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In the Company of Women: Inspiration and Advice from over 100 Makers, Artists, and Entrepreneurs

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“I want to rip out every page of this glorious book and hang them on my wall so that I can be surrounded by these incredible women all day long.” —Emma Straub, New York Times bestselling author of The Vacationers and Modern Lovers Across the globe, women are embracing the entrepreneurial spirit and starting creative businesses. In the Company of Women profiles over 100 of “I want to rip out every page of this glorious book and hang them on my wall so that I can be surrounded by these incredible women all day long.” —Emma Straub, New York Times bestselling author of The Vacationers and Modern Lovers Across the globe, women are embracing the entrepreneurial spirit and starting creative businesses. In the Company of Women profiles over 100 of these influential and creative women from all ages, races, backgrounds, and industries. Chock-full of practical, inspirational advice for those looking to forge their own paths, these interviews detail the keys to success (for example, going with your gut; maintaining meaningful and lasting relationships), highlight the importance of everyday rituals (meditating; creating a daily to-do list), and dispense advice for the next generation of women entrepreneurs and makers (stay true to what you believe in; have patience). The book is rounded out with hundreds of lush, original photographs of the women in their work spaces.


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“I want to rip out every page of this glorious book and hang them on my wall so that I can be surrounded by these incredible women all day long.” —Emma Straub, New York Times bestselling author of The Vacationers and Modern Lovers Across the globe, women are embracing the entrepreneurial spirit and starting creative businesses. In the Company of Women profiles over 100 of “I want to rip out every page of this glorious book and hang them on my wall so that I can be surrounded by these incredible women all day long.” —Emma Straub, New York Times bestselling author of The Vacationers and Modern Lovers Across the globe, women are embracing the entrepreneurial spirit and starting creative businesses. In the Company of Women profiles over 100 of these influential and creative women from all ages, races, backgrounds, and industries. Chock-full of practical, inspirational advice for those looking to forge their own paths, these interviews detail the keys to success (for example, going with your gut; maintaining meaningful and lasting relationships), highlight the importance of everyday rituals (meditating; creating a daily to-do list), and dispense advice for the next generation of women entrepreneurs and makers (stay true to what you believe in; have patience). The book is rounded out with hundreds of lush, original photographs of the women in their work spaces.

30 review for In the Company of Women: Inspiration and Advice from over 100 Makers, Artists, and Entrepreneurs

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    I've share a few times now -- that we have a guest room where - besides drinks - a few snacks in the refrigerator- and teas to drink - I leave 'books' in the room also for our guests to enjoy. This week is our one year anniversary of running our Airbnb business. We are usually booked 2-3 months out. All the women "IN THE COMPANY OF WOMEN", own their own business. They are interesting women with interesting jobs. I purchased this lovely book a month ago. I haven't transferred it to the guest room I've share a few times now -- that we have a guest room where - besides drinks - a few snacks in the refrigerator- and teas to drink - I leave 'books' in the room also for our guests to enjoy. This week is our one year anniversary of running our Airbnb business. We are usually booked 2-3 months out. All the women "IN THE COMPANY OF WOMEN", own their own business. They are interesting women with interesting jobs. I purchased this lovely book a month ago. I haven't transferred it to the guest room yet-- because I'm still enjoying it... but soon. First and foremost....it's the PHOTOGRAPHY that first captures our attention. The portraits of the 100 women against backgrounds in a rooms filled with their work are eye-catching fabulous!!! The layout - of how this book is organized is scrumptious as well as 'inviting-to-read'. It's fun to read the questions asked of each woman. ..... what did you want to be when you were a child? ..... what was the best piece of business advice you were given when you were starting out? ..... what is your favorite thing about your workplace? ..... what does success mean to you? ..... name a fear or professional challenge that keeps you up at night ..... name the biggest over all lesson you learned in running a business ..... has learning from a mistake ever lead you to success? ..... in moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you build yourself back up? ..... what does the world need more of? .....etc. Grace Bonney said..... "I traveled across America to interview the vast majority of these women face to face. Those moments spent listening and learning have provided me with enough inspiration for decades to come and have motivated me to change the way I run my business, and with a renewed focus on inclusiveness and providing a platform for people to tell their stories in their own voices. The lessons reflected in this book come from lifetimes of experiences in places as far away from my hometown as Nigeria, Australia, and Peru". Furniture designer Tanya Aguiniga, from Los Angles, Ca. says, "success to me means being able to continue doing what I love to do". Thelma Golden, museum director and chief curator in New York, said when she was a child she wanted to be a curator. She was obsessed with museums. Samin Nosrat, chef and author from Berkeley California says when she's in a rut and needs inspiration she goes "jumping in the ocean". Kate Bornstein, Author, performer, activist, from New York, says with the world needs more of is, "more questions, if you were answers". Roxane Gay, writer, Professor, from Indiana says that she wanted to be a doctor, a surgeon, or an emergency room position when she was a child. Desiree Akhavan, writer, actor, filmmaker, director, from London, England says the trait that she is most proud of herself is, "my brain is wired to find the humor in every situation". I'll end with quoting bestseller author of "A Little Life", Hanya Yanagihara .... She says: "A joyful book that celebrates both the diversity of beauty and the beauty of diversity: in race, age, size, sexuality, and ways of thinking". Great gift book for yourself - your daughter, sister, mom, or close girlfriend! Men can appreciate this book too!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nat

    After having read and wholeheartedly loved Strong Is the New Pretty, I was on the look-out for more books featuring empowering women when, lo and behold, this gem came along. In the Company of Women features an incredibly diverse group of women that are makers, artists and entrepreneurs and questions them about some important creative and personal issues. I found it truly awe-inspiring. Their perseverance in the face of adversity and their words and actions inspired me deeply. I took each piece of After having read and wholeheartedly loved Strong Is the New Pretty, I was on the look-out for more books featuring empowering women when, lo and behold, this gem came along. In the Company of Women features an incredibly diverse group of women that are makers, artists and entrepreneurs and questions them about some important creative and personal issues. I found it truly awe-inspiring. Their perseverance in the face of adversity and their words and actions inspired me deeply. I took each piece of advice these fearless women imparted and stored it in my heart. I was continuously learning from their impeccable grace, deep talent, braveness, vulnerability and boldness. And I decide to feature the questions that really made me think or feel so understood and together with the women: Interview #1: Tavi Gevinson Writer, Magazine Editor in Chief New York, NY Tavi Gevinson being featured here made me want to pick up this collection even more. What does success mean to you? Having adequately expressed a thought or feeling. What’s the first thing you do every morning to start your day on the right foot? Put on a podcast. I need to be engaged with something and listen to people right. I love how distinct her voice was in this interview. Interview #2: Preeti Mistry Chef Oakland, CA In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you build yourself back up? I read shitty Yelp reviews of restaurants that I love and know are amazing. Seriously, I do this sometimes. For me, the cooking becomes meditation: I get in the kitchen and start cooking and tasting, and that reminds me why I’m doing this and that what we are doing is delicious. HA! I love this response. Interview #3: Cy Lauz Lingerie Designer Long Island, NY Name a fear or professional challenge that keeps you up at night. The biggest professional challenge for me would be trusting anyone other than myself. Name a woman (or women), past or present, whom you admire or look up to. It may sound corny, but I really do admire all women. I realized how powerful women are when I was a freshman in college in sociology 101. The lecture that day was to the effect of “when you change the lives of women, you also change family life—and when that core of family values is changed, you’ve changed the world forever.” As a trans woman I now experience what it’s like to be a woman today, and to be able to shine while living in a world that seeks to dim your light is a feat in and of itself. I really love these questions and answers!! Interview #4: Lisa Hunt Designer, Artist Brooklyn, NY Name the biggest overall lesson you’ve learned in running a business. Trust your instincts! There’s nothing worse than realizing that your first instincts were right and that second-guessing led to a costly mistake. As women we’re taught to second-guess ourselves and to look to others for direction and guidance. Most times my inner voice tells me in a flash what I want and need, and whom to trust. I’m learning to honor that inner voice. I’ve been thinking this for awhile now but couldn’t put it into words. Interview #5: Janet Mock Author, Television Host New York, NY What is your favorite thing about your workspace? My favorite thing is being faced with a blank page and having endless possibilities to say what is on my mind, uncover truths, and share myself with the world, whether that blank page is an essay, a show script, or a book project. I found this to be such a fascinating answer because blank pages absolutely terrify me. Interview #6: Karen Young Product Designer, Entrepreneur Brooklyn, NY Name the biggest overall lesson you’ve learned in running a business. My good friend tells me at least once a year that it takes ten years to achieve overnight success. I think entrepreneurship can be highly romanticized and polished. Few magazines write about the fortitude required to grow a business, and the real challenges faced beyond the spark of “I can do it!” The biggest lesson I’ve learned is to prepare for the long haul, the rise and fall, and let neither define your sense of self. This was such a crucially important piece of advice for me. Interview #7: Christine Schmidt Artist, Designer San Francisco, CA Name the biggest overall lesson you’ve learned in running a business. Name a fear or professional challenge that keeps you up at night. Honestly, none. My twin sister, Jessie, died in 2006 when this business was in seed form. As I was slowly piecing myself back together, I built back all the big stuff first, then found I didn’t have the energy or need for small unnecessary bits. One of them was fear of things I can’t control anyway. This isn’t to say I don’t worry about whether my sketches will be liked or that the shipment won’t arrive in time; just that I know I’ll be breathing even if it doesn’t. The last sentence!! Interview #8: Roxane Gay Writer, Professor West Lafayette, Indiana I recently read Bad Feminist and it completely shifted my worldview, so having Roxane Gay featured here was a heartwarming surprise. Name a fear or professional challenge that keeps you up at night. I worry that my next essay or story or book won’t be good enough, that I will disappoint my fans or that one day I will wake up and I won’t find the words to write well. In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you build yourself back up? I am lucky to have a support system, by way of a person. Certainly, I can build myself back up, but in truth, there is someone who keeps the faith when I falter and I am comfortable admitting that. This idea of the solitary artist is nonsense. My success can be attributed to my hard work and ambition and the support of my person, who is always there, giving me what I need, whether it’s a pep talk, a warm smile, or a sharp lecture on getting over myself. In terms of building myself back up, I remind myself that I love writing. I write for me before I write for anyone else. She’s back with her incredible last sentences!! I’m so ecstatic that Roxane Gay was featured here. Interview #9: Olimpia Zagnoli Illustrator Milan, Italy What characteristic do you most admire in other creative women? They don’t talk much about their work—they work. !!! What would you tell yourself ten to twenty years ago that you wish you knew then? Gummy bears are not fruit, therapy can be interesting, don’t judge people by their shoes. This was such an interesting combination of tips!! Interview #10: Cameron Esposito Comedian, Actor Los Angeles, CA Name a fear or professional challenge that keeps you up at night. I don’t have anything really tangible that says I have “made it” in comedy—just my name and my memories and the things marked on my calendar. I worry that if I stop for a moment, everything I have created will go away. An all too familiar feeling. Interview #11: Lizzo Musician Minneapolis, MN What characteristic do you most admire in other creative women? The female perspective, in general, is to be admired. We are the eyes and ears of the universe. Such a mesmerizing saying. Which of your traits are you most proud of? My “spirit of discernment.” We all go off vibes, but I can decide if I’m going to vibe with someone within the first ten seconds of meeting a person. Interview #12: Maira Kalman Artist, Author New York, NY Has learning from a mistake ever led you to success? I make mistakes every day. But we always say, “Mistakes bring good.” Taking on a job that turns out to be a bad fit and quitting the job. You feel a million pounds lighter. Relief prevails. So, so true. Interview #13: Laura Jane Grace Musician, Songwriter Michigan What does success mean to you? Feeling like you created what you wanted to create and it connected with an audience or with one person in the way you wanted it to. I couldn't agree more. I love how educating this book feels. Interview #14: Abbi Jacobson Writer, Illustrator, Actor, Comedian Brooklyn, NY Has learning from a mistake ever led you to success? I don’t know if it was a “mistake,” but a big part of the beginnings of the web series Broad City was Ilana [Glazer] and me not getting on house teams at the theater where we were training. I’d auditioned three years in a row, and gotten called back, and I just felt so close. I had such tunnel vision, and getting on those teams felt like the whole world and the only way I was going to advance my career as a performer. So after three years we were bummed. We decided to make something ourselves. We thought we were geniuses; why were we waiting for other people to “let” us do comedy? So we made Broad City. Making that series taught me so much and gave me so much confidence, it’s unbelievable. It’s the old saying, “When one door closes, another door opens”—except you have to build the other door and pry it open yourself. When you do it that way, you’re walking into a place of your own design. I love her saying about building the other door. This might seem random, but it really reminded me of something similar said in Crooked Kingdom. Interview #15: Danielle Henderson Writer, Editor New York, NY Name a fear or professional challenge that keeps you up at night. I worry that I’m going to get marginalized. I love writing about race, gender, and class, but sometimes it prevents people from seeing that I’m capable of writing about a lot of different topics. What is your personal or professional motto? Give yourself permission. I used to think that I didn’t have the credentials to do creative work professionally, and I talked myself out of it for years. Really important!!! Interview #16: Mary Lambert Musician Amherst, MA In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you build yourself back up? I don’t know how many times I’ve heard that it’s important to your growth as an artist or business­person to “get out of your comfort zone,” but I find there’s been a very clear difference between stretching my own boundaries when I feel safe and grounded and someone telling me to do something I’m not comfortable with. To get myself out of those situations, I’ve learned how to be direct and assertive. To say, “I understand that you think x is a good idea, but this is my business decision/creative work and I want it to be like y. Maybe someday down the road I will come to a place where I feel like x is what I want to do, but I’m not there right now, and I need you to respect and honor my voice and decision-making.” I wish there was a different phrase like, “Get out of your comfort zone, but if you start crying a lot and feeling bad about yourself and your art, that is also not good, and you should go back to what you feel like doing and makes you happy,” but I guess it would be difficult to put that on a motivational poster. YES!! This has been on my mind for awhile now. Also, Mary Lambert talked about performing at the Grammys with Madonna, Macklemore, and Ryan Lewis, which then made me go look it up, and I got non-stop chills while watching it. Interview #17: Ashley C. Ford Writer Brooklyn, NY In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you build yourself back up? I read. I’ve always found the power to regain my strength or confidence in the pages of books. That could mean rereading a favorite book, or finding a new one to fall in love with. Either way, books have always been a solid foundation for me, sturdy ground. If I can find my way there, I can get through anything. I feel buoyed, protected, and understood. Books have saved me more than once. Indeed, they save me over and over again. Couldn't have said it better myself! What I learned from this collection was profound and boils down to this: women's enthusiasm, compassion, stamina, pat­ience, persistence, and courage can change the whole wide world. And to finish off this review, here are some of the main things I learned from all these incredible women: • natural lightning in your work space is crucial. • ask for the money first. • going out in nature. • being your own boss can get lonely . • missing a lot of family events (birthdays, weddings, holidays, etc.) for work. • travel is the best way to find inspiration. • keep records of everything. • knowing when to say NO is a really important trait. *Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying In the Company of Women, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission!* Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with Ko-fi.com/bookspoils

  3. 4 out of 5

    Candie

    I personally did not really enjoy this book very much. I absolutely love the idea of it, but I found that the execution came off as pretty superficial. It was done in an interview style where the author asked each woman the same few questions and they just gave a short sentence or two answer. It was very surface level and they didn't really go into depth at all on any of the topics. I would have enjoyed the book a lot more if they had just let each woman write the advice that they had in general I personally did not really enjoy this book very much. I absolutely love the idea of it, but I found that the execution came off as pretty superficial. It was done in an interview style where the author asked each woman the same few questions and they just gave a short sentence or two answer. It was very surface level and they didn't really go into depth at all on any of the topics. I would have enjoyed the book a lot more if they had just let each woman write the advice that they had in general instead of the focused questions. Maybe if they had narrowed it down to less women and let them really go into more depth on their experiences, it wold have been more inspirational to me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Susan Price

    The book came highly recommended but I found it very superficial. A set of amazing, hard-working, creative women are making a living being artists. How did they accomplish that? The author must have sent each maker a list of 10 or 15 questions and recorded their short answers without further probing. Seems they all wish they'd taken more business courses. Really? Fewer women and real conversations would have been so much more helpful.

  5. 5 out of 5

    RH Walters

    Maira Kalman's in it! Neko Case is in it! Abbi Jacobson! Maya Lin! Carrie Brownstein! Dominique Browning! An exquisite blurb from Jill Soloway plus a blurb from the amazing Hanya Yanagihara. Beautiful photos of lots of other people I haven't heard of wearing interesting outfits, in interesting spaces, yet so many wanted to be the same thing when they grew up, admired their moms, confessed to spending too much time working or picking an iphone as their favorite tool. Cumulatively, I found it a li Maira Kalman's in it! Neko Case is in it! Abbi Jacobson! Maya Lin! Carrie Brownstein! Dominique Browning! An exquisite blurb from Jill Soloway plus a blurb from the amazing Hanya Yanagihara. Beautiful photos of lots of other people I haven't heard of wearing interesting outfits, in interesting spaces, yet so many wanted to be the same thing when they grew up, admired their moms, confessed to spending too much time working or picking an iphone as their favorite tool. Cumulatively, I found it a little depressing. Maybe because there was an emphasis on business? I have little reading time and my living room is so cold? The paperstock? The questions were too general? I don't know. I wanted something to set me on fire, but something kept this book on a superficial level. I liked this piece of ruthless advice "Hire slow, and fire fast." I will say the author is great at making friends and making things happen, because there are a lot of cool people in here.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    I decided to add this book to my March Women’s History Month reading. Unlike the other books, I have chosen for this category, this book is not on Women’s History but is about women in our current timeframe. Bonney has chosen 100 women to profile in her book. I noticed that many are in the field of fashion and design, all are in the area of creativity. The women featured are business women from all over the world but the majority are from the United States. Bonney chose a diverse group to presen I decided to add this book to my March Women’s History Month reading. Unlike the other books, I have chosen for this category, this book is not on Women’s History but is about women in our current timeframe. Bonney has chosen 100 women to profile in her book. I noticed that many are in the field of fashion and design, all are in the area of creativity. The women featured are business women from all over the world but the majority are from the United States. Bonney chose a diverse group to present. The book contains photographs about each woman. It is a beautifully styled book. It is not a business advice book, but more of what was the personal drive to achieve and their experiences as a creative woman in the business world. The book provides a snapshot of social history. Anyone interest in launching a business or creative career should read this book. The book is 366 pages long. I read this on the Kindle app for my iPad.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    A very diverse and well-chosen collection of creative women and entrepreneurs. Lovely photographs, good advice throughout. Everyone is inspired by either Frida Kahlo or Georgia O'Keeffe. Would make a great gift for any creative woman in your life.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    The concept of this book is important. Young women need these examples and this advice. The format of the book was very well thought out, giving the reader short but meaningful insights from the interviewees with a couple beautiful photos of each of them and their space. This book also did a fantastic job of representing a very large swath of WOC, LGBTQ, and disabled women, and women from outside the United States. So important. However it gets four stars instead of five because I felt it really The concept of this book is important. Young women need these examples and this advice. The format of the book was very well thought out, giving the reader short but meaningful insights from the interviewees with a couple beautiful photos of each of them and their space. This book also did a fantastic job of representing a very large swath of WOC, LGBTQ, and disabled women, and women from outside the United States. So important. However it gets four stars instead of five because I felt it really lacked a diverse representation within the category of "entrepreneur". 85% of the women were artists (in various mediums, but all artists), another 10% were authors and musicians, and the last 5% were chefs. (I understand that "artists" is in the title, but out of "makers, artists, and entrepreneurs," I was expected more than JUST artists). These professions are wonderful, but "entrepreneur" consists of so much more. As a woman in my twenties who has aspirations of one day starting my own law firm, I was disappointed that none of these women related to my dreams in any way. Same could be said for any other reader who wanted to do something without a creative, artsy base. By the end of the book I was tempted to skim and not give each women the attention she deserved because all of the artists interviews were running together into a pile of tips and stories that are not relevant to the type of entrepreneurship that interests me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Paige Jackson

    Really disappointing, I couldn't even finish the book, got about a third of the way and quit. Three reasons this book was sub-par: 1. There was no intro/bio of any of the women she interviewed. Just: Jane Doe, Fashion Designer. So with the lack of context you had to read between the lines of the answers to figure out who these women were. 2. VERY surface level interviewing. If the majority of these interviews were done face-to-face, I would have liked to see her deviate from her same repetitive 10 Really disappointing, I couldn't even finish the book, got about a third of the way and quit. Three reasons this book was sub-par: 1. There was no intro/bio of any of the women she interviewed. Just: Jane Doe, Fashion Designer. So with the lack of context you had to read between the lines of the answers to figure out who these women were. 2. VERY surface level interviewing. If the majority of these interviews were done face-to-face, I would have liked to see her deviate from her same repetitive 10 questions and probe in deeper to the interesting parts of these women's stories and ask more questions around those subjects. 3. Of the 30 profiles I read only 1 was not from either NY or CA - would have been good to advertise the narrow scope of the book. There were some great golden nuggets in what I did read - but it literally was like panning for gold - I'd much rather read somebody else's highlights and skip the heavy lifting.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    How did she take this group of fascinating women and write such a boring book?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hope Martin

    This book was everything I didn’t know I was looking for. I stumbled upon it as I was running the sociology section, and it definitely called to me. These strong, independent women are beyond inspiring. A book I thought I’d resell, but instead I think I’ll pass it on to a friend or two, and I’m sure it’ll find it’s way back to me again when I need it the most.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nadiah Razali

    Would like to hear more insight from various industry such as from technology, manufacturing, food and beverages industry and etc After 100 pages, it gets tiring for me to see the same question been asked. Nevertheless, I may take my own sweet time to keep on reading to get inspired.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    Shallow and boring. The author took a lazy approach and left it as a general question and answer format. Same questions over and over and over. "What did you want to be as a child?" Good question, cute. Except for the fact that I read it as question 1 for every woman interviewed. What would make this book better is more narrative and zero Q&A. Shallow and boring. The author took a lazy approach and left it as a general question and answer format. Same questions over and over and over. "What did you want to be as a child?" Good question, cute. Except for the fact that I read it as question 1 for every woman interviewed. What would make this book better is more narrative and zero Q&A.

  14. 5 out of 5

    lauren

    This book is sort of a yearbook of women entrepreneurs in creative fields, all asked the same questions, and the cumulative effect is that it quickly feels like once you’ve read a few of the responses, you’ve read them all. Main takeaways- to be successful you need to be a workaholic, and you will definitely get burnt out, and it helps to be beautiful.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    This is definitely a fun and lovely book, though the advice ranges from inspiring to insipid. The best part is the many beautiful pictures of real, non-airbrushed, women.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Juliana

    5 stars for the diversity of women in the book (age, colour, careers); and for the importance of the theme. 3 starts on how the book was structured. Having all women answer almost the same questions made the book somewhat repetitive. While reading the interviews it felt like this was meant to be a coffee table book, to be read slowly, instead of all at once. I did get, though, some interesting perspectives and advice that I hope to carry to my everyday life. Average, 4 starts.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Asma_h

    Passion is definitely contagious. Love the book!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    First of all, this book is really beautiful. Second: I've been reading it little by little over the years and it is really inspiring to see these stories and how similar yet different they are from one another. Everyone's journey is so unique, which is what makes this book so interesting. Anyways, women are rockstars and this book is lovely.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Daphne

    I was very disappointed in this book. I really wanted to like it but I didn't. First of all, I didn't know who 99 percent of these people were. None of these essays had a bio, it would only list a very general one to two word description describing what type of work they did. I found it disconcerting to read about someone and have no idea who I was reading about. I was halfway through one of the essays before I realized that this woman had lost use of her arms and learned to paint with her mouth I was very disappointed in this book. I really wanted to like it but I didn't. First of all, I didn't know who 99 percent of these people were. None of these essays had a bio, it would only list a very general one to two word description describing what type of work they did. I found it disconcerting to read about someone and have no idea who I was reading about. I was halfway through one of the essays before I realized that this woman had lost use of her arms and learned to paint with her mouth. That would have been great to know from the start instead of assuming I knew who this woman was. Plus knowing that completely changed how I read the piece. Yes I know I could google them but I would had to google every few pages and that would get tedious quick. Plus, the author gave all of the subjects the same set of questions and the answers all ended up sounding very similar to each other and I got so bored reading it. Most of them loved their I phone and wished they had taken more business classes and appreciated their supportive friends and families. Honestly I couldn't finish it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Niecie

    This book saved me this semester. When I was feeling inspiration leave me, opening up to the colorful photos and stories of beautiful, successful women from different backgrounds gave me permission to create and innovate artistically and academically. I bought three copies of this book on November 9th - one for me and two for female colleagues that I love. So glad I made the investment!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Hayley Dyer

    This book is a must read for anyone thinking about starting a new venture or business, especially lady entrepreneurs. My only complaint is that the book didn't highlight women from the center of the country - mainly just the East and West coasts.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Am Y

    None of the women's backgrounds, stories, and ages are given. Every page is just a straight-up Q&A with them, with mostly the same questions (e.g. what do you count as success, what's the best piece of advice you were given, what would you do if you were given $100 million, etc). We're only told each woman's name and occupation and that's it. Without knowing at least some of their story/background history and accomplishments/successes, why should we care what they have to say? You may as well ap None of the women's backgrounds, stories, and ages are given. Every page is just a straight-up Q&A with them, with mostly the same questions (e.g. what do you count as success, what's the best piece of advice you were given, what would you do if you were given $100 million, etc). We're only told each woman's name and occupation and that's it. Without knowing at least some of their story/background history and accomplishments/successes, why should we care what they have to say? You may as well approach a random person on the street and ask that person for advice. I only recognised one of the women as being sort of "famous", in the sense that I'd heard her name mentioned before online, but none of the other women were even remotely familiar to me.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    This book was so inspiring and a must-read for women who are thinking about starting their own business or need some advice to keep going. The book is gigantic and it celebrates entrepreneurs in all kinds of different fields. It had some great advice in it. One common denominator I noticed is that many said they wished they had taken a business course; and that businesses take a minimum of 10 years to develop. This book would also be a great read for a recent graduate.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Hilliard Owens

    I am SO inspired! I am “Creative” in that I am a writer and editor and I love to do crafts, etc., and I am also am entrepreneur. I am in no way an artist or real musician. But each and every story in this fabulous book moved and motivated me in so many ways. I kept a lot of quotes, and I am going to write down and answer the questions for myself. I am just sorry the book had to end. I wish it was twice as long.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cecilia Lindgren

    Sometimes I go through life wondering how other people, especially women, can succeed and make their lives fulfilling and fun. This book shows me that it takes hard work, determination, having a circle of trust, and having badass inspiring quotes at hand! As a recent graduate this helped me understand that even though I feel like I’m in a creative rut currently, I can push my way out and work towards my goals. I will just be following in the fabulous footsteps of all of these courageous women!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I enjoyed this! It was cute and I loved reading about all of the different women and their paths to success. However I do wish there was more diversity in the types of jobs these women had as most were designers or actresses or chefs and I know there are other jobs out there where women succeed in them.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jazz Castañeda

    In the Company of Women allows for you to take a peek within the lives of 100 inspiring, creative, and entrepreneurial women from an array of professions and backgrounds. The stories, illustraions, and photography within this book has been done beautifully. An absolute treat, this book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jon Finkel

    Eclectic and inspiring, a rare combination of coffee-table book and Norman Vincent Peale, with great pictures. Further evidence that there are a lot of cool people out there doing cool things. Check it out.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Really awesome collection of inspiring women who are doing all sorts of cool, creative things with their lives. Super fun to page through + marvelous photos.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    All around inspiring.

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