hits counter Christian Beliefs: Twenty Basics Every Christian Should Know - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Christian Beliefs: Twenty Basics Every Christian Should Know

Availability: Ready to download

Not every Christian should go to seminary, but there are certain teachings of the Bible that every Christian must know. Theology is important because what we believe affects how we live. Whether you're a relatively new believer in Jesus or a mature Christian looking for a better understanding of basics of the faith, Christian Beliefs is for you.   This readable guide to twen Not every Christian should go to seminary, but there are certain teachings of the Bible that every Christian must know. Theology is important because what we believe affects how we live. Whether you're a relatively new believer in Jesus or a mature Christian looking for a better understanding of basics of the faith, Christian Beliefs is for you.   This readable guide to twenty basic Christian beliefs is a condensation of Wayne Grudem’s award-winning book Systematic Theology, prized by pastors and teachers everywhere. He and his son, Elliot, have boiled down the essentials of Christian theology for the layperson and made them both clear and applicable to life. You will learn about the Bible, the characteristics of God, what it means that we are created in the image of God, what God has done for us in Christ, the purpose of the church, and much more. Each chapter includes questions for personal review or group discussion.   "These truly are twenty basic beliefs that every Christian should know. Wayne Grudem is a master teacher with the ability to explain profound truths in simple language. He is a man of deep conviction and theological passion--and those who read this book will be both educated and encouraged in the faith." --R. Albert Mohler Jr., President, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky   Based on Systematic Theology, this summary will certainly help beginners with Christ to get the hang of their faith." --J. I. Packer, Regent College, Vancouver, British Columbia   As Wayne Grudem's Systematic Theology contracts into a compact book, I do not lose my enthusiasm for the truth he loves and the clarity of his words." --John Piper, Bethlehem Baptist Church, Minneapolis, Minnesota


Compare

Not every Christian should go to seminary, but there are certain teachings of the Bible that every Christian must know. Theology is important because what we believe affects how we live. Whether you're a relatively new believer in Jesus or a mature Christian looking for a better understanding of basics of the faith, Christian Beliefs is for you.   This readable guide to twen Not every Christian should go to seminary, but there are certain teachings of the Bible that every Christian must know. Theology is important because what we believe affects how we live. Whether you're a relatively new believer in Jesus or a mature Christian looking for a better understanding of basics of the faith, Christian Beliefs is for you.   This readable guide to twenty basic Christian beliefs is a condensation of Wayne Grudem’s award-winning book Systematic Theology, prized by pastors and teachers everywhere. He and his son, Elliot, have boiled down the essentials of Christian theology for the layperson and made them both clear and applicable to life. You will learn about the Bible, the characteristics of God, what it means that we are created in the image of God, what God has done for us in Christ, the purpose of the church, and much more. Each chapter includes questions for personal review or group discussion.   "These truly are twenty basic beliefs that every Christian should know. Wayne Grudem is a master teacher with the ability to explain profound truths in simple language. He is a man of deep conviction and theological passion--and those who read this book will be both educated and encouraged in the faith." --R. Albert Mohler Jr., President, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky   Based on Systematic Theology, this summary will certainly help beginners with Christ to get the hang of their faith." --J. I. Packer, Regent College, Vancouver, British Columbia   As Wayne Grudem's Systematic Theology contracts into a compact book, I do not lose my enthusiasm for the truth he loves and the clarity of his words." --John Piper, Bethlehem Baptist Church, Minneapolis, Minnesota

30 review for Christian Beliefs: Twenty Basics Every Christian Should Know

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

    Imagine for a moment that you once received a 1000+ page book called Systematic Theology by Wayne Grudem. And then imagine that you read that entire book, realizing that you couldn't possibly understand and soak in all that was in that book. So now imagine that the author of that book then decided to make a distilled version of Systematic Theology called Bible Doctrine, that was half the size, of the same substance. He cut a few of the longer points, left the main ones, still got the points acro Imagine for a moment that you once received a 1000+ page book called Systematic Theology by Wayne Grudem. And then imagine that you read that entire book, realizing that you couldn't possibly understand and soak in all that was in that book. So now imagine that the author of that book then decided to make a distilled version of Systematic Theology called Bible Doctrine, that was half the size, of the same substance. He cut a few of the longer points, left the main ones, still got the points across. You read that book too, but were still left trying to wrap your head around the information. Now imagine that he decided that it just wasn't concise enough, and wrote a 156 page book that cut out all the fluff, and left you with the bottom lines from each chapter. That is this book. It is readable, jam-packed with right doctrine, and concise enough to be read on a short flight. This is a great introduction and fly-over understanding to systematic doctrine. There are no "stories" to let it sink in, although there are some application questions if you want to bring the content to your heart. I really enjoyed this book, having read all 3 versions of it, and plan to use it to "refresh" my thoughts on certain doctrines. I'm not sure there is anything to dislike about this book. Disclaimer: for those of you who REALLY like to read, and enjoy lengthy books, you may want to pick up the other versions of this, for they certainly have more information, and make more detailed arguments and points. That being said, this will help you in your precision as to what the actual "doctrine" is.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Trevor Winsor

    Very simple yet very rich in Biblical foundations. I used this as a resource for a series teaching through Christian foundations. This was an excellent resource and was not a difficult read. Grudem is amazing and his ability to be concise and straight forward about what the Bible says is life-changing for me. Highly recommend that everyone reads this simple, small, dynamic work from Grudem!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Barrow Wilfong

    Many people today would call themselves Christian but if they were asked what that meant exactly, their answer might be vague. If someone were to ask them specific questions such as what is their belief on heaven and hell and can someone still sin and be saved or what is election, they might be at a loss. This book explains many of these topics. Christian Beliefs provides a great concise overview on the basic tenets of Christianity. Each chapter (there are twenty of them) answers questions like, Many people today would call themselves Christian but if they were asked what that meant exactly, their answer might be vague. If someone were to ask them specific questions such as what is their belief on heaven and hell and can someone still sin and be saved or what is election, they might be at a loss. This book explains many of these topics. Christian Beliefs provides a great concise overview on the basic tenets of Christianity. Each chapter (there are twenty of them) answers questions like, What is the Bible? What is the Trinity? What is Creation, Prayer, angels Satan and demons, man? (Those are each separate chapters.) Who is Christ? Some of the best chapters explain Election, Sanctification and Atonement. Two appendices contain historic confessions of faith like the Nicene and Apostolic Creeds and also a list of further resources.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lynne

    The problem with this book isn't that it's that basic, but that it presents ideas that are peculiar to one theology of Euro-American, mainstream, upper middle class, academic-focused "church" as if they are general Christian doctrine. If you want to memorize human academics as if they better represented Jesus Christ and His church then the simple message Jesus gave us in the Gospel, then this is the book for you. Otherwise, I wouldn't even recommend getting it free at the library. The problem with this book isn't that it's that basic, but that it presents ideas that are peculiar to one theology of Euro-American, mainstream, upper middle class, academic-focused "church" as if they are general Christian doctrine. If you want to memorize human academics as if they better represented Jesus Christ and His church then the simple message Jesus gave us in the Gospel, then this is the book for you. Otherwise, I wouldn't even recommend getting it free at the library.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Andress

    Essentially a reader’s digest version of Wayne Grudem’s 800 page Systemic Theology. I highly recommend it to anyone who is new to learning about theology! This book presents the essential cores of Christianity better than most — defining so eloquently who a Christian is and what a Christian believes. It serves as a starting point for anyone who is wrestling with these complex concepts. The author presents each concept in a very concise way, making the book super readable. Afterwards, you may wan Essentially a reader’s digest version of Wayne Grudem’s 800 page Systemic Theology. I highly recommend it to anyone who is new to learning about theology! This book presents the essential cores of Christianity better than most — defining so eloquently who a Christian is and what a Christian believes. It serves as a starting point for anyone who is wrestling with these complex concepts. The author presents each concept in a very concise way, making the book super readable. Afterwards, you may want to look into other resources to get further information on these concepts and to see more detailed arguments and points. Overall, this book reminds me of how simplistic the Christian faith is and what we believe. We tend to make it more complicated than it should be. Yet these simple truths are so profound when I sit here and soak them all in. While reading I found myself numerous times completely blown away by the God we serve and the Gospel we believe in. It has both grounded me and humbled me. This is a great book for any individual who is new to the faith to understand Christianity deeper; but it is also a great book for the seasoned Christian to remind himself/herself of the essential yet beautiful realities of the Christian faith. Highly recommend!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Paige

    This is a great book full of important theology beliefs that were to the point and had Biblical backing. I enjoyed the “text book” style. It will be a new resource for me.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cory McArtor

    Great book to read and discuss with a new believer.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kate Austin

    Quick overview of a array of Christian topics. Grudem does a good job of keeping solid arguments and explanations while also being more concise and direct than his other books.

  9. 5 out of 5

    John Martindale

    WOW, oh wow. Full-fledged, unadulterated hyper-Calvinism presented as the clear and plain bible truth that every Christian should believe as if no interpretation is involved. In this chapter, we have all the classic and overused apologetic bandaids that try (and fail) to cover the gapping and gory nasty bits, everything is spun as if Calvinism is actually a wonderful doctrine. Reading Grudem's chapter on Election, was analogous to reading a true, drunk-the-kool-aid believer in communism, who hon WOW, oh wow. Full-fledged, unadulterated hyper-Calvinism presented as the clear and plain bible truth that every Christian should believe as if no interpretation is involved. In this chapter, we have all the classic and overused apologetic bandaids that try (and fail) to cover the gapping and gory nasty bits, everything is spun as if Calvinism is actually a wonderful doctrine. Reading Grudem's chapter on Election, was analogous to reading a true, drunk-the-kool-aid believer in communism, who honestly and sincerely believes Joseph Stalin was the best leader EVER, and writes a gushing apologetic for all he did. In response to those "strawmen" attacks and enemies to the Truth, who spew their propaganda against Stalin, condemning him for murdering like 60,000,000 of his own people, the Stalin-apologist points out it was all done in love, and in the name of justice and there was a reason for all he did, and yes some things are mysterious and hard for mere mortals to understand, but Stalin is good and we should NEVER question his choices, which were all done for the higher good. The excuses and positive spin could only satisfy other communist and true believers, for everyone else who is not a Stalin fan, the morally repugnant mental-gymnastics will NOT work. Now, if the evil of Stalin is like a candle, the evil of the god that Grudem proclaims in this chapter is like the sun. Stalin, Hitler, Mao, Antiochus Epiphanes, and everyone other tyranny combined would still pale in comparison, honestly, they would come out looking like a Mother Tresa compared to the deity Grudem presents in this chapter. As John Wesley points out, Calvinism makes God out to be infinitely worse than the devil. Grudem thinks his god created mankind so they could ONLY do what they want and thus they are "free" because they can do what they want (though they couldn't have done otherwise). But Grudem's god has predetermined and ordained everything they want, in order to be in complete control. So, all for his good pleasure, this god ordained every evil desire and designed humans so they could only do the evil he made them want to do. But then, for Grudem, because the people do the evil they wanted to do, they alone are guilty for the sin, and his god is off the hook! yes! you heard this right! This god is now wholly just and right to have them sadistically tortured for all of eternality for "choosing" to do what he determined they would do! like heck NO! The depth of ludicrous absurdity Grudem must engage in is unfathomable. He had me yelling at the book! Only for the true believer in Calvinism does it get Gruden's god off the hook, for everyone else who has not drunk the kool-aid, it blasphemously entails logically that God is the source and the cause of every evil that has ever occurred in history and he unjustly tortures people forever. Grudem then goes into the two wills of god: his god's Dr. Jackle and Mr. Hyde. The revealed will, you know things like "God wants all to be saved" this simply doesn't occur, Why? because the dark side of god, his "secretive will" which cannot be thwarted, predetermined 99.9% of all humanity to burn alive for all of eternity, all for his good pleasure. So what the bible says God wants, Nope! but ALL the evil that happens in the world: the holocaust, every rape, every abduction, every sexually abused child, every genocide, every act of cruelty, and almost everyone being eternally tortured for doing what god determined them to do, YEP! THIS is ALL part of his absolute unthwartable sovereign will predetermine before time, all determined for Grudem's god's selfish and twisted pleasure since evil must bring god so much more glory than good. As John Piper would insist, his god is the most selfish being in the entire universe and does all for his glory. The Calvinist god is simply absolute power and will, arbitrary and monstrous, Augustine and Calvin and their followers imagined the most evil earthly sovereign and blow him up to divine proportions. Grudem tries to spin this all positive and drape his paper-thin rationalizations over this hideousness, but in the book of Isaiah, the prophet said "Woe to him who calls evil good, darkness light, bittersweet" and this is what Grudem is doing. It is tragic the depths of his delusion and tragic he convinces so many others to affirm heresies. Fortunately, the proof-texts Grudem used are taken out of context, and often the Greek grammar is ignored. There are excellent interpretations from imminent scholars that show literally not a single proof-text that he used clearly presents the heinous doctrines Augustine and Calvin read into the text and Grudem perpetuates. Okay, now with that rant out of the way. Election and predestination are typically IN Christ. A simple analogy can help us get a sense of what may be expressed. A plane might be predetermined to go from Dallas to New York, now everyone who gets IN that plane takes part of that predestination, whoever does not get on the plane is not. So everyone who responds to God's loving pursuit of them and is reconciled is then IN Christ and partakes of this election, they are like a branch grafted into the Olive Tree. Next, Paul says all those whom God foreknew, he predetermined to be conformed to the image of his Son. If a word study is done on the Greek word foreknow, it is learned it simply means "previous knowledge of" for example in Acts Paul said the Pharisees foreknew him from the beginning. All Paul is saying in Romans 8 is that those God already knows (those with whom he is already in a relationship) he has a plan to conform them into the image of his son. Great news! Now despite this plain, some of us are not quite living into our destiny. An example of Grudem's poor hermeneutics is in Acts, if the Greek is consulted, and Grudem's theology is not read into the text, Luke could have simply stated "And all those who committed themselves to eternal life, believed." This would fit the context perfectly. It is an interpretative decision to make it "All those God appointed to eternal life believed." Having gotten the Calvinism train, Grudem continues on about irresistible grace. Now very little scripture even hints at the Calvinist doctrine of irresistible grace, as a result very little scripture is presented in favor of this key tenant of Calvinism in this chapter. It is interesting how Calvinist like to use Paul’s blinding light conversion experience, then overgeneralize from it as if this is THE case study of how God’s irresistible grace always overwhelms and forces conversions of those who were the lucky winners of the salvation lotto. However, later in Acts 26:19, Paul makes it clear he had a choice, for to Agrippa he stated he didn’t resist the vision of God—implying he could have. Interestingly, it logically follows from Grudem’s doctrine of irresistible grace, that God is exceedingly less potent than a human who could pursue, woo and win another’s love. For Grudem, God cannot do what humans can, but rather he has to use something like a love potion, to make others (who otherwise would never have anything to do with him otherwise) want him—and to have no choice but to accept his love. This deity is also said to send a (very disingenuous) message to ALL, telling ALL to come, telling ALL to be reconciled to God, and declaring (an absolute lie) that God wants ALL to be reconciled to him, but then, in reality, he only sends the love potion to a tiny few to force them to want him. As with the doctrine of Election, this twisted view is, in reality, slanderous of God, and we have a moral and biblical obligation to expose it for what it is. He then goes on into the Preservation of the Saints and sanctification: In this chapter, Grudem presents the doctrine of the Preservation of the Saints. Of Course, if it is God who ordained all people to be wholly depraved--making them so they could only do what they want and then determining they only want evil, and it is God who arbitrary elects a tiny few to be saved, and whose Son's death was limited to the tiny few he elected beforehand, and God who then gives the love potion (I mean irresistible grace), to cause the monster's of iniquity to love him, then clearly, since humanity has no part in anything, then obviously the tiny handful he decided to save cannot be lost. As Christians though, people can still ONLY do what they want, and the tiny bit of good that Christians do is only because God made them want good. Now of course, as Pelagius recognized with Augustine's teaching, this implies God is ultimately responsible for all the evil of Christians too. Sanctification can only occur to the degree God decides to step in and make one want to change and love. The revealed will of God would suggest this is something God really wants to do, of course, the unthwartable secret, dark and mysterious will prefers sin and unrighteous (clearly bringing him so much more glory and good pleasure) and determines most Christians on this side of eternity to NOT be conformed to the image of his Son. Yet, still, because of contradiction (I mean, mystery), Grudem still talks as if Christians should go ahead a try to get better, though they can't do this unless God makes them want to, something God is most of the time quite unwilling to do--thus the Romans 7 life. What is fascinating, is as John Piper's son Abraham left the faith, which means he was never one of God's elect, to begin with (According to Grudem), now if John Piper also leaves the faith, it would mean he was NEVER a Christian! Just think, it is possible now that John Piper is NOT among the elect; just think about it, every sermon, every book might have been written by reprobate! Same with Wayne Grudem! This entire book might be written by someone predetermined to be burned alive for all of eternity, we cannot know until Grudem dies. We cannot know until they die. For falling away from the faith could happen to both of them--evangelical gate-keepers crumble, tons of evangelists, missionaries, and pastors eventually lose their faith later in life. So what this means, is despite Grudem saying it is about assurance, logically, there is ABSOLUTELY NO ASSURANCE. Since the most passionate Christian for 60 years, who falls away later in life, was NEVER actually a Christian to begin with, this means NO one can be sure they are saved, there is no evidence, absolutely none.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Riding

    Really enjoyed this book! The book does exactly what the book says it does; addresses 20 basic beliefs of Christianity, from what the Bible is to what sin is to what exactly IS salvation. It’s dry at times, but only for the purpose that it was written: to answer questions, not to be read like a novella. Will definitely keep it on my shelf for reference.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mike Fendrich

    I used this book to teach middle-school students in Sunday School. The goal was to give these students a basic foundation in the basic truths of the Christian faith as our concern was passing the language of the faith to the next generation. In this, the book succeeds. This is a great resource for the new believer, initial training in systematic theology with students or perhaps someone who has questions about Christianity. For more advanced studies, Gruden's "Systematic Theology" or any other m I used this book to teach middle-school students in Sunday School. The goal was to give these students a basic foundation in the basic truths of the Christian faith as our concern was passing the language of the faith to the next generation. In this, the book succeeds. This is a great resource for the new believer, initial training in systematic theology with students or perhaps someone who has questions about Christianity. For more advanced studies, Gruden's "Systematic Theology" or any other more robust systematic book would be needed. But this slim edition fills a void in an excellent way. Used in its right place, I highly recommend it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Greg Balzer

    I found the beginning of this book a bit dry - similar in feeling to reading a dictionary. The scriptural truth it conveyed was accurate, but it seemed to me to be missing passion, unique insight or moving truth. I am not totally certain that the problem was the author's, I personally found it difficult to engage the content. Halfway through the book, however, something changed. Starting with Chapter 8 on the topic of Who is Christ, continuing on into Atonement, the Resurrection, Election, Regen I found the beginning of this book a bit dry - similar in feeling to reading a dictionary. The scriptural truth it conveyed was accurate, but it seemed to me to be missing passion, unique insight or moving truth. I am not totally certain that the problem was the author's, I personally found it difficult to engage the content. Halfway through the book, however, something changed. Starting with Chapter 8 on the topic of Who is Christ, continuing on into Atonement, the Resurrection, Election, Regeneration, Justification, Adoption and the like, reading this book switches from a chore to a reward. The scriptures quoted and the supporting text do a good job of fully communicating what Christ has done for us when we were dead in our sins and trespasses. If you are a new believer and want to get a quick overview of Christian beliefs, or if, like me, you are an older, more seasoned believer who wants a high level refresh of God's word, this book will provide the information you need.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Micah Till

    If you are just starting to discover what Christians believe, this is a great book. If you want systematic theology or need convincing when it comes to sticky points of modern reformed protestant arguments, this is not going to be particularly helpful. Christian Beliefs is the simplified version of the simplified version of Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine. Simply put, this book is concise to a fault. And I mean that literally. I recognize that I have a somewhat academic If you are just starting to discover what Christians believe, this is a great book. If you want systematic theology or need convincing when it comes to sticky points of modern reformed protestant arguments, this is not going to be particularly helpful. Christian Beliefs is the simplified version of the simplified version of Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine. Simply put, this book is concise to a fault. And I mean that literally. I recognize that I have a somewhat academic bent and many people prefer the cliff notes version of things over the full write-up, but in seeking to simplify the subject matter Grudem fails to fully argue his assertions or deal with all the relevant scripture for each topic. This book may be a useful springboard, but I highly recommend picking up Grudem's Systematic Theology instead.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Natalie VanDusen

    As someone who grew up in a church with Arminian theology, this book both challenged and frustrated me. Some points I will never agree with Reformed (Calvinistic) theology about, election for example. However, I also felt challenged to test my beliefs against scripture, and let that be my guide. Very good to read, no matter what your religious background is.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bailey Marissa

    This is a summary of Grudem's Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine, so if you want a faster summery of doctrine, this is the book for you. This is a summary of Grudem's Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine, so if you want a faster summery of doctrine, this is the book for you.

  16. 5 out of 5

    High Pointe Baptist Church

    Condensed version of Grudem's systematic theology; likely more useful for group study Condensed version of Grudem's systematic theology; likely more useful for group study

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    A great Reader's Digest version of his very readable, but lengthy, Systematic Theology. This would be a great choice for small group study. It includes discussion questions after each chapter. A great Reader's Digest version of his very readable, but lengthy, Systematic Theology. This would be a great choice for small group study. It includes discussion questions after each chapter.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tristen

    This book was very helpful. It definitely explained many fundamentals of Christianity in a clear and easy to understand way.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Keturah Lamb

    This book was simple. Not simple as in child-like profound or even mind-boggling eye-opening, but as in simply stupid. And the author seems to think this work is incredible. (I'm not saying this because I have a strong dislike for Calvinism, but because I have a strong dislike for poorly presented inaccurate theology) Maybe it would be if you were a new Christian. Or a baby Calvinist. I have the feeling most deep-thinking Calvinists would be offended by this book, too. The greatest horror though This book was simple. Not simple as in child-like profound or even mind-boggling eye-opening, but as in simply stupid. And the author seems to think this work is incredible. (I'm not saying this because I have a strong dislike for Calvinism, but because I have a strong dislike for poorly presented inaccurate theology) Maybe it would be if you were a new Christian. Or a baby Calvinist. I have the feeling most deep-thinking Calvinists would be offended by this book, too. The greatest horror though is that whenever I bothered to look up a reference is was so misconstrued I lost all respect at once. My example is super frivolous, but: Revelation 22:2 Grudem wrote that the tree of life shall have twelve fruits, one for every month. Scripture simply says that it shall yield every month. Twelve fruits, nothing about twelve months. Such a silly thing to harb over. Yet. This book just felt completely silly from beginning to end. Does it deserve though this review? Probably not. I shouldn't have even finished the little book. To end on a pleasant note: I felt it had some nice things to say about sanctification (not salvation), on communion, and I had an intriguing thought when they spoke of mercy as a natural gift compared to more miraculous spiritual gifts. I think I would agree, and yet how miraculous Mercy feels, and even is! It is not something one can easily offer, which makes it seeom out of this world.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Hawkins

    Wayne Grudem's Systematic Theology is one of the clearest and best explanations of the Christian faith from the Bible. It is around 1300 pages. He then abridged it to his book Bible Doctrine, which is around 600 pages. This book, Christian Beliefs, is a further abridgment, at around 150 pages. It's an abridgment of the abridgment! That being said, you can tell it isn't as complete or detailed as it could be. But it still is a very detailed, Bible-saturated book. On each of the 20 basic beliefs, h Wayne Grudem's Systematic Theology is one of the clearest and best explanations of the Christian faith from the Bible. It is around 1300 pages. He then abridged it to his book Bible Doctrine, which is around 600 pages. This book, Christian Beliefs, is a further abridgment, at around 150 pages. It's an abridgment of the abridgment! That being said, you can tell it isn't as complete or detailed as it could be. But it still is a very detailed, Bible-saturated book. On each of the 20 basic beliefs, he explains it well with a surprising amount of biblical support. Some chapters are better than others, but in each chapter he clearly explains the belief and he sufficiently shows its base in Scripture. Overall, I give the book four stars because you can tell it is rushed. But for being 150 pages and describing the faith so well and biblically, I would recommend it to anyone less familiar with doctrine and/or new to the faith who is interested to learn more about what the Bible really teaches as a whole. Grudem is a brilliant systematician, and it shows here once again.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Evan Steele

    3 1/2 Stars As a fan of Grudem's Systematic Theology, I was surprised that I did not find this 20 Basics more compelling, but I am left wondering who exactly this is for. The book advertises itself as "Christian essentials made plain and simple" but having worked through his admittedly short work, I am concerned that he achieves brevity through concentration rather then simplicity. The book was too dense and full of Christian insider lingo to be particularly useful to the unchurched/unfamiliar. And 3 1/2 Stars As a fan of Grudem's Systematic Theology, I was surprised that I did not find this 20 Basics more compelling, but I am left wondering who exactly this is for. The book advertises itself as "Christian essentials made plain and simple" but having worked through his admittedly short work, I am concerned that he achieves brevity through concentration rather then simplicity. The book was too dense and full of Christian insider lingo to be particularly useful to the unchurched/unfamiliar. And for anyone looking for a deep dive I believe that his Systematic Theology (although much larger and potentially intimidating) was more readable as he had the space to expound and explain in more detail. My favorite two chapters were toward the end. I thought he was both eloquent and insightful as he explained "What is the church" in chapter 17. He also expertly worked through the different end times understandings in chapter 18 title "What will happen when Christ returns." Over all this book is probably a fine pickup, but I am not sure who I would be recommending this to.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Garber

    This is a good book for the brand new Christian. I got it from a thrift store years ago when I first became a Christian and I slowly read it a bit at a time. I finished a while ago but never reviewed it. Questions include the obvious What is God Like? or What is Creation? but also What is the Atonement?, What is Election? and What Does it Mean to Become a Christian? The book isn’t very long and covers just 20 questions but is a good start. At the end of each chapter is a Questions for Review and A This is a good book for the brand new Christian. I got it from a thrift store years ago when I first became a Christian and I slowly read it a bit at a time. I finished a while ago but never reviewed it. Questions include the obvious What is God Like? or What is Creation? but also What is the Atonement?, What is Election? and What Does it Mean to Become a Christian? The book isn’t very long and covers just 20 questions but is a good start. At the end of each chapter is a Questions for Review and Application section with three questions to help you understand what you read. If you are looking for an in depth study of Christian belief, this is not it. But if you are looking for somewhere to start on your path to Christianity, this book will work fine.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Richard Angelus

    When I first saw Grudem's classic Systematic Theology (1,290 pages) in our central office library, I said to myself someday I will read it. But that day was delayed and the book is already gone. Then, I came across a condensed version of that book entitled Bible Doctrine (528 pages) in a bookstore. "When I received my salary," I promised, "I will buy it." But by the end of the month, that too has gone with the wind. Only during second-hand bookfair in Kuching that I get to get this book, Christi When I first saw Grudem's classic Systematic Theology (1,290 pages) in our central office library, I said to myself someday I will read it. But that day was delayed and the book is already gone. Then, I came across a condensed version of that book entitled Bible Doctrine (528 pages) in a bookstore. "When I received my salary," I promised, "I will buy it." But by the end of the month, that too has gone with the wind. Only during second-hand bookfair in Kuching that I get to get this book, Christian Beliefs (157 pages), a condensed version of the condensed version of Systematic Theology. This experience makes me believe in the doctrine of election 🤣 To read my review, CLICK HERE: https://legasitv.blogspot.com/2021/01...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael Blaylock

    A good primer on Christian basics, which can be a good thing or a bad thing. For those who are new to the faith or have simpler questions, this is a great resource for getting a good foundation on theology and what the Bible says about this, that, and other things. However, if you've studied the Bible for any length of time, this book may seem pretty bland and basic, and that's because it's meant for new students of theology. So if you're looking for a good foundation, this is a good place to st A good primer on Christian basics, which can be a good thing or a bad thing. For those who are new to the faith or have simpler questions, this is a great resource for getting a good foundation on theology and what the Bible says about this, that, and other things. However, if you've studied the Bible for any length of time, this book may seem pretty bland and basic, and that's because it's meant for new students of theology. So if you're looking for a good foundation, this is a good place to start, but if you've already been in the Bible/theology for even a little while, you may want to look elsewhere.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Matt Crawford

    This short little treatise is designed for other who can’t make it through its two larger versions. Not everyone can make it through a 1200 page volume. It is a volume on systematic theology topics. Since he only gives a few pages to each topic he barely scratches the surface. Sure you wish he had gone deeper, but that is the point of the other volumes, not this one! It would be a great starter volume to someone wanting to dive in a little deeper. It would be great for a new believer or a mature This short little treatise is designed for other who can’t make it through its two larger versions. Not everyone can make it through a 1200 page volume. It is a volume on systematic theology topics. Since he only gives a few pages to each topic he barely scratches the surface. Sure you wish he had gone deeper, but that is the point of the other volumes, not this one! It would be a great starter volume to someone wanting to dive in a little deeper. It would be great for a new believer or a mature one wanting to explore what to teach those whom they are discipling. It is great... for what it is.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jason Hinrichs

    A great, very short introduction to Christian theology. Due to Grudem's faulty Trinitarian theology, however, I cannot give it a 4 or 5 star, or recommend it without caveat. As I take young men in the faith through an introductory book to Christian beliefs, this has been the one that I take them through. However, I always have to tell the person I am discipling at the time to ignore the second to last paragraph in the chapter on the Trinity. Just say no to Eternal Function Subordination, kids. A great, very short introduction to Christian theology. Due to Grudem's faulty Trinitarian theology, however, I cannot give it a 4 or 5 star, or recommend it without caveat. As I take young men in the faith through an introductory book to Christian beliefs, this has been the one that I take them through. However, I always have to tell the person I am discipling at the time to ignore the second to last paragraph in the chapter on the Trinity. Just say no to Eternal Function Subordination, kids.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Rumbell

    A strong introduction to Biblical Christian beliefs. Each chapter briefly covers a specific area of Christianity drawing its answers from the Holy Bible. It is intentionally not comprehensive, instead serving as an entry point to understand Christian beliefs and the reason for them. The author admits this as a shallow version of the in depth material found in his work Systematic Theology. I recommend it for people who don't necessarily want to read the bible, but want to know more about what it A strong introduction to Biblical Christian beliefs. Each chapter briefly covers a specific area of Christianity drawing its answers from the Holy Bible. It is intentionally not comprehensive, instead serving as an entry point to understand Christian beliefs and the reason for them. The author admits this as a shallow version of the in depth material found in his work Systematic Theology. I recommend it for people who don't necessarily want to read the bible, but want to know more about what it actually says as compared to what many people claim it says. Good for quick referencing.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brad Bartlett

    Led our community group through this shortened version of Grudem's Systematic Theology this Spring. Members who began the study saying they weren't really interested in theology left the study having a greater understanding and worshipful appreciation for doctrine. The short chapters are easily digestible, and the questions at the end are engaging and convicting - great for any small group ready to go deeper in their study of theology. Led our community group through this shortened version of Grudem's Systematic Theology this Spring. Members who began the study saying they weren't really interested in theology left the study having a greater understanding and worshipful appreciation for doctrine. The short chapters are easily digestible, and the questions at the end are engaging and convicting - great for any small group ready to go deeper in their study of theology.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marshall Wilcox

    This book devotes an entire chapter to claiming that The Bible contains everything you need to know. If that's true, then why should we waste our time reading this? It doesn't even explain scripture in any depth. It just summarizes the parts that the author claims are most important. These claims, and the shallow interpretations accompanying them, are dubious, and nothing contained therein did I find remotely convincing, nor inspiring. This book devotes an entire chapter to claiming that The Bible contains everything you need to know. If that's true, then why should we waste our time reading this? It doesn't even explain scripture in any depth. It just summarizes the parts that the author claims are most important. These claims, and the shallow interpretations accompanying them, are dubious, and nothing contained therein did I find remotely convincing, nor inspiring.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marlene Evans

    Great teaching of God word and how we are to follow. Thought provoking questions that inspired deeper studies. Great for small group teaching I chose the 5 star rating because this book brought out a lot of great information relevant to the belief of Christians. How we view God word and how we love life according to his word. The importance of right choice and will. Knowing who the God head is for ourselves and not neglecting the faith and the trinity of God.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...