness afterward, and finally meeting (or rather, re-meeting) the man who would become her second husband. She also writes movingly about her mother's decline and eventual death. People tell us so much by the way they grieve. Dickinson may be an advice columnist but she's first and foremost a person and she doesn't get everything right on the first try. But it is her openness about her mistakes and the disappointments life has brought her that made this such an engaging read. It made me proud to have written to her all those years ago.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    I enjoyed this book as a follow-up to the Mighty Queens of Freeville, Amy's (mostly) matriarchal family story. Her father makes appearances and I give Amy credit for tolerating him and showing more care than he may have deserved. I have seen Amy on a couple occasions but never met her. Once for a taping of "Wait Wait Don't Tell Me" and when she was a Moth host and her daughter Emily was a speaker. Amy is quick with non-scripted humor. One vocabulary item jumped out at me: the use of the word I enjoyed this book as a follow-up to the Mighty Queens of Freeville, Amy's (mostly) matriarchal family story. Her father makes appearances and I give Amy credit for tolerating him and showing more care than he may have deserved. I have seen Amy on a couple occasions but never met her. Once for a taping of "Wait Wait Don't Tell Me" and when she was a Moth host and her daughter Emily was a speaker. Amy is quick with non-scripted humor. One vocabulary item jumped out at me: the use of the word "tamped", twice in first few pages. I like that word and if she had used "panked" instead I would have nominated her as an honorary Yooper. Something completely unrelated is my liking of the typeface. It has swoopy Qs. I do not see the name of it in the credits.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gwen

    Yup, I read her column. Yup, I read her first memoir. Yup, I saw her at one of her stepdaughter's soccer games (honestly, I'm not stalking her!). How would I not like this book? It's honest. It's about real life, the good and the bad; the challenges of older family members' frail health; second chances; and how to blend families. I literally laughed, and cried, nodding my head in understanding, agreement, sympathy and empathy. And in the end, when there are a few morsels of advice, they are Yup, I read her column. Yup, I read her first memoir. Yup, I saw her at one of her stepdaughter's soccer games (honestly, I'm not stalking her!). How would I not like this book? It's honest. It's about real life, the good and the bad; the challenges of older family members' frail health; second chances; and how to blend families. I literally laughed, and cried, nodding my head in understanding, agreement, sympathy and empathy. And in the end, when there are a few morsels of advice, they are well-chosen, carefully thought through and the reader knows exactly how and why Amy has gotten to this place.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mia Emslie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It took me awhile to get into it, but this memoir eventually really grew on me. Loved Freeville & small-town life.. and her love story with Bruno.. actually, especially that part. There were times sprinkled throughout where I thought.. Great turn of phrase! or yeah, that Is absurd. Tender insights on how to deal with heartache of grief.. yeah, appreciated that. To tell you the truth, what will probably stay with me forever is.. burning, actually burning, all the stuff you just dont know what It took me awhile to get into it, but this memoir eventually really grew on me. Loved Freeville & small-town life.. and her love story with Bruno.. actually, especially that part. There were times sprinkled throughout where I thought.. Great turn of phrase! or yeah, that Is absurd. Tender insights on how to deal with heartache of grief.. yeah, appreciated that. To tell you the truth, what will probably stay with me forever is.. burning, actually burning, all the stuff you just don’t know what to do with... Thanks, Amy!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This is my favorite of Amy Dickinson's three books--witty, heartwarming, empathetic, authentic. The things we go through--good, bad, funny, sad--as we (and our parents) get older are portrayed so well. A few of the stories in The Mighty Queens of Freeville are enlarged upon with much new content, as well.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Well written experiences of Amy Dickinson--family, loss, divorce, remarriage, relocations and joy and humor interwoven in life's experiences. It was fun to discover I lived in the same Washington, DC apartment building as the author. Someone you'd like to have as a friend.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Such a good read. I really enjoyed this memoir.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eileen

    Amy Dickinson's memoir shows how resilient she was despite her chaotic childhood and crazy dad and mother who never disciplined her kids. Her mother's disappointment was enough to keep them in line if they acted out. Amy's honest account with trials and tribulations and intermittent humor made the book readable and relatable. I almost came to tears when she wrote about her mother's declining health. Brought me back to my care taking years of my own mother. My favorite chapters were: "We Played Amy Dickinson's memoir shows how resilient she was despite her chaotic childhood and crazy dad and mother who never disciplined her kids. Her mother's disappointment was enough to keep them in line if they acted out. Amy's honest account with trials and tribulations and intermittent humor made the book readable and relatable. I almost came to tears when she wrote about her mother's declining health. Brought me back to my care taking years of my own mother. My favorite chapters were: "We Played with Matches," "The Fallacy of Closure," "How to Use a Saw" "Next of Kin," "Strangers Tend to Tell Me Things," and "Mother's Day." The Saw chapter was cleverly written and could stand on its own in a magazine article. After reading the book, I think I got a real sense of who Amy was and is now, faults and all. I admire her gumption and her capacity to love and forgive. It would have been so difficult to visit her father as selfish and boorish as he was. Yet she found a way to see him as a broken man who needed a little help. I loved that she was so close to her mother. Her mother was very strong to deal with all the drama she had to, using her typing skills, going back to school later in life. She didn't seem like a complainer nor did Amy. I feel like Amy could be a friend I would enjoy spending time with. I admire her overcoming obstacles in her life with humor and gusto and music. So glad that Bruno is there for her. He sounded very giving and kind. Her last paragraph in her book offers sage advice. Nothing earth shattering, just a good foundation on how to be a family: "Spend time together. Try to be honest so people trust you. Forgive others their failings and disappointments and ask for forgiveness for your own. Let things happen, surrender to events and accept that no matter what you do, life unspools anyway. Embrace those fleeting moments when every one is healthy and happy. And, sometimes, you have to make a spectacular celebration, just because you can."

  19. 5 out of 5

    Niffer

    I've read a lot of memoirs in the last couple of years, and I think that this one is pretty high up there on my list of "well worth the time" memoirs. There are three primary focuses of this book. Amy Dickinson tells us about her romance with her husband, the loss of her mother, and the process of grieving for her mother. The first part of the book is a long lead in to all those things. We get a glimpse of her childhood, hear about her failed romances and first marriage, see a quick glimpse of I've read a lot of memoirs in the last couple of years, and I think that this one is pretty high up there on my list of "well worth the time" memoirs. There are three primary focuses of this book. Amy Dickinson tells us about her romance with her husband, the loss of her mother, and the process of grieving for her mother. The first part of the book is a long lead in to all those things. We get a glimpse of her childhood, hear about her failed romances and first marriage, see a quick glimpse of her raising her daughter as a single mother, and then we are dumped into the romance with her husband. None of the three main themes of the book are earth-shatteringly astounding. Her romance with her husband is sweet, the loss of her mother is sad, the grief is understandable. But through it all I felt very much like I was sitting down with a cup of tea with Amy Dickinson and having a nice long chat about things. About how hard it is to raise a child alone. About marrying a divorced man with teen children of his own. About the struggle between wanting our mothers with us forever, and yet also how hard it is to watch them suffer. The author doesn't come across as a know it all. She admits her flaws. But she is also not so self-deprecating that you feel overwhelmed by it--like she's waiting for you to say "Oh no, you're not really that bad." She's honest, she recognizes she has faults. She tries to use coping skills to deal with them, sometimes with okay results, sometimes not. It was a breath of fresh to read something that felt very honest. I'm not sure that most people will agree with my 4 stars, but I enjoyed this book and honestly, this rating is for me as much as anyone else, right? I enjoyed it. I thought it was worth my time. And I appreciated having an opportunity to read it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    3 1/2 stars. I really enjoy the author's appearances on "Wait, Wait, Don't Tell Me," and I read her advice column every day, so I was sure I'd enjoy her memoir - and I did. I did skim some parts - her aggressive courting of her second husband, her mother's decline - and (just like her column) she tended to be long-winded, but she also wrote some beautiful passages about family and motherhood and small-town life.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    If you've read Amy's column (Ask Amy)or listened to her on one of my fave shows, "Wait, wait...Don't tell me," you already know she is quick and funny. Her book also shows how human, down-to-earth, and wise she is. Thank goodness we have her take on the middle years, trying to navigate #allthethings like a new marriage, an expanded family, caring for aging relatives, maintaining a long-time career, and learning about grief and loss. I loved this book so much.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mica

    The memoirwith its witty and honest storytellingsurpassed all my expectations. Now the author of two memoirs, Dickinson clearly knows how to bring readers into her life. I laughed-out-loud over Dickinson's account of her whirlwind courtship. I shed tears throughout the chapter on her mother's last year. And, when I finished the memoir, I turned to page one to read her story all over again. The memoir—with its witty and honest storytelling—surpassed all my expectations. Now the author of two memoirs, Dickinson clearly knows how to bring readers into her life. I laughed-out-loud over Dickinson's account of her whirlwind courtship. I shed tears throughout the chapter on her mother's last year. And, when I finished the memoir, I turned to page one to read her story all over again.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura Siegel

    I loved everything about this memoir, read on audiobook by the author. I loved her voice, her relationship to her family and hometown that she returns to to begin a new life. I love how she is real, funny, honest, and without ego, valuing the simple and important things of life. Just a feel good book about someone I would want to be friends with.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mary Robinson

    Another memoir from Amy Dickinson, who I love as a writer and admire as a person. Amy won the job of being Ann Landers successor as an advice columnist. This book deals with a lovely fairy-tale second love; the long, sad and loving goodbye to a Mother; and the challenges, fun and stress of blending two large families. Another memoir from Amy Dickinson, who I love as a writer and admire as a person. Amy won the job of being Ann Lander’s successor as an advice columnist. This book deals with a lovely fairy-tale second love; the long, sad and loving goodbye to a Mother; and the challenges, fun and stress of blending two large families.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Both this and The Mighty Queens of Freeville are excellent books with conversational tones that are easy to get into. That said, I had to take breaks reading the second half of this one, as the honest reflections on her grief experience were tough emotionally for me to read in large chunks.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    I don't usually read memoirs, aka non-fiction books, but this one read like a novel. It was interesting to learn about the background of an advice columnist and how her life has the same ups and downs as we all do. Easy reading, yet thought provoking. Thanks Amy.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Snyder

    A humorous approach to some of life's most difficult transitions (marriage, divorce, death, stepchildren, careers, children, etc.). This was an enjoyable read especially fI think for middle age women...will recommend to others.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jane Dugger

    This was excellent and very thought-provoking (read: self reflection). I've always enjoyed Ms Dickinson's column, even when I don't agree with her, and thoroughly enjoyed her memoir. I am pretty sure I might be a lost cousin and need to move to Freeville ASAP.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kayo

    Funny and refreshing! Loved it!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ken Ransom

    A wonderful combination of humor and wisdom.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.